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Michigan 2015 Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

VOL. 99 | ISSUE 6 | DECEMBER 2016

mimilk.com


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For high quality products and services for today’s progressive dairy operations, contact your local A&L distributor or visit www.ecolab.com ©2016 Ecolab USA Inc. All rights reserved.


DECEMBER 2016 FEATURES

On the Cover

18 | NMPF YC CONFERENCE

the 2016 NMPF Young Cooperator Conference. Learn about the exciting experiences of 2016 OYDC Darrin and Barbara Siemen.

As winter approaches and the holiday season nears, we wish all our members and friends a season filled with peace and

10 OYDC SNAPSHOT: 20 | TOP BRADY AND KELLIE BROWN

Brady and Kellie Brown, of the 2016 Top 10 OYDC class, offer a glimpse into their life and farm in

happiness! Cover image by Bonnie Mohr.

MMPA OYDCs travelled to Nashville, Tennessee for

Brown City, Michigan.

FARMERS, SIX LEADERS, 26 | SIX 100 YEARS

Hull, Meyer, Maystead, Lake, Kirkpatrick and Nobis: Six farmers, six fathers, six husbands. Learn about the six leaders who led MMPA as President since 1916.

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 2,000 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

3


Change is coming. Will you be ready? Beginning Beginning January January 1, 1, 2017, 2017, aa Veterinary Veterinary Feed Feed Directive Directive order order must must be be presented presented to to purchase purchase feeds feeds containing: containing: Established drug name Established drug name Chlortetracycline (CTC) Chlortetracycline (CTC) Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine/Penicillin Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine/Penicillin Hygromycin B Hygromycin B Lincomycin Lincomycin Oxytetracycline (OTC) Oxytetracycline (OTC) Oxytetracycline/Neomycin Oxytetracycline/Neomycin Penicillin Penicillin Sulfadimethoxine/Ormetoprim Sulfadimethoxine/Ormetoprim Tylosin Tylosin Tylosin/Sulfamethazine Tylosin/Sulfamethazine Virginiamycin Virginiamycin

Examples of proprietary drug name(s) Examples of proprietary drug name(s) Aureomycin, CLTC, CTC, Chloratet, Chlorachel, ChlorMax, Aureomycin, CLTC, CTC, Chloratet, Chlorachel, ChlorMax, Chlortetracycline, Deracin, Inchlor, Pennchlor, Pfichlor Chlortetracycline, Deracin, Inchlor, Pennchlor, Pfichlor Aureo S, Aureomix S, Pennchlor S Aureo S, Aureomix S, Pennchlor S Aureomix 500, Chlorachel/Pficlor SP, Pennchlor SP, ChlorMax SP Aureomix 500, Chlorachel/Pficlor SP, Pennchlor SP, ChlorMax SP Hygromix Hygromix Lincomix Lincomix TM, OXTC, Oxytetracycline, Pennox, Terramycin TM, OXTC, Oxytetracycline, Pennox, Terramycin Neo-Oxy, Neo-Terramycin Neo-Oxy, Neo-Terramycin Penicillin, Penicillin G Procaine Penicillin, Penicillin G Procaine Rofenaid, Romet Rofenaid, Romet Tylan, Tylosin, Tylovet Tylan, Tylosin, Tylovet Tylan Sulfa G, Tylan Plus Sulfa G, Tylosin Plus Sulfamethazine Tylan Sulfa G, Tylan Plus Sulfa G, Tylosin Plus Sulfamethazine Stafac, Virginiamycin, V-Max Stafac, Virginiamycin, V-Max

Tilmicosin Tilmicosin(Pulmotil,Tilmovet), (Pulmotil,Tilmovet),Avilamycin Avilamycin(Kavault), (Kavault),Florfenicol Florfenicol(Aquafl (Aquaflor, or,Nufl Nuflor) or)currently currentlyrequire requireaaVFD VFDorder. order.

www.michigan.gov/vfd www.michigan.gov/vfd www.michigan.gov/vfd


CONTENTS 6

MMPA MATTERS

“MMPA shows itself to be a Key Partner through sponsorship, partnering on education, and collaborating on growing the Michigan Dairy Industry.”

Additional Information Meetings to Provide Deeper Understanding During Local Meeting Season

8

QUALITY WATCH NPE to be Disallowed at the End of This Year

— STAN MOORE (PAGE 29)

10

NEWS & VIEWS

12

LEGISLATIVE WATCH

17

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE NDB/NMPF/UDIA JOINT ANNUAL MEETING

33 MERCHANDISE

25

MSU EXTENSION HONORS MMPA WITH KEY PARTNER AWARD

35 POLICIES

30

LOCAL OFFICERS AND LOCAL MEETING DATES

32

YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

MMPA CORE VALUES:

»

QUALITY

»

INTEGRITY

Managing Editor................................................ Sheila Burkhardt Editor...............................................................................Allison Stuby Advertising Manager......................................Nancy Muszynski Circulation.......................................................................................2,814 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

DEPARTMENTS 34

QUALITY PREMIUMS

36 FREELINERS 37 CLASSIFIEDS 38

MARKET REPORT

39 STAFF

»

PROGRESS

»

41310 Bridge Street P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376-8002

LEADERSHIP

»

COMMUNITY

p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924 w: www.mimilk.com

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)

NOVEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

5


MMPA MATTERS

Additional Information Meetings to Provide Deeper Understanding During Local Meeting Season BY KEN NOBIS, PRESIDENT

The sunshine and warm temperatures we had into November were pleasant, but the calendar has now rolled over to December. It is the end of 2016, and once again, we can only wish that milk prices had been as nice as the weather. Although they were not as good as we would like them to be, they were at least good enough to give hope for the future. We will wait and see what the new political climate might bring. 2016 also marked MMPA’s successful expansion of plant capacity at both Ovid and Constantine. We moved forward on other projects, too, including the purchase of a cheese plant in Middlebury, Indiana. This means that we are officially in the cheese processing business. December has traditionally meant the beginning of the meeting season, and that will continue at MMPA but with some important adjustments to improve sharing of information with our members. The season has always begun with local annual meetings, followed by district meetings, and then our annual delegate meeting in March. This will continue.

“We feel that taking care of essential business at the local meeting, and then discussing other issues that face the industry at a separate meeting, will serve our members better.”

However, this past summer MMPA added something new: informational meetings that were held in five locations across the state. The focus of these meetings was the latest dairy issues and how MMPA is affected by them. The rapid changes we are experiencing in the industry call for updates that cannot be handled within the time constraints of the local annual meetings, where essential business must be conducted. The informational meetings were well attended, and the open-ended format stimulated conversation. Each session lasted two and a half to three hours, longer than we had anticipated. This is a good thing, because more information was shared that way, and a deeper understanding of current happenings was gained. The feedback we received from those who attended indicates that these informational meetings were worthwhile, so we will continue to have them. Traditional local annual meetings also have enormous value, of course, because they focus on the essential business meeting. This includes, among other items, the elections that determine who will represent you as delegates from your local. This year, conducting business and receiving a report by your district director will be the primary purposes of your local annual meetings (in addition to sharing a meal). Issues like global milk production, MMPA policies, marketing, manufacturing, and building for the future will now be discussed instead at the separate informational meetings. We feel that taking care of essential business at the local meeting, and then discussing other issues that face the industry at a separate meeting, will serve our members better. Local annual meeting attendance has been down, and hopefully more members will attend if they know they can play an active role in making decisions at their local meetings without taking on a time commitment of several hours. Those who want additional information can attend a separate informational meeting near them—nine locations will be available—to gain industry information in a format that gives us the opportunity to share more in-depth information than time allows during a local annual meeting. Your directors and staff members are always looking for ways to improve communication and sharing of information. Please feel free to call us at any time. I look forward to seeing you soon, and in the meantime, best wishes for a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

6

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016


QUALITY WATCH

NPE to be Disallowed at the End of This Year BY DEAN LETTER, DIRECTOR OF MEMBER SERVICES

Last spring, Duane Farmer wrote an article indicating where the market is going regarding NPE. For a number of years, NPE has been a compound of concern, particularly in Europe. NPE is an acronym for nonylphenol ethoxylate. It is an important component of many products such as paint, pesticides, dish and laundry soaps. NPE is a surfactant. Surfactants are compounds that lower the surface tension between two liquids or a liquid and a solid. Surfactants may act as detergents, wetting agents, and emulsifiers; as well as foaming agents and dispersants. They are the ingredients that enable cleaners to effectively remove soils from a wide range of surfaces. This is why they are so often used in dish soaps, laundry detergents and products used on dairy farms including teat dips. All of these products are what are considered “wet end” or “down the drain” products. Meaning of course that after they have been used, they are typically rinsed down the drain along with any harmful residues. This allows them to possibly be introduced to the water supply.

“…following the move of our merchandise warehouse, we installed Ecolab’s M1 teat dip mixing system. This allowed us to provide a sustainable alternative to iodine products made with NPE.”

Members need to know how NPE plays a role in their operations. Nonelphynol ethoxylates have been found to have adverse effects on the environment, most notably on the aquatic environment. NPE is not readily biodegradable and therefore persists in aquatic environments. It reportedly has a half-life of about 60 years in aquatic sediments. There are reports of estrogen like activity in humans. This is not to say that there is a known human health risk associated with direct contact of products containing NPE. In 2003, this discovery caused the European Union to pass a directive restricting the use of products containing more than 0.1 percent of NPEs. This directive went into full effect in January 2005, effectively banning the use of NPE in the E.U. Japan has taken steps to ban its use in their country as well. As we all know, the dairy industry is an increasingly global market. The concern over NPEs entering the food chain through dairy products has prompted action in the United States. Milk is being tested for NPE is some markets and we are told that they are looking for less than 10 ppb. This is roughly equivalent to just a few drops in an Olympic size swimming pool. The Environmental Protection Agency has initiated an action plan to restrict its use in the United States. This action plan has caused many companies to begin phasing out the widespread use of NPEs. The merchandise program sells a wide range of chemicals used on dairy farms. These include, CIP (clean in place) and manual cleaners as well as sanitizers and teat dips. Ecolab has been MMPA’s main supplier of these products for many years. All of Ecolab’s CIP cleaners, sanitizers and non-iodine teat dips (except Protek Spray) are NPE-free and have been for some time. The iodine dips are the ones that have provided a challenge to eliminating NPEs completely from our lineup. However, there are alternatives today – in some cases, the alternative product is more cost effective than the product it is replacing. Last year, following the move of our merchandise warehouse, we installed Ecolab’s M1 teat dip mixing system. This allowed us to provide a sustainable alternative to iodine products made with NPE. Ecolab introduced Ecoplus SA concentrate which is the base for all of our NPE free iodine teat dips blended through the M1. This allows us to offer a virtually NPE free lineup of dips and cleaners. What can I do as a dairy farmer? Contact your equipment supplier and request NPE-free products. All major chemical suppliers are aware of this need and can provide you options if you are currently using NPE containing products. If you have additional questions, please contact Duane Farmer at the Member Merchandise Warehouse or me at (989)289-9251.

8

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016


MILKER Training MILKER Training MILKER Training MILKER Training

School School School School

MMPA Milker Training School MMPA MMPA Milker Milker Training Training School School MMPA MMPAMilker MilkerTraining Training School School

Milker Milker Training Training Schools Schools aim aim to to help help improve improve the the marketability marketability of of MMPA MMPA members’ members’ milk milk by by providing providing Milker Training Schools aim to help improve the marketability of MMPA members’ milk by providing milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members and their milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members and their Milker Training Schools to the of MMPA MMPA members’and milk byproviding providing milk quality and animalaim stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members their Milker Training Schools aim tohelp helpimprove improve the marketability marketability of members’ milk by employees. employees. milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members and their employees. milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members and their employees. employees. Strategies Strategies to to help help members members achieve achieve this this goal goal include: include: Strategies to help members achieve this goalquality include: •• Relay proper milking techniques and milk Relay proper milking techniques and milk quality procedures. procedures. Relay proper milking techniques and milk procedures. Strategies tothe help members achieve this goal include: help members achieve goalquality include: •Strategies big-picture science of mastitis and milk • Present Present to the big-picture science of this mastitis and milk quality. quality. Present the big-picture science of mastitis and proper milk quality. • •• Relay proper milking techniques and milk quality procedures. Relay proper milking techniques and milk quality procedures. Give members a chance to try-on and practice milking Give members a chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniques techniques and and procedures. procedures. Give members a chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniques and procedures. • ••• Present the big-picture science of mastitis and milk quality. Present the big-picture science of mastitis and Improve stockmanship and animal care while supporting National Dairy FARM Improve stockmanship and animal care while supporting National Dairy FARM requirements. requirements. Improve stockmanship animaland care while supporting National Dairy FARM requirements. • • Give aachance to practice proper milking milking techniques andprocedures. procedures. Givemembers members chanceand totry-on try-on and practice techniques and Improvestockmanship stockmanshipand andanimal animalcare care while while supporting supporting National • • Improve National Dairy Dairy FARM FARMrequirements. requirements.

Partnership » Quality » Animal Care Consistency » Education » Affirmation Partnership Partnership » » Quality Quality » » Animal Animal Care Care Consistency Consistency » » Education Education » » Affirmation Affirmation Partnership»»Quality Quality»»Animal Animal Care Care Consistency » Partnership » Education Education »»Affirmation Affirmation

February 15 February 15 February 15 p.m. 9:30 a.m. 2:30 9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m. 2:30 February 15 p.m. Alvin Hochstetler’s February 15 Alvin & & Dorothy Dorothy Hochstetler’s

March 15 March 15 March 15 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. -- 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. March 15 DeMotts West March DeMotts15 West Park Park Inn Inn

April 20 April 20 April 20 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. -- 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. April Aplex Alpena April--20 20 Aplex Alpena

Alvin &Perrin Dorothy Hochstetler’s DeMotts West Park Inn Aplex -a.m. Alpena 9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. --3:00 p.m. 26671 Road 440 Sanilac Rd. 701 Woodward Ave. 9:30 a.m. - -2:30 p.m. 10:00 a.m. -- 3:00 p.m. 10:00 3:00 p.m. 26671 Perrin Road 440 W. W. Sanilac Rd. 701 Woodward Ave. 26671 Perrin Road 440 W. Sanilac Rd. 701 Woodward Ave. Alvin & Dorothy Hochstetler’s DeMotts West Park Inn Aplex Alpena Sturgis, MI Sandusky, MI Alpena, MI Alvin & Dorothy Hochstetler’s DeMotts West Aplex - MI Alpena Sturgis, MI Sandusky, MI Park Inn Alpena, Sturgis, MI Road Sandusky, MI Rd. Alpena, MI 26671Perrin Perrin 440W. W. Sanilac Sanilac 701 Ave. 26671 Road 440 Rd. 701 Woodward Woodward Ave. Sturgis, MI Sandusky, MI Alpena, MI February 21 April 13 Sturgis, MI Sandusky, MI Alpena, MI February 21 April 13 February 21 p.m. April 13 3:00 p.m. A 10:00 10:00 A $10 $10 per per person person registration registration fee fee will will 10:00 a.m. a.m. -- 3:00 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. a.m. -- 3:00 p.m. A $10 per person registration fee will 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. February 21 April 13 Winter Inn Wextford-Missaukee ISD be deducted from your milk check Winter Inn 21 Wextford-Missaukee ISD be deducted from your milk check to to February April 13 Winter Inn - 3:00Rd. Wextford-Missaukee ISD be deducted fromregistration your milk check to A $10 per person fee will 10:00 a.m. p.m. 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 100 N. Lafayette Career Tech. Center cover and costs. 100 N. Lafayette Rd. Careera.m. Tech. Center A $10lunch per person registration 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 - 3:00 p.m. cover lunch and material material costs. fee will 100 N. Lafayette Rd. Career Tech. St. Center ISD cover lunch and material costs. Winter Inn MI Wextford-Missaukee be deducted from your milk check to Greenville, 9901 Greenville, 9901 E. E. 13th 13th St. Winter Inn MI Wextford-Missaukee ISD be deducted from your milk check to Greenville, MI 9901 E.Tech. 13th St. 100 N. Lafayette Rd. Career Center Cadillac, MI cover lunch and material costs. Cadillac, MI Center 100 N. Lafayette Rd. Career Tech. cover lunch and material costs. Cadillac, MI St. Greenville, MI 9901 E. 13th Greenville, MI 9901 E. 13th St. Cadillac, MI Cadillac, MI » To Marianne Gasiewski To register, register, contact: contact: Marianne Gasiewski » 248-442-7597 248-442-7597 » » gasiewski@mimilk.com gasiewski@mimilk.com To register, contact: Marianne Gasiewski »MI 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com P.O. Box 8002, Novi, 48376 P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376 P.O. Box 8002, Novi,»MI 48376 To register, contact: Marianne Gasiewski 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com To register, contact: Marianne Gasiewski » 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376 DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376

9


NEWS & VIEWS

MMPA Unveils New Logo to Welcome Cooperative’s Next Century MMPA launched a new logo as the cooperative brings its centennial year to a close. The logo—which now only includes the co-op’s initials—features a modernized look, deeper blue and the addition of a cow silhouette. “As we prepare to bring our centennial year to a close, we are looking forward to the next century and the opportunity to enhance the MMPA brand,” Joe Diglio, MMPA general manager said. “This transition reflects our strong foundation while demonstrating our five core values: quality, integrity, progress, community and leadership.”

The logo was unveiled to members at MMPA’s annual Leaders’ Conference in East Lansing, Michigan on Nov. 21. Throughout 2016, MMPA has utilized a commemorative centennial logo in place of the traditional logo used by MMPA since the 1950s. The new logo marks a transition in MMPA’s brand identity.

MMPA also has a new website – mimilk.com Also at the Leaders’ Conference, MMPA launched a new website for public audiences. The new site is mobile friendly with improved design aesthetic and site usability. Information on MMPA products and member services has increased. Postings with MMPA news and articles from the Michigan Milk Messenger also have an improved presence on the site. The members-only side of mimilk.com remains the same following the launch. To access, click the blue “Member Login” button or visit members.mimilk.com. Questions related to the logo or website can be directed to Allison Stuby at 248-471-2134 or astuby@mimilk.com.

Online member access to these features and more! » Event information and registration » Information on member services » Herd Health Testing information » Milker Training School information and calendar

» Calf Care School information and calendar

» Opportunities to get involved with the co-op

» Young Cooperator information » Scholarship information » MMPA News » Current articles from the Michigan Milk Messenger

» Submit a freeliner for the Michigan Milk Messenger

» Field staff contact information and ability to search for a representative by producer number

10

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016


FARM Program Changes to Take Effect Jan. 1, 2017 The National Milk Producers Federation Board of Directors approved revisions to the dairy industry’s animal care program, Farmers Assuring Responsible Management (FARM). The changes, approved by NMPF on March 8, were recommended by both the FARM Technical Writing Group and the producer-led Animal Health and Wellbeing Committee. The NMPF Board vote concluded the nearly 10-month revision process that began in May 2015, when the Technical Writing Group, comprised of farmers, veterinarians, co-op staff and animal care experts, convened to discuss the latest research in animal health and wellbeing and review data from the last three years of FARM Program evaluations. This comprehensive revision process occurs every year and includes input not only from the Technical Writing Group and Animal Health and Wellbeing Committee, but also a public comment period. Specifically, the new FARM Program will include several key criteria that receive additional focus and attention. Such criteria include having a Veterinarian Client Patient Relationship, maintaining employee training records, developing protocols on key issues such as euthanasia and non-ambulatory cattle movement, as well as ending tail docking. While these evaluations points have always been part of the FARM Program, they will receive greater focus in Version 3.0.

MMPA teams with ALM to discuss state’s dairy industry On Monday, Oct. 10, the Agriculture Leaders of Michigan (ALM) and MMPA held a briefing for state legislative staff on the present state and future of Michigan’s dairy industry.

Indiana Dairy Producers to Host Indiana Dairy Forum An inaugural Indiana Dairy Forum is planned for Feb. 1-2, 2017, covering topics including herd management, employee management, robotic milking, forage quality and calf feeding. The forum will be held at the French Lick Springs Hotel in French Lick, Indiana. To register, contact Doug Lehman at 317-695-8228 or visit indianadairy.org.

Upcoming Events December

Ken Nobis, president of MMPA, led the discussion, zeroing in on Michigan’s top 10 overall ranking in dairy production and the fact that in 2015 Michigan is second only to Colorado in milk produced per cow and is the only state East of the Mississippi in the top ten for production per cow.

Local meetings begin

Worldwide, the dairy market is changing, he said. European milk production is ballooning after quotas were removed last spring, while New Zealand’s milk production has dipped. In fact, in the first year since April of 2015 when the European Union did away with the cap on how much milk a farmer could sell, EU milk production was up 4.6 percent.

Meeting, Novi

The increase in overseas milk production coupled with a 40 percent decrease in milk prices in the U.S. since 2014 is creating some challenges for dairy farmers in Michigan – but the outlook for milk prices is showing some improvement for the remainder of 2016.

Meeting, Novi

With milk production in Michigan continuing to increase, MMPA is continuing to consider ways to expand processing capacity – including through the recent purchase of the Deutsch Käse Haus in Middlebury, Indiana. MMPA is also exploring opportunities with Foremost Farms and the Dairy Farmers of America to own and operate a cheese plant in Michigan.

French Lick, IN

This event was part of a series of monthly forums sponsored by ALM aimed at educating legislative staff on issues important to Michigan’s agricultural industry.

Dairy Conference,

December 14 Advisory Committee

January 31 Resolutions Committee

February 1-2 Indiana Dairy Forum,

February 2-4 Great Lakes Regional Frankenmuth

ALM is a coalition of agricultural, commodity and agribusiness leaders committed to promoting Michigan agriculture, participating in the ongoing dialogue about issues affecting our state and harnessing agriculture’s power and potential to further grow Michigan’s economy. You can learn more about ALM by visiting www. agleadersmi.com. DECEMBER DECEMBER 2016 2016 | MESSENGER | MESSENGER

11


LEGISLATIVE WATCH

Leading Farm Organizations Challenge Dannon and Other Food Companies on Retreat from Sustainable Agriculture Practices

L

eaders of the nation’s top farming organizations joined together in urging food companies to recognize that their sustainability goals, intended to reduce the use of natural resources, cannot be achieved without the use of modern agricultural practices, despite any misleading assertions to the contrary. This focus on deceptive food company marketing claims is in response to Dannon’s recent pledge to eliminate the use of safe and proven crop technology to feed the dairy cows that supply milk for its yogurt products. Dannon is one of several prominent food manufacturers and retailers that in recent years has taken steps to eliminate genetically-modified ingredients from its supply, claiming that such a move improves the sustainability of its products. In a letter sent to Mariano Lozano, head of Dannon’s U.S. operations, the farm groups said that the company’s strategy to eliminate GMOs “is the exact opposite of the sustainable agriculture that you claim to be seeking.  Your pledge would force farmers to abandon safe, sustainable farming practices that have enhanced farm

productivity over the last 20 years while greatly reducing the carbon footprint of American agriculture.” “This is just marketing puffery, not any true innovation that improves the actual product offered to consumers,” said Randy Mooney, chairman of the National Milk Producers Federation, and a dairy farmer from Rogersville, Missouri. “What’s worse is that removing GMOs from the equation is harmful to the environment – the opposite of what these companies claim to be attempting to achieve.” The letter was cosigned by the farmer leaders of the American Farm Bureau Federation, American Soybean Association, American Sugarbeet Growers Association, National Corn Growers Association, National Milk Producers Federation and U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance. Collectively, the six organizations represent hundreds of thousands of farmers and food producers across the U.S. The groups agree that biotechnology plays an important role in reducing the environmental footprint of agriculture, and challenged as disingenuous the assertion

that sustainability is enhanced by stopping the use of GMO processes. During the last 20 years, advancements in agricultural technology have allowed farmers to use less pesticides and herbicides, fossil fuels, and water, and prevent the loss of soil to erosion. Taking away this technology is akin to turning back the clock and using outdated 20th century technology to run a business. Numerous, conclusive studies have come out over the last 20 years proving the safety of GMO food and the environmental benefits of growing GM crops. Most recently, 109 Nobel laureates announced their support of GMO technology, citing a study from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine saying, “the study committee found no substantiated evidence of a difference in risks to human health between current commercially available genetically engineered (GE) crops and conventionally bred crops, nor did it find conclusive cause-and-effect evidence of environmental problems from the GE crops.”. SOURCE: NMPF

2016 MMPA Advisory Committee

12

District 1 Bruce Lewis, Jonesville....................................................517-869-2877 Jeff Horning, Manchester.................................................734-428-8610 Art Riske, Hanover...........................................................517-524-6015 Clark Emmons, Fayette, OH............................................419-466-4471 Jeff Alexander, Hanover...................................................517-740-9981

District 5 Mike Rasmussen, Edmore...............................................989-304-0233 Lyle Vanderwal, Lake City................................................231-328-4926 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton....................................................989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain...................................................231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy............................................................231-388-0496

District 2 Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN.........................................574-825-2454 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek.............................................269-660-2229 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN......................................574-825-5198 Don Bever, Delton............................................................269-671-5050 Heather Wing, Bellevue....................................................269-660-0498

District 6 David Reed, Owosso........................................................989-723-2023 Jamie Meyer, Ionia...........................................................989-640-3372 Kris Wardin, St. Johns......................................................989-640-9420 Aaron Gasper, Lowell.......................................................616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler........................................................989-682-9064

District 3 Tim Butler, Sand Lake......................................................269-330-5538 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland.......................................................616-875-8162 Burke Larsen, Scottville....................................................231-425-8988 Bill Stakenas, Freesoil......................................................231-425-6913 Gary Nelsen, Grant..........................................................231-834-7610

District 7 John Bennett, Prescott.....................................................989-345-4264 Mark Iciek, Gladwin..........................................................989-426-5655 Eric Bergdolt, Vassar........................................................989-652-6500 Philip Gross, Weidman.....................................................989-289-0670 Rodney Fowler, Chesaning..............................................989-302-2299

District 4 Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth................................................231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Herron......................................................989-464-4022 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard................................................906-630-1957 Russ Tolan, Ossineke.......................................................989-471-2993 Ron Lucas, Posen............................................................989-379-4694

District 8 Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing..............................................989-977-3718 Bill Blumerich, Berlin........................................................810-706-2955 Michael Bender, Croswell.................................................810-404-2140 Patrick Bolday, Emmett....................................................810-395-7139 Michael Noll, Croswell......................................................810-404-4071

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016


Early registration ends January 20!

Early Early registration registration ends ends January January 20! 20!

Great Lakes Early registration ends January 20! Great Lakes Regional Dairy Regional Dairy Conference Great Lakes Conference Regional Dairy February 2–4 Conference February 2–4 February 2–4

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MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016


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Common Voice, Clear Vision Highlights from the 2016 NDB/NMPF/UDIA Joint Annual Meeting BY JESSICA WELCH The 2016 joint annual meeting of the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), National Dairy Promotion and Research Board (NDB) and the United Dairy Industry Association (UDIA) was held Oct. 30 to Nov. 2, in Nashville, Tennessee. Nearly 800 dairy producers, member cooperatives, Young Cooperators (YCs), industry representatives, staff, and others from all over the country arrived in “Music City” for a few days of speeches, reports, banquets, general sessions, town hall meetings, and award ceremonies.

has been slated by Congress to be readdressed in the next session. NMPF has considered ‘lessons learned’ so far and have begun the progress of working with legislators to improve MPP. Jim Mulhern, NMPF President & CEO, said, “NMPF is committed to determining the necessary adjustments – such as restoring the margin feed cost adjuster to the level NMPF originally intended (to assist dairy farmers nationwide) – and having Congress pass them at the earliest opportunity.”

In addition to two days of the general session the conference involved delegate meetings for boards of NBD, NMPF and UDIA and a conference for Young Cooperators. Learn more about the NMPF Young Cooperator Conference from 2016 OYDC Darrin and Barbara Siemen on page 18.

MPP - Margin Protection Program outlook: National Milk Producers Federation has worked and will continue to work closely with Congress and the USDA on implementation of the MPP-Dairy program. The overall message shared at the joint annual meeting was, “The Margin Protection Program is the right program for the dairy industry’s future, yet it is clear that MPP must be improved to be a viable safety net program for farmers.” The Farm Bill

ROD DANIELS, MMPA BOARD MEMBER

PHOTOS CREDIT: SCOOBIE'S PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGES

The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet Investigative journalist Nina Teicholz was a fan favorite as she revealed the truth: “that everything we thought we knew about dietary fats is wrong. She documents how the past sixty years of low-fat nutrition advice has amounted to a vast uncontrolled experiment on the entire population, with disastrous consequences for our health.” The crowd cheered and applauded as Nina sorted through the facts and “groundbreaking claim that more, not less, dietary fat – including saturated fat – is what leads to better health, wellness, and fitness. Science shows that we have been needlessly avoiding meat, cheese, whole milk and eggs for decades and that we can, guilt-free, welcome these ‘whole fats’ back into our lives.”

JAIME CASTEANEDA, NMPF SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

NMPF Weighs in on the Trade – Trans-Pacific Partnership “NMPF believes that the Trans-Pacific Partnership, if properly implemented and enforced, will be provide key benefits to U.S. dairy farmers,” said Jaime Casteaneda, Senior Vice President, Strategic Initiatives & Trade Policy. He added it is important to make proactive efforts to maintain market access globally. “We will push to advance trade deals that represent a net positive for America’s dairy farmers, as the TransPacific Partnership does. And we will work in close collaboration with the U.S. Dairy Export Council to expand the access we have in other markets,” Mulhern said.

NINA TEICHCHOLZ, AUTHOR OF THE BIG FAT SURPRISE

NMPF Communications Contest MMPA received four total awards in this year’s communications contest managed by NMPF. The Michigan Milk Messenger, MMPA’s special history publication, the monthly Member Connection newsletter and a press release all won awards and were honored during the joint annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee. DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

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NATIONAL MILK PRODUCERS FEDERATION

Young Cooperators Conference BY BARBARA SIEMEN, 2016 OYDC

Visiting Nashville for the first time ever proved to be memorable beyond our wildest dreams! Darrin and I were fortunate to be selected MMPA’s OYDC for this year, which led us to Nashville, Tennessee for the joint NDB/NMPF/UDIA annual meeting at the end of October.

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MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016

W

e attended the meeting with last year’s OYCDs, Shawn and Beth VanDrie, and this year’s runner-up David Tolan (we missed you Gretchen!) We learned so much during the NMPF Young Cooperator conference, and made new friendships with YC’s from around the country. As a bonus, and completely unrelated from the conference, we landed tickets to the CMA awards! Wow! That was amazing!

The conference began with a fun welcome event – bowling. We went to a nearby bowling alley and enjoyed

refreshments and hors d’oeuvres while hitting the lanes. The next day, was jam-packed with speakers. We heard from Dr. Christopher Wolf, professor of agricultural economics from Michigan State University (go green!) He discussed ways to measure and manage risks on the farm. He provided the group with tools and strategies for examining trends and evaluating financial performance. My favorite session featured Elaine Froese, a farm family business coach. Even though Darrin and I have already transitioned the farm from his parents


2016 OYDC RUNNER UP DAVE TOLAN, 2015 OYDC SHAWN AND BETH VANDRIE, AND 2016 OYDC BARBARA AND DARRIN SIEMEN AT THE 2016 NMPF YC CONFERENCE IN NASHVILLE.

to us, the information she provided the group was so superior to anything I have ever heard yet on this subject. Her presentation is interactive and fun, while being informative and tackling real issues. I highly recommend any family in a transition period to attend one of her sessions if possible, or at the very least, purchase her books for guidance on this sensitive subject. After a delicious lunch and some mingling time, from the next speaker was Tom Wall, The Dairy Coach. He spoke to the Young Cooperators about turning employee obstacles into opportunities. He’s worked with dairies across the nation for over 16 years, helping them create systems for training and coaching employees. Don Schindler and Jamie Vandermolen from DMI showed us how to create videos from our farm to share on social media. We practiced with Facebook Live and an app called VideoShow. We know how important it is for consumers to get the right information from the right people, and video is an excellent way to communicate our message. Finally to wrap up this busy first day, we heard from Larry Kaagan, the President of Kaagan Research.

MADDY BERNER (RIGHT) RECOGNIZES BETH AND SHAWN VANDRIE (WITH SON CLARK) FOR THEIR SERVICE ON THE NMPF YC COUNCIL.

His company conducts polling, trend analysis, and strategy consulting to assist us folks in the “ag world” with understanding what everyone else thinks about terms like “sustainable agriculture.” It’s easy to forget that everyone else doesn’t know what we know, or think like we think. We ended the day with dinner, mingling, and a mechanical bull at a restaurant in downtown Nashville. All the day’s info was swimming in my head, so I took the bus back to the Opryland Resort to call it a night. Darrin stayed behind with some other YCs. The next morning I learned all about how a fried bologna sandwich led to a nice guy offering him tickets to the CMA awards! The rest of the conference was so fun and informative too. We met so many people; board members, national staff,

and other cooperative representatives. We mingled in the Dairy Bar, where we tasted new dairy products and relaxed between sessions. Another notable speaker was Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise, and she described her decade crusade to discover the truth about dairy fat and its health benefits. We heard from so many individuals, it’s quite difficult to sum all of them into one article. However, we know without a shadow of a doubt that the future of dairy is in good hands. We have such strong convictions, as did everyone else at the conference, about protecting our industry, that we hope we can take this knowledge and build upon it, and use it, for many years to come.

“...we know without a shadow of a doubt that the future of dairy is in good hands. We have such strong convictions, as did everyone else at the conference, about protecting our industry, that we hope we can take this knowledge and build upon it, and use it, for many years to come.” DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

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OYDC SNAPSHOT

TOP 10

OYDC 2016 Brady and Kellie Brown Brown Brothers Dairy, Brown City, Michigan Mid-Sanilac Local, District 8

Our kids:

Best part of being a dairy farmer:

Bailie (7) and Aaron (4)

Knowing that you’ve produced a safe, wholesome product for people to eat and drink.

Our farm:

Brown Brothers Dairy is owned by [Dave’s] father and uncle and is undergoing a transition of ownership to include the next generation. We are in the process of purchasing [Kellie’s] grandparent’s farm and will have ownership on Jan. 1. Our herd:

We are milking 110 cows with around 400 total head. We milk twice a day in a double six herringbone parlor with a rapid exit. Our land:

We have around 1,000 acres of hay, corn, soybeans and sugar beets. Our mission:

Our mission is to produce high quality food for the consumer and to take care of the environment like it takes care of us.

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MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016

How we stay positive:

We just keep our heads up and look forward to better times. We try to stay one step ahead of the issues the dairy industry faces to stay positive. What makes a difference:

We are a family oriented farm; we have no hired help. This means we do everything ourselves and harvest our own crops. We all have our own roles and go to each other with problems and solutions. We know how to work together. We also try to be very sustainable in our farming practices.


Clothing Catalog K500

L500

K500 – Silk Touch Shirt

L500 – Ladies Silk Touch Sport Shirt

An enduring favorite, this comfortable classic sport shirt is anything but ordinary. Superior wrinkle and shrink resistance. • 5-ounce, 65/35 poly/cotton pique • Flat knit collar and cuffs • Metal buttons with dyed-to-match plastic rims • Double-needle armhole seams and hem • Side vents • Colors: White*, Light Pink, Tropical Pink, Hibiscus, Red*, Burgundy*, Maroon, Banana*, Gold, Texas Orange, Orange, Light Stone, Stone*, Coffee Bean, Light Blue*, Ultramarine Blue, Maui Blue, Mediterranean Blue, Royal*, Navy*, Purple, Eggplant, Lime, Mint Green, Kelly Green, Court Green, Clover Green, Dark Green*, Bark, Steel Gray, Cool Gray*, Black • Sizes XS-6XL available in all colors. • Sizes LT-4XLT available in * colors.

An enduring favorite, this comfortable classic sport shirt is anything but ordinary. Superior wrinkle and shrink resistance. • 5-ounce, 65/35 poly/cotton pique • Flat knit collar and cuffs • Metal buttons with dyed-to-match plastic rims • Double-needle armhole seams and hem • Side vents • Sizes: XS-6XL (available in all colors)

Price: $18.50

Price: $18.50 Please Note: All clothing will have the MMPA logo embroidered on it.

MICHIGAN MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

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MMPA CLOTHING CATALOG

J705

L705

J763

J705 - Textured Soft Shell Jacket

J763 - Duck Cloth Work Jacket

Perfect for everyday wear. Super soft and flexible, these jackets deliever pure comfort as well as water and wind protection. The raglan silhouette gives you optimum range of motion, while the angled zipped chest pocket adds visual appeal.

Tough enough to do the job, this work jacket layers easily over shirts and jackets so it’s great for mild or harsh weather.

• 1000MM waterproof rating, 100G/M2 breathability rating • Storm flap with chin guard, ergonomic zipper pulls

• Hood with dyed-to-match drawcord, rib knit cuffs and waistband.

• Zipped chest pocket, eront zippered pockets

• Front hand warmer pockets.

• Spandex-trimmed cuffs, open hem with drawcord and toggles for adjustability.

• Colors: Duck Brown, Navy, Black

• Sizes: XS-4XL

Price: $60.00

• Colors: Black, Insignia Blue, Cafe Brown, Stone

Price: $56.00 L705 - Ladies Textured Soft Shell Jacket Gently contoured silhouette, Princess seams • Open hem • Ladies Sizes: XS-4XL

Price: $56.00

• 12-ounce, 100% cotton duck cloth, 6-ounce polyfill nylon lining for added warmth.

• Sizes: XS-6XL

J763H - Navy Hooded Work Jacket Tough enough to do the job, this work jacket layers easily over shirts and jackets so it’s great for mild or harsh weather. • 12-ounce, 100% cotton duck cloth, 6-ounce polyfill nylon lining for added warmth. • Hood with dyed-to-match drawcord, rib knit cuffs and waistband. • Front hand warmer pockets. • Colors: Duck Brown, Navy, Black • Sizes: XS-6XL

Price: $63.00

Please Note: All clothing will have the MMPA logo embroidered on it.

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J763H

MICHIGAN MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION


MMPA CLOTHING CATALOG

8900

S608

8900 - Summit Jacket The Summit jacket features a shell constructed of windproof/water resistant polyurethane-coated heavyweight Toughlan® nylon, and is lined with super heavyweight 11.5 oz. Anti-pilling panda fleece. Also features contrasting color on front and back panel, full storm and outer placket, plus two front pockets with zippers and one inner right chest pocket with zipper. Elastic waistband. Velcro cuff closure. Hood is easily concealed in collar.

Price: $59.00

S608 – Easy Care Shirts These comfortable wash-and wear shirts are indispensiable for the workday. Wrinkle resistant. 4.5 ounce, 55/45 cotton/poly, button down collar, dyed-to-match buttons, patch pocket, box back pleat. • Colors: White*, Light Pink, Tropical Pink, Hibiscus, Red*, Burgundy*, Yellow, Gold, Athletic Gold, Texas Orange, Light Stone*, Stone*, Coffee Bean, Light Blue*, Royal*, Navy*, Classic Navy, Purple, Eggplant, Court Green, Clover Green, Dark Green*, Steel Gray, Black*

PC90H

• Sizes XS-6XL avaliable in all colors. • Sizes LT-4XLT available in * colors.

Price: $24.30 PC90H – Pullover Hooded Sweatshirt 9-ounce, 50/50 cotton/poly fleece. Dyed-to-match drawcord (Ash and Athletic Heather have white drawcord) • Adult Sizes: S-4XL • Colors: White, Ash, Athletic Heather, Gold, Orange, Dark Chocolate Brown, Red, Cardinal, Maroon, Pale Pink, Purple, Royal, Navy, Safety Green, Kelly Green, Dark Green, Black.

Price: $27.00

Please Note: All clothing will have the MMPA logo embroidered on it.

MICHIGAN MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

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MMPA CLOTHING

»

ORDER FORM

Ordering Information: Please complete all necessary information. Indicate sizes where required. Costs can be deducted from producer’s milk check. Money orders and checks are also accepted. Do not mail cash. Orders must be placed through the Novi Office. Allow 3-4 weeks for delivery (all items shipped USPS).

Three ways to order:

Use size chart to determine your correct size. Specify the quantity by size.

1 Email: muszynski@mimilk.com 2 Mail: MMPA Clothing,

Size Chart* S

M

L

XL

2X

3X

4X

34-36

38-40

42-44

46-48

50-52

54

56

P.O. Box 8002

Novi, MI 48376

*Please read size chart carefully. Since garments are decorated, returns or exchanges will only be accepted with prior approval.

3

248-426-3412

Ship To:

Select Payment:

___________________________________________________________________________________ NAME ___________________________________________________________________________________ STREET ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________________________ CITY/STATE/ZIP

Fax:

Please subtract the amount below _ from my milk check:

Local_________________________ Hlr___________________________

State #_______________________

___________________________________________________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________________________________________________ EMAIL

Check or money order enclosed payable to MMPA.

TOTAL PRICE STYLE/CODE DESCRIPTION COLOR SIZE** QTY. EACH

**Please add $2 for size 2XL and larger and any tall sizes.

TOTAL AMOUNT

Merchandise Subtotal 6% Sales Tax

__________________________________________________________________________ SIGNATURE __________________________________________________________________________ DATE

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Add S&H Charges Total Order

MICHIGAN MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION

$8.00


MSU Extension Honors MMPA with Key Partner Award BY MELISSA ELISCHER, MSU EXTENSION EDUCATOR – 4-H DAIRY

T

he Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA) has been a long-time supporter and partner with Michigan State University (MSU) Extension. As the co-op celebrates their centennial anniversary, MSU Extension honored the organization with a Key Partner Award during the annual Extension Celebration at Fall Extension Conference in October. This was the third award from MSU Extension MMPA has received this year in recognition of their ongoing efforts to support not only dairy producers in Michigan, but youth and communities across the state. In April, MMPA was awarded the Michigan Association of Extension 4-H Youth Staff (MAE4HYS) Partnership Award and the 4-H Citation Award from the Michigan 4-H Foundation in September. Many MSU Extension staff have had the opportunity to work with MMPA on numerous projects over the course of their careers. Stan Moore, MSU Extension Senior Dairy Educator in Antrim County, reflects on his experience with the co-op stating, “MMPA shows itself to be a Key Partner through sponsorship, partnering on education, and collaborating on growing the Michigan Dairy Industry. MMPA has stepped up when a critical educational need arises, such as sponsoring MSU Extension programming efforts around the 2014 Farm Bill. They also provide content support for educational efforts reaching those not involved in agricultural, such as detailing how milk is processed for consumption.”

Dr. Chris Wolf, a professor in the Department of Agriculture, Food, and Resource Economics shares his experiences with MMPA: “MMPA has been a long-term supporter of MSU from teaching to research to Extension. MMPA provides many scholarships to MSU undergraduate students. They also cooperate on applied research programming from crops to nutrition to reproduction to business management.” Communities are impacted by the work and passion of the co-op, as most recently demonstrated last January through the donation of 12,000 gallons of milk to the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan for distribution to families impacted by the Flint water crisis. MMPA, along with the Kroger Co. of Michigan and in conjunction with the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, made the donation because nutrition can be used to fight the effects of lead. Dr. Jeff Dwyer, Director of MSU Extension, said in response to MMPA and Kroger’s donation, “We were blown away by the generosity of Michigan’s dairy farmers and Kroger. All it took was a mention of the how calcium plays a key role in blocking lead absorption, and they were immediately on board with not only donating milk to Flint families, but looking for longterm, sustainable solutions to raising the level of nutritious options available there.” An additional 24,000 gallons of milk have been donated to help the residents of Flint this year. and a promise from MMPA also announced the donation of donate 100 gallons of

milk every day for one year to the Food Bank Council of Michigan in honor of the MMPA’s one hundredth anniversary. Helping the youth of today find success tomorrow is another way MMPA partners with MSU Extension to provide innovative, educational opportunities for youth. The best example of this partnership is the 4-H/MMPA Milk Marketing Tour hosted annually at MMPA headquarters in Novi, Mich. During this event, Michigan youth are invited to tour headquarters, learning about how a co-op operates, what happens to milk once it leaves the farm, and discovering new career opportunities within agriculture. Past participants speak highly of the experience. Michelle Neff, MSU Extension Educator in Clare County and 1996 tour participant stated, “Looking back at my experience attending MMPA tour, I remember learning a lot about the dairy industry related to milk pricing, grade of milk and understanding more of the backside of what happens to the milk after it leaves the farm. I would encourage any youth interested in learning more about the dairy industry to take advantage of this great program.” Nearly twenty years later, 2015 participant Nic Grifka of Sanilac County shared a similar sentiment: “The 4-H Tour was an eye-opening experience. I learned about the processes used in the dairy industry to produce and change milk into a variety of products. The education from this tour helped me better understand the dairy industry and advanced my goal of one day taking over the family farm.” MSU Extension is proud to have partnered with MMPA to educate, support and help the citizens of Michigan for the past one hundred years and is looking forward to one hundred more years of collaboration. DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

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POWER of the Past. » VISION for the Future.

GLENN LAKE MET WITH PRESIDENT KENNEDY AND FIVE OTHER PRESIDENTS.

SIX FARMERS, SIX LEADERS, 100 YEARS BY MELISSA HART

They traded in their t-shirts for a suit and tie. They took off their favorite hat revealing their white foreheads and hard work and used their brains for making marketing decisions. They slipped off their boots, put on their wingtips and headed to Lansing and Washington D.C. on behalf of their peers, sacrificing family time, a few pounds of milk and the peace of mind knowing all was well in the barn at home. They were the epitome of leadership, letting their fellow dairymen know they had their backs. Their broad shoulders took the bulk of criticism while they took care of their cows and kids at home. They were the courageous leaders who have carried the membership of the state’s largest dairy cooperative from year one to year 100. Six men would hold the position in a century. They were the Presidents of MMPA.

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MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016


I

n the beginning, a dairy farmer from Lansing was the cooperative’s chosen one to lead in the infant years of the MMPA. Nathan P. Hull served from the beginning to 1936 and developed the concepts of milk marketing that became the standards across the country. He took the cooperative from a questionable creation deep into the decade of the Great Depression. He also served as one of the early presidents of the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF). Hull handed the reins over to a farmer from Fair Haven, Fred Meyer in 1936. He served through 1944 and did double duty as President and General Manager of MMPA in 1941 and 1942. The path wasn’t easy for Meyer as he guided the cooperative through World War II and the problems with the United Mine Workers. He effectively brought MMPA into the next era of dairy marketing where strength in the marketplace was vital. The little town of Osseo in a southern border county was where the next President called home. Ivan K. Maystead served from 1944 to 1955. Well educated through Hillsdale College and Michigan State College, Maystead guided the cooperative into a larger advertising program breaking into radio and TV advertising and thus enjoyed a fifteen percent increase in Class I bottle milk sales. Under his leadership, MMPA bought the Elsie Creamery, the Fairview Dairy, saw the completion of the Ortonville Station and brought the Holland and Marquette markets under the MMPA umbrella. Described as one of the most charismatic MMPA Presidents was Glenn Lake of North Branch. He led

from 1955 until 1981. In his 26year tenure, Lake became the leading nationwide voice for dairy farmers as the President of the NMPF. Right out of the gate, Lake and General Manager Jack Barnes were instrumental in establishing the first over-order “SuperPool” in 1956. According to former General Manager John Dilland, the success of the Michigan Super Pool also led to the establishment of the Great Lakes Milk Marketing Federation which eventually included cooperative participation from the Great Lakes to Florida by forming the Great LakesSouthern Milk Inc., organization for price coordination allowed under the Capper-Volstead Act. Lake influenced political leaders on ag policy as he had the ear of John F. Kennedy and made himself available to meet with him when then PresidentElect Kennedy requested a meeting. His influence continued with six U.S. Presidents as he brought the dairyman’s personal point of view to each president. When Lake retired, a dairy producer from Kinde moved into the office, Elwood Kirkpatrick. John Dilland described Kirkpatrick as a masterful president who was low-key and patient. According to Dilland, he allowed full discussion at the board meetings but was always able to bring the board to a consensus before a decision was made. His calm demeanor helped when discussions got contentious as he never got rattled. Kirkpatrick followed his predecessors and served as the vice president of the NMPF and treasurer of Dairy Management, Inc. He was also the very first chairman of the U.S. Dairy Export Council recognizing the importance of exports for the success of the U.S. dairy industry.

This year at the 100th annual meeting of MMPA, a dairy producer from St. Johns presided over the meeting. Ken Nobis, the most recent of six men to take over the leadership of the cooperative, has been in office since 2007. Nobis has led through plant expansions, watched multigenerational farms disperse and maneuvered through the heightened public focus on animal welfare. Realizing relationships are key, Nobis has personified that leadership quality. His generous leadership has been fleshed out in his cooperative spirit when working with our political leaders at the state and national level. And when the Flint water crisis hit, under a Nobis presidency, MMPA stepped up to the plate to donate milk. Hull, Meyer, Maystead, Lake, Kirkpatrick and Nobis: Six farmers, six fathers, six husbands. And six leaders who took a new concept called a cooperative and successfully cultivated the integrity needed to sustain through 100 years of “marketing the members milk to the greatest possible advantage.”

FROM LEFT: IVAN K. MAYSTEAD, FRED MEYER AND GLENN LAKE, THREE GREAT MMPA PRESIDENTS.

DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

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MBIC Helps Launch New Michigan GROWN, Michigan GREAT Brand Kickoff Takes Place at State Fair The Michigan Beef Industry Commission (MBIC) helped the Michigan Ag Council launch the new Michigan GROWN, Michigan GREAT brand during the 2016 Fifth Third Bank Michigan State Fair in Novi, MI. As part of the brand launch, fairgoers at the Michigan State Fair had the chance to win a $250 Kroger gift card each day and to donate to the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan by participating in the Michigan GROWN, Michigan GREAT selfie contest. Michigan GROWN, Michigan GREAT invited guests to take a selfie with a farmer during the Fair and post it on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag #migrownmigreat for a chance to enter.

MICHIGAN

GROWN

MICHIGAN

GREAT

By local farm families. MichiganGrown.org

Michigan GROWN, Michigan GREAT also donated $1 to the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan for every selfie shared using the hastag. Farmers met and talked with fairgoers at the Kroger Michigan-Made Pavilion, where guests were able to find food and other products provided by Michigan farms and small businesses. MBIC supported beef cooking education at the State Fair during the BBQ Boot Camp sessions. MBIC provided BBQ Boot Camp attendees with meat thermometers and beef cookbooks. MBIC also hosted a booth near the beef cattle exhibits that provided fairgoers with recipe brochures, cut charts and nutrition information.

Selfie photos helped promote the campaign.

MBIC Promotes Heart Health The Michigan Beef Industry Commission (MBIC) partnered with the American Heart Association to promote beef and heart health at the 2016 Lansing Heart Walk and 2016 Washtenaw County Heart Ball.

wet weather to support the American Heart Association and raise awareness and funds to help fight heart disease. Walkers and their supporters visited with event sponsors at their booths before and after the walk.

Washtenaw County Heart Ball. This event elevated beef’s status as a hearthealthy choice among doctors and other medical professionals from Michigan and surrounding states who attended the event.

The Lansing Heart Walk took place on Oct. 1, 2016 at the Cooley Law School Stadium. Attendees braved cold,

MBIC hosted the most engaging booth at the event. Attendees visited a Spice Bar and created a spice mix to pair with a pound of ground beef. This activity encourages beef purchases and teaches consumers about the importance of enjoying protein throughout the day.

As the Dinner Sponsor, MBIC helped in selecting the entrée and placed an advertisement in the event program. MBIC also provided a “Beef Dinner for Two” silent auction basket, and each attendee received nutrition information, a recipe card and beef cook book.

The event was a huge success, with participants leaving encouraged to make a heart-healthy beef purchase. The Michigan Beef Industry Commission was also the Dinner Sponsor for the 2016

“It is important to share beef nutrition information with doctors and medical professionals who educate consumers on what to eat,” said Cindy Hulings, MBIC Director of Promotion and Consumer Marketing.


George Quackenbush, MBIC Executive Director, presented a cutting demonstration of the beef top loin to a group of Michigan teachers attending a ProStart training.

Family Meal Time is Topic of Immersion Event

Michigan High School Teachers Learn About Beef in ProStart Training Your beef Checkoff is reaching high school teachers to help keep beef competitive as a protein in the foodservice arena. MBIC hosted a nutrition and beef foodservice training for a group of ProStart teachers. ProStart is a nationwide, two-year high school program that unites the classroom and the restaurant industry. It helps teachers develop the best and brightest talent into tomorrow’s restaurant and foodservice industry leaders. In Michigan, 68 high schools and career centers use the ProStart curriculum with more than 5,000 students participating. Through work with the Michigan Restaurant Association, MBIC was invited to present at the ProStart teachers’ in-service training. Cindy Hulings, MBIC Director of Promotion and Consumer Marketing, presented a comprehensive beef nutrition slide show and explained the nutritional benefits of beef. George Quackenbush, MBIC Executive Director, talked about Beef’s Value in Foodservice, and conducted a cutting demonstration of the beef top loin to create strip filets and the strip petite roast. The cutting demonstration was the highlight of the training with several teachers interested in adapting the presentation into a lesson program for their students. Teachers went home with a wealth of knowledge and resources to start the year off teaching students about beef.

Families In Motion Campaign Launched in Michigan The Michigan Beef Industry Commission (MBIC) uses digital advertising on channels like YouTube to relay beef messaging, including recipes, cooking tips, beef nutrition and more. Recently, MBIC supported the launch of the checkoff’s “Families In Motion” digital advertising campaign with YouTube pre-roll videos targeted at Michigan millennial parents age 25-34. The purpose of the Families in Motion videos is to reinforce consumers’ positive perceptions of beef. The campaign included a mixture of 30-second and 60-second videos. Overall, the campaign served 1,469,748 impressions of the videos and generated 377,074 video views. Digital advertising allows MBIC to efficiently use limited checkoff dollars to reach millennial parents with the message that beef fits into a healthy and balanced diet.

MBIC partnered with SpartanNash and Family Fare stores to promote the 2016 Back to School season and host a Family Meal Time Immersion Event. This immersion event gave MBIC the opportunity to re-engage with registered dietitians, food bloggers and nutrition educators who attended a pastureto-plate tour last year. The event was conducted Sept. 20, 2016 at the SpartanNash Culinary Kitchen. The national beef checkoff’s Executive Chef Dave Zino shared a Beef 101 presentation and a cooking demonstration of convenient and affordable beef-meal preparation. Attendees also received information on the SpartanNash beef program. The highlight of the training was “MBIC Grocery Games,” a fun interactive group activity that had participants shopping the store and making a family-friendly “Back to School” beef meal. Teams made 30-minute quick-and-easy beef recipes that incorporated My Plate nutrition recommendations, eight or fewer ingredients, and simple cooking techniques. The winning recipe was “Halloween Mango Beef Fajitas” (pictured), which is featured on Family Fare’s Fresh Thinking blog and on MBIC social-media properties. Participants shared their experiences on their blogs and through social media using #FamilyMealTimeBeef and #FamilyMealMonth.


2016-2017 Local Officers During the local meetings held by each local last year, the following officers were selected to lead their local throughout the year. Elections for 2017-2018 officers will take place at each local meeting this December or January.

DISTRICT 1 Adrian Local

President: Clark Emmons V. President: Jim Marvin Sec/Treas: Gary Stout Dairy Communicators: Geraldine Emmons, Joy Marvin

Hillsdale-Litchfield Local

President: Scott Ferry V. President: Bruce Lewis Sec/Treas: Carlton Evans Dairy Communicators: Jennifer Lewis, Cami Marz-Evans

Ingham County Local

President: Richard Chaffee V. President: Dan Minnis Sec/Treas: Josh Lott Dairy Communicator: Evelyn Minnis

Jackson County Plus Local President: Jeffrey Alexander V. President: Tom Zenz Sec/Treas: Arthur Riske

Saline-Ann Arbor Local

President: Jeff Horning V. President: Stan Lambarth Sec/Treas: Keith Weidmayer Dairy Communicators: Arlene DeForest, Lynda Horning, Kaitlyn Packard

DISTRICT 2 Barry-Eaton Local

President: Tom Wing V. President: Bob Baker Sec/Treas: Sally Bivens Dairy Communicators: Heather Wing, Sally Bivens

Blossomland Local

President: Jerry Koebel, Jr Sec/Treas: Joshua Gamble

Constantine Local

Kalamazoo Local

U.P. West Central

Lansing Local

DISTRICT 5

President: Don Bever V. President: Tim Hood Sec/Treas: Dan Ransler Dairy Communicator: Tammy Spicher President: Daniel Ritter Sec/Treas: Kristina Langmaack Dairy Communicators: Stacey Edick, Kristina Langmaack

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016

Alma Local

DISTRICT 3

President: Mike Rasmussen V. President/ Sec/Treas: John Black Dairy Communicators: Cheri Chapin, Ramona Okkema

Grand Rapids Local

Evart Local

President: Tim Butler V. President: Russell Acker Sec/Treas: Ken Leseman Dairy Communicator: Kay Willcome

Muskegon Local

President: Bill Stakenas V. President: Glen Sparks Sec/Treas: Sharron Powers Dairy Communicator: Terri Stakenas

West Michigan Local

President: Gordon Dick V. President: Bruce Benthem Sec/Treas: Lyle Vanderwal Dairy Communicators: Ken DeZeeuw, Amy Martin

President: Jeremy Werth V. President: Paul Ponik Sec/Treas: Ron Lucas Dairy Communicators: Connie Lucas, Michelle Lucas

President: Larry Niec V. President: Eric Frahm Sec/Treas: Bob Krafft Dairy Communicators: Barbara Wardin, Joanmarie Weiss, Debra Krafft

Sunrise Local

DISTRICT 8

President/V. President: Peter Juengel Sec/Treas: Daniel Weil Dairy Communicator: Jennifer Jacobs

Mid-Michigan Local

Hillman Local

Frankenmuth Local

Flint Local

DISTRICT 4 President: David Folkersma V. President: David Bell Sec/Treas: John Kronemeyer Dairy Communicator: Anne Folkersma, Diane Miller

President: William Stough V. President: Scott Kleinhardt Secretary: Phillip Gross Treasurer: Doug Stevens Dairy Communicators: Bertha Mae Stough, Lynnell Rider

DISTRICT 6

Livingston Charter Local

Chippewa County Local

Clare-Mt. Pleasant Local

President: John Bennett V. President: Jeremy Beebe Secretary: Chris Daniels Treasurer: Michael O’Farrell Dairy Communicator: Abigail O’Farrell

President: Paul Elzinga V. President: Steven Berens Secretary: William Gruppen Treasurer: Darren Coffey Dairy Communicators: Jenny Elzinga, Arlene Ter Haar

President: Richard Ultz V. President: Clyde Miller Sec/Treas: Richard Thomas Dairy Communicators: Upstate Local President: Marv Rubingh Judy Oesch, Richard Ultz, V. President: Terry Lautner Cynthia Adam Sec/Treas: Richard Fettig

30

President: Gary Palosaari V. President: Milton Patz Sec/Treas: Kimberly Pirman Dairy Communicator: Karen Palosaari

President: Scott Bontekoe V. President: Chuck White Sec/Treas: Janet White Dairy Communicator: Jodi Hill President: John Hufnagel V. President: Aaron Gasper Sec/Treas: Kris Wardin Dairy Communicators: Doreen Slavik, Carla Wardin, Patti Jandernoa

Owosso Local

President: Brad Ritter V. President/Sec/Treas: David Reed Dairy Communicator: Megghan Honke Seidel

Huron Local

President: Mark Ziel Secretary: Shelly Messing Treasurer: Nick Leipprandt Dairy Communicators: Shelly Messing, Barbara Siemen, Ashley Kennedy, Cassie Sneller

Mid-Sanilac Local

President: James Herberling V. President: Jeremy Sharrard Sec/Treas: Mike Bender Dairy Communicators: Jordan Noll, Jodi Sharrard, Sara Lee, Rita Phillips, Gertie van den Goor

Mid-Thumb

President: Scott Lamb V. President: Patrick Bolday Sec/Treas. Bill Blumerich Dairy Communicators: Melissa Small, Kristie Lamb, Doris Stuever, Virginia Ankley, Kathleen Clinton, Kathleen Knust, Robin Falker

DISTRICT 7 Deford/Clifford-Mayville Local

President: Ray Wolak V. President: Calvin Bodeis Sec/Treas: Diane Foley Dairy Communicators: Diane Foley, Jane Wood, Katie Wood


2016-2017 Local Meetings The meeting information listed below was availiable at press time. All members will receive complete meeting details in the invitation from their local. In addition to these local meetings, MMPA is hosting nine information meeting across the state. Information about these meetings will be mailed to members. Local

Date

Location

City

Kalamazoo

12/6/2016

Old Country Buffet

Kalamazoo

11:00 a.m.

Sunrise

12/7/2016

Klacking Twp. Hall

West Branch

12:00 p.m.

U.P. West Central

12/7/2016

Home Base Restaurant

Shaffer

12:00 p.m.

Chippewa County

12/8/2016

Rudyard Christian Reformed Church

Rudyard

11:30 a.m.

Barry-Eaton/Lansing

12/10/2016

Main Street Banquets

Nashville

12:00 p.m.

Upstate

12/13/2016

Ellsworth Christian Reformed Church

Ellsworth

11:00 a.m.

Muskegon

1/4/2017

Russ’ Banquet Room

Muskegon

11:30 a.m.

Deford/Clifford-Mayville

1/9/2017

Spring of Life Church

Mayville

12:00 p.m.

Adrian

1/10/2017

UAW Hall

Adrian

12:00 p.m.

Flint/Livingston Charter/Owosso

1/11/2017

Durand VFW

Durand

12:00 p.m

Grand Rapids

1/11/2017

Golden Corral

Walker

11:45 a.m.

Evart

1/12/2017

Rehoboth Reformed Church

McBain

11:00 a.m.

Alma

1/13/2017

Maxfield’s

Blanchard

11:30 a.m.

Hillman

1/13/2017

Ramada Inn

Alpena

11:30 a.m.

Huron

1/14/2017

Franklin Inn

Bad Axe

11:30 a.m.

Constantine

1/14/2017

Siloam Fellowship

Goshen, Ind.

10:30 a.m.

Saline-Ann Arbor

1/17/2017

Freedom Township Hall

Ann Arbor

12:00 p.m.

Mid-Michigan

1/17/2017

Agro Liquid Headquarters

St. Johns

11:45 a.m.

Blossomland

1/20/2017

Zeke’s Restaurant

Dowagiac

12:00 p.m.

Clare-Mt. Pleasant

1/20/2017

Clare Church of the Nazarene

Clare

11:00 a.m.

Frankenmuth

TBD

Jackson County Plus

TBD

Mid-Sanilac

TBD

Hillsdale-Litchfield

TBD

Ingham County

TBD

Mid-Thumb

TBD

West Michigan

TBD

Time

DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

31


YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

UDIM Helps Gleaners Provide Over 61,000 Gallons of Milk MATCHED DONATIONS DOUBLE IMPACT TO PROVIDE AREA CHILDREN WITH NEEDED NUTRITION On Tuesday, October 18, 2016, volunteers and staff of Gleaners Community Food Bank of Southeastern Michigan (Gleaners) received a truck filled with over 4,300 gallons of milk at the agency’s Detroit Warehouse & Distribution Center. Executives from Gleaners and the United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM) will share the importance and impact of its milk donation program. Gleaners received 39,888 gallons of fresh milk donations over the past year from UDIM, Kroger and the Michigan Milk Producers Association. Additionally, Gleaners purchased another 21,600 gallons, including the truck that’s being delivered on October 18, through financial donations from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, Quicken Loans, Gleaners volunteers and other generous donors. The Milk Match Program will help Gleaners

32

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER DECEMBER 2016 2016

provide a total 61,488 gallons of milk to food insecure families in SE Michigan this year. “Fresh milk is a nutritious staple for children, and one of the most requested foods by the families we serve, who frequently don’t have sufficient resources to buy it. Yet, milk is rarely donated,” said Julie Beamer, Gleaners Chief Operating Officer. “We’re humbled by the continued generosity of our donors who help ensure that thousands of children here in southeastern Michigan have the protein and calcium-rich milk they need to help them learn, grow and play.” According to Feeding America, milk is among the top five requested foods by food bank clients but sourcing and distributing a consistent supply of milk and milk products is a challenge; one of the main reasons dairy comprises only 5.3 percent of food available in

food banks. Gleaners is one of the only food banks in Michigan capable of storing and transporting milk. “Hunger is a serious issue and with an average of eight grams of high-quality protein per cup, milk is an ideal product to supply hungry individuals,” said registered dietitian and UDIM Chief Executive Officer Sharon Toth. “On behalf of all Michigan dairy farm families, UDIM is incredibly proud to partner with Gleaners to help fill a nutrient gap and increase access to milk. There isn’t anything closer to our farmers’ hearts than feeding people.”


MERCHANDISE

Discontinued Products & Alternatives As you may have read in this issue’s Quality Watch, NPE containing products are being phased out across the dairy industry. Nonylphenol Ethoxylate (NPE), is a surfactant used in some cleaners, teat dips and udder washes. It has been found to have an adverse effect on the aquatic environment. With this in mind, MMPA’s merchandise program will completely phase out all products containing NPE as soon as possible. These products include Optima and Optima Plus concentrates, Monodine udder wash, Teat Glo and Protek Spray. NPE free alternatives for these discontinued products are available.

NPE-free Alternatives Our Ecoplus SA 505 is a ready to use (RTU) product with .5% iodine and a 5% emollient package. This product is the same as what is created after mixing Optima (with more emollients) and Optima Plus on the farm. It is available in 15 gallon and 55 gallon containers. If you would prefer to use a concentrate, Ecoplus SA concentrate can be used to make a .5% RTU product on the farm using a new style mixing pump (please contact the warehouse for details on this subject). The only udder wash alternative for Monodine is Bac-Drop. Bac-Drop is a noniodine product, used at the same rate as Monodine. Teat Glo is a 1% iodine dip typically used as a post dip. If you are using it as a post dip only, Ideal barrier dip is an excellent alternative. Ideal is a 1% barrier dip with an 11% emollient package. It cannot, however be used as a pre-dip. In the event that you would like to use the same product for pre and post dipping, Masticare or Cynergy are excellent non-iodine pre and post dips. Another iodine based option is Ecoplus SA 1012, mixed here at the warehouse. Ecoplus SA 1012 is a NPE-free 1% iodine dip with a 12% emollient package. It is available in 15 gallon and 55 gallon containers. Protek Spray is a chlorhexidine based pre/post teat dip. Unfortunately, we do not have a NPE-free chlorhexidine base dip available. Masticare and Cynergy are the best non-iodine alternatives available to replace Protek Spray.

Somaticell SCC Test Idexx has decided to discontinue the distribution of the Somaticell SCC test effective immediately. The Somaticell SCC test is being discontinued due to ongoing packaging and shipping issues that have resulted in leaking reagent bottles. At this time, the merchandise warehouse has completely depleted our stock of this product. For pricing on the above mentioned teat dips or if you have any questions regarding the NPE issue and need more information about alternatives, please call us at the merchandise warehouse.

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information These are service personnel only. Order your Member Merchandise supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 For Service, call the Ecolab Service Message Center 1-800-392-3392 or one of the following service representatives: Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr. Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636 Pat Mitchell 7273 N. Rollin Hwy. Addison, MI 49220 517-403-0928 Jason Wolfe 1890 Canter Dr. Riner, VA 24149 540-553-5755

Three Ways to Order your MMPA Merchandise 1. Place order through your milk hauler 2. Call in your order:

Duane Farmer, Supervisor......................................................989-317-8370

Toll Free..................................................................................... 877-367-6455

Orders (Novi)..................................................... 800-572-5824 then dial 2

3. Fax in your order:

MMPA Merchandise fax........................................................... 989-317-8372

DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

33


PREMIUMS MERCHANDISE

MMPA Quality Premium Program

MMPA Member Testing Fees

Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below............ +55¢/cwt.

201,000-225,000........... +20¢/cwt.

51,000-75,000................+50¢/cwt.

226,000-250,000............+15¢/cwt.

76,000-100,000.............+45¢/cwt.

251,000-300,000...........+00¢/cwt.

101,000-125,000.............+40¢/cwt.

301,000-400,000..........- 30¢/cwt.

126,000-150,000........... +35¢/cwt.

401,000-500,000........ -$1.00/cwt.

151,000-175,000.............+30¢/cwt.

501,000-600,000.........-$1.50/cwt.

176,000-200,000.......... +25¢/cwt.

601,000 and greater.. -$2.00/cwt.

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count

if

There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count. To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month.

Cow Tests: $1 Cow samples may be tested for: Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC. Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include: Raw bacteria count and components. All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your representative.

MMPA member

Additional Tests Available: All costs are listed per individual sample.

• Mycoplasma Cultures...........................................................................$13 • Bacteriology Cultures...........................................................................$15 – Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA........................................................................................................$6 • Johne’s Milk Test - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA.................................................................... $4.50

To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month

Lab test results by mail: $2/month

To qualify for MMPA volume premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month • An average somatic cell count of 350,000 or less

All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol.

NORTHSTAR MI LABORATORIES Loc/Hlr/Producer #____________________________________ Sample Date__________________________ Member name_______________________________________________________________________________ Sample ID__________________________________________________________________________________ BLV ELISA__________

Johne’s ELISA_________

Johne’s PCR_________

Pregnancy_________

Refer to above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. This card MUST be filled out completely when sending in samples to be tested by NorthStar Labs to avoid potential service charges.

34

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016


POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1. Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2. The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk may be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice may be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative.

If…

If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.*

3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature.

In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT If… 1. a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy.

1. a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and,

4. MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurrences within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.

DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

35


FREELINERS

To place a freeliner, fax your ad to 248-426-3412 or email your ad to: Muszynski@mimilk.com

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise— at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding the desired month of publication.

« Freeliners and Classifieds can now be submitted online. » Visit www.mimilk.com/news/michigan-milk-messenger/advertise/ freeliner-and-classified-ads/

Bulls

Cows & Heifers

Registered Holstein Bulls: We now have a nice selection of service age bulls, sired by top AI sires. Green Meadow Farms, Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit www.greenmeadowfarms.com.

Milk Cows. Herd currently averaging 92 lbs. and 125 SCC. Up to 100 head to sell! 734-776-0285.

Service age Holstein bulls. Call Steve Alexander, 810-6228548 evenings or 810-404-8548. Registered Holstein breeding bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some polled, high production, low SCC herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886 or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com.

50 Milk Cows. Averaging 90 lbs. and 170 SCC. Call Allen Yoder, 269-467-9932.

Dairy Equipment Mueller 1,250 gal. bulk tank. High perform 2 washer. 734-231-0633. 1,000 gallon Mueller Bulk Tank, complete $2,500. Please contact 517-605-4945.

Equipment JD 459 Round Baler Silage Special, mega P.U., like new, excellent condition. 260-768-7803 ext. 3. Penta 6710 twin screw mixer. 810-516-6867. 27 ft. Big Jim silo unloader for parts, angled Kelly feed conveyor, 26 ft. Buffalo (same as Kelly) conveyor, Gehl 960 and 970 for parts, all offers considered (do not want them to waste away if someone can use them), John Deere 250 series 2 skid steer, 3950 hours $9,999. Allis Chalmers 185, 1 for parts, 1 to rebuild, best offer. 810-348-5500 Flint area.

Wanted Freestalls and self-locks for feed bunk. Jacob Weaver 260-499-4318 ext. 2 Calf-Tel Calf Hutches. Call 616-634-2958.

36

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016


CLASSIFIED ADS A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received

UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/

by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send

texturing provides high quality

check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by:

service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC.

MAIL: Classified Ads | Michigan Milk Messenger

traction in new & old concrete, fast

FOR SALE: 5000-4000-3000-2500-

P.O. BOX 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002

2000-1500 OH MUELLER LATE MODEL BULK TANK MILK TANKS,

EMAIL: Muszynski@mimilk.com

complete, will trade. 1-800-558-0112.

FAX: 248-426-3412 WANTED TO BUY: USED BULK MILK TANKS, 200 gallons & larger, Sunset OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can

Concrete Grooving and Texturing Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202 Cell: 1-716-353-1137

& Mueller, 1-800-558-0112.

fix your scabbled floors. Diamond

DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small

sawed grooves, no hammering

bales) & BARLEY FOR FEED.

or cracking of concrete. No hoof

989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

damage. Call Opperman Grooving

FARMERS: INCREASE YIELDS

Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381.

7 PROFIT by using the 1# crop production system. Distributors

DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING,

needed. 260-768-8137 ext. 1

INC: NO water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. 3

ALPHALFA HAYLAGE (excellent & fair grades) & CORN SILAGE. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

operators will travel Michigan and

HERD OF DAIRY COWS, parlor and

other states. No interest payment

freestall cows. 40 years of AI breeding.

terms. Est. since 1987.

First, second and third lactation.

Call 1-800-365-3361.

$2,500. Doyle David 989-343-0756 or 989-254-0213. Prescott, Michigan.

CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction,

CALF JACKETS. Keep your calves warm this winter. Very durable, water repellent, Cordura outer shell, with

lowest prices. (800) 554-2288.

double faced quilted Thinsulate lining.

www.tristatescabbling.com

No Velcro. $25 each. 517-543-2415.

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION!

PTO and Automatic Start Generators

A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419

GREEN MEADOW FARMS

www.hamiltondist.com

www.greenmeadowfarms.com

6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

DECEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

37


MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary

| FOR MILK MARKETED IN OCTOBER 2016

Market Statistics - Mideast Federal Order #33 (pounds)

% This Month Year Ago Change

National Trends* (million pounds) 2016

2015 % Change

California

3,302

3,243

+1.8

Wisconsin

2,490

2,436

+2.2

Production

Total Class 1 Sales

559,238,835

561,644,819

-0.43

Total Class 2 Sales

347,100,878

328,146,931

+5.78

Total Class 3 Sales

505,831,292

523,673,562

-3.41

Total Class 4 Sales

279,283,751

237,917,245

+17.39

New York

1,240

1,184

+4.7

1,691,454,756

1,651,382,557

+2.43

Idaho

1,243

1,195

+4.0

Pennsylvania

899

880

+2.2

Mideast Federal Order #33

Michigan

903

861

+4.9

Total Producers........................................................................................................5,266

Texas

922

852

+8.2

Minnesota

795

780

+1.9

New Mexico

650

643

+1.1

Washington

554

547

+1.3

Ohio

455

454

+0.2

Indiana

342

335

+2.1

Total Production Class 1 Utilization

33.1%

34.0%

Avg. Daily Production per farm.......................................................................9,498 Avg. Protein Test....................................................................................................3.04% Avg. Butterfat Test................................................................................................3.64% Avg. Oth Solids Test............................................................................................. 5.73% Avg. SCC - MMPA............................................................................................... 171,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33 Protein Price /lb.................................................................................................$2.2975 Butterfat Price /lb............................................................................................$2.0493 Other Solids Price /lb........................................................................................$0.1351 Class III Price @ 3.5%..........................................................................................$14.82 Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt.................................................................... $0.39 Uniform Price at 3.51.............................................................................................$15.21 SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000.................................................................. $0.00079

AMS Survey Prices Product

Monthly Avg

Cheese /lb................................................................................................................1.5830 Butter /lb.................................................................................................................. 1.8637 Nonfat Dry Milk /lb.............................................................................................0.9222 Dry Whey /lb.......................................................................................................0.3303

38

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016

Total U.S.*

16,493 16,063

+2.7

U.S.* Y-T-D

166,570 163,480

+1.9

* For 23 States


MMPA STAFF MERCHANDISE

MMPA Field Staff* Northwest Area

Novi Headquarters

Supervisor Ben Chapin, Blanchard......................................989-289-0731

Main Office Local line...................................................... 248-474-6672 Toll free......................................................... 800-572-5824

Energy Auditor Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI................................906-250-0337

General Manager Joe Diglio................................................................ ext. 200

Animal Care Coordinator Deb Gingrich, Leroy...........................................248-520-3580

Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys......................................................... ext. 240

Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.....................................231-519-2455 Sarah Michalek, Portland...................................248-305-0537 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard.................................. 248-756-2062

Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt..................................................... ext. 208

Board of Directors

Quality Amandeep Dhillon.................................................. ext. 305

Officers

Manufactured Product Sales Jim Dodson............................................................. ext. 229

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Animal Care Coordinator Lindsay Green, East Lansing...............................989-488-8159

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula........................................................... ext. 219

Joe Diglio, GM / Secretary

Ben Butcher, Durand.........................................248-514-5273 Ashley Herriman, Alpena...................................269-245-6632 Bridget Moore, Snover......................................231-414-4539

Member Services Dean Letter................................................... 989-289-9251

Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

Milk Sales/Dispatch Carl Rasch............................................................... ext. 244

Directors-At-Large

South Area

Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt.................................................... ext. 210

Northeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Fairgrove.............................248-513-7920

Supervisor & Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers....................................269-967-7351 Dave Brady, Grass Lake..... 517-522-5965 or (c) 517-937-9061 Elyse Martin, Charlotte......................................810-701-6460 Joe Packard, Manchester...................................248-520-3481 Krista Schrock, Orland, IN..................................269-986-6792 Emily Smith, Bronson.........................................269-535-0822 Brittni Tucker, Elsie.............................................248-880-3785

Other Services Technical Area Supervisor & Mastitis Mgt. Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca....... 989-875-3441 or (c) 989-330-1638 Bulk Tank Calibration John Lehman, Elsie............................................248-444-6775

Management Information Systems Gregory Schulkey.................................................... ext. 237 Andrew Caldwell.....................................................ext. 304 Communications Allison Stuby........................................................... ext. 296 Member Relations Jessica Welch.......................................................... ext. 303 Human Resources Bill Zoli.................................................................... ext. 301

Manufacturing Plants

Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson, Coleman.....................................989-289-9686

Constantine Dave Davis, Plant Manager............................ 269-435-2835

Sustainability Coordinator Kendra Kissane, Grand Rapids...........................248-880-4234

Ovid Colt Johnson, Plant Manager........................ 989-834-2221

Andrea Meade, Livonia......................................248-880-4113

Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) In Michigan....................................................800-572-5824 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................... 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.).........800-391-7560

Main Line......................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free............................................................ 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)..................................800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax................................................................... 989-317-8372

Josep Barenys, Asst. Treasurer

Ken Nobis, St. Johns 989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 201 Rodney Daniels, Whittemore 989-756-4935 Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Mark Halbert, Battle Creek 269-964-0511 James Reid, Jeddo 810-327-6830 District Directors 1. Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032 2. Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771 3. David Pyle Zeeland 616-772-1512

5. Doug Chapin Remus 231-972-0535

Toll Free 800-233-2405

Supervisor: Duane Farmer

Eric Frahm, Treasurer

4. Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436

MMPA Labs

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant

Ken Nobis, President

*If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area.

6. Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7. Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8. Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135

NOVEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

39


POWER of the Past. » VISION for the Future.

Michigan Milk Messenger: December 2016  
Michigan Milk Messenger: December 2016  
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