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milk. ISSUE

____ magazine

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fashion

arts

culture

S UMMER 2013


COME COME COME C CO OM ME E COME COME

INTO INTO INTO II N NT TO O INTO INTO

OUR OUR OUR O OU UR R OUR OUR

3. Editor’s Letter// 4. Under the Noodlebar// 8. WORD// 10. KSENIA// 16. CROATIA// 18. POP// 23. SECRET.SOHO// 26. TREND// 30. FRED V & GRAFIX// 34. PATTERNITY// 36. TINNED BANANAS// 40. MIRROR MIRROR// 41. CUPP// 43. DUCKS// 44. MORE FROM MILK// 2

MILK. MILK. MILK. M M II L LK K .. MILK. MILK.

WORLD WORLD WORLD W WO OR RL LD D WORLD WORLD


E D I TO R ’ S

L E TT E R

hello. hello. Hey mini milkers. Welcome to the first issue of MILK__Magazine! It’s taken jugs of caffiene, patience and dates with indesign to get here, but it’s done. MILK___has grown from a little streetwear brand, starting off in 2012, into a hub of finding new talent across the fashion, arts and culture worlds. Bit by bit, this has been etched onto these pages to form our first summer issue of MILK___Magazine! Wheee! Like I said, this issue focuses on the emerging talent we expect to see seeping into your lives this summer. We’ve travelled everywhere from New York to Croatia, Bristol, Cardiff and back to London, to bring you the little gems which we couldn’t let go un-noticed. We see talent which has already acheived a hella-lot, like Fred V & Grafix. Only just waving bye to their teens and they’re touring Europe with the biggest DnB label out there at the moment. Or Ksenia Schnaider, the Ukranian Designer who has put her foot in the door of London Fashion Week this year. One of my favourites of the issue is the feature on super hawt, dancewear meets streetwear label TINNED BANANAS. We had so much fun shooting this, the bubble balloons, the crazy, little bit bananas prints and the chat with co-founder Rosie Spencer. Definitely one to note down for your summer splurge list. Also, a little roll back to the 90s is happening. There’s a mini style file of classic 90s pieces, ones which have been surfacing of late, and ones which we never, ever, ever thought would reappear. But ones we love. And cannot stop wearing. For some, the 90s scrunchie won’t even need to be repurchased, have a little rummage around your top draw and you’ve probably got one lurking from the gymnastics classes nine years ago. Then we’ve got a dip into the culture pot - New York, Croatia, a festival dedicated to patterns and a Taiwanese tradition which will soon be knocking froyo off the top spot at festivals this summer. Phew. It’s been so much fun making this issue, massive thanks to everyone who has helped along the way! Woo, enjoy, and HAPPY SUMMER!

Louisa MILK___team

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ARTS

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under the noodlebar. under the noodlebar.

Taking inspiration from the renowned studio 54 in New York - STUDIO 89 offers the latest fix in disco and deep house since opening its doors at the end of 2011. Expect slow beats, electric atmosphere and disco vibes behind the unsuspecting black door in the backstreets of Cardiff.

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I

Ink stamps, indian headresses, gold headbands and glit-

ter galore. It’s all regular attire for the underground night in the backstreets of the inconspicuous welsh captial, Cardiff. Mix in some deep house and disco vibes and you’re well on your way to having a pretty sweet night. Venture off the beaten track in London or New York and you’re soon to find something of the sort, but Cardiff, it doesn’t exactly scream underground scene. Welcome

to

Studio

89.

The twosome behind this ingenius venture have enjoyed sellout events since the little black door was opened in December 2011. They’ve managed to keep regulars and a close knit quality to the place, the ‘studio family’ without it feeling like a clique in the slightest. They’ve got branding on point and have passed up pleas of a bigger venue although the demand is evidently there. Studio just wouldn’t be studio without being under one of Cardiff’s most popular noodlebars. 5

ARTS


arts

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The former ‘secret underground’ seems to be surfacing somewhat. In the light of artists such as Disclosure and Julio Bashmore gaining regular airplay on mainstream radio, previous fans of the conventional vibe are seemingly starting to dip their toes into the world of deep house, disco and future garage. This welsh venue is certainly gathering a following, and being decked out with 70s and 80s influenced artwork all helps to transport you back to the vibes that were circulating in the 70s at Studio 54 in New York. It’s the attention to detail in this place that makes it so special, and keeps its disco bunnies going back for more every month. Acts like Bicep, Duff Disco, Medlar, Detroit Swindle and Casino Times have all graced the decks and taken home a coverted studio golden vinyl which is presented at the end of their set. It’s Studio time. Don’t be left out.

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arts


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WORD. ELLIOTT MORGAN___ PHOTOGRAPHER

ROSIE TAPNER___MODEL

Working with the likes of Dazed & Confused, Glamour, GQ and Topman, it’s safe to say Elliott Morgan has a fully flourished CV behind him having graduated from his BA photography course at UCA. MILK__ has chosen to feature Elliott because of the freshness he brings to photography, particularly in fashion, where his models demand attention. There’s a certain attitude behind his shots, all figures making a real statement in every click of the camera lens. At only 21, his work shows an effortless touch, and his ability to switch between subjects in the music, fashion and film industries is one he is highly credited for. Being a freelance for sony’s syco, and being the inhouse picture editor at Fiasco Magazine, more and more people are going to be getting to know Elliott’s work in 2013.

One of the main faces to watch this year. Rosie has started off her year as the campaign gal for Topshop SS13, walking for them at their LFW Unique show, as well as opening the Todd Lynn show and walking for Giles and Michael Van Der Ham. She was scouted by Storm at the Clothes Show in 2011, and now, still only at the tender age of 17, her career has skyrocketed. She’s currently got two Balenciaga campaigns under her belt and has worked with Burberry and Chloe, as well as being pals with fellow brit faces, Cara Delevinge and Jordan Dunn. Personality is an attractive selling point for models at present, and with her down to earth approach to the modelling lifestyle, Rosie retires back to boarding school when she’s not working on jobs. Being actively involved in a heap of sports too, she’s definitely got mass appeal.

@ELLIOTT_MORGAN

@ROSIE _TAPNER 8


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MILK. GIVES YOU A LITTLE PEEK INTO THE INDUSTRY NAMES WE THINK ARE SET FOR THE BIG TIME IN 2013. RICK I HALL.___MODEL

SOKI MAK___STYLIST Being best mates with singer Yasmin has already got Soki Mak some serious kudos among other celebrities, and leaving Central St. Martins because it ‘just isn’t for everyone’ she landed herself a sought after internship at Vivienne Westwood. From there she’s planted her foot firmly on the styling scene. Working with the likes of Dazed & Confused, Soki says it gave her chance to build a portfoio and be taken seriously. “It takes a while to gain respect from people that are in your line of work.” She’s certainly proved her worth, recently adding rapper Eve and female trio Stooshie to her list of celebrity clientel.

Discovered as he stepped out of Topman on Oxford Street, which he refers to as ‘incredibly cliche’, this bearded, tattooed brummie has an attitude to match his exterior and has been stormin’ the modelling world so far this year. Taking inspiration from a vetran model, Miles Better, Ricki admits his iconic beard was the changing point for his career. “If I didn’t have the beard I don’t know where the fuck I’d be right now to be honest with you! It just gives that edge where you’ve got that gentleman look about you – that bit of dapperness, but you’ve got a little bit of naughtiness on the edge”.

@SOKIMAK

@RICKIFUCKINHALL

CLAIRE BARROW___DESIGNER Gaining worldwide recognition for her detailed painted leather jackets, Westminster Uni graduate, Claire Barrow, has enjoyed a stream of success since being spotted by Lulu Kennedy of Fashion East. Her latest collection was included in a catwalk show at the Tate, and streamed to millions via Topshop.com. With Rihanna being a fan of the designer, it seems Barrow’s future is set to hold promising things, although she presses it’s not all about the celebrity appeal. “When I got asked to do stuff for Rihanna of course I wanted to do it, but people seem to think it should be something that’s a highlight of my career, but I don’t see it like that.” Her AW13 collection sees her diversifying her handling of leather, while maintaining the dignity of the underground culture in which she believes. View her collections at www.clairebarrow.com.

@MISCLAIREBARROW 9


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Eastern European Fashion in its finest form, Marchenko reveales her p a

“you have to keep your heart wide open to see all the beauty that surrounds you� KSENIA SCHNAIDER

ss io n

fo

r design which pushed her to pursue her dream & the meaning behind her collections. 10


I NT E R V I E W

F A S H I ON

P hoto: Misha Boc hka r e v Model: Olimpia W hite musta c he

Conceptual Design Duo Ksenia Schnaider, a European Unisex brand which launched in 2011, share a passion for contemporary design. Ukrainian designer Ksenia Marchenko and Russian Graphic Designer Anton Schnaider formed together, building collections that feature minimalist, versatile pieces that can be paired with just about anything. MILK___ spoke to Ksenia about AW13 collection ‘BODYWARMER’, the new collection from the duo AND PREVIOUS COLECTION ‘CAMOuFLAGE’ which held a strong presence at the Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in Kiev at the end of 2012.

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I NT E R V I E W

Everyday people are exposed to various factors which influence their choice of clothing. Where do you feel fashion trends actually originate from? For you as a designer, who or what inspires your creativity the most? You have to keep your heart wide open to see all the beauty that surrounds you – sky, architecture, people, music, nature, art… You never know what will influence your work in the future; you just have to be ready to react. As for me, I get my inspiration when I am working, I just need to begin and then ideas will follow. I try to work consciously, constantly asking “why?” and “for what reason?” Nothing appears in the designs without a reason. In general, we are both inspired by clothing itself; we use traditional clothes and bring them our experience – simplicity and clarity. Your past two collections are extremely strong and have such a simplistic feel to them. How would you describe your latest collection ‘Bodywarmer’ and what was your inspiration for this collection? Thank you! When starting this collection I thought about the classic bodywarmer, how in the Soviet Union, the bodywarmer is such an iconic piece because of its affordability, versatility and utility. I took inspiration from this and wanted to relay the idea of quilting and carry it through the collection, with dresses, skirts, jackets, coats and the backs of t-shirts, using a fanned panelling technique. I still wanted to make it a luxury, away from the utility of the classic style, so chose to use a mix of leather and deep detail. 12


F A S H I ON

image courtesy of kseniaschnaider.com


F A S H I ON

image courtesy of kseniaschnaider.com


I NT E R V I E W

Do you aim to send out a message within the collections you create? What message are you trying to deliver and do you want people to have their own interpretations?

from a cut and choose the best proportion. When samples are ready we carry out numerous shoots and other administrative work… emails, phone calls, meetings, fittings and so on.

Of course, but we are trying to mask the meaning slightly, allowing people space and freedom to express their personal beliefs with our clothes. I feel this allows people to feel an inner confidence in my designs when they are worn. By simply telling someone the meaning attached to a collection, you are stripping their own imagination in some way. Fashion is like art, everyone has their own interpretations, and everyone will wear something in a different way to the next person. That’s what I love about fashion and that’s what drew me to designing, it’s ever-changing nature.

What boundaries do you cross in relation to your designs and collections which you feel other designers don’t cross and are you constantly trying to challege yourself?

Describe the journey your designs go through from beginning to end for a Ksenia Schnaider collection?

When you first started designing, what encouraged you to keep persevering in such a tough industry?

Everything starts in conversation, we discuss different ideas and then I start sketching. I like to change everything at the first fitting, but it doesn’t happen too often. We usually start from dialogues in a car. Anton works with fabrics, patterns and colours. We always measure our clothes for ourselves. We love long fittings when you can concentrate on a feeling

I started about 10 years ago, and I was lucky to have great friends who have always inspired me and encourage new collections. I think it’s definitely an important part of designing to get honest opinions from the outset, it helps to toughen your exterior for the things to come in this world, and having that support from my family and friends prepared me

I think it is my personal borders. Everyday brings a new challenge and a new approach, and you have to adapt to that. So I would say, growing and adapting to my work as a designer are constant boundaries which I cross everyday. This allows me to push my own talents and hopefully that will allow the designs to grow with the people who I design for.

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for the challenges I face when designing today. They gave me inspiration without me having to look too far for it, it allowed my designing to come naturally in a way and I’m lucky in that respect that everything managed to fall Into place the way it did with the help of Anton What advice would you give your younger self, starting off in today’s fashion industry? I think young designers should give advice to the professionals nowadays! You have to have a tough skin to work in this business - the more work you put in early on, the earlier the benefits will start showing. If you don’t believe in what you are doing, then how do you expect anyone else to believe it – self-belief is crucial to the success of your work. So my advice is to work, work, work!

[Favourite things] [Favourite City] Anton: New York & Moscow Ksenia: Paris and Kiev [Favourite moment of day] Anton: early evening Ksenia: early morning [Favourite dessert] Anton: Umm, Watermelon Ksenia: Probably ice cream w w w. k s e n i a s c h n a i d e r. c o m


culture

F E AT U R E

A E U I A

D N R S N

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V T E L D


culture

croatia. You’d be forgiven for failing

behind this additional Croa-

to keep up to speed with every

tian event have secured a line

festival on the planet at the mo-

up which will see Disclosure,

ment. Some have been around

Jessie Ware, TEED, Jamie XX,

for years and are only just start-

Joy Orbison and Cyril Hahn, to

ing to seep into the media light.

name a few, taking to stages set

Others, are little babies in this

against the contrasting Croatian

ever growing outdoor musical

landscapes, forest and beach.

industry and have kept their fol-

Add in another element to this

lowing a tight knit one, nestled

adventure island fest which

in the idilic hideaways where

will see artists providing im-

they belong. One thing festi-

promtu sets at secret venues

vals are good at doing is getting

around Rovinj in the North of

the same loyal followers back

Croatia and it’s looking like a

every year for more. Lineups

definite cert for anyone cling-

are evolving to suit the needs of

ing on to the last moments of

the festival goers. We all want

summer. The idea of providing

different things out of a festival.

live music alongside mysteri-

If you want a bit of tranquility,

ous art installations also keeps

a bask on the beach, followed

it in line with its sister, Hide-

by a seductive beat and rippling

out. With many UK festivals

waves in the backdrop, then

being a washout last year and

have a little lookie at some of the

the temptation of flying away

offerings Croatia has brought to

for a holiday and festival in

the table this year. In particular,

one, it seems festival fans are

Unknown festival, the latest of-

considering jumping on a plane

fereing from the organisers be-

out of the UK and into the Eu-

hind Hideout festival, held on

ropean fest scene. No chance of

the island in July. Following on

being knee deep in mud, leav-

from Hideout’s popularity with

ing because of flooding or get-

UK house fiends, Unknown is

ting trench foot , instead you’ll

to be launched at the start of

basking in the beauty that is the

September. The driving forces

island of Croatia at Unknown.

w w w. u n k n o w n c r o a t i a . c o m 17


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F E AT U R E

POP

[90s] [MILK.__& THE RE-BIRTH OF THE ICONIC PIECES OF 90S FASHION IN 2013. WHY WE CAN’T LET THE SCRUNCHIE DIE OUT AND DON OUR RUCKSACKS EVERYWHERE WE GO.] 18


F E AT U R E

F A S H I ON

The ultimate symbol of

iour. After it’s fasing out,

ponytail. The scrunchie

the 90s. The scrunchie is

the scrunchie has been left

prints should speak for

back. So uncool, it’s cool.

to the preschool generation

themselves - bright, child-

These were in their prime

and those of us who can’t

ish, phychedelic or a full

just before crimped hair

find an alternative bob-

metallic or velvet is the

took over the world. When

ble in the morning rush.

look you’re going for here.

‘Saved By The Bell’ was

This time around, wear

People may sneer, but it’s

compulsory after school

hair piled on the very top

probable they’re the ones

viewing and Cher Horow-

of the head - think messy

sporting a DORK, GEEK,

itz was our fashion sav-

topknot or Stefani style

DWEEB or NERD tee.

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F E AT U R E

The epitome of 90s grunge, acid wash denim walked all over the stonewash trend which appeared in the late 90s. It began to emerge in the late 80s, but the acid wash jean became a staple for the American supermodels of the 90s era, which they chose to wear with bodysuits tucked in to the high rise waist. The rebirth sees the same oversized looks - jackets, jeans, shorts - with the emphasis on the gathered paperbag, cinched in waist and rolled up bottoms. It has an androgynous feel to it, without the sharp silhouette, more about creating layers and throwing together patterns and textures for this look. Choose a thick belt or patterned silk scarf to hold everything together at the waist, a skinnybelt will get a bit lost in the mix - it may look like you’ve raided a man’s warbrobe, but that’s pretty much what you’re aiming for. If you have a little nose online, you’ll find the best heavyweight vintage pieces. The more overbleached the better. You need a dark plum lip and strong brows to carry this iconic piece forward.

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I think by now it’s clear

grunge fiends alike in the

striking the contrast be-

to see how streetwear had

90s. Wear it pointy, turned

tween hair colour and bean-

taken over as the key feel

up and oversized. We’re

ie and the rest of the outfit,

of 90s pieces. It’s taken off

chanelling

‘Brian

the more effective this re-

in a new direction this time

from East 17’ look. Log-

birth will be. Don’t go for

- slightly more polished

os, patches, symbols and

the obvious brands either,

with bolder colours and

neon colours are all major

make it look a bit more au-

patterns. The beanie was

players in the beanie boom

thentic and have a search

sported by boybands and

at the moment. The more

away from the high street.

the

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F E AT U R E

Ever since Cara Delevinge rocked up to New York fashion week with her name embroidered rucksack, the child-esque bag has seen a new light in the modern world. The 90s saw the popular bubble rucksack bags, if you didn’t have a metallic one in school, you were a bit of a loser, and the clashing printed canvas was also a favourtie. Fast forward fifteen years and it’s the leather, denim and tribal prints which have wormed their way down to the high street stores. The way to get this revival spot on is to make the bag your own. Don’t go buying tonnes of rucksacks, one for each day of the week. You have left school. You don’t need to impress on the first day of term. This rucksack will be an investment piece, lugging your life around with all its little hidden compartments. Add printed scarves and big beads to bleached denim rucksacks, or look out for the more unusual prints. These will make a bit more of a statement than aztec designs which have been exhausted by the high street. So. The 90s rebirth really will make you feel like a little kid all over again. An ice cream in one hand, rucksack on and a scrunchie bun bobbing along, Happy Summer Kids.

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culture

Secret SoHo

The narrative that embodies the landscape of New York.

SoHo. South of Houston.The streets are lined with market stalls crammed into nooks and crannies of the street blocks, the lights seeping out onto a chaotic, blurred Broadway. Sometimes you have to blink that little bit more just to keep up with everything that’s going on around. Blink for too long and you’ll end up being blasted by a horn from the impatient city truckers. It’s a constant dodge of human life and clogged pavements. Not enough time to take a step back and appreciate the glow, the electric atmosphere and the hidden SoHo, the real SoHo, which lurks behind the facade.

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culture

F E AT U R E

Step to the side of the buzz of the SoHo strip and you’ll be transported into the history of this famed Manhattan community. The brickwork laiden with murals, figures, paintings and every kind of street art you can imagine. The concrete jungle of New York City sees an escape in SoHo from the plentiful grey wash skyscrapers with its ‘gallery on the street’ movement. Being renowned for its artistry since the 1960s, the creative inhabitants of SoHo have kept moulding and extending their canvases around every back street corner. You’ll notice a new addition every morning, every time it hits evening, there’s a new expression being shared on the walls of this community. A new layer of New York’s life. Layers of writing, of names, pictures, paintings, sometimes intelligible, sometimes ambiguous, but always expressive of who New York City is on that day.

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New York, you’re perfect. Don’t, please don’t change a thing. - James Murphy

culture


F A S H I ON

F E AT U R E

[ trend. ]

|noun|

[general direction in which something is going/changing] [a current style or fashion]

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F A S H I ON

The image in the media has never been more powerful. Persuasive. Bewitching. Enthralling. Capturing the mood and feel of a unique moment in time and relaying this within media that can be viewed over and over again. With fashion moving at such a fast pace in the contemporary world, who is there to navigate us through the continuous journey through an ever-changing landscape? Who ultimately decides what is in and what is out of fashion - and quintessentially, what is a trend and how is is determined? ---------------------------------------------------When defining a fashion trend, we usually think of styles or items of clothing which are currently popular to consumers. You could say, something which is already near saturation point by the time it works its way down to the high street. A number of factors infulence trends, but which of these ultimately decide what is ‘of the moment’. M i l k _ _ _ _ i n v e s t i g a t e s . celebrities. designers.social and economic factors.the media.money.you [CELEBRITIES] It’s difficult to know a celebrities true style. Maybe go way back to when they first became famous, when they didn’t have a stylist there to decide what is worn at various public events and that’s when you’ll see what they would choose. However, with celebrity endorsements being at the top of the list for major brands, it’s true that many people get the majority of their trend influences from their favourite star. Celebrities in contemporary culture are brands in their own right, and they have the selling power. Although

27

they are generally on trend, celebrities don’t create the trends. They are a platform for designers and brands alike to showcase their latest work and further influence the public.

[DESIGNERS] When a collection is shown at fashion week, the designers are immediatly back to researching ideas for the next show in 6 months time. Designers are usually exposed to many of the same influences, which is why various themes will be noticeable throughout different col-


F A S H I ON

F E AT U R E

lections. The influences often come from present factors in culture. Every little thing that is going on around us. Visual, films, books, events are all absorbed and relayed by designers as trends. So, the trends are ultimately decided by designers? They are in a sense bound together by designers, the root of trends is already formed in society.

[SOCIAL.AND.ECONOMIC.FACTORS] Society illustrates current trends of the season to designers. Not necessarily just fashion, but economic fluctuations and shifts in music genres, art and film. Significant trends over the past few years have shown a return to glamour and luxe, coinciding with the background of political and economic gloom. This could be interpreted as escapism, the same way fantasy films have been popular – dressing as a character, hiding away from the harsh reality of the present. Compare this to the 90s, when everything was heading in a better direction, grunge was in its prime. Although the world and its movements influ-

ence the direction trends will head, it is left to another source to promote and focus in on specific trends and topics.

[MEDIA] With celebrities clearly being an influence for the growth of a trend, the media acts as a platform to showcase the styles they choose or are endorsed to wear, With the visual power of the typical glossy magazines having a significant effect on the development of trends, the Editor has the power to choose what is included and what isn’t covered. If a particular fashion is left out of focus, then it simply doesn’t reach the critical mass required. With the shift to online media content and print sales falling, there is still a need to keep designers happy in this industry. Why is that? Well....................

[MONEY] Magazines make the majority of their money through advertising. That advertising happens to come from some of the big

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names and faces in the world of fashion. Editor’s may be choosing certain looks for more than one reason, money from designers is often a factor which is at the source of certain editorial shoots for instance. High street fashion chains are constantly adding new lines to their store catalogue , meaning that you, the customer, is also being swept along with the fast pace of these changes, ie. spending more money and updating your wardrobe more and more frequently. Although this may come across as manipulation by these fashion giants, there is still a massive deciding factor involved in a trend taking off or not.

[YOU] Ultimately, it is up to the customer whether they buy into that trend or not. While it may seem that stores are luring you in and making it hard not to make that purchase, there are also many trends which are planned and tested and don’t end up developing, simply because the customer hasn’t bought in to it. Usually, in the present day,

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F A S H I ON

this is achieved before being passed down to the high street stores. With the increase in social media and the blogosphere, retailers and designers alike have the ability to test the water of certain trends to their audiences before the production fase, giving them a clearer idea of which ones to push forward. Trends will also develop from customers influencing each other, as you often find people with similar style are easily influenced by each other. So, to conclude, fashion trend ideas are brainstormed by fashion industry retailers, judged by you, the customer, pushed to the designers, debuted on the catwalks, endorsed by celebrities, covered by the media, intergrated into high street ranges and ultimately worn by you. A process which happens over and over every 6 months. All of the factors discussed work hand in hand to complete the trend cycle . Every one, even if they are unaware of it, is involved in this cycle , every one having an equal part in deciding its sucess or failure.


ARTS

I NT E R V I E W

see see see

you you you

in in in

the the the

rave. rave. rave.

The world’s fresh faces in DnB take us into their world.

FACT: Drum and Bass music came into existence in the early 90s, developing somewhat from its original ‘jungle music’ title, where people mixed reggae basslines with sped up hiphop breakbeats, along with various influences from techno. What is now a mega mix of influences and genres came from humble roots in the UK. A bit like Fred V & Grafix, two jungle lovers from Exeter.

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I NT E R V I E W

ARTS

image courtesy of hospitalityrecords.com

Fred V & Grafix.

“ BELGIUM ALMOST FEELS LIKE OUR SECOND HOME ” Anyone who is remotely tuned in to the DnB world will be well aware of Fred Vahrman and Josh Jackson aka. Fred V & Grafix, and their recent success after being signed and catapulted into the limelight by Hospital Records at the end of 2011. The Devonshire duo have been working together for over five years, but have shown bags of promise of late after a successful year in 2012. Not only have the boys been travelling the country with Hospital Records events programme, they have played sets at festivals such as DOUR in Belgium and even dipped their

feet into the world of event organization, setting up their own club night ‘Get Me’ in their hometown of Exeter. Add on to that an award for ‘Best Newcomer DJ’ at the Dnb Arena Awards in Decemeber 2012, and it’s safe to say Fred V & Grafix have a lot to be proud of already. All of this having barely left their teens is quite an accomplishment - balancing Uni life studying creative music tech at Bath Spa they have big things planned for 2013. Having already been credited with gems such as “One Of These Days”, “Long Distance” and “Room To Breathe” 31

Having already released music on Allsorts and Talkin Beatz, and received Radio One support from Zane Lowe and Annie Mac, Fred V & Grafix made their Hospital debut on the “Fifteen Years Of Hospital Records” album with “Find My Way”. As well as producers within their own right, Fred V & Grafix have also stunned us with their remixes of Emeli Sande – “Daddy” and Skepta – “Hold On” Having signed to Hospital late in 2011. MILK.___ caught up with the cheeky chappies to get to know the story behind their success...


ARTS

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HI Fred V & Grafix. Congratulations on winning Best Newcomer DJ at the DnB Arena Awards in December last year! Being some of the youngest DnB artists on the scene, what does it mean to you being recognised with the award?

spired your creativity the most growing up? When we both started going to university in Bath in 2009 I think we were both sure we wanted to make a career out of DJing/producing but we weren’t sure how realistic this was. It wasn’t really until we got signed to Hospital that we knew that we were fortunate enough to be able to make a living doing music after leaving uni. We were both really into Hospital when we were around 16 and listened to the podcasts religiously hoping to be featured on one of the Democasts!

We were thrilled just to have been nominated but to win was a real honour, especially considering the other nominees. DJing is one of the most fun things to do and we put a lot of thought into our sets so to get so much recognition for it is an amazing feeling! You played at Dour Festival last year, and were in Belgium for NYE as well, the atmosphere must have been crazy! What was the buzz like playing to a European crowd? And after such a successful year, what can we expect to see from Fred V & Grafix in 2013?

Have you ever produced any other genre of music or would you like to experiment with producing different genres? And who would you most love to collaborate with if you could outside of the drum and bass world? We’ve both got experience playing in live bands and making many different genres from hip-hop to electro house. Collaborations wise we’re both really into Bonobo’s ‘Black Sands’ album so it would be great to work with him.

Belgium almost feels like our second home and it’s great to see the scene over there doing so well. European crowds are always full of energy and we have some amazing European memories. Throughout 2013 we’re going to continue putting out new music and focussing So we know you’re probably super busy at as hard as we can on our debut album. Watch out the moment, what’s been your most hectic 24 for our first solo rehours as DJs so far lease on Hospital “ I think the best piece of in your career afin March as well! advice we can give anyone ter being signed to who’s making tunes is to Hospital records? It’s hard to believe enjoy the process itself In the summer we what you’ve both achieved at such a rather than trying really had one weekend young age, at what hard to make a good tune” in particular that stage did you both was extremely hecrealise you wanted to become an active part tic. It involved Nass Festival, Hospitality Bristol of drum n bass music? And who or what inand Urban Art Forms Festival. It’s not unusual images courtesy of hospitalityrecords.com 32


ARTS

I NT E R V I E W

weird OCD customs which have to happen before taking to the stage to perform a set?

for DJ’s to have three gigs in a weekend but the hard part about this weekend was that we had to play 4 till 5 in Bristol and then check into Heathrow airport at 9am. Needless to say we didn’t get a lot of sleep! We’re not complaining at all though, all three of those gigs were very very fun.

We don’t really have a ritual but we usually brief whoever is MCing for us the general mission (which is simply ‘smash the rave’). So you no doubt spend most of your time together travelling around with Hospital - what’s the best thing about being a part of a duo in this industry and being on the road together?

You’ve got some pretty inspiring role models in the drum n bass world to look up to at Hospital Records – do you ever turn to the other guys in the business and what’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given?

We both have experience DJing alone in other countries and the hardest thing about that is having to travel alone for very long periods of time. This really makes you appreciate having someone else’s company on the road. We also find that it makes our DJ sets more fun because the amount of pressure is divided by two. That way it’s easier to enjoy the feeling of being on stage and not feel too intimitated by all the people looking at you while you’re deep in concentration

Of course! One of the best things about being on Hospital is being able to get the opinions of some of the artists which have made some of our favourite pieces of music. It’s hard to think what the best advice we’ve been given is. I do remember reading an interview with ShockOne where he revealed that he spent 8 to 10 hours a day minimum making tunes, this motivated us quite a lot. I think the best piece of advice we can give anyone whos making tunes is to enjoy the process itself rather than trying really hard to make a good tune - that way you’ll end up spending a lot longer making tunes which will (hopefully) lead to making good tunes.

Finally, we know you’ve played at numerous festivals like Beachbreak, Dour and Lovebox in 2012. Will you be attending any as festival-goers yourselves in 2013? One that we’re really looking forward to that we haven’t attended yet is Bestival. We’ve always been told amazing things about it so it should be quite the adventure! There’s a chance we’ll both be attending Beautiful Days as well since its walking distance from Josh’s house. See you in the rave!

Okay so, explain the usual Fred V & Grafix ritual when getting ready for a set? Any

Check out hospitalrecords.com for the latest news and releases from the boys - and their latest EP, including latest tune ‘Purple Gates’ is already set to take the DnB world by storm this year. Thanks Guys! 33


F E AT U R E

ARTS

patternity.

“Because a shared awareness of pattern can positively shape our world” “Because “Because aa shared shared awareness awareness of of pattern pattern can can positively positively shape shape our our world” world”

W

hen we sit back and

moving objects. Enter the

engage. To aid the under-

think what a pattern

world of Patternity. The cre-

standing that pattern shapes

means to us, we usually as-

ative organisation specialis-

our day to day life and is a

sociate it with a material, a

ing in the expoloration, ap-

constant in society. April

fabric, made up of a print

plication and awareness of

2013 saw the first of a series

pattern, or a physical pat-

pattern, which works with

of annual festivals presented

tern in life. Something with

the ethos that pattern is all

by the organisation, entirely

follows a certain direction,

around us. It’s an inspir-

about patterns. Encompass-

framework or format. We

ing concept. Combining the

ing every attribute of this

don’t always sit back and

desires of founders, Anna

entwined world of design.

engage with patterns. We’re

Murray and Grace Winter-

Delving into the world of

oblivious to a lot of them.

ingham, to educate and push

patterns and their ability to

Patterns formed by shad-

the understanding of pattern

connect

ows, by discarded life, by

and its power to inspire and

and ultimately, the world.

34

nations,

cultures


F E AT U R E

arts

This initial event sheds light

terns shape our lives and are

complex visual, the pattern.

on the superstripe. How the

often overlooked in our cul-

Since its creation in 2009,

stripe is created in everyday

ture. The visual is the most

Patternity has held a strong

life. Shadows, illusions, food,

powerful medium in today’s

online presence,

drink, barcodes, artwork and

society, and being plummeted

makes the leap from inspira-

the meanings behind these

into the creative world of Pat-

tional online hub into the real

unsuspecting lines. Making

ternity will further the educa-

world every year with this

the public aware of how pat-

tion and breakdown of this

celebration of pattern power.

www.patternity.co.uk 35

and now


F A S H I ON

F E AT U R E

a little bit bananas.

I

tinned bananas. tinned bananas. f you’re planning on jet-

ly beaming like the sunshine

the bold patterns, colours and

ting off to a festival this

as you scroll through the site.

use of chosen material, lycra.

year,

tropi-

A

little bit bananas. This

from dresses, tees and bikinis,

cal, or just want to pretend

is

TINNED

BANANAS.

there’s a type of banana to suit

it’s Summer in Britain, then

The new dancewear meets

everyone for the summer season.

Milk have found your new

streetwear UKlabel from broth-

MILK. spoke to Rosie about the

best friend to take with. A

er and sister Rosie and James

exciting new brand and SS13

crazy collection of goodies

Spencer. The idea is all about

collection which will have eve-

which will have you absolute-

expressing personality through

ryone

anywhere

36

talking

this

summer.


F E AT U R E

F A S H I ON

Congratulations on the launch! How did the concept come about and how long did it take to come to fruition? We actually only started work on Tinned Bananas about seven months ago now. My backgrounds Textile Design and Design Management and James has just finished a business degree. I studied at The University of Manchester and got a job as a printer designer the same summer I graduated. I worked hard for three years and got a bit restless (unlike James). So I started looking at other jobs and I actually got down to the final stages for a job in Hong Kong so everything could have been very different!! I ended up sending some fashion illustrations off to Manchester Fashion week for their promotional campaign, and it was there that one of the guys asked me where I wanted to be in three years time (it got the ball rolling). The name Tinned Bananas actually came from a drunken dinner party that no one can actually remember, it was a good night though. We love the bold personality of the designs at Tinned Bananas. Describe the perfect TB customer and what celebrities would you love to see wearing TB this summer? The perfect TB customer is people who are tooty but yet a little bit fruity. Our signature style is bright colourful and bold. Our clothes are made from stretch fabric with real personality. Ideal for fashion-forward, fun lov-

TOP - ÂŁ35 bottoms - ÂŁ35 37

PHOTOGRAPHY: Nina Robinson STYLING: Louisa Marsden MODEL: Mhairi West


F A S H I ON

ing creatures and

F E AT U R E

that

like to be

get

out,

be

TOP - £35 bottoms - £35

seen heard..

We’re sure we’ll be seeing a lot of Tinned Bananas out and about as the festival season starts this summer, if you could choose one summer tune to sum up TB, what would it be and why? Tracy in spiritual

my Room, awesome track, house music. Strengthy.

What would you pick as your favourite pieces from the SS13 collection to take away this summer and where would be your ultimate TB hotspot to wear them? I love the high-waist bikinis, perfect for Ibiza. I’m hoping to get out there the first week of June, so I’d say theTangerineTrees bikini for the Flower Power opening at Pacha. Peace Out!! ​ As people Bananas, to see the we expect personality

start going nuts for Tinned where would you like brand in a years time? Can more crazy prints and filling up our wardrobes?

Definitely. There’s a lot more to come, I’m currently designing our Autumn/Winter 2013 collection, which we’re very excited about. I want to have as much fun as I can with the collections, to produce high energy, standout pieces, that will do more than get you noticed. And finally, any last words for those fruity fiends wanting to get their hands on these totally bananas creations? Set true

yourself free personality.

and Don’t

express worry,

your be

happy!! Embrace your weirdness!! Make shit happen!! 38

www.tinnedbananas.co.uk


F E AT U R E

F A S H I ON

MESH DRESS - £35 CARIBBEAN QUEEN DRESS - £50


F A S H I ON

C O M M E NT

MIRROR

O

Louisa Marsden

revolve

is realistic. A nation obsessed

fast food consumption at a re-

numbers.

with image, weight and the

cord high, there won't be much

They're dictated by

ideal. An ideal which is being

to stop you gorging a few dou-

numbers. We all go by num-

twisted and skewed every now

ble cheeseburgers when you’ll

bers. If you're a certain number

and again to keep us spending.

still be fitting into that size

you fit into a certain category in

Working with the idea that we,

eight next week. There's also

life. You fit into a size. A cloth-

as consumers, will spend more,

the issue of how influential ce-

ing size which defines how you

buy more and feel better about

lebrity culture is. If we’re be-

analyse your own body. As so-

ourselves fitting in to a small-

ing ing led to believe our role

ciety has developed, sizing has

er size. Maybe re-evaluate the

models are able to achieve this

too. The rise in popularity of

size zero phenomenon. Why

weight and size, then we must

online outlets ebay, etsy and

is it now this size has come to

follow suit. The supposed

asos marketplace has seen vin-

light. Size zero, equivalent to

ideal. By stores introducing

tage fashion thrust back in to

a UK four, hasn't just appeared

this sizing, it is seen to be re-

our lives from decades, some-

because a cult of celebrities de-

alistic. A size zero would've

times generations ago. Shining

cided to push the human bound-

been a higher equivalent a few

light on the shift in our bodies

aries of eating, although that is

years ago. It goes back to the

and manufacturers motive to

sometimes the case. This media

desired look of Marylin Mon-

deliver inconsistency in con-

spectacle has simply formed

roe. Her size sixteen figure of

temporary fashion. Vanity siz-

from sizing morphing down

the time would sit comfort-

ing is something we're accus-

and us being made to believe

ably as an eight in the modern

tomed to dealing with. We hop

we’re that respected size. Some

world. The proof of the way

from shop to shop, and size to

could argue it's not necessar-

we're being meticulously led

size everytime we do so. A size

ily a bad thing being led to be-

to spend and to conform to a

eight now, was a size twelve

lieve we’re a smaller size than

size, which, unlike stepping

not that long ago. We're led

is true. But as a nation which is

on a weighing scales, we have

to believe we're smaller than

seeing obesity on the rise and

absolutely no control over.

ur

lives

around

40


F E AT U R E

CULTURE

bubble.pop.electric.

R

emember in school when your lunchbox wouldn’t be seen dead without BN BN’s? So much so, the accompanying jingle could’ve easily made it to number 1 within the primary school market in 1999. Now it’s all about frozen yoghurt. Froyo froyo froyo. It’s 10 degrees outside and we’re still gorging froyo. But it’s fine, right? It’s yoghurt, it’s healthy, it’s the thing to have blady-blah. But, it’s pretty much hit saturation point. The same variations of units and branding which started in London, have probably reached the Scottish Highlands by now. So what can we expect for 2013 and

beyond? The craze which will be entering our lives and be quenching our thirsts at festivals, in the British sunshine and even through to winter? Hello, hello, bubble tea. This milk or fruit based tea has just started to make its mark on the UK market after being invented in Taiwan in the 80s. It’s made with these funny little chewy tapioca pearls, also known as bubbles, which are shaken up with the milk or fruit tea, creating a bubbly mix. Having a little chew and drink in one seems to be the novelty here. Served with a fat straw and over ice, the bubble tea already has a little advantage over froyo with its 41

hot option, which won’t leave you a chilly billy in the winter. With the nation being obsessed with the latest health fix, this new phenomenon offers a base of green, black/ red or white tea. All of which are extremely rich in antioxidants. The national drink has long been popular in Chinatowns of the world since its invention 30 years ago, but the transition to western culture is just about to pop. MILK___. travelled to Bristol, in the West of England, to visit the UK’s first ever bubble tea cafe, built within an old shipping container, which opened mid March 2013 in Bristol’s City Centre.


CULTURE

H

F E AT U R E

ere we have CUPP, the

have transformed a once unused

bubble bar concept from 28

shipping container into the ‘CUPP

year old Lee Peacock and Amy

BOX’, complete with tea crates

Miles. While spending three

as stools, and an industrial design

years in Taiwan teaching English,

feel. “We thought by replicating

the couple drank the national

the tea crates as seats and using

drink everyday and when plan-

raw materials like wood and mesh

ning a return to the UK, wanted

metal containers, the CUPP BOX

to recreate the drink they had

would have a more authentic feel,

fallen in love with while living in

and using a shipping container has

Asia. The CUPP creators learned

kept a link to the shipping history

the true origins and authentic

in Bristol!”. Choose from Lemon,

techniques of bubble tea, train-

Blueberry, Lime, Strawberry, Co-

ing in a small independent tea

conut, Taro, Lychee...the list goes

shop in Kaohsiung to perfect the

on. The addition of bubble coffee

trade. “It’s such a popular drink

to the menu reaches out to an even

out there, and although we’re

wider audience. Bubbleology fol-

the first independant bubble bar

lows the same principal. Based in

in the UK, we’ve already seen

London, this chain is rapidly ex-

a few more popping up after we

panding. They encourage you to

opened!” Co-creator, Amy, took

be your own mixologist, trying

MILK__ through the story of

out new flavours and combina-

their idea and how it became re-

tions. That’s what this experience

ality. “We started off in 2012, do-

is all about. ‘The drink you can

ing the festival circuit in our Cit-

chew’ is bringing a completely

roen HY van, and after getting a

new sensation to the UK market,

good reaction, we felt like a more

a refereshing new lease of life

permenant base!” The two-some

into our ever evolving culture.

w w w. c u p p t e a b a r. c o . u k 42


ducks.

A

nostalgic trip is always awaiting me in the boxes under my bed. I feel the need sometimes to tear through the hoards of paper and debris which they contain just to put my hands on the treasured photograph album I’ve compiled while growing up. I make this sound very grand, when in actual fact, the album is simply a scrapbook. A scrapbook filled with photos and their negatives, gathered since I was reluctantly handed a Kodak on my 5th birthday. I’m glad my parents did that, let me record my own history, in the way I wanted to, from 3ft high. Even if it meant everyone losing their heads in the shot. Looking through the book, I always notice the recurrence of a place I visited in my childhood. A place which wouldn’t let a bad photo be taken. So it suited me perfectly. That place is Hyde Park. It has that power to transport you away from the concrete jungle and cosmopolitan life surrounding. The way the black perimeter railings guard you from the outside urban area is always something which has intrigued me. Really, it’s the sort of locality where I’d struggle to feel completely contented without the company of my parents. Merely because every footstep taken around the lake and onwards to the children’s playground provokes recollections somewhere in the past. Memories which stretch from the array of bronzed leaf trees in the autumn chill, to the many pallid, plastic pedalos drifting over the ripples on the lake in the summer.

Editorial

Maybe, also a reminder there is still chance to be separated from the material age we live in. Boxing Day does bring some competition to the park. You’ll find the area patronised by many glossy bicycles, velvety, yapping puppies and pristine winter gear, all courtesy of the day before. Being a regular visitor to the park, I was prepared for this day, and often made a point of wearing everything gathered from my present box. It came to my attention this was something of a mistake, as wearing a new wardrobe and new roller-skates at the same time didn’t really bode well. I guess the novelty has worn off now for flaunting round the lake. The excitement for everyone to see my new bike or roller-skates or pogo stick was almost as thrilling as opening it on Christmas day. Now, with micro scooters gone, it’s a continuous stint of the gleaming blue, electric buggy speeding by, with the little tyke behind the wheel chasing the squawking geese in front, his sister with the pink version, stopping to feed the ducks with what looks like the leftovers of the turkey crown. Apart from Christmas, the park is settled. I always wondered where it finished, if there was any boundary to the green foliage and grassy expanses beyond the playground. I did know the hustle and bustle of city life was just around the corner, but inside, I liked to think the park was away from what I was used to. 43

CULTURE

It’s surprising the contrast in the atmosphere from after Christmas to the summer months. I’ve always cherished one photo of the park, the frozen lake in February. I do remember from looking at this photo how shutdown the park felt, the wildlife had completely vanished, and the usual squeals of excitement from the playground weren’t to be heard. A time where the park felt slightly daunting, but fascinating at the same time; the only day I can ever remember the ice cream vans being locked up and no pigeons fluttering over head or encircling my minature feet. The park holds a variety of pleasant and not so pleasant memories. The feeling of losing some of your prize possessions was always the worst and climbing on the numerous picnic benches to escape the flock of geese. Maybe not quite as bad as a failed photograph which ended with me being submerged in the murky water. I only wish my camera had survived the plunge to pick up my mother’s reaction to this. However, there are always traits Hyde Park holds which will keep me going back; the stilness of the water in contrast to the howling noises from the city behind the serpentine lake, the slide ferrying you to the playground and the vivid orchard gardens beyond this. It really is a beautiful getaway from the centre. One which I will always remember as holding many recollections in my childhood, and visits in my adulthood.


milk

more from milk. more from milk. All content and images Š Louisa Marsden 2013 unless otherwise stated.

MILK___Magazine  

f a s h i o n . a r t s . c u l t u r e

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