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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OCTOBER 19, 2012

FeatureStory

This map from the 733rd Civil Engineer Division identifies the projected traffic pattern along Fort Eustis Boulevard (Route 105, running horizontally) during phase one of the City of Newport News' upcoming bridge replacement project, scheduled to begin in the coming weeks. The inset diagrams detail traffic tapers, buffers and work zones on- and adjacent-to the bridge. During phase one, northbound traffic, which takes motorists toward Fort Eustis, will travel along the southbound span of the bridge in a two-way traffic pattern. This traffic pattern is scheduled to last approximately six months.

This map identifies the projected traffic pattern along Fort Eustis Boulevard (Route 105, running horizontally) during phase two of the City of Newport News' upcoming bridge replacement project, which will begin upon completion of phase one of the project. The inset diagrams detail traffic tapers, buffers and work zones on- and adjacent-to the bridge. During phase two, southbound traffic, which takes motorists from Fort Eustis toward Jefferson Avenue and Interstate 64, will travel along the newly-constructed northbound span of the bridge in a two-way traffic pattern.This traffic pattern will last approximately six months.

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Beginning later this year, the City of Newport News will begin a major construction project on Fort Eustis Boulevard, which will impact traffic entering and exiting Fort Eustis for approximately one year. The project involves the replacement of two bridges that cross the CSX Transportation rail lines directly southwest of the Interstate 64 off-ramps onto Fort Eustis Boulevard. The northbound lane bridge, which carries traffic from Jefferson Avenue to Fort Eustis, will be demolished and replaced first. The first phase of construction is scheduled to last until May 2013. Upon completion of the northbound bridge, the city will begin replacement of the southbound bridge, which is slated for completion in mid-November 2013. During construction, traffic will merge into one lane to cross the open bridge in a two-way traffic pattern. City crews will provide appropriate signage, flaggers and other communicative marking to manage the flow of traffic along the impacted stretch of roadway.

As phase one is underway, the rerouting taper for traffic traveling westbound on Fort Eustis Boulevard will begin just east of Jefferson Avenue. The taper for eastbound traffic leaving Fort Eustis will begin at the eastern end of the reservoir bridge. When phase two begins, all traffic will cross the newly-constructed northbound span. The traffic taper for westbound traffic will begin just west of I-64. The eastbound traffic taper will begin at the western end of the reservoir bridge. Fort Eustis experiences peak traffic flow weekdays between 7:30 and 8:30 a.m., marshaling in an average of 16,000 vehicles during the morning rush hour, according to the 733rd Security Forces Squadron’s Mike Hagans. The post admits about 24,000 vehicles each weekday. To help mitigate traffic flow issues, Fort Eustis senior leadership is considering a series of measures to decrease peak hour traffic volume. These initiatives include, but are not limited to, “telework,” the practice of working from home or another off-site location; flextime scheduling, in which workers can customize their schedules by coming in early,

working later, or vice-versa, and staggered reporting times. Soldiers and civilian employees should refer to their unit leadership for appropriate scheduling. The installation has made several improvements in the past six months to improve traffic flowing on and off post. For example, morning “Reveille” was moved to 5:30 a.m., eliminating traffic stoppage during the music. An improved force protection barrier plan, which dictates how security forces control access to the post, is in development. Commercial deliveries are prohibited on the installation prior to 8 a.m., streamlining gate access for commuters. Additionally, day contractors can only enter the post via Dozier Road, which alleviates some of the vehicle load at the main gates. During peak hours, additional gate security will help process inbound traffic control at the gates to speed up entry on to post. Traditional concrete “Jersey barriers” will be removed in favor of passive bollards, giving security personnel the flexibility to quickly adapt entry lanes to ensure maximum efficiency and driver safety. Leadership from the 733rd Mission Sup-

port Group coordinated with Newport News city managers to synchronize and increase turn signal times, which will allow more vehicles to enter Gate 2. Also, the city built an additional turning lane to streamline outbound traffic at Gate 2. Keith Morrow, the 733rd MSG deputy commander, said that while the construction project will definitely impact traffic in and out of the installation, the best way to avoid delays is to plan ahead. Plotting new routes to and from the post, carpooling, and allotting extra time for travel are among his recommendations to alleviate logjam at the gates. “We’re doing everything we can to mitigate a negative traffic impact on the installation, but people living and working on Fort Eustis can help by doing a little back planning,” he said. “For the first few days, we expect people to allow a little extra time for their commute to see what the situation will be like. Eventually, we’ll fall into a routine where we know what to expect, and how to get where we’re going on time.” Additional information will be released as it becomes available.

Peninsula Warrior Oct. 19, 2012 Army Edition  

Fort Eustis edition of the Oct. 19, 2012 issue of Peninsula Warrior

Peninsula Warrior Oct. 19, 2012 Army Edition  

Fort Eustis edition of the Oct. 19, 2012 issue of Peninsula Warrior