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J O I N T

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L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

AIR FORCE EDITION | 04.26.2019 | Vol. 09 | No. 16

A PAW-RTNER RETIRES: THANKYOU FOR YOUR SERVICE PG 8

Ft. Eustis celebrates U.S. Army Reserve’s 111th birthday PG 2

JBLE ceremony recognizes volunteers PG 4

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e r e s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s • w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m


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www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS EDITORIAL STAFF Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. Sean Tyler Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Capt. Sara Harper • Sara.Harper@us.af.mil Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Aliza Reisberg • aliza.reisberg@us.af.mil Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw.paedit@us.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. For more information call 878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The Peninsula Warrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base Langley-Eustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

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Ft. Eustis celebrates U.S. Army Reserve's 111th birthday JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

Fort Eustis celebrated the U.S. Army Reserve’s 111th birthday with an address from Maj. Gen. Paul M. Benenati, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Deputy Chief of Staff. The event also included a cake-cutting ceremony and static displays celebrating the U.S. Army Reserve’s history and current readiness.

U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Chandler Baker

Maj. Gen. Paul M. Benenati, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Deputy Chief of Staff, and Private Cameron Darden, a student with Echo Company, 266th Quartermaster Battalion, cut the celebratory cake together at the U.S. Army Reserve’s 111th birthday celebration at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. Darden, 18, was the youngest Soldier present at the event.

U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Chandler Baker

Spec. Mallory Trower, 18th Field Hospital combat medic specialist, explains the training patient simulator to Lt. Col. Richard Hobart, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, during the U.S. Army Reserve’s 111th birthday celebration at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. The training patient simulator can move by remote control and even bleed.

U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Chandler Baker

Maj. Gen. Paul M. Benenati, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Deputy Chief of Staff, addresses the crowd during the U.S. Army Reserve’s 111th birthday celebration at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019.

We want to hear from you. Contact us at 633abw.paedit@us.af.mil, or call 878-4920 or 764-5701.


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

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AFRC gets makeover, improves mission support By Airman 1st Class Alexandra Singer 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT VA.

BASE

LANGLEY-EUSTIS,

The newly renovated Airman and Family Readiness Center reopened its doors at Joint Base LangleyEustis, Virginia, April 19, 2019. The center was under renovations for about nine months beginning July 2018. The renovations included expanding the space with the addition of 13 new offices, relocating the front desk, updating the AFRC classroom and updating the overall look with new carpet, paint and LED lights. During the renovations,

the AFRC was temporarily moved to the Community Commons on Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. “We have one of the largest AFRC staffs in the Air Force but did not have the facility to match,” said U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Craig Havelis, Airman and Family Readiness Flight superintendent. “The purpose of the renovation project was to give the AFRC team enough operating space to meet daily mission requirements and customer demands.” According to Havelis, the new center will make it

easier for service members to access their services because they are all in one place now. “My hope is that all members of Team Langley will visit our center and get familiar with the entire staff and the awesome programs we offer daily,” Dawn Teagle, Military and Family Readiness flight chief said. “Without a doubt, there are great things happening at the Langley Airman and Family Readiness Center.” The AFRC is located at Building 15 and open Monday through Friday from 7:30 am to 4:30 pm. For more information on services provided at the AFRC, call 757-764-3990.

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandra Singer

U.S. Army Col. Edward Vedder, 633rd Air Base Wing vice commander and U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Laura King, 633rd ABW Force Support Squadron commander, cut the ribbon at the Airman and Family Readiness Center reopening at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 19, 2019.

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www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

JBLE ceremony recognizes volunteers By Senior Airman Delaney Gonzales 633D AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

Service members, families, civilians, retirees and youths were recognized for their commitment to service in a Volunteer Recognition and Award Ceremony April 12 at JBLE-Eustis and April 19 at JBLE-Langley. Volunteerism is a tool for Airmen and Soldiers to bridge the gap between the local community and the installation it supports. “It’s an honor to celebrate our incredible volunteers,” said Shannon George, Fort Eustis Volunteer Recognition and Award Ceremony guest speaker. “Time is a precious gift, it is the best gift you can give.” Volunteers identify a problem, evaluate the circumstance at hand and work toward a solution, said Xavi Slocum, Langley Volunteer Recognition and Award Ceremony guest speaker. When an individual decides to help those in need, they are choosing to give up their time to benefit the community. Volunteerism is key for the betterment of installations and their surrounding communities. “All you have to do is be available, willing and have a heart to serve,” George noted. “Little things make a difference because they build on each other.” The combined total volunteer hours performed by members of JBLE equated to approximately $2,917,482.50. “I look into the crowd and see the large amount of volunteers here and the money saved is amazing,” George said with a smile. Ceremonies such as these are used to showcase the impact volunteering contributes to the mission. “You don’t have to be superhero to make a difference, you don’t have to have accolades to make a difference, you don’t have to be perfect to serve

people,” George concluded. “You have to be yourself and have a heart and a passion to serve.” Below is a list of the award winners. Award winners for JBLE-Langley: Commander’s Gold Award for

Community Service: Air Combat Command, Inspector General, Logistics Readiness Section Youth Volunteer of the Year: Madison Bennett Family Member Volunteer of the Year: Taryn Huse Single Airman Volunteer of the Year: Airman 1st Class Shayekh Rana Service Member Volunteer of the Year: Staff Sgt. Patrick Sims Civilian Volunteer of the Year: Terence Spann Retiree Volunteer of the Year: Rodney Venables Volunteer Family of the Year: The Rehak Family Volunteer Excellence Award: Donna Craft, Christopher Watkins, Lynne Mills Award winners for JBLE-Eustis:

Commander’s Gold Award for Community Service: Noncommissioned Officer’s Academy (NCOA) Youth Volunteer of the Year: Brooke Mastel Family Member Volunteer of the Year: Mary Ward Single Soldier Volunteer of the Year: Spc. Tommy Ngo Service Member Volunteer of the Year: Sgt. 1st Class Roberto Flores Civilian Volunteer of the Year: Daniel Mendez Retiree Volunteer of the Year: Chief Master Sgt. (Ret) Gary Robie Volunteer Family of the Year: The Burney Family Baylon Community Link Volunteer of the Year: Capt. Kiara Reed David E. Minor Volunteer of the Year: Danielle Wyatt

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Delaney Gonzales

, U.S. Army Command Sgt. Major Edward W. Mitchell, U.S. Army Center for Initial military training CSM, congratulates an award recipient during a Volunteer Recognition and Award Ceremony at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., April 12, 2019. . The ceremony recognized winners and nominees for their volunteer contributions to the Army and Air Force on and off-post communities


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

5

PRESENTED BY

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

Xavi Slocum address the audience during a Volunteer Recognition Ceremony at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., April 19, 2019. The ceremony recognized winners and nominees for their volunteer contributions to the Army and Air Force on and off-post communities.

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Shannon George, Fort Eustis Volunteer Recognition and Award Ceremony guest speaker engages the audience during a Volunteer Recognition and Award Ceremony at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., April 12, 2019. The ceremony recognized winners and nominees for their volunteer contributions to the Army and Air Force on and offpost communities.

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www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

TRADOC CG emphasizes the importance of Mission Command By Mike Voss

U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS FORT EUSTIS, VA.

Gen. Stephen J. Townsend, commanding general, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, has set a near-term priority to emphasizing the importance of Mission Command from AIT to the battlefield. Mission Command is the Army’s approach to command and control. It focuses on empowering subordinate decision-making, decentralized execution and using mission orders to enable disciplined initiative in accomplishment of the commander’s intent. In a recent Army University Press article, titled “Reinvigorating the Army’s Approach to Mission Command,” Townsend and Maj. Gen. Douglas Crissman, the commander of the Army’s Mission Command Center of Excellence, echoed the Chief of Staff of the Army in saying the time is right to ensure Mission Command is clearly defined in Army doctrine and is applied in every aspect of Soldier training. “We preach Mission Command, but we don’t necessarily practice it on a day-to-day basis in everything we do…If we’re going to have to operate like that in warfare, we have to train as we’re going to fight,” said Chief of Staff of the Army, Gen. Mark A. Milley. “We have to live and operate like that on a day-to-day basis, even on administrative tasks you have to do in a unit area.” Although the Army’s approach to Mission Command builds off of a deep foundation that traces back to the crossing of the Delaware in 1776, the term mission command first appeared in Army doctrine in the early 2000s. At the time, Army Doctrine Publication 6-0 approached Mission

Command from a strategic standpoint that Soldiers are needed to make split second decisions nested in the commander’s intent. However, according to Army senior leaders, over the years mandatory training has robbed subordinate leaders of the opportunity to lead and promote trust and confidence. “The bad news is many in our Army find the idea of Mission Command confusing or insincere,” Townsend said. “For some, there is a

significant difference between what Mission Command should be versus what actually happens.” To address this say-do gap, the Army is updating ADP 6-0. The new doctrine, titled “Mission Command: Command and Control of Army Forces,” clarifies both the logic and the language the Army uses. Additionally, the updated ADP 6-0 defines Mission Command based on seven principles: competence, trust, shared understanding, mission orders, commander’s intent, disciplined initiative, and risk acceptance. “We are currently engaged in a much-needed professional dialogue to get it right. Our orders must be clear and simple enough to be executed without continuous communication or leader interaction,” Townsend said. “Our success as an Army depends upon our ability to build leaders at all levels, who recognize when their plan is failing or when the enemy has presented an opportunity. They must be

smart enough to come up with a plan that will work and have the guts and trust to execute.” Townsend, and other senior leaders, recognize changing Army culture will take time, training and deliberate efforts by commanders to build trust and confidence in subordinate leaders, but they are committed to reinvigorating the culture of mission command. “This approach is the only way to lead a winning Army,” Townsend said. Parts of this story were taken from the Army University Press article, “Reinvigorating the Army’s Approach to Mission Command.” This is part one of a three part series to be released in the Military Review this summer. Read the full article at https://www.armyupress.army.mil/ journals/military-review/ online-exclusive/2019-ole/march/ reinvigorating-mc/

Photo 12 / Alamy Stock Photo

U.S. tanks cross the Ludendorff Bridge 7 March 1945 at Remagen, Germany. The bridge was prepared for demolition but was still intact when the 27th Armored Infantry Battalion arrived at its location. Recognizing the importance of the bridge, battalion leaders acted on their own initiative to change their mission and seize it ten minutes before it was scheduled to be blown up by retreating German forces, ultimately enabling six divisions to cross the bridge and continue the attack before it collapsed on 17 March.


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

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Take the stress out of your PCS By 733d Logistics Readiness Squadron Personal Property Processing Office 733D LOGISTICS READINESS SQUADRON JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

Peak moving season runs May through August each year with the peak of the peak between Memorial Day and July 4. Surface Deployment and Distribution Command officials want service members, federal employees and their families to know a smooth move for household goods is possible. Transitioning to a new permanent change of station can be an exciting yet hectic experience for service members and their families, particularly during the summer peak-moving season. The primary goal of the

733d Logistics Readiness Squadron Personal Property Processing office is to provide personnel with necessary information to help ensure they are adequately prepared for all phases of their PCS move, such as pre-move, packing, shipment pick-up and delivery at the final destination. According to the personnel at the 733d LRS, playing an active role in planning the movement of a member’s personal effects is absolutely essential. They have assembled a list of ideas and suggestions to help ensure sure service members and their families

have a smooth and successful moving experience. · When possible, try to schedule move dates on a Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday. Avoid Monday and Friday. · Avoid the last week of any month as tensions, delays and cancellations increase due to the sheer volume of moves. · Provide 733d LRS counselors legible orders and documents. · Start working on securing move dates immediately after PCS orders are in hand. Any delay will limit the Joint Personal Property Shipping Office’s ability to accommodate service members’ preferred dates. JPPSO requires 21 days in advance for booking shipments.

· Be aware that due to overall carrier capacity issues we may need to utilize origin storage in order to get your property picked up. If so, this could delay or add time to your delivery at destination. · If pressed for time, seek alternate modes or sources of transportation such as a Personally Procured Move, formerly known as a Do-ItYourself Move, as an option. · Avoid making major decisions or commitments until move dates are confirmed with the Transportation Service Provider or carrier. The JPPSO-Northeast will utilize all resources available in an effort to accommodate service members

during a PCS move, but service members’ flexibility and involvement is critical throughout the stressful moving process. For further information or questions, contact the Langley Personal Property Office at (757)764-7868/7869 or JPPSO Northeast’s Customer Service Department at 781-377-3700 or 845-3700. You may also review the information in the 733d Logistics Readiness Squadron brochure.

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www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

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A PAW-RTNER RETIRES: THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE By Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

“My eyes have seen many things in the darkness of the night, some of which you never saw as you held my leash so tight. I protected you and as a team we feared none. My ears have heard the sound of many things that made you freeze at night, you trusted me and used my pointed ears as battle sights. I protected you and as a team we feared none. Over the years, many have held my leash, several who held it loose and a few who held it tight. No matter how you choose to keep me, I protected you and as a team we feared none. I’ve heard the highest praise and the heaviest correction. Regardless of the tone of your voice or the weight of your correction, I protected you and as a team we feared none. When evil crossed our path I never backed down, I will fight to the end, my loyalty to you is unconditional. I protected you and as a team we feared none. Many years have passed and my muzzle is now full of gray. When it’s time to face my final battle let me keep my pride. Know that I loved no other place than by your side.

When it’s all said and done remember the battles that we’ve won. Never forget that I protected you and as a team we feared none.” As U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Carmen Pontello, 633rd Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, read the poem, he fought to keep his emotions in check. Military Working Dog Max, 633rd SFS explosives detector, retired from active duty at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. “Max is truly a special dog,” Pontello said. “I remember when I first met Max; to be honest, I was a little intimidated. He’d always present himself like he was in charge and wouldn’t let anyone back him down. ” Max provided unwavering dedication and distinguished service to the U.S. Air Force for 12 years, risking his life to save others without thinking about the potential outcome of an ultimate sacrifice. He could be inches away from harm and show no fear. Max, a Belgian Malanois, started his career at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas in 2009. Upon graduating from the Department of Defense dog training school, he was assigned

to the 633rd SFS at Langley Air Force Base. He has been a valued team member to 11 dog handlers as an explosives detector and patrol dog. He worked at JBLE defending the installation, its people and resources. “Max, in my biased opinion, is the perfect working dog,” said Staff Sgt. Adrien Dupius, 633rd SFS. “My time holding his leash and letting him do what he did best was the best time I had in my Air Force career.” During his tenure, Max deployed to Kahtar, Iraq, Afghanistan twice, Kuwait twice and to the United Arab Emirates. He also traveled to numerous places in the U.S. in support of the Office of the President of the United States, fortifying the protection of the commander in chief. Max conducted over 3,000 random anti-terrorism measures, searched 13,428 items and provided 3,200 hours of counter-explosive and patrol support in war fighting missions, protecting billions in DoD assets and 50,000 military and civilian personnel. His keen ability to detect buried threats helped save countless lives. “Max is a sweetheart,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Carmen Pontello, 633rd

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Carmen Pontello, 633rd Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler gazes at Military Working Dog Max, 633rd SFS explosives detector, during Max’s retirement at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. Max conducted over 3,000 random anti-terrorism measures, searched 13,428 items and provided 3,200 hours of counter-explosive and patrol support in war fighting missions, protecting billions in DoD assets and 50,000 military and civilian personnel.

The official party walks in for a retirement ceremony in honor of U.S. Air Force Military Working Dog Max, 633rd Security Forces Squadron explosives detector at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019.

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

(Center) U.S. Air Force Military Working Dog Max, 633rd Security Forces Squadron explosives detector, takes a last group photo with his brothers at arms at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019.

Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler. “Obviously I can say that now, but when I first met Max, he gave that vibe like ‘hey man, if you mess with me, we’re gonna go at it.’ So I was always kind of sketched out about Max at first.” Before Pontello had the chance to be assigned to Max, they had already been selected to deploy as partners. News that was met by an anxious ‘Oh boy, here we go,’ from Pontello. The first time Pontello took Max on a walk and gave him the command to heel, Max stood about three feet away and just barked at him. According to Pontello, soon after they just

clicked. He remembers being told ‘hey man, you got a Cadillac, you just have to figure out how to drive.’ “That spoke a lot to me,” said Pontello. “For him to say this dog is one of the best dogs we have, he’s built the way he should be built, he runs the way he should run. So as long as you can figure out how to drive that Cadillac, you guys will be unstoppable.” That became more and more evident to Pontello as they grew as a team and learned to trust each other. Pontello remembers the time they deployed together; his daughter was only six months old. Whenever he missed his family, he knew he could walk to

Max’s kennel and not only find a partner, but a brother. For Pontello, noticing Max’s constant joy and eagerness to see him was a recurring reminder that he wasn’t alone; he always had Max. But now at 12 years of age, the gray hairs have grown around Max’s muzzle. “It’s hard to say he should retire because he is ‘that’ good, he is a military asset,” Pontello said. “He doesn’t miss, he still wants to apprehend, he still wants to bite and he still wants to find odors.” After a long 12 hour shift, Pontello noticed Max starting to slow down. What used to be eating and some play

time had become eating and bed time. Still, Max waits anxiously for his mission collar every time he sees his handler put the vest on. “Obviously he loves what he does, but at some time you gotta say ‘hey man, enough is enough,’” Pontello said. “Yeah, I love what I do, but I’m not doing this for the next 50 years. You know what I mean! So I just want to take Max home and have him enjoy the last couple of years or whatever it may be, relaxing on the couch and having fun.” Now adopted into the Pontello family, Max’s watch is over, but those he protected will never forget his dedication and the sacrifices he made.

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Leo Martin, 633rd Security Forces commander speaks during a retirement ceremony in honor of U.S. Air Force Military Working Dog Max, 633rd Security Forces Squadron explosives detector at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. During his tenure, Max traveled to numerous places in the U.S. in support of the Office of the President of the United States, fortifying the protection of the commander in chief.

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

U.S. Air Force Military Working Dog Max, 633rd Security Forces Squadron explosives detector, joins the Pontello family for a family photo at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. After serving and deploying together, Staff Sgt. Carmen Pontello, 633rd SFS military working dog handler adopted Max into his family.


8

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

9

A PAW-RTNER RETIRES: THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE By Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

“My eyes have seen many things in the darkness of the night, some of which you never saw as you held my leash so tight. I protected you and as a team we feared none. My ears have heard the sound of many things that made you freeze at night, you trusted me and used my pointed ears as battle sights. I protected you and as a team we feared none. Over the years, many have held my leash, several who held it loose and a few who held it tight. No matter how you choose to keep me, I protected you and as a team we feared none. I’ve heard the highest praise and the heaviest correction. Regardless of the tone of your voice or the weight of your correction, I protected you and as a team we feared none. When evil crossed our path I never backed down, I will fight to the end, my loyalty to you is unconditional. I protected you and as a team we feared none. Many years have passed and my muzzle is now full of gray. When it’s time to face my final battle let me keep my pride. Know that I loved no other place than by your side.

When it’s all said and done remember the battles that we’ve won. Never forget that I protected you and as a team we feared none.” As U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Carmen Pontello, 633rd Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, read the poem, he fought to keep his emotions in check. Military Working Dog Max, 633rd SFS explosives detector, retired from active duty at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. “Max is truly a special dog,” Pontello said. “I remember when I first met Max; to be honest, I was a little intimidated. He’d always present himself like he was in charge and wouldn’t let anyone back him down. ” Max provided unwavering dedication and distinguished service to the U.S. Air Force for 12 years, risking his life to save others without thinking about the potential outcome of an ultimate sacrifice. He could be inches away from harm and show no fear. Max, a Belgian Malanois, started his career at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas in 2009. Upon graduating from the Department of Defense dog training school, he was assigned

to the 633rd SFS at Langley Air Force Base. He has been a valued team member to 11 dog handlers as an explosives detector and patrol dog. He worked at JBLE defending the installation, its people and resources. “Max, in my biased opinion, is the perfect working dog,” said Staff Sgt. Adrien Dupius, 633rd SFS. “My time holding his leash and letting him do what he did best was the best time I had in my Air Force career.” During his tenure, Max deployed to Kahtar, Iraq, Afghanistan twice, Kuwait twice and to the United Arab Emirates. He also traveled to numerous places in the U.S. in support of the Office of the President of the United States, fortifying the protection of the commander in chief. Max conducted over 3,000 random anti-terrorism measures, searched 13,428 items and provided 3,200 hours of counter-explosive and patrol support in war fighting missions, protecting billions in DoD assets and 50,000 military and civilian personnel. His keen ability to detect buried threats helped save countless lives. “Max is a sweetheart,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Carmen Pontello, 633rd

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Carmen Pontello, 633rd Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler gazes at Military Working Dog Max, 633rd SFS explosives detector, during Max’s retirement at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. Max conducted over 3,000 random anti-terrorism measures, searched 13,428 items and provided 3,200 hours of counter-explosive and patrol support in war fighting missions, protecting billions in DoD assets and 50,000 military and civilian personnel.

The official party walks in for a retirement ceremony in honor of U.S. Air Force Military Working Dog Max, 633rd Security Forces Squadron explosives detector at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019.

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

(Center) U.S. Air Force Military Working Dog Max, 633rd Security Forces Squadron explosives detector, takes a last group photo with his brothers at arms at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019.

Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler. “Obviously I can say that now, but when I first met Max, he gave that vibe like ‘hey man, if you mess with me, we’re gonna go at it.’ So I was always kind of sketched out about Max at first.” Before Pontello had the chance to be assigned to Max, they had already been selected to deploy as partners. News that was met by an anxious ‘Oh boy, here we go,’ from Pontello. The first time Pontello took Max on a walk and gave him the command to heel, Max stood about three feet away and just barked at him. According to Pontello, soon after they just

clicked. He remembers being told ‘hey man, you got a Cadillac, you just have to figure out how to drive.’ “That spoke a lot to me,” said Pontello. “For him to say this dog is one of the best dogs we have, he’s built the way he should be built, he runs the way he should run. So as long as you can figure out how to drive that Cadillac, you guys will be unstoppable.” That became more and more evident to Pontello as they grew as a team and learned to trust each other. Pontello remembers the time they deployed together; his daughter was only six months old. Whenever he missed his family, he knew he could walk to

Max’s kennel and not only find a partner, but a brother. For Pontello, noticing Max’s constant joy and eagerness to see him was a recurring reminder that he wasn’t alone; he always had Max. But now at 12 years of age, the gray hairs have grown around Max’s muzzle. “It’s hard to say he should retire because he is ‘that’ good, he is a military asset,” Pontello said. “He doesn’t miss, he still wants to apprehend, he still wants to bite and he still wants to find odors.” After a long 12 hour shift, Pontello noticed Max starting to slow down. What used to be eating and some play

time had become eating and bed time. Still, Max waits anxiously for his mission collar every time he sees his handler put the vest on. “Obviously he loves what he does, but at some time you gotta say ‘hey man, enough is enough,’” Pontello said. “Yeah, I love what I do, but I’m not doing this for the next 50 years. You know what I mean! So I just want to take Max home and have him enjoy the last couple of years or whatever it may be, relaxing on the couch and having fun.” Now adopted into the Pontello family, Max’s watch is over, but those he protected will never forget his dedication and the sacrifices he made.

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Leo Martin, 633rd Security Forces commander speaks during a retirement ceremony in honor of U.S. Air Force Military Working Dog Max, 633rd Security Forces Squadron explosives detector at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. During his tenure, Max traveled to numerous places in the U.S. in support of the Office of the President of the United States, fortifying the protection of the commander in chief.

Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec

U.S. Air Force Military Working Dog Max, 633rd Security Forces Squadron explosives detector, joins the Pontello family for a family photo at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, April 23, 2019. After serving and deploying together, Staff Sgt. Carmen Pontello, 633rd SFS military working dog handler adopted Max into his family.


10

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

ARMY ARTIST POSITION OPEN TO ALL CAREER FIELDS By Joe Lacdan FORT BELVOIR, VA.

A dim, 120,000-square-foot vault within Fort Belvoir houses a vast collection of art, pieces of Soldiers’lives and exploits on the battlefield. The pieces have been stacked on thin metal walls featuring scenes from both World Wars, Operation Desert Storm and the Iraq invasion. Located in the bowels of Belvoir’s Army Museum Support Center, the pieces contained here capture candid moments often unseen by the public eye -- embers of war that would otherwise remain lost in history. Subjects could be a Soldier stopping to rest after a long day of marching through rough terrain. Another could show a Soldier in a poignant moment as the grief over losing a fallen comrade sinks in. Some pieces depict startling battle scenes. Others portray raw human emotion such as “The Man without a Gun,” an oil painting created by Lawrence Beall Smith, which shows a young Army medic during World War II. The piece exhibits the panic and fear of a non-combatant Soldier who cannot defend himself with a firearm. The Army’s Center of Military History hosts the 16,000-piece collection whose subjects date as far back as the Revolutionary War. Many of the works are inherently personal, with Soldiers -- Army artists -- documenting fellow Soldiers. And more often than not, the artists have experienced the trauma and emotions of their subjects firsthand. Though, the subject matter of the works often extends

beyond battlefield turmoil. “Art is very relatable. A lot of times we are able to kind of humanize the art,” said Master Sgt. Juan Munoz, the Army’s current artist-in-residence. “We’re not just capturing the cool Soldier repelling from the helicopter. We’re also capturing the Soldier missing his family. We’re capturing the Soldier being hot and tired and sleepy. So we’re capturing all these common things as a Soldier we go through each and every single day.” Soldiers from all career fields now have the opportunity to apply for the unique position that allows a Soldier to empathize with his artistic subjects on the museum support center’s staff. “It is Soldiers writing their own history in creating these artworks,” said Sarah Forgey, chief art curator for the U.S. Army museums. “They bring a little extra 'something’to it that you can’t create in a studio as somebody who hasn’t experienced it firsthand.” Artists could be tasked to create art of a career field such has military dog handlers or to document training of Special Forces units. But the subject matter and creative parameters are left to the creators. Museum administrators give Army artists nearly full creative freedom. “The artist is first and foremost a Soldier,” Forgey said. “He or she is documenting their own experience.” One night while on assignment in the Florida Keys, Munoz observed a tired Soldier sitting on a curbside. The Soldier looked visibly exhausted from 12 hours of delivering food and supplies to nearby residents, whose lives

were ravaged by the devastation of Hurricane Irma in the late summer of 2017. The Soldier pulled out his phone and began to use the FaceTime app to talk to his wife. “I saw him there and the expression on his face, to be able to reconnect with his wife,” said Munoz, who has served as an Army artist for three years. “What it immediately reminded me of was a piece of art that we already have in the collection of a Soldier back in (the Korea War) where he received a letter and he had the same expression -- the same emotion.” The art resonates across generations, even as technology changes. Munoz said that something as simple as a painting of pulling guard duty could connect a Soldier of today to a troop who served during Desert Storm or in Vietnam. One of Munoz’s favorite pieces features a junior Soldier serving as a security guard in Baghdad. “It shows the timelessness of emotion that our Soldiers portray throughout the history of our Army,” Munoz said. The program originally began during World War I with eight Soldiers chosen as artists. During World War II the Army had 43 Soldier artists and during the Vietnam War the service formed nine teams of creators. The service eventually narrowed the number to one artist beginning in 1993 with occasional Soldiers serving as apprentices to the primary artist. In his tenure as the artistin-residence, Munoz has contributed 24 artistic creations to the collection stored within the climate-controlled vault. Across the Army’s 47 museums worldwide, another 16,000 have been stored or displayed. Eventually, more than 100 pieces of art will appear in the opening exhibit of the

Joe Lacdan

Master Sgt. Juan Munoz, the Army's artist-in-residence, displays one of his 24 pieces that he has contributed to the Army's collection of 30,000 art works. About 16,000 of that collection is housed at the Army's Museum Support Center in Fort Belvoir.

Army’s new 185,000-squarefoot National Museum, a $250 million project that broke ground at Belvoir in September 2016. Army artists contributed the vast majority of the pieces in the collection, although the museum welcomes contributions from Soldiers who create their own art, as well as civilian artists who have traveled with military units during historical campaigns. Munoz deployed to both Afghanistan and Iraq to create his artistic works and also traveled to disaster areas after Hurricanes Irma and Maria documenting Soldiers during the relief efforts. Sgt. 1st Class Amy Brown, who served as the resident artist before Munoz, deployed to document Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts in the Caribbean. In his most recent assignment, the former drill sergeant embedded himself with Soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) during Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq. There he noticed a young Soldier, Spc. Jose Perez, perched atop a watchtower in Baghdad. Inspired by the Soldier’s dedication, Munoz crafted a pen and ink rendering of Perez on a wooden panel.

Munoz captures these moments either by taking a still photograph he will later pore over in his studio. Or, he will roughly sketch the piece at the same location. Two-dimensional art mostly make up the 16,000piece collection inside the warehouse that also includes commissioned and contributed works. Munoz’s pieces could be documenting ordinary or routine moments to Soldiers. But they could mark milestones in the Army’s history. Munoz has served as the Army artist at a pivotal time, during the Army’s massive modernization overhaul. The next Army artist can look forward to possibly documenting new milestones. Interested Soldiers in the ranks of staff sergeant to master sergeant can apply at the Center of Military History website: https://history.army.mil/museums/ armyArtists/apply.html. “It’s a very unique and a very rewarding position,” Munoz said. “Your art will become a part of the history of our Army. And overall, you’ll get to see our Army from a whole different perspective.”


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

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www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

Air Force senior leaders update OCP uniform guidance Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs ARLINGTON, VA.

The Air Force announced April 23 new rules on Operational Camouflage Pattern uniforms that aim to better fit the needs of Airmen and the jobs they do while also holding fast to tradition. The changes highlighted include authorization of the two-piece Flight Duty Uniform in garrison and updated patch guidance for the OCP uniform. “During the initial rollout of the OCP, we originally matched our sister services regarding patch configurations as we sought to emphasize our role as a joint warfighting force,” said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein. “In response to overwhelming feedback received from Airmen, we will make an easy ‘sleeve swap’ of the patch configuration to further elevate our focus on honoring the heritage of squadrons as the war-fighting units of the world’s greatest Air Force. We will now place the squadron patch on the right sleeve along with the U.S. flag and move the higher headquarters patch to the left sleeve of the OCP.” Additionally, to pro-

vide commanders with expanded uniform options to fit myriad missions, on April 15, the two-piece flight suit, otherwise known as the 2PFDU, will be authorized to be worn in both garrison and deployed locations. The 2PFDU continues an effort to provide Airmen with improved form, fit and function to perform their duties in any environment. The traditional flight duty uniform will also continue to be an option. Squadron commanders will now have the flexibility to make combat uniform decisions based on what is best for their Airmen to meet mission requirements. “The new unit patch configuration of the OCP and 2PFDU also aligns with the traditional FDU, elevating the significance of squadron focus and identity, which supports CSAF’s intent to revitalize squadrons,” said Lt. Gen. Mark D. Kelly, Headquarters Air Force deputy chief of staff for Air Force operations. In May 2018, Air Force leaders decided to transition to the OCP following feedback from Airmen that it is the best, battletested utility uniform

U.S. Air Force

available. It will also eliminate the need to maintain two separate uniforms – one for ingarrison and one for deployments.

The service expects to fully transition to OCPs by April 1, 2021. For more information, Airmen should view Air Force Guid-

ance Memorandum 2019-01 and check Air Force Instruction 362903 for updates, which are available on the public website of

the Air Force’s Personnel Center at https://www.afpc.af. mil/Career-Management /Dress-and-Appearance /.


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

JBLE Community Memorial Golf Tournament

The Denise E. Mikolajczyk Chief Mik Memorial Golf Tournament is scheduled for 7 a.m., May 3 at the Eaglewood Golf Course. This event is 50 dollars per person and deadline to sign-up and pay is April 26. Registration and check-in starts at 7 a.m. and tee time will begin at 8 a.m. There will be mulligan packages available, prizes for the top three teams, longest drive, closest to the pin and more. For more information, please contact Kaci Duhart at (757) 251-8931

King Street gate and bridge closure

The 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron will execute a project to repair a King Street water main and install a new gate from April 1-30. The King Street gate and the King Street bridge will be closed for the duration of the project. Traffic will be rerouted through the Armistead (West) and LaSalle gates. For more information, call (757) 660-4403.

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month

Joint Base Langley-Eustis will host various events during the month of April in support of Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention month. Clear Challenge (Resiliency Obstacle Course) at 9 a.m., April 26, at Memorial Park, Langley Air Force Base. Preregistration is required. To register call SAPR at 764-3359. Deadline is April 12. Standing Together Against Rape Motorcycle Rally at 8:30 a.m., April 26, at Memorial Park, Langley Air Force Base. Pre-registration is required. To register call SAPR at 764-3359. Deadline is April 12, 2019.

Fort Eustis Environmental Element

The Fort Eustis Environmental Element will host activities from April 22-26 in observance of Earth Day. All are welcome to come out and participate in the upcoming events. • April 22- Clean-up of Dry Retention Ponds and Mosquito Breeding Site survey. • April 23- Nature trail maintenance/ clean-up and tick awareness presentation. • April 24- The Wildlife Boat Tour allows you to take a ride along the James River coastline where you can see a large array of wildlife including bald eagles. • April 25- The Eastern Box Turtle Survey will help inventory specific natural resources in training areas. • April 26- Balfour Beatty will host a Community Earth Day Celebration from 3-6 p.m. at the Reserve Center, Bldg. 1034. To register or receive more information about the upcoming events, contact Ms. Donna Haynes at 878-4123 or donna.c.haynes.civ@mail.mil

JBLE Earth Week events

The 2019 Earth Week celebration at JBLE-Langley will begin with Earth Day on 22 April. There are numerous events across the base that will focus on pollution prevention, preservation, and environmental awareness. Volun-

13

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com teer events include: safe drain maintenance, a community clean-up, nature trail preservation, and a bench building project. Participation is also encouraged for the pet waste awareness event, rain barrel class, free shred event, and the Earth Week 5K Fun Run. To volunteer or for more information, contact Sherry M. Johnson at (757) 764-1130 or sherry.johnson.4@us.af.mil with your name, organization, phone number and the event(s) you would like to participate in.

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training

The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Chaplain Corps will host two Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) classes on April 22-23. For more information, call Senior Master Sgt. Devine at (757) 764-7847. To sign up for April 22-23, visit https://einvitations.afit.edu/inv/ anim.cfm?i=443871&k=066541017C56.

Brown bag lunch lecture

The U.S. Army Transportation Museum will host its monthly Brown Bag Lunch lecture, U.S. Army Rail and the Golden Spike, at 11:30 am in the Regimental Room in the museum. This lecture will celebrate the anniversary of Army Rail on Fort Eustis and the anniversary of the Golden Spike when two rail lines were joined in Utah creating the first transcontinental railway in the United States. Learn this entertaining history of one railway that linked the nation and one that defends the nation and how they are forever linked.

MWD K9 Max N553 retirement ceremony

The 633rd Security Forces Squadron will host a retirement ceremony for military working dog Max N553 at 1 p.m., April 23, at the Langley Air Force Base Memorial Park Pavilion (Building 475). All Joint Base Langley-Eustis members are invited to honor Max N553’s ten-year career and bear witness as he transitions from service member to family pet. In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will be held at the Community Commons gym (Building 61). For more information, call (757) 764-3466.

Days of Remembrance Observance

Please join the JBLE Community in commemorating the roughly six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust during this year's Days of Remembrance Observance. The event will take place April 29 at 1030 a.m., at the Jacobs Conference Center. This year, we are privileged and honored to host Holocaust Survivor Ms. Nicole Yancey, who is a distinguished French-American citizen from the local community dedicated to spreading awareness of the Holocaust to anyone willing to listen.

Air Force Ball

JBLE is looking for passionate Airmen to help organize and execute this year’s Air Force Ball. Attached is a roster of subcommittees with descriptions. If interested in a position, please fill out attached application and return to Lt. Marina E. Lopez (marina.lopez@us.af.mil) and SMSgt Jason Foster (jason.foster.5@us.af.mil) by April 22. The ros-

ter will be finalized and a kickoff meeting will be scheduled for May 1.

Army Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) Industry Day and Exposition An Army Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) Industry Day and Exposition will take place April 30-May 1 at the Fort Eustis Club, 2123 Pershing Ave. The two-day event features an Industry Day with subject matter experts from U.S. Army Center for Initial Military Training (USACIMT) and U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) followed by an Exposition of related technologies fulfilled by industry partners. The intent of the Army's H2F system is to optimize Soldier readiness. H2F is a comprehensive, integrated, and immersive health and fitness system that generates lethal Soldiers who are physically, mentally and spiritually ready to engage with and overmatch the enemy in multi-domain operations. The goal for TRADOC's H2F Industry Day and Exposition is for companies to showcase products and services that can provide the Army with effective solutions within the H2F system. The event is open to all military, government employees and contractors. To register, visit www.ncsi.com/ event/h2f/registration. Note: The registration deadline is April 29.

Protestant Women of the Chapel Free Market

The Fort Eustis Protestant Women of the Chapel will host a Free Market from 9 am to 2 pm Saturday, 27 April, at the Regimental Memorial Chapel, 923 Lee Boulevard, Fort Eustis. The Free Market is like a yard sale except everything is free. Come shop and find some treasures, you can't beat the price. Entry is via the RMC Assembly Room entrance on Donnellson Place. For more information call 757-878-4316.

JBLE Prayer Breakfast

JBLE will host a prayer breakfast at 7:30 a.m., May 2, at the Bayview Commons. The breakfast for this event is free so come out and support. To attend, all participants must RSVP at https://einvitations.afit.edu/inv/ anim.cfm?i=438981&k=06624A007356

Profiles of Honor Traveling Exhibit

The U.S. Army Transportation Museum at Fort Eustis is proud to host the Profiles of Honor traveling exhibit on May 8, 9 am - 4:30 pm. The Profiles of Honor traveling exhibit brings to life Virginia's integral role in World War I and World War II and highlights stories of Virginians who served in either conflict. As part of the exhibit, visitors are invited to bring their own World War I and World War II related photographs and documents to be scanned for inclusion in the Virginia Profiles of Honor project. In partnership with the Library of Virginia, these photographs, documents and stories will be preserved for today's and future generations.


14

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

JBLE Community

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Training and Jobs for Transition Military Per- connect military retirees, and their dependents, with re- free-guitar-lesson. For more information, call (757) 759sources they may be unaware of, or have not otherwise 6405. sonnel JBLE Career Skill Program is offering two programs for transition Military personnel. The Professional TractorTrailer Commercial Driver Training Program for Commercial Driver License (CDL) with Shippers’ Choice of Virginia Inc. and a Welding Program with Thomas Nelson Community College (TNCC), Hampton , VA. The CDL Program has a 90% participant completion rate and a 100% referred for job interviews as well as 85% placement into employment rate. The cohort starting May 28, 2019 is excepting applications now until April 29, 2019. There is no cost for the CDL training for eligible Service Members. The Welding program starting at TNCC on June 3, 2019 is excepting applications now until May 3, 2019. The Welding Program has a 90% participant completion rate and a 100% referred for job interviews as well as 90% placement into employment rate. There is no cost for the Welding training for eligible Service Members. Eligible Service Members must have commander approval, be in the military for 180 days of continuous active duty service, and expect to be discharged or released from active duty within 180 days. For more information contact Clayton B. Wilkes, Career Skills Program Installation Administrator (757) 878-5356, email: clayton.b.wilkes.ctr@mail.com.

Booster Club Meeting

There will be a booster club meeting at 3 p.m. April 25 to discuss upcoming events and future volunteer opportunities.

Honor Those Who Sacrificed All

The Hampton National Cemetery is looking for volunteers to help honor those who served in the military. Volunteers will be placing Flags on graves for Memorial Day Friday, May 24 beginning at 8 a.m. and removing the Flags Tuesday, May 28 beginning at 8 a.m., Cemetery Road at Marshall Avenue, Hampton Va. For more information, call 757-723-7104.

U.S. Army OCS Reunion

The U.S. Army OCS Reunion will be from April 28 to May 1, 2019. The event is open to all branch classes from 1941 to 2019. The reunion will feature the opening of Phase 1 of the OCS Heritage Center, the induction of the 2019 Hall of Fame class, Nett Award presentations, Patterson Award presentations and the dedication of bricks, pavers, and class memorials. Mini class reunions are invited to celebrate with the national reunion. To register for the event, visit https://www.ocsalumni.org/. For more information, contact Nancy Ionoff at ocsalumnireunion@gmail.com or (813) 917-4309.

Retiree Appreciation Day

The Retirement Services Office, in conjunction with the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, will host a Retiree Appreciation Day in the main Exchange, May 18, 9 am. The purpose of the Retiree Appreciation Day is to

been able to access. Representatives from the Virginia Department of Veterans Services, Disabled American Veterans Chapter 2, Association of the United States Army, and others of the like will be present. All are welcome to attend. For more information call 878-2227.

Summary Court Disposition

1st Lt Elizabeth M. Hill, 633d Medical Support Squadron, Langley AFB, is detailed as the Summary Courts Officer to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Senior Airman Devaughn D. Weston. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased, contact 1st Lt Elizabeth hill at 757-764-9591 or elizabeth.m.hill54.mil@mail.mil

Recruiting Family Child Care providers

The JBLE FCC Programs are recruiting individuals to provide licensed child care in their homes for infants, children with special needs and children up to 12 years of age. Interested applicants must be available during regular business hours, swing shifts, night shifts and weekends. Requirements include, background checks, orientation training, home inspections and family interviews. For more information, call (757) 764-3585 or (757) 878-5584.

Alpha Warrior fitness class

The 633rd Force Support Squadron gym staff will host a free “at your own pace” Alpha Warrior class from 11:3012:30 p.m., every Tuesday and Thursday, at the ACC gym Alpha Warrior rig. The class will teach attendees to exercise the entire body in full body circuit training by hitting every component of fitness for all levels of athletes and to also teach and encourage fitness. For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Earl White at earl.white.3@us.af.mil or Tony Arroyo at victor.arroyo@us.af.mil.

JBLE Retiree Council

The JBLE Retiree council will meet every third Wednesday each month in the Army Community Service conference room, building 650, on Fort Eustis. Retirees and those who are approaching retirement from all military branches are invited to attend the free meetings. Members can stay connected with their community and local events, as well as learn more about investments, benefits and other military-related information. For more information or to join, contact (757) 878-5884, (757) 2187118, or torrence0512@gmail.com.

Free Guitar Lessons

United States Air Force Heritage of America Band guitarist Tech. Sgt. Daniel Santos is conducting free beginner and intermediate guitar lessons. Lessons are open to military members, civilian personnel, veterans and retirees. Members must bring their own guitar and smartphone. Space is limited. To sign up, go to https://www.milsuite.mil/book/people/daniel.b.santos2/blog/2018/08/13/

Electronics Recycling Drive

The 192nd Medical Group is hosting an on-going electronics recycling drive to help raise funds for moral events. Items such as empty inkjet cartridges, cell phones & accessories, GPS devices, calculators, ebook readers, iPods/MP3 players, digital & video cameras, PDAs, iPads/tablets and video game consoles can be dropped at 159 Sweeney Blvd, Bldg. 764, Room 109. The following items cannot be accepted: printers, computers, laptops, laserjet cartridges, keyboards, monitors and cords or cables without their respective devices. For more information, call (757) 764-0127.

633 ABW/EO Hours

The Fort Eustis and Langley Equal Opportunity Offices will operate under normal customer service hours from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The offices will close daily from 11 a.m. to noon. For more information, call (757) 764-5877/5878 or (757) 878-4797/0022.

710th Combat Operations Squadron vacancies

The 710th Combat Operations Squadron at JBLE and 710 COS Det 1, Shaw AFB are recruiting for the following officer Air Force Specialty Codes: 11F, 11B, 11M, 12F, 12B, 13B and 14N. These AFSCs will fill positions within Air Operations Center Master Air Attack Plan teams and other AOC planning cells. Enlisted vacancies include Intel, Air Traffic Control Command and Control Battle Management. These AFSCs are eligible to receive up to $500 travel stipends for monthly Unit Training Assembly weekends. For inquiries email 710cos.workflow@us.af.mil or call 757-225-1955.

Weekly Live Fire Schedule

Ranges, training areas, and associated facilities are Off Limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations, or inspections/recons unless clearance is obtained in person from Range Control Fire Desk (Bldg. 2432 Mulberry Island Road) or a designated Range Control Technician. All personnel are required to check in and out with range control before going into or departing any Range or Training area. Range schedule until April 12: DATE... RANGES... TIMES... April 12, 2019 BTRAC, R1, R2, R3, R4 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. April 13, 2019 POF R3 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 14 POF R3 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 15 BTRAC, R1 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. April 16 BTRAC, R1 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. April 17 BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. April 18 BTRAC, R1, R4 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. April 19 BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Pharmacist Cough and Cold Clinic

The Langley Hospital will provide a Pharmacist Cough and Cold Clinic starting Feb. 12, 2018. Patients who cannot get an appointment with their provider right away and do


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

JBLE Community not want to wait at the ER can check in at the Family Health front desk to be seen by a clinical pharmacist on a walk-in basis, Monday through Friday from 8 to 10 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. Service is available to all active duty and Department of Defense beneficiaries 18 to 70 years of age who are enrolled to Langley Hospital. Patients who are on flying status or Personal Reliability Program, are immunocompromised or have symptoms over 10 days cannot be seen at the Cough and Cold clinic. For more information, contact Tech. Sgt. Ashely Dixson at 7648995.

Durand Entry Control Facility (NASA gate) changes

Security Forces personnel will no longer man the Durand Entry Control Facility (NASA Gate). Personnel will still have their credentials checked by guards at the main NASA gate, however, their credentials will not be checked again at the Durand Entry Control Facility. NASA guards will still man their side of the Durand Entry Control Facility and will only allow CAC holders (no dependent ID cards) to enter NASA property. Additionally, no commercial vehicles are allowed access to NASA property. The Durand Entry Control Facility hours are from 6 to 9 a.m. and 3 to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Worship hours for JBLE services

Langley services Main Chapel: Sunday Catholic Mass at 9 a.m. Sunday Protestant Gospel Service at 11 a.m. Monday-Thursday Catholic Mass at 12 p.m. Bethel Chapel: Sunday Protestant Community Service at 9 a.m. Sunday Catholic Mass at 11 a.m. Saturday Catholic Reconciliation at 3:30 p.m. Saturday Catholic Mass at 5 p.m. Additional/special services call 757-764-7847 or visit https://www.facebook.com/JBLELangleyChapel. Fort Eustis services Regimental Memorial Chapel: Sunday Catholic Reconciliation at 8:15 a.m. Sunday Roman Catholic Mass at 9:30 a.m. Sunday Traditional Protestant Christian Service at 11 a.m. Sunday Latter Day Saints Worship at 10 a.m. (RMC Annex) Monday-Friday Roman Catholic Mass at 11:45 a.m. Chapel NeXt, Wylie Theater, Bldg. 705 (entrance closes to Express Mart): Sunday Contemporary Christian Service at 10 a.m. Cultural Center, Bldg. 2751: Islamic Daily Prayer, Monday - Thursday at 1:30 p.m. JUM'AH Prayer, Fridays at 12:30 p.m. (Islamic Prayer Room) Ramadan Worship services at Ft. Eustis Cultural Center 6 April 6 p.m. Ramadan Orientation 6 May – 4 June 5:00 a.m. Daily Faijr Prayer 6 May – 3 June 9:30 – 11 p.m. Daily Isha/Taraweeh

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Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com Prayer 11 May Sunset Iftar Meal 18 May Sunset Iftar Meal 25 May Sunset Iftar Meal 1 June Sunset Iftar Meal Additional/Special services, call 757-878-1450/1316 or visit www.facebook.com/RegimentalMemorialChapel or https://www.facebook.com/ChapelNextFortEustis.

Manpower shortage impacts 633rd Medical Group services The 633rd Medical Group strives to provide Trusted Care to all they serve, while supporting many deployed and home-station missions. Due to contract vacancies and multiple provider deployments/permanent changes of station during the coming months, it will take longer to receive appointments and have messages returned. In light of these staffing concerns, TRICARE will temporarily enroll only Active Duty service members and their family members. This action is being taken to ensure patients receive the care they deserve within the established standards. There will be no enrollment changes or action taken to any patients who are already enrolled at the 633rd Medical Group, regardless of category. For questions regarding TRICARE benefits, or for enrollment assistance to locate the best medical facility to meet healthcare needs, contact the TRICARE Information line at 1800-TRICARE or 1-800-874-2273.

JBLE Family Child Care Program

The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Family Child Care Program is looking for child care providers interested in a professional, portable career that will allow them to stay at home and run a home-based business. The program is available for children ages two weeks to 12 years old. Child care providers must be at least 18 years old, be able to read and speak English, be in good health, and willing to undergo a background check. The FCC will provide training and materials to get your business started. For more information, call Fort Eustis at 878-5584/5726 or Langley Air Force Base 764-3585/2835

Life lessons over lunch workplace study

Join the new Life Lessons over Lunch the first and third Thursdays of the month from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in the 633rd Mission Support Group Conference Room. The Langley Chapel offers this marketplace initiative where participants meet on a regular basis to view a DVD message over lunch, providing a unique opportunity for participants to enter an environment in the workplace where they can consider relevant insights around personal and professional challenges. The principles are presented from a biblical perspective but are non-denominational and open to all active-duty service members and lunch provided is free. For more information, contact the Langley Chapel at 633abw.hc@us.af.mil.

Air Force Reserve hosts Palace Front-Palace Chase informational sessions The Air Force Reserve will host Palace Front-Palace Chase informational sessions the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m., in the 633rd Force Support Squadron auditorium, building 15 in Wing B, room 203. Palace Front is available to Airmen within 180 days of their projected separation date. Palace Chase is reserved for Airmen over 180 days from separation who are interested in separating from Active Duty early. For more information, call 751-4825 or 846-7532.

Fort Eustis’ Groninger Library encourages reading

Fort Eustis’ Groninger Library has implemented an ongoing Reading Program entitled "1000 Books Before Kindergarten" and "1000 Books from 1st -5th grades." For every 100 books read, children can take their reading log to the library to receive a prize. After reading 1000 books, children will receive a free t-shirt. For more information, contact the library at 878-5017 or visit www.groningerlibrary.com.

Army Emergency Relief available online

The JBLE-Eustis Army Emergency Relief (AER) campaign will run through May 15, 2019. This year's slogan is, "It's What We Do." AER is the Army's own emergency financial assistance organization and is dedicated to helping the Army take care of its own. Soldiers, military retirees and family members can now request financial assistance through AER’s redesigned website at https:// www.aerhq.org. Applications can be submitted 24 hours a day via desktop, laptop, tablet or smartphone. The redesigned site allows for easier navigation and authorized patrons can access their accounts, apply for scholarships, donate and utilize the new loan calculator. For additional information, contact Debra Stancil at debra.stancil.civ@ mail.mil, Beverly Wyche Reid at beverly.d.wychereid,civ@mail.mil or call 757-878-2137.

Company Grade Officer Council welcomes members

The Company Grade Officer Council will meet at 4:45 p.m., at the Bayview Commonwealth Center every third Thursday of the month and is open to all Company Grade Officers. The council has an opening for a U.S. Army officer on the council board. Join the council for professional development, social events and fun. For more information, call 764-9954.

Langley 5/6 club hosts monthly meetings

The Langley 5/6 club will meet at 11:30 a.m., at the Bayview Commonwealth Center every second Wednesday of every month. A guest speaker will visit the club every month to discuss various topics. Along with being a networking tool, the group meets to brainstorm fundraising opportunities and membership drives. For more information, call 764-0507.


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www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Air Force • April 26, 2019

THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.

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$750 REBATE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR NORTH AMERICA, INC. AND MAY BE APPLIED TOWARD FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACTS ON NEW TOYOTA VEHICLES, DATED FROM APRIL 1, 2019 THROUGH APRIL 30, 2019. TO QUALIFY FOR THE REBATE, AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE OR LEASE YOU MUST (1) BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD; OR A MILITARY VETERAN OR RETIREE (RETIREES HONORABLY DISCHARGED) OF THE U.S. MILITARY WITHIN TWO YEARS OF THEIR DISCHARGE/RETIREMENT DATE; OR A HOUSEHOLD MEMBER OF AN ELIGIBLE U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL, INCLUDING GOLD STAR FAMILY MEMBERS; AND (2) PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE; (3) RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENT FOR YOUR NEW VEHICLE; AND (4) RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL FROM AND EXECUTE A FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. ON LEASE CONTRACTS, REBATE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, REBATE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. LIMIT ONE REBATE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION PER ELIGIBLE U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL OR ELIGIBLE HOUSEHOLD MEMBER. OFFER NOT COMBINABLE WITH THE COLLEGE GRADUATE REBATE PROGRAM, THE IFI PROGRAM, AND THE LEASE-END REFI PROGRAM. VEHICLE MUST BE TAKEN OUT OF DEALER STOCK. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY. PROGRAM IS NOT AVAILABLE IN AL, FL, GA, HI, NC, AND SC. REBATE TERMS MAY BE MORE GENEROUS IN YOUR LOCAL AREA. ASK YOUR PARTICIPATING DEALER ABOUT THE MILITARY REBATE TERMS IN YOUR AREA. MUST PAY SALES TAX. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. NOT REDEEMABLE FOR CASH. TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES IS A SERVICE MARK OF TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORPORATION (TMCC). TMCC IS THE AUTHORIZED ATTORNEY-IN-FACT AND SERVICER FOR TOYOTA LEASE TRUST. 2ALL LEASE OFFERS: LOW MILEAGE LEASE. OFFER AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESSIVE WEAR AND EXCESS MILEAGE CHARGES OF $.15 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 30,000 MILES. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. RAV4 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2780 DOWN, FIRST $219 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. EXAMPLE BASED ON 2019 RAV4 LE FRONT WHEEL DRIVE MODEL 4430, MSRP $26,685 AND CAPITALIZED COST, WHICH MAY VARY BY DEALER, OF $26,246. HIGHLANDER DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,700 DOWN, FIRST $299 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. EXAMPLE BASED ON 2019 HIGHLANDER LE MODEL 6948, MSRP $36,135 AND CAPITALIZED COST, WHICH MAY VARY BY DEALER, OF $34,499. LEASES DO NOT INCLUDE $350 DISPOSITION FEE DUE AT LEASE END. EXAMPLES INCLUDE $650 ACQUISITION FEE AND ASSUME DEALER PARTICIPATION. YOUR PAYMENT TERMS MAY VARY BASED ON FINAL NEGOTIATED PRICE. OFFER AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. 3BUYERS CAN RECEIVE A $1,000 FINANCE CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA IF VEHICLE IS PURCHASED AND FINANCED THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. STANDARD APR RATES APPLY. INCENTIVE WILL BE APPLIED FIRST TO THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE TRANSACTION. FINANCE INCENTIVE IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. 4CUSTOMERS CAN RECEIVE $1,000 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON TACOMA (EXCLUDES TRD PRO); $1,500 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON CAMRY; $2,000 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON COROLLA (EXCLUDES HATCHBACKS), HIGHLANDER (EXCLUDES HYBRIDS), OR TUNDRA (EXCLUDES TRD PRO); OR CAN APPLY CASH BACK TO DOWN PAYMENT. ALL OFFERS: OFFERS MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS UNLESS SPECIFIED OTHERWISE. DEALER FEES ARE EXTRA. VEHICLE SHOWN MAY BE PROTOTYPE AND/OR SHOWN WITH OPTIONS. ACTUAL MODEL MAY VARY. DELIVERY MUST BE TAKEN FROM DEALER STOCK BY 4/30/19 AND IS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. LEASE, APR AND CASH BACK OFFERS MAY NOT BE COMBINED. SEE PARTICIPATING CENTRAL ATLANTIC TOYOTA DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFERS END 4/30/19. 5TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE FOR 2 YEARS OR 25,000 MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. 24-HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE IS ALSO INCLUDED FOR 2 YEARS AND UNLIMITED MILES. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET, OR A LIVERY/TAXI VEHICLE. SEE TOYOTA DEALER FOR DETAILS AND EXCLUSIONS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. AND ALASKA. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE DOES NOT INCLUDE PARTS AND FLUIDS, EXCEPT EMERGENCY FUEL DELIVERY. 1

Profile for Military News

Peninsula Warrior Air Force Edition 4.26.19  

Vol. 9 | No. 16

Peninsula Warrior Air Force Edition 4.26.19  

Vol. 9 | No. 16