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SaintPetrocs

Brand Handbook 2010/11 Supporting Cornwalls vulnerably housed through positive transitions


The Brand

Why the Re-Brand On assessing the previous SaintPetrocs branding it became clear that the full potential benefits that a branding scheme can provide, even for a relatively small local charity. Homelessness is such a key area of the charity sector, often those suffering have multiple other issues affecting their relationship with the rest of society. The mixture of complex needs in many of the clients as a cause or result of their situation highlight the importance of communication between the charity and its clients. By readdressing the branding of SaintPetrocs, a clearer and more refined message can be expressed from the charity to both clients and the wider communities. Better communication inevitably means better service.


The Brand

Change of Name Old and new names Quite simply, just the name ‘Saint Petrocs’ stands out within the Cornish third sector and beyond. With no ‘competitor’ brands the name needs little further differentiation and as such by removing the ‘Society’ the name feels a little more friendly and informal without sacrificing any of its original meaning. Furthermore, by grouping the two words, separated by capitals they form a stronger, supportive base, as well as standing out within a piece of text, potentially even extending the brand within the simplest of word processing.

St Petrocs Society to

SaintPetrocs The name within body copy

In these difficult circumstances we at SaintPetrocs will continue to create the conditions and environment for the homeless of Cornwall...


The Brand

Core Values In order to improve clarity of communication and thought of the charity, we have considered and distilled down the core values of SaintPetrocs as a brand. Based on Steve Ellis’ sentiments in the recent SaintPetrocs documentary (left) we have developed a core idea and driving force behind everything SaintPetrocs. In doing so, everyone, (staff, clients and the general public) can understand what SaintPetrocs is all about and this can resonate in all of the charity’s communications allowing a constant and consistent brand message whatever the medium.

Inspiration

“People think SaintPetrocs is about money, they think it is about houses, but actually it is about people... ...it is about helping people through positive transitions in their lives” Steve Ellis, Chief Executive Core brand value

“Supporting Cornwalls most vulnerable residents through positive transitions in their lives”


The Logo

Main Logo Full Logo The logo is designed to reflect this idea of positive transition from the lighter to bolder text to the ‘positively transitioning’ home icons. The first icon suggests the first, forward, positive progression that SaintPetrocs offers. This is followed by the next, upward pointing arrow suggesting growth and progression. This is rounded off by the solidly set upward arrow, clearly reflecting the traditional house shape and sense of completion or conclusion. By having this mini-narritive running through the fairly simple idea in the logo the individual icons can then be divided up again and applied individually across the brand to compliment the different parts of the brands storytelling and also provide another visual anchor for the brand.

Colour Variants


The Logo

Logo Variations Through keeping the logo simple and reflecting the brands core values, the two separate entities of the logo, wordmark and logotype, can also work successfully even when from one another The colours and style are distinct enough in SaintPetrocs sector to allow the elements to work by themselves when appropriate.

Wordmark

Colour Variants

Logotype


The Logo

Exclusion Area Various exclusion areas In order to let the Logo and its variants speak out, we must give them a little space to breath. This simply means having nothing else of visual importance within the demonstrated space allowing the logos to deliver their full impact. By using this simple method, it is easy to calculate and thus preventing visual confusion.


The Logo

Logo Usage The Icons can also be broken down further compliment the brands communications. By taking on individual messages when used in isolation, the identity can become even more versatile as the individual elements can further compliment specific messages across the brands communications. For example, if the piece is introducing an idea or a thought is continuing beyond that piece of media, the ‘transition’ icon can be used as a kind of ‘read on’ device acting almost as an ellipsis. Or the ‘house’ icon can be used to round off a more conclusive piece of statement.

The ‘house’ icons when working in isolation of one another Transition

Highlighting that a statement is just the beginning of an idea....

So to round off a concluding statement for instance...

Progression

Conclusion

working is effective it would undoubtedly suffer


Colour Scheme

Primary Colours In order to emphasize the new and updated spirit of SaintPetrocs a new colour scheme will be used to help differentiate the charity within the myriad of other charities operating in Cornwall. Orange became the clear basis of the new brand, having connotations of both protection and warmth as well as a sense of urgency and importance. It simultaneously shows both the importance and urgency of the work done by SaintPetrocs while hinting at the benefits reaped of its work. The orange should be punctuated by lots of white space, enhancing its impact but remaining friendly and open. This will also allow the

Primary Colours

large impact typography to remain compacted while still being able to breath. These two main colours work so hard together that the only additional colours should be varying degrees of greys. Black should be avoided as it would confuse the punctuation of the orange-on-white, and any further colours would confuse the simplified messages being communicated within the branding scheme. Furthermore by making the simple colour scheme work harder, all printing costs will be kept considerably lower through black and white printing with just one spot colour rather than the traditional four colour process.

C=0 M=35 Y=85 K=0 R=251 G= 176 B=64 Pantone 143 M

C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=60 R=128 G= 130 B=133 Pantone 424 M

C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=40 R=167 G= 169 B=172 Pantone 423 M


Colour Scheme

Secondary Colours To allow variation but retain consistency, the primary colours may also be used in varying tones of the original colours. Although black, as mentioned, is a little too harsh it will inevitably be inavoidable in some cases, but if at all possible use a lighter shade to take the edge off.

Secondary Colours C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=60

C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=40

C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=20

C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=0

C=0 M=35 Y=85 K=0

C=0 M=25 Y=60 K=0

C=0 M=14 Y=34 K=0

C=0 M=7 Y=17 K=0


Typography

Typography Again, to help the new SaintPetrocs brand to stand out improve crossbrand consistency and clarity we have selected a single font family with great versatility and distinction to act as a visual anchor. It can work both at very small and large sizes as well as body or header type, meaning in purchasing just two weights of the typeface there are endless possibilities for further development within the brand guidelines.

Typography at various sizes

SaintPetrocs, Supporting transitions Far far away, behind the word mountains, far

36 pt.

SaintPetrocs, Supporting transitions Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean.

18 pt.

SaintPetrocs, Supporting transitions Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean.

9 pt.


Typography

Brand Typeface The new typeface for SaintPetrocs is MetaPro, we have selected this font for a number of reasons. The slightly flared ascenders and slanted terminals gave it a distinct scripture feel, hinting at the scripture style of writing around the time of Saint Petroc. This is coupled with the distinct Continental or, more importantly, non-English feel, something which the Cornish population often like to relate to, seeming more appropriate for an organisation operating exclusively in a strongly independent Cornwall. Although it is a font family with a large amount of different weights (or styles, eg bold, italic or black), Saint Petrocs will keep things simple by using primarily just the bold and book styles, leaving the main focus on what the type is saying rather than the type itself.

Brand Typefaces

MetaPro Bold

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890.,?!/@ÂŁ& MetaPro Book

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890.,?!/@ÂŁ&


Typography

Typographic Style Titles and Headings

Titles and headings should be big and bold, on smaller media, the size of the type can be calculated according to how it fits into the grid. This can vary across different booklets, leaflets or flyers, however the size must then remain constant across that single item.

Leading

Due to the style of the typeface Meta, leading for the titles and headings can be set to the same point size as the text itself. This prevents the gaps between the lines from appearing too great when at large sizes. In body text however, the leading should then be set to 120% of the texts point size. Due to a larger volume and smaller text it needs a little more space to breath and therefore reads more comfortably.

An Example of Typographic Heirarchy 36pt. MetaPro Bold 14pt. MetaPro Bold 9pt. MetaPro Book

Heading Sub Heading Body Text

36/36pt Meta (100%)

36/43.2pt Meta (120%)

Advice for Advice for Sleeping Sleeping Rough Rough


Typography

Typographic Style Headers & Titles

In order stand out from the crowd, headings should utilize the SaintPetrocs orange, This can be either orange text on a white background or white text reversed out of a strong orange background. The latter has a somewhat overpowering feel so should be used sparingly but with force.

General Body Text

Most body text should be placed on a white background using the 60% black. If small highlights are needed then the 40% black or the orange can also be used but generally only for very small sections of text. Due to the strong white background these can tend to wash out if not framed by the darker text. If the text is white on orange then it is also worth setting it in a slightly thicker weight, from book to medium for example to prevent the ink of the background ‘bleeding’ into the text.

Try to Stay Dry in Wet Wether

Variations of Headers

Try to Stay Dry in Wet Wether Spending an extended period of time in wet clothes can be very uncomfortable. Although often a difficult task in wet wether, drying off afterwards can be even more difficult.

Regular Body Text

Spending an extended period of time in wet clothes can be very uncomfortable. Although often a difficult task in wet wether, drying off afterwards can be even more difficult.

Highlighted Body Text

Spending an extended period of time in wet clothes can be very uncomfortable. Although often a difficult task in wet wether, drying off afterwards can be even more difficult.

Reversed Out Body Text


Photography

Using Photography As the problem of homelessness is a very powerful issue, the stories told from the imagery we use should also be very powerful. Therefore let the photography do the talking, using either double or full page spreads allows them to have the biggest impact. In keeping with the colour system developed for the brand, general photos should be black and white, again to allow the orange keep its punch. However in some cases, particularly portraits where the subject is the story it may be appropriate to use some colour, however this should be slightly desaturated allowing the brighter, more positive colours to stand out whilst still fitting in with the rest of the brand imagery.

Double page spread

Full single page


Photography

Subjects The photography should be used to tell a simple narrative or story, reflecting the positive new developments in peoples lives achieved through the work of SaintPetrocs. This doesn’t have to be an elaborate narrative, often just focusing solely on the person at hand is more than powerful enough. Sometimes it won’t be relevant or appropriate to have a human subject, a piece not focused on a specific individual for instance, however SaintPetrocs is all about people. Therefore the photography should suggest a human element is present, using a cup of tea implying comfort and support for instance.

Focusing on a person

Hinting at human element


Photography

Using Text & Image To create stronger unity between image and text, and also continue the concept of bold, solid typography, for more atmospheric photography use large white spaces to create a greater effect by drawing the viewers attention to the key device in the image. This also leaves a good background on which to place extracts of text and headers rather than placing text in a box on top of the photography which blocks out part of the image and decreases the overall impact of the picture.

The landlord said that I had been highly recommended and was worth taking a chance with. I took the tenancy and SaintPetrocs SmartMove didn’t turn their backs The landlord said that I had been highly recommended and was worth taking a chance with. I took the tenancy and SaintPetrocs SmartMove didn’t turn their backs

Good use of type and image

Bad Type Placement, too much contrast behind type


Grid Systems

Poster Layouts Use a bold margin, though not exccessively wide 20mm on A3 is about right amd only one column. Blow the type up as large as possible so there is only two to three words per line and a bit of space at the bottom to let the poster breath and fit in the logotype in the bottom right.


Grid Systems

Booklet Layout Longer texts on the left spread Impact typography on the right For full page, impact typogrpahy use a bold margin, though not exccessively wide only one column. Blow the type up as large as possible so there is only two to three words per line. This gives the words on the page the fullest impact allowing the message to speak assertively for itself. For more lengthy texts, try to use thiner, and multiple columns. This makes the reading lengths more comofrtable than a single wide column. It also gives a larger body of text a solid, but not overall heavy feel on the page. Furthermore, by offsetting the columns from the header slightly the page is given a more dynamic feel, suggestive of movement across the page reflecting the brands concept based around transitions.



Saint Petrocs - Brand Gudielines