Page 1

STD U S POSTAGE PAID PETERBORO N Y PERMIT # 003

Quality Pre-Owned Vehicles NO CREDIT CHECK – BUY HERE – PAY HERE Best Used Cars of CNY 1121 Glenwood Ave., Oneida • 280-0435 Visit us at www.bestusedcarsofcny.com

Madison County Courier M3P Media, LLC, is an official sponsor of the Madison County Fair: Only 57 Days to Opening Day!

May 11, 2011

Inside Business ... 34 Columns ... 27-31 Crossword ... 33 Events ... 34, 37 Farms ... 18-24, 38-39 Fire Service ... 8 Government ... 3-7 History ... 14-17 Letters ... 2, 25-27 PAC 99 ... 10 Politics ... 7, 9 Public Notices ... 36 Schools ... 33 Subscribe ... 31 Veterans ... 32 The Madison County Courier is the Official Paper of: Village of Chitenango Town of Sullivan Madison County Town of Brookfield Town of Fenner Town of DeRuyter (alternate) ...and counting.

Subscriptions $13 per quarter $20 for six months $35 per year

Vol. 3, No. 19

www.MadisonCountyCourier.com

75 cents

ly

On

Weekly

Slow Start for Crop Season

Caz School Bus Ditched; No Serious Injuries Reported

Farmers Slogging Through Soggy Spring

Martha E. Conway/Staff Writer (Cazenovia – May 4, 2011) No one was reported seriously injured in a school bus accident occurring on Barrett Road near the intersection of State Routes 13/80 south of New Woodstock late this afternoon. A Cazenovia Central School District bus slid into a deep ditch alongside Barrett Road. Police, fire and ambulance crews and school district representatives were still on the scene as of 5:30 p.m. that evening.

Martha E. Conway (Madison County) The Courier reported last week on the damage caused by heavy rains and flooding in several southern Madison County towns. Municipal infrastructure damage, now approaching $1 million total around the county, according to some county officials, isn’t the only hardship caused by heavy precipitation this year.

Crops - 20

Valesky, Magee Attend Opening Day of 36th Farmers Market Town Residents Express Anger Over New Assessments Chris Hoffman (Hamilton) – Saturday, May 7, was the opening day of the Hamilton Farmers Market’s 36th season. After an early morning rain shower, the sun came out to stay, and by 10 a.m., the

market was bustling with shoppers eager to enjoy a spring too long coming. At the gazebo on the Village Green, Village Trustee Russell Lura welcomed everyone, then turned the microphone over to Diane Eggert, executive director of the Farmers

Protest - 24

Kevin Fairbanks/Kevin Fairbanks & Associates, LLC, Oneida

Firefighters Train in the Flames

Postmaster, please

See photos on page 8.

send address changes to:

M a d i s o n C o u n t y Fa i r U p d at e

M3P Media, LLC 119 Genesee Street Chittenango, New York 13037

Get Paid, Recognized for Doing Something You Enjoy

Chris Hoffman/Contributing Writer Sharon Risley and Karen Hotaling, two Town of Hamilton residents angry with their revaluations.

(Brookfield) Do you bake a delicious pie, have an uncanny knack for pickling, or are you crafty with a crochet hook? Let’s see who does it best in all of Madison County. Entries are also open to all of our good

neighboring counties…join in the fun. Madison County Fair is offering you the chance to win prizes and recognition for your outstanding

Fair - 3

“Is The Place For Me! Summer Classes Begin May 31 SEE OUR FULL PAGE AD WITH CLASS SCHEDULE ON THE BACK PAGE


May 11, 2011

Page 2

Your Voice

Madison County Courier

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw

Madison County Courier and

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Published Weekly By

M3P Media, LLC 119 Genesee Street Chittenango, New York 13037

315.687.7561

FAX: 315.687.6758

Publisher

Michael A. Bova, Jr. 315.404.8200 mike@m3pmedia.com Chief Information Officer

Philip L. King 315.542.7892 phil@m3pmedia.com

Managing Editors

Let ters

Annual Fishing Derby a Success To the Editor: (Sullivan) On Saturday April 16th the Town of Sullivan held their annual fishing derby for kids ages 3 to 12 yrs old in the township. The cold wind was blowing and it rained off and on, but that did not stop the kids from showing up with their fishing poles and bait! The enthusiasm was contagious! We had over 250 kids participate in the event. This was a fun event for the town and it was only made possible with the help of all the volunteers! The following is our list of winners: For the 3- to 7-year-olds: Youngest to Catch a Fish: Arlee Westcott First Trout Caught: Renna Entwhistle First Fish Caught: Cameron Reynolds Largest Fish Caught: Holden Taylor 2nd Largest Fish Caught: Jessica Hallock 3rd Largest Fish Caught: Cadence Entwhistle Smallest Fish Caught: Kira Jock 2nd Smallest Fish Caught: Mary West For the 8- to 12-year-olds: Oldest to Catch a fish: Matthew Theobald

First Trout Caught: Markus Gersch First Fish Caught: Sierra Stofer Last Fish Caught: Aaron Norman Most Fish Caught: Dylan Sius Largest Fish Caught: Samantha Given 2nd Largest Fish Caught: Courtney Pepyer 3rd Largest Fish Caught: Emily Steward Smallest Fish Caught: Makenzie Cesario 2nd Smallest Fish Caught: Allison Woodruff 3rd Smallest Fish Caught: Bill Demand Thank you again to all of the volunteers that helped make this event a success! Also, thanks to all of the organizations that donated

Margo Frink 315.481.8732 margo@m3pmedia.com

Contributing Editor

Aaron Gifford 315.687.7561 agiffor3@twcny.rrcom

Want healthier,

plants?

bigger

Use vermicompost - a natural, local product made by composting worms and microorganisms.

Devine Gardens, LLC D 31 315-663-1675 devinegardensllc@aol.com de ww www.devinegardensllc.com

0000277557-01

Martha E. Conway 315.813.0124 martha@m3pmedia.com

Opinion and Editorial

to this event! Matthew Moore, Town of Sullivan Parks and Recreation

Thanks Community for Support To the Editor: (DeRuyter) Well we did it! The American Legion post 894 DeRuyter wishes to thank all the individuals and organizations that assisted us in putting on a benefit spaghetti dinner for

Austin Baker. It was a big success and could not have happened without all the contributions of time talent and funds. Good job, DeRuyter! William J. Staley, commander

Betterment Day a Success To the Editor: (Chittenango) The village of Chittenango’s Community Betterment Day was another

Letters - 25


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 3

Your Government

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Your Window Into

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw the Legislative Process

In other business * Peter Kazlauskas asked the board to reserve the park field for the last weekend in July for

County Clerk’s Office personnel continue their struggle against humidity in the Clerk’s Office and encroaching mold in the county’s archival facilities in the basement of the County Office Building.” Madison County Buildings and Grounds Supervisor Kevin Loveless said there is a small amount of dormant

Chris Hoffman

Stockbridge - 6

Correction In an article entitled “Finance, Ways and Means Tackles Mold Problem” published in the May 4 edition of the Courier, misconstruction of the first sentence could lead readers to believe the mold was a problem on the first floor in the County Clerk’s Office. The sentence should have read, “Madison

Linda J. Haley

for plow drivers to keep their bearings. During that March 7 storm, numerous towns reported having multiple trucks off the road. In addition, an early thaw coupled with unusually high ground moisture content has made the roads more vulnerable to damage from traffic. Kiehn said he learned of the complaint earlier in the day before the board met. He said things would have to dry out some before taking any equipment to Miller Road for fear of doing further damage.

Ric Main

Martha E. Conway (Stockbridge – May 2, 2011) A Miller Road resident reported to the Stockbridge Town Council that the blacktop on her road – for which she paid half, she said – had at least a 15-foot section gouged and chewed up. She brought chunks of asphalt to show the board. Highway Superintendent Peter Kiehn said the damage, which was rampant in many areas due to the harsh winter, will be repaired. “There is a problem with water running through there,” Kiehn said. “We need to fix the ditches and shoulder, then

we will rebuild that section of road.” The woman said it is the second year in a row there have been problems. “You need somebody more cautious who knows how to drive a truck,” she said, adding that she has suffered damage to her property as a result of highway department maintenance efforts. Kiehn said the damage reported could have been done by a civilian vehicle or could have happened in one pass on March 7 when the area was hit by two feet of snow overnight. Like other highway superintendents around the county, Kiehn said the unrelenting and heavy snow storms obscured visual landmarks, making it difficult

mold on the books in the archival facility in the basement only. “The carpet buckles due to the contractor using the wrong glue during installation on the first and second floors of the County Office Building,” Loveless said. “We are currently trying to have that taken care of under warranty.” The Courier regrets the error.

Robert Arnold

Weather Uncooperative, Delaying Start of Usual Summer Road Work

Jim Scheid

Miller Road in Need of Repair

Troy Bishopp

Pictured is debris consisting of wood and other substances that has washed up on the east shore of Oneida Lake on the south side of Oneida Creek. Local resident Ed Biekert contacted Lenox Town Supervisor Rocco J. DiVeronica and asked for help. DiVeronica said it’s not a town problem but he wrote letters to the Army Corps of Engineers, the state Department of Environmental Conservation and Oneida County authorities looking for help for the residents living along the east shore.

Jim Bona

Jim Coufal

Daniel Marvin

Robert Betz

Donald Krueger

C ontributing Writers

Matthew Urtz

creations. The Madison County Fair 2011 Premium Booklet is now available online at madisoncountyfairny.com. Click on 2011 Premium Booklet in the left column. Visit our online Premium Booklet to see what items you can exhibit or contest you would like to enter; the possibilities are endless. * Baking, Gardening, Collecting, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Sewing, and Knitting * Ms. Madison County Pageant * Livestock Classes: Horses, Cattle, Poultry, Goats, Lambs, Rabbits * Truck Pull, Tractor Pull, Demolition Derby and Rollover Contest New this year is the Creative Arts Junior Division (all competitors must not have passed their 19th birthday before Jan. 1 of this year). Reuse/Recycle is the theme, with a $10 premium to first-place entries in each of the six class divisions. Entry must contain at least 75 percent of the recycled material. The departments and classes are listed in PDF files that maybe downloaded and printed, along with the entry form. Entry forms should be submitted by July 1st (mail to: Entry Clerk, Madison County Fair, P.O. Box 114, Brookfield, N.Y. 13314). If you are unable to access the Internet listings, you may leave a message at 315-8995867, and forms will be sent to you via U.S. Mail. Please specify which departments you are interested in, along with your mailing address. Exhibitor tickets will be available free to all exhibitors entering three or more exhibits, which remain on the grounds for the duration of the Fair or who show livestock. Visit us online at www. madisoncountyfairny.com.

Debris Clutters East Shore of Lake

Ron Wright

Fair from page 1

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Your news. Your voice.


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Your Government

Your Window Into

Page 4

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw the Legislative Process

W a m p s v i ll e

County Official Responds to State Announcement Martha E. Conway (Wampsville) Madison County Board of Supervisors Chairman John M. Becker (R,C,I – Sullivan) responded to an announcement last week during a state majority press conference that a committee on Native American Affairs is proposed. According to nysenate.gov/event/2011/may/03/ majority-press-conference, Senators George Maziarz, Tom Libous, Mark Grisanti, Patrick Gallivan and Betty Little will populate the group. Maziarz will chair the committee. “I am very happy to see the Senate is taking the issue of Native American Affairs seriously enough to appoint a select committee to address the problems New York state taxpayers have endured,” Becker wrote in a prepared statement May 3. “From the collection of sales and excise tax on sales to non-Indians to land claims across the state, it is about time the Senate stepped in to resolve the many issues facing local governments.” According to a report by WIVB in Buffalo, the committee is expected to tackle issues such as “…revisions to the outdated Indian Law, education on reservation lands, taxation, preservation and protection of Indian culture and social services. The WIVB report quoted Seneca President Robert Odawi Porter as saying the Seneca Nation’s leaders, and its people, are pleased with this demonstration of potential progress in our relationship with the state government.” New York state is home to one of the top 10 highest populations of Native Americans. “I am confident Senators Maziarz, Libous, Gallivan, Grisanti, Valesky and Little will be on the forefront of enforcing the laws of New York state and will support the collection of the $130 million budgeted in sales tax on tobacco,” Becker said. Madison County Solid Waste and Recycling

County to recycle metal pots and pans

(Wampsville) Don’t know what to do with those old and unusable metal pots and pans? Recycle them. Madison County is adding pots and pans to the list of voluntary recyclable items. Pots and pans can be placed at curbside along with recycled steel and aluminum cans or recycled at the transfer stations. Solid Waste Director James A. Zecca said that adding pots and pans to the other items recycled by the County will bring in additional revenue and keep these items out of the landfill. Further, recycling pots and pans prevents raw materials from being extracted from the earth. All the common metals used to manufacture pots and pans are mined from the earth and are non-renewable natural resources. Metal cookware is by no means the biggest culprit when it comes to mine-waste problems; however, taken together, the extraction and processing of all metals creates between one and two billion tons of mine waste annually and has polluted more than 3,400 miles of streams and more than 440,000 acres of land. In 2004, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ranked the metal mining industry as the nation’s worst toxic polluter. After doing some research, Zecca said he found other municipalities around the country have established extremely successful pot-and-pan-recycling programs. He said recycling old cookware to prevent them from becoming waste is one of the most sustainable approaches to dealing with old cookware. For questions or more information on the voluntary pots and pans recycling program call the recycling hot line at (800) 721-2208.

Canastota: From Village Hall GLAS plans open house; Legion plans Memorial Day ceremony Margo Frink (Canastota) The Canastota Fire Department made a request to the village board to rebid the hydraulic rescue tool, previously bid on by Code 4 Fire and Rescue, a company that specializes in extrication tools (Jaws of Life). Code 4 was the only bidder. According fire Chief John Massarotti the bid did not meet specifications. The company offered a simultaneous tool at no extra cost but the fire department did not want it. The department designed another set of specifications that includes the asking price for each unit and mounting tool in the bid and separated the trade-in value for tools and hoses Removed from the new bid was the battery powered rescue tool. A motion was made to reject the previous bid and to rebid with new specifications. The bids will be opened May 24 at noon. Mayor Todd Rouse and Trustee Margaret Peters were absent from the meeting. Deputy Mayor Scott Rapasadi led the

meeting. In the mayor’s absence and at his request, village Administrator Larry Carpenter asked the board to move forward with plans to purchase a new snow plow truck at the anticipated price of $146,000. The new truck will have a stainless steel frame for an additional $1,500 but will last longer, Carpenter said. The board agreed to pursue it. Trustee Ted Lumbrazo made a complaint about “Pennysaver” newspapers littered around the village. “Can’t they put them in boxes and not on people’s lawns? They are all over the village,” Lumbrazo said. Clerk Catherine Williams said she had called the Pennysaver and asked them to not deliver to her residence. Carpenter said they used to attach newspaper tubes to resident’s mailboxes but he doesn’t think they do that anymore. “From a village standpoint I don’t think there is anything we can do,” Carpenter said. Trustee AnnMarie Rossi complemented Canastota Little League for its 60th anniversary celebration held April 29 and 30 with special guest, retired Major League

Baseball pitcher Tommy John. However, Rossi said she thought the dinner ticket price was too [expensive) for residents of Canastota. Dinner tickets sold for $30 in advance or $35 that evening.

Other Business Several residents made request to have rotting trees located within village limits removed near their homes. The locations were turned over the Department of Public Works for review. The Greater Lenox Ambulance Service will hold an open house on May 22 at its facility on Canal Road. The board approved GLAS’ request to utilize the DPW parking lot for the event. The board also approved several training classes for the fire department and one for the clerk. The American Legion Charles Miller Post 140 will hold its Memorial Day observance with parade on May 30. The parade will start at the high school at 10 a.m. and proceed to Clark Park where a ceremony will take place at 11 a.m. Margo Frink is vice president of M3P Media LLC and managing editor of the Madison County Courier. She can be reached at Margo@m3pmedia.com or 315481-8732.

Cazenovia May Seek Federal Money Riverside Drive development is one possible project for HUD block grant Aaron Gifford (Cazenovia, May 2, 2011) – The suggestion box is open. By law, the Cazenovia Village Board of Trustees must accept ideas for a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development grant application due by the end of this month. Eligible projects include community centers, housing rehabilitation for low- to moderate-income residents, new sidewalks and improvements to water or sewer lines. The second of two required public hearings is scheduled for May 23,

four days before the grant application is due. Trustees cautioned that they would be hesitant to apply for funding if they don’t have a strong proposal. The first public hearing took place during the May Village Board meetings following a brief presentation from Jeanie Gleisner of the Central New York Regional Planning and Development Board. She said individual municipalities are eligible to receive up to $400,000 for housing rehabilitation projects, $600,000 for public infrastructure improvements and $400,000 for community facilities like recreation centers or child care centers. Inter-municipal projects involving counties or two or

more towns or villages can receive up to $900,000 for projects. Gleisner said the village or the village and town combined should select a project that is consistent with their most updated comprehensive plans, which emphasizes neighborhood connectivity, preserving the community’s rural character and bolstering the quality of life for all demographics, including senior citizens. “Those are some of the goals to think about,” she said. Trustees suggested that a project has not been selected yet, though it was clear at the start of the meeting that the proposed Riverside Drive development had already

Cazenovia- - 5


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 5

Your Government

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Your Window Into

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw the Legislative Process

DiVeronica Attends Summit in Washington Addresses key issues facing Madison County constituents

Margo Frink (Madison County) Lenox Town Supervisor Rocco J. DiVeronica joined other county leaders in Washington D.C. May 3 for a National Association of Counties/ White House Summit to discuss government issues facing local communities. DiVeronica was there to represent Madison County. The five-hour summit featured secretaries of the president’s cabinet and other key administration officials speaking on issues such as “Breaking the Cycle of Jail and Poverty,” “Infrastructure and Sustainable Communities” and “Health Reform Implementation and Medicaid.” Vice President Joe Biden also spoke. “There was an array of cabinet people there; top dogs in federal government,” DiVeronica said. DiVeronica said the purpose was to find ways to partner with the federal government and to better understand how they can work together to solve problems at the county level. “We need answers so we

can survive,” DiVeronica said. “Counties are the backbone of our federal government.” DiVeronica said only 100 county leaders were invited to the summit, and Madison County was one of the few counties mentioned from the cabinet. Before attending, DiVeronica was sent a questionnaire specific to certain issues. He answered the questions and returned it. When asked about the key challenges Madison County faced in the areas of health reform and implementation/Medicaid; breaking the cycle of jail and poverty, infrastructure and sustainable communities and other issues, DiVeronica said: “Like most local governments in the recession, we are facing aging infrastructure – roads, bridges, water, sewer and lack the funding to bring these up-to-date en masse. We are working on it. Also, we lack broadband access in many communities in our county. Without addressing these issues, there can be no future growth in the community. Local projects in the town of Sullivan, Town of Lenox and our industrial parks have been blocked due to challenges from the Oneida Indian Nation. These projects

provide sewer and water for the residences and businesses of Madison County.” “New York counties pay more than $7.3 billion annually for the state’s Medicaid program (in the form of property taxes),” DiVeronica said. “This is a major issue for Madison County and every other county in New York. We hope that Health Care Reform will provide New York with additional funding to take over the local share of Medicaid. Madison County has budgeted $10.6 million for Medicaid in 2011, which equates to approximately 37 percent of our tax levy.” “Resolving ongoing jurisdictional and other disputes with Native American tribes in a manner fair and reasonable to all matters include land claims, applications to take lands into federal trust, tax collection on sales to nonIndians, jurisdiction, scope of Indian Country, intergovernmental agreements regarding services, census map changes, federal action and participation has been largely adverse and counterproductive, and we seek to develop dialog and communication to assist in reaching a balanced, permanent resolution to each of the challenges,” DiVeronica added.

Bob Lucas, complained that some of the new regulations are too restrictive and focus more on protecting view sheds than they do fostering economic development. His family owns undeveloped land near Town and Country Plaza. “If I’m gonna pay taxes,” he said, “I need to know what I can put there.” * The board approved a request from Redhouse Art Center to use Lakeland Park at 7 p.m. Sunday, June 19, for its production of “Romeo and Juliet.” The performance is free to the public. “What a great Father’s Day present,” said Mayor Tom

Dougherty. * The board approved Summit Church’s request to hang a banner advertising its ongoing Sunday program, “What in the World is Going on?” for the next two months on the Lakeland Park fence. The banner will be displayed every week between Thursday and Sunday. The program focuses on Biblical prophecies about terrorism, crude oil prices and other related current events. * The board approved St. James’ Church request to close a portion of Green Street on June 5 for its annual parish picnic.

In other business * Deputy Mayor Kurt Wheeler has finished the latest draft of a proposed updated zoning schedule. One audience member,

most recently with the Stockbridge-Munsee in 2010 and with others previously (including the Oneida of Wisconsin in 2005). However, the settlements were never implemented due to other forces, which in the instance of the Stockbridge-Munsee, was

DiVeronica - 7

Fuel Prices Are Up. Save Money Now! The Best Way To Save Is with New Windows & Doors. Vinyl Replacement Windows

Only $279 ea. Installed! “We Are Lead Certified”

Call Us for the Best Work & The Best Prices

The Window King Rt. 365 • Holland Patent Over 50 Years In Business • 337-5500

If You're Not Advertising With The Courier

You're Missing The Boat

Cazenovia from page 4 been talked about. “It should come as no surprise that we need money,” said Trustee Peggy Van Arnam, noting that the developers of the proposed medical center/senior apartment project have been unable to secure financing that would cover a public parking lot at the site. Audience members said the village should prioritize replacing water lines that are more than 100 years old.

He was asked to describe an example of an innovative solution that the county is using to overcome these challenges successfully. “We have reduced workforce but not services,” DiVeronica said. “In the area of resolving disputes with Native American tribes, we have successfully negotiated resolutions,

Photo courtesy of purposeandgraceblog.com

Advertise in The Madison County Courier and on MadisonCountyCourier.com

Our low prices and the response you'll get will amaze you!!! Call 315-687-7561 ext. 20 today!


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Your Government

Your Window Into

Page 6

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw the Legislative Process

Madison County and ARC Partner on New Recycling Initiative

ABOVE: Ewaste169: Pictured from left are Wayne Horning of Madison Cortland ARC; Doug Bedell of LoJo Technology; Jim Zecca, director of Madison County Solid Waste; Bob Andrews of Madison Cortland ARC; Scott Butler representing Sen. David J. Valesky; Michael Hulland of Madison Cortland ARC’s Alternatives Industry; Grace Rapasadi representing Assemblyman William Magee; Kim Kapfer of ARC’s LoJo Technology; Phyllis Little, Madison Cortland ARC board member; Raymond Lewandowski, executive director of Madison Cortland ARC; Forrest Furlong of LoJo Technology; Louis Leggett representing Madison Cortland ARC; Hank Leo, president of Greater Oneida Chamber of Commerce and Jim Bouyea of LoJo Technology. RIGHT: Ewaste150—Jim Zecca, director of Madison County Solid Waste and Sanitation and Raymond Lewandowski, executive director of Madison Cortland ARC together load a printer into an E-Waste collection bin as Jim Bouyea, of LoJo Technology looks on.

A red ribbon was cut by Madison Cortland ARC staff, Madison County officials and local dignitaries, marking the official grand opening of Madison County’s E-Waste Recycling and disposal program. The new collection site for all of Central New York is located at Madison Cortland ARC’s LoJo Technology, 327 Farrier Ave. in Oneida. Hours of collection are Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the first Saturday of each month from 9 a.m. to noon. This service is free of charge. For more than 20 years, Madison Cortland ARC and Madison County have been partners in the county’s Recycling Program, ARC has managed the Alternatives Recycling Center on Buyea Road in Lincoln. “I am very pleased to announce this new initiative that is four months in the making,” said Michael Hulland, associate executive director of Enterprise at Madison Cortland ARC. “This is just the next step of what has been and continues to be a successful partnership,” said Jim Zecca, Madison County director of Solid Waste and Sanitation.

Items that are being accepted include computers, televisions, smallscale servers, computer peripherals, monitors, electronic keyboards and mice or similar pointing devices, fax machines, scanners, printers, VCRs, DVRs, portable digital music players, DVD players, digital converter boxes, cable or satellite receivers, electronic or video game consoles, cell phones, cash registers, typewriters, PDA’s, digital cameras, telephones and stereo equipment. The county will continue to accept electronic items at transfer stations and continue to charge one punch on the punch card system to cover transportation costs. Questions regarding the new recycling program can be answered by calling Madison Cortland ARC’s LoJo Technology at (315) 363-3014.

Stockbridge from page 3 the Stockbridge Ruritan weekend activities. This year’s event marks the 30th anniversary for the group. A 30th anniversary dinner celebration is planned for May 12 at the Legion. * Town Attorney Steve Jones reported that a pending legal action was avoided when residents performed necessary work and applied for and received proper permits for their project. “We didn’t have to go to court,” Jones said. “[Code Enforcement Office] Dave [Fort] said he is waiting for one letter from the engineer and is confident it is coming.” * Kiehn reported that state Department of Environmental Conservation permit paperwork is complete for Freeman Road. He said his department is expected to get the fence erected between the playground and the parking lot by week’s end.


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 7

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, MadisonCountyCourier.com DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, Georgetown, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw

Your News

From Around the County

DiVeronica from page 5 the disapproval by the Department of Interior (DOI) after reportedly having assisted in brokering over the previous year.” DiVeronica said top concerns for constituents were continuing disputes/ difficulties with the Oneida Indian Nation of New York and the lack of a federal role to protect the local communities. Particular concerns he said were (1) the acquisition (and attempted treatment as “sovereign”) by this tribe of thousands of acres of property, including numerous, key commercial properties and its near monopolization of the sales of fuel and cigarettes resulting in significantly higher taxes due to nonpayment of real property taxes on such property and refusal to collect and remit sales and excise taxes on sales by the tribe to non-Indians; (2) the proposed expansion of the

availability of taking land into trust under the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 (the so called “Carcieri fix”); (3) the change without notice or the opportunity to comment reflected in the 2010 census maps purporting to increase the area of the Oneida Indian Reservation from 32 to 307,000 acres. “The Administration needs to establish an advocate for local government to balance the very one-sided approach by the federal bureaucracy, particularly the DOI/BIA (Bureau of Indian Affair).” Other top concerns he said included the Farm Bill and milk pricing, a lack of agriculture produce processing facilities, the need for jobs and new economic development opportunities in our communities. When asked what question he would have most liked to have

Madison Count y Democr actic C o mm i t t e e N e w s

Madison County Reads Ahead to be Honored (Oneida) The Madison County Democratic Committee announced recently that this year’s recipient of the Award for Service to Community, to be presented May 19 at the Second Annual James & Dolley Madison Dinner, will be the “Madison County Reads Ahead” adult literacy program centered in the Madison County Library system. The Award for Service to Community is annually presented to an organization providing exceptional community service to those in need in Madison County. “Madison County Reads Ahead” began with a founding grant from the Central New York Community Foundation in February 2006 and offers free one-on-one adultliteracy tutoring to the residents of Madison County through participating public libraries. The program trains volunteer literacy tutors and recruits potential

learners 18 years of age and older who want to improve their basic English-language skills, get a GED diploma or learn English as a second language. The keynote address will be given by Stephanie A. Miner, mayor of Syracuse, the first woman elected mayor of any of the “Big 5” cities in New York state. Miner is the ideal person to speak at this year’s event because of her commitment to education and public service. As a Syracuse City Councilor, she championed and helped pass legislation that gave $1 million in initial funding to Say Yes to Education, a program that provides necessary support services for Syracuse City School District students. Last year’s honoree was the Munnsville American Legion Post No. 54 for their work in bringing the Moving Vietnam Memorial Wall to Madison County. Dinner - 9

addressed, DiVeronica asked, “How can New York counties partner with the federal government to encourage the state of New York to take over the local cost of Medicaid?”And, “Can the administration establish an advocate for local government to balance the very one-sided approach by the federal bureaucracy, particularly the DOI/BIA and take other steps to assure local government interests are protected?” When asked if there would be money available to counties to resolve some of the issues, DiVeronica said, “Who knows? The way things are today. We need to try and figure out how the federal government can partner with us with all these budget cuts.” Margo Frink is vice president of M3P Media LLC and managing editor of the Madison County Courier. She can be reached at Margo@m3pmedia.com or 315481-8732.

Should I Sell My Gold Now? Well I’m no financial adviser, but I do watch the gold & silver market fluctuate on a daily basis. Most people that I have the pleasure of meeting and who stop into our showroom are not interested in the investment aspect of the precious metals market. They are more interested in selling their junk jewelry or coins that have no meaning to them. I do know they are walking away with a lot more money than ever before. Why is this? The number one reason is because the gold, silver & platinum markets are very much on the rise. In fact, gold has hit its all time high and people are taking advantage of that every day when they come in and see us at A Buyer of Gold & Silver Coins & Jewelry located at 1121 Glenwood Ave., Oneida.

Greg VanAlstine

The second reason people are walking away with more money than ever before when they sell us their items is because they are really digging around their homes and taking advantage of the fact that more gold and silver means more money! As I have mentioned many times in the past, more weight equals more dollar signs for you! Although gold & silver prices are high, unfortunately there are many greedy business owners out there paying the same prices they were paying before gold and silver took off. If you have items you want to have looked at and maybe sell, we would be more than happy to invite you to our showroom. Please feel free to call or stop in Monday-Friday 10am-5pm & Saturday 10am-3pm. This Saturday, April 16th, we will be set up & buying gold & silver coins & jewelry at the Chocolate Festival & Business Expo at the Kallet Civic Center downtown Oneida. If you’re not sure if we’ll buy it, bring it anyway! We look forward to seeing you there!

1121 Glenwood Ave., Oneida • 280-0435 www.abuyerofgoldandsilver.com

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Attention Business Owners: Advertise in the Madison County Courier Weekly and on MadisonCountyCourier.com and get a return on your advertising dollars. Call Now For Affordable Rates Discounts & Current Specials!

Mike Bova, Publisher 315-404-8200 mike@m3pmedia.com


Page 8

May 11, 2011

Your News

Madison County Courier

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Around theWhitelaw County Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville,From West Eaton, West Edmeston,

Firefighters Train in the Flames

(Canastota, Chittenango, Lincoln, Munnsville, Oneida, Wampsville) Fire companies from Canastota, Chittenango, Lincoln, Munnsville, Oneida and Wampsville participated in a live burn in Lincoln Saturday, May 7. Pictured are scenes from the day’s activities.

Photos courtesy Kevin Fairbanks, Director of Operations, Kevin Fairbanks & Associates, LLC, Oneida


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 9

Your News

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Around theWhitelaw County Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville,From West Eaton, West Edmeston,

B r o o k f i e l d R e p u bl i c a n C o mm i t t e e N e w s

Committee to Meet Wednesday (Brookfield – May 11, 2011) The town of Brookfield Republican Committee will meet Wednesday, May 11, at 7:30 p.m. at town hall on Main Street in the hamlet. Any Republican interested in being a candidate for

To w n

the office of town council, highway superintendent or town supervisor is encouraged to attend. There are two seats up for reelection for council; councilors and the highway superintendent serve fouryear terms. Town supervisor

is a two-year term. Anyone interested in running for office but unable to attend should contact Chairman Gail E. Abrams at 899-6266 or co-Chairman Jeff Mayne at 899-6215 or 899-8206.

S u ll i va n P a r k s & R e c r e at i o n N e w s

of

16th Annual Scholarships for Youth Golf Outing (Sullivan) The Town of Sullivan Parks & Recreation Office and SARDA is hosting its annual golf outing at Rogue’s Roost Golf & Country Club Friday, May 13. This event is a captain and crew format starting at 9 a.m. The cost is $65 per person, or $55 if you are a member of Rogue’s Roost, which includes 18 holes of golf with cart, lunch and door prizes. Advanced registration required. Proceeds will be used to fund the Sullivan Community Council Volunteer Service Award. It provides a monetary scholarship to a male and female Chittenango High School senior who have been active as a volunteer of the SCC or Parks & Recreation Department.

The event will also help fund future SARDA projects. For registration information contact the Parks & Recreation Office at 687-3471.

Just A Bit The Parks Department also is offering a “Just a Bit” class at Trador Farms in Bridgeport. The class will run Wednesdays, May 18 to June 15, from 3:45 to 5:45 p.m. for youth in kindergarten through second grade. The cost is $125 for new students and $100 for returning students, with checks payable to Tracey Stellakis. Kids will learn how to care for horses from grooming to riding. Bus passes are available from Bridgeport School. For more information,

contact the Parks & Recreation office at 6873471.

A Horse of Course The town of Sullivan Parks Department also is offering “A Horse of Course” class at Trador Farms in Bridgeport. The class will run on Thursdays, May 19 to June 16, from 3:45 to 5:45 p.m. for youth in third to fifth grades. The cost is $125 for new students and $100 for returning students, with checks payable to Tracey Stellakis. Kids will learn how to care for horses from grooming to riding. Bus passes are available from Bridgeport School. For more information, call the Parks & Recreation office at 687-3471.

- SAVE THIS AD We Do: Chimney's (rebuilt or repaired), roofing, siding, masonry, carpentry, porches, blown – in insulation in Attic & Walls, basement waterproofing EMERGENCY ROOF REPAIRS

JOE MACRI Home Improvement 336-4176 ` Business Opportunity Become a Mobile Media-Text Message Marketing Agency for less than $500 per YEAR. Add this to existing customers, or START A NEW BUSINESS for less than $500! Text: Thrasher to 90210 to learn more... Or visit: http://Text.CyberVillage.com

CONCERNED ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER?

A & P WATER TESTING 315-684-3169 NYS DOH ELAP CERTIFIED

U.S. RT. 20 EAST MORRISVILLE

Dinner from page 7 Munnsville Post 54 Color Guard will participate again this year with the presentation of the colors before the dinner. “We are extremely proud to be able to highlight the ‘Madison County Reads Ahead’ program as it embodies the great principles of a free democratic society,” said Marianne Simberg, chairwoman of the Madison County Democratic Committee. “The ability to read allows one to participate fully and freely in the democratic process and to make judgments independently based on printed, verifiable facts. The community benefits

when individuals reach their full potential and the ‘Madison County Reads Ahead’ program makes an immeasurable impact on the lives of the participants and the community as a whole.” Mike Oot, chair of the committee responsible for the Dinner said that the selection of the honoree for this year was an interesting and fulfilling task. “This year, the entire Democratic Committee had the opportunity to nominate candidates for the Award and the Dinner Committee had to choose between many outstanding organizations,” Oot said. “We’re lucky

to live in a county where volunteerism and community service are a way of life for many people.” The dinner will be held at the Kallet Civic Center in Oneida May 19, cash bar at 6 p.m. The dinner begins at 6:45 p.m. Tickets are $40 per person; dinner is a buffet catered by Napoleon’s Restaurant. Orders for full tables are accepted. Tickets for the James & Dolley Madison Dinner are available now; contact Charles McMahon (315) 271-7218; fax (516) 908-3792 or email otis@twcny.rr.com.

Submit Your News

We welcome your news, photos, press releases and more. Email madnews@m3pmedia.com

CHECK OUT OUR QUALITY TREES & SHRUBS **************************************

Harris Seeds Fruit Trees Seed Potatoes Onion Sets **************************************

Berry Plants Strawberry – Blueberry Currants – Grapes

Seneca Trail Garden Center Rte. 5, Wampsville 361-1532 ● www.SenecaTrail.com


May 11, 2011

Page 10

Madison County Courier

Your News

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Around theWhitelaw County Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville,From West Eaton, West Edmeston,

Open Your Heart Fundraiser Celebrate Preservation Month in Cazenovia Event Features Plane, Train and Boat Rides

Submitted by Sharye Skinner (Cazenovia) The third Open Your Heart event to benefit Caz Cares will be held Saturday, May 14, in the Meeting House behind the Presbyterian Church in Cazenovia (corner of Sullivan and Route 20) from 7 to 9 p.m. This is an evening of fun, food, music and fundraising. The Meeting House entrance is on Sullivan Street. There is no admission charge (donations will be accepted), but bring your check book or wallet for some awesome silent auction items. This year’s silent auction items include an airplane ride over the Central New York countryside., a family train ride on a private model track, a Total Table Tennis Table and rackets, an overnight at the Jefferson Clinton Hotel in downtown Syracuse, a gourmet dinner for six by Coleen Pepe, an afternoon of water sports on Cazenovia Lake, wine tastings, furniture, original works of art, gift certificates from local businesses, flatware from Oneida Silver, handmade items and collectibles. Jeff DeVeau will provide live piano music. There will be a raffle for the Stickley Collectible Mirror. This reproduction mirror was originally designed by architect Harvey

Walk the Historic Village, Learn More About Grants Programs

pre-registration is required. For more information, call Diane Voss at (315) 6553200. (Cazenovia) In association with the * The second public informational Cazenovia Public Library and the Village meeting made possible by OPRHP will of Cazenovia each May, The Friends of be held Thursday, May 19, at 7 p.m. in the Lorenzo and Lorenzo State Historic Site Community Room of the Cazenovia Public invite the public to celebrate Preservation Library, 100 Albany St. Month and learn more about the many Julian Adams of the state Historic social, cultural and economic benefits in Preservation Office will highlight how preserving historic architecture, landscapes Ellis for Gustav Stickley SHPO helps communities identify, evaluate, and craft traditions. back in the early 1900s. preserve and revitalize their historic, This year’s offerings include a free walking archeological and cultural resources through The poem “On Marriage” tour May 14, two public information sessions a variety of programs including the state and by Gibran Kahil Gibran is on May 11 and 19, and a hands-on faux written on the back mirror. National Registers of Historic Places, the painting workshop on May 21. It is the perfect to give federal historic rehabilitation tax credit, the someone you love. The * Of particular interest to non-profits and state historic preservation grants program $5 Raffle Tickets for this local governments will be the Wednesday, and a wide range of technical assistance. mirror are available at the May 11, 2 to 4 p.m. informational The public is invited to attend this free church, from members of presentation on Environmental Protection program; for more information, contact the church or on the church Fund planning grants. Voss at (315) 655-3200. website cazpres.org. Offered by Christine Capella-Peters and * Whether restoring historic paint finishes CazCares is a not-forJean Egenhofer of the state Office of or applying decorative faux finishes on profit 501(c)(3) Food Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, furniture and decorative objects, Golden Pantry & Clothing Closet. attendees will receive guidance on developing Artist Colors paint application expert Lori For almost 30 years, competitive grant applications for the Wilson will lead a hands-on faux paint CazCares’ mission has been upcoming EPF grant round. workshop in the Community Room of the to provide food, clothing, Pre-registration is recommended by Cazenovia Public Library Saturday, May 21, emergency assistance and contacting Egenhofer at (315) 492-1756. from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. referral services to low Free and open to the public, this program Wilson holds master of arts from the income families in the will take place at the Cazenovia Municipal Victory University of Manchester, England, Cazenovia School District Building, 90 Albany St. and has studied her craft and trained and surrounding areas of * On Saturday, May 14, from 10 to 11:30 in Europe for three years to hone her Madison County. An average a.m., local history enthusiasts will enjoy application techniques and skills. of 160 families visit the site a walking tour of Cazenovia’s forgotten All required materials and supplies will per month. industrial past. be furnished for this Friends of Lorenzo During the past two years, Tour leaders Jerry Munger and Ted Bartlett workshop. Pre-registration (including a this Open Your Heart event will lead walkers along Chittenango Creek $20 payment) is required by May 17, and has raised more than $17,000 from the Lake to Clark Street to re-discover participants are encouraged to bring along a to assist Caz Cares in their the Village’s historic water-powered industrial bagged lunch; bottled water will be supplied. efforts to serve those in heritage; the tour will begin promptly at 10 For more information, contact Voss at need in our community. a.m. at Carpenter’s Barn, 1 Forman St. (315) 655-3200. Caz Cares has long been Space is limited for this free tour and a mission of Cazenovia First Presbyterian. The Evangelism & Fellowship To w n o f M a d i s o n Committee is looking Comprehensive Plan Informational Meeting June 8 for creative donations of (Madison – June 8, 2011) There will be a Organizers are asking residents to help services, talents and special community input meeting in preparation for shape the future of their community and items. If you would like to a comprehensive plan update Wednesday, save the date. make a donation, buy raffle June 8, at 7:30 p.m. tickets or help with the For more information please call Mitch event, call Steve McEntee at The meeting will be held at the firehouse Hoffmeister, town of Madison Planning (315) 380.7891, Kevin Curtis located at 7362 State Route 20 in the village Board chairman, at 982-1560. at (315) 447.1772 or Kristin of Madison. Curtis at (315) 281.5533 or visit cazpres.org.

Letter Carriers Collecting Food (Bridgeport) The Bridgeport Post Office is soliciting your support to help the local Bridgeport Food Pantry by collecting non-perishable food items Saturday, May 14. All contributions will stay in the local community.

Week of May 9

PAC 9 9 S c h e d u l e

May10 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.: Oneida Rotary Club meeting of May 3 with Ronald Spadafora 2:27 p.m. and 7:27 p.m.: Village of Canastota Board meeting of May 2 2:54 p.m. and 7:54 p.m.: Oneida Common Council meeting of May 3

May 11 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.: Canastota Central

Schools Board Meeting of April 26 3:15 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.: Town of Sullivan Board meeting of May 4

May 12 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.: Tomorrow’s World 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.: Heaven Bless the Little Ones with Thom O’Connor 3 p.m. and 8 p.m.: CMS and You – Children’s Health 11 p.m.: Ear to the Streets


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 11

Your News

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Around theWhitelaw County Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville,From West Eaton, West Edmeston,

M o r r i s v i ll e S tat e C o ll e g e N e w s

College Honors Journalism Professor with Distinguished Faculty Award (Morrisville) Morrisville newspaper columnist, graphic State College faculty member artist, publicist and book Brian McDowell has received publisher. His experience in the Morrisville State College the industry has spirited him Distinguished in the classroom, Faculty Award. where he is revered He will be by students for his recognized during unique classroom the college’s 100th lessons and teaching commencement on style. May 14 at 1 p.m. He remains in the new athletic current in the stadium. field through Brian The award is various affiliations McDowell presented to faculty and activities, members who display holds seminars in desktop professional growth, personal publishing, public relations and professional achievement and publication development and have provided and creativity with local outstanding service to the companies, and maintains college. strong industry ties, which have greatly affected students’ McDowell, assistant careers. professor of journalism and chair of the Journalism “The mark of a truly Department, has worked at distinguished professor lies in Morrisville State College for the impact that professor has 26 years. He worked in the on his or her students,” reads Public Relations Department a nominating letter from for 10 of those years, also 28 current students. “We serving as its director. can honestly say that, as his students, Brian McDowell has A devoted member of changed us; fundamentally the college and campus and for the better.” community, McDowell has served on various committees “Professor McDowell’s and in numerous capacities. devotion goes far beyond He is currently advisor of the the classroom,” said Franci student-run newspaper, The Valenzano, public relations CHIMES, and also has taught associate and alumnus of the at the Norwich campus. college’s journalism studies program. “He’s an advocate Throughout his academic for alumni, still providing career, McDowell has guidance to former students, worked as a freelance writer,

H a m i lt o n P a r t n e r s h i p

for

C o mm u n i t y D e v e l o p m e n t N e w s

Seven Successful People Share Secrets

(Hamilton) Former Syracuse NewTimes owner and Hamilton resident Art Zimmer presents “7 Habits of 7 Highly Successful People,” a seminar for the citizens of Hamilton Wednesday, May 18, at 7:30 a.m. at the Palace Theater. Facilitated by the Partnership for Community Development, this seminar is based on the best-selling book, “7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” by Stephen Covey. “I have been fortunate to have experienced my fair share of success,” Zimmer said. “It isn’t something that happens overnight. You have to work toward it and for it.” Zimmer is no stranger to success. He was the owner of the Syracuse NewTimes for 26 years and is owner

taking pride in graduates’ work and championing their accomplishments.” He’s been vital in the growth of the journalism program, too. “Brian is very dedicated to keeping alive the best of the 40-year traditions of the journalism program, including close studentfaculty contact and a major emphasis on student writing and reporting skills,” said Dr. Paul Griffin, dean of the School of Liberal Arts. “He’s been instrumental in developing a new bachelor and associate degree that address the needs of today’s student going out into the contemporary job market.” McDowell has participated in curriculum development that led to numerous new courses and the college’s journalism for online communication bachelor degree. He also established a photography show for students in the Press Photography course. Outside of his college duties, he owns Log Cabin Books of Hamilton and has published 10 titles to date, including three books about Peterboro in partnership with Dr. Norman K. Dann, local historical author and former professor at Morrisville State College.

of Zimmer Motor Car Company in Hamilton. “People can learn from other people’s successes,” Zimmer said. “There are many successful people in the Hamilton area. That’s what this seminar is all about – putting people in a room and letting them share their habits, work ethics and beliefs on success in the workplace.” The 7 Habits of 7 Highly Successful People seminar will unite seven leaders in their fields from Hamilton. The seven panelists include: Ed Vantine, president, Vantine Imaging; Diana Bowers, superintendent of Hamilton Central School; Chris Kendall, attorney; Dennis Kelly, president, Den Kelly Cars; Sue McVaugh, mayor, Hamilton; Dr. Robert

Delorme and RuthAnn Loveless, vice president, Alumni Affairs, Colgate University. “‘7 Habits of 7 Highly Successful People’ is not something new to Zimmer,” said Roger Bauman, managing director of the PCD. “He presented a similar seminar in 2004 for the Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce and the event was widely received. The seminars are still being presented annually to this day.” The seminar on May 18 is free and open to the public. Guests are invited to arrive between 7:15 and 7:30 a.m. for coffee, pastries and networking. For more information, call (315) 825-3537.

Through his company, McDowell has published children’s books as well as fiction, nonfiction/history and crafting. McDowell donated publishing services and

printing of “In Our Own Words,” which chronicles the 40-year history of the college’s Journalism Department through stories

McDowell - 14

Fuel Prices Are Up. Save Money Now! The Best Way To Save Is with New Windows & Doors. Vinyl Replacement Windows

Only $279 ea. Installed! “We Are Lead Certified”

Call Us for the Best Work & The Best Prices

The Window King Rt. 365 • Holland Patent Over 50 Years In Business • 337-5500

Save 10-50% On Your Business Phone Service Free initial no obligation consultation Free demo of our hosted Voice over IP Phones Free telecom audit of your current phone/internet bill

Call Today & Save! Keith Haviland 315-750-4393 keith@h2telecomconsultants.com

Cleaner Carpets & Floors CNY's “Go-To Guy” "Your Greener Cleaner" Lance Comfort - Owner "My Mission is to Provide the Highest Quality Work with Courteous, Prompt and Attentive Service, the Complete Satisfaction of Every Client Being My Number One Goal." - Lance Comfort

Residential / Commercial Low Moisture Methods - Eco Friendly Products


Page 12

May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Your News

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Around theWhitelaw County Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville,From West Eaton, West Edmeston,

Miss Oz-Stravaganza Pageant May 14 (Chittenango) The first-ever Miss OzStravaganza Pageant will be held Saturday, May 14, at Chittenango High School beginning at 10 a.m. The pageant is open to the public, and there is no cost to attend. Twenty-one contestants, ranging in age from 3 to 16, will compete for six different titles. Additionally, four specialty awards will be presented for kindness, bravery, academic excellence and community spirit. For more information, contact Lorrell Walter at (315) 687-1122.

Special Guests Announced The 33rd annual OzStavaganza planned for June 3 through 5 in Chittenango is offering an impressive lineup of special guests. New this year is Michael Siewert, a collector of Judy Garland dresses. He will display the dresses and show video of Garland wearing the dresses in various movies in which she starred. Returning this year are Flower Pot Munchkin Margaret Pellegrini, Trumpeteer Munchkin Karl Slover and Myrna Swensen, widow of Munchkin Clarence Swensen. Two of L. Frank Baum’s great grandsons will be attending with their wives, Bob and Clare Baum and Roger and Charlene Baum. Emmy award-winner, Oz historian and author John Fricke will once again host the weekend events. Garland’s movie stand in, Caren Marsh-Doll will serve Grand Marshal of the Oz parade. Also in the lineup are a variety of Oz authors and Oz artists. The Oz-Stravaganza Committee welcomes sponsors for many of the special guests and events being offered OzStravaganza weekend. To date, Margaret Pellegrini is sponsored by the generosity of our “Presenting Sponsor,” the Oneida Indian Nation. Bob and Clare Baum are sponsored for the second year in a row by John

Wilcox. Sponsorship information is available at oz-stravaganza. com or by calling Colleen Zimmer at (315) 415.8546. In addition to the special guest sponsorships, a variety of Oz events are also in need of sponsorship. For further information please contact OzStravaganza co-director Colleen Zimmer  at (315) 415.8546 or collsue@aol. com.

Room for Vendors Running Out The Oz-Stravaganza park is rapidly filling with crafters and vendors for the 33rd annual Oz-Stravaganza weekend. Park applications are available for download from the official website at oz-stravaganza.com or by contacting Lynne Bunce at (315) 530.3319 or shedlady@twcny.rr.com. Prior participation is not a guarantee of a site in the park. Applications are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Passport Program Announced A new addition this year is an Oz passport. Participants will visit the 23 participating businesses in the downtown area to get their passports stamped and solve the mystery message. Many of the participating businesses are offering free gifts to the participants. Completed passports will be stamped at Baum’s Bazaar in Oz-Stravaganza park and participants will receive a gift. Completed entries will be entered for a grand prize drawing. Complete details will be included with your passport, which will be the center pullout in the OzStravaganza program.

Auction Donations Sought Throughout Oz weekend three silent auctions will be held offering a wide variety of items, gift certificates and Oz memorabilia. To donate to the auctions contact Colleen Zimmer at (315) 415-8546.

Paint the Town … Green

O z - S t r ava g a n z a N e w s The Oz-Stravaganza Committee encourages all Chittenango area businesses to decorate their store fronts with Oz decorations and green lights to make our village welcoming to the thousands of guests who will come to Chittenango to celebrate Oz. Green lights are available at Kinney Drugs in Chittenango. Ideas for Oz decorating ideas may be directed to Barb Evans at (315) 687-6250.

Sign Up for Golf Classic Underway Now is the time to sign up for the fifth annual Emerald City Golf Classic hosted by Madison County Tourism Friday, June 3, at Woodcrest Golf Club. Applications are available for download at: oz-stravaganza.com or by calling Jim Walter at (315) 684.7320 ext. 11.

‘Celebrating Dorothy’ is this Year’s Theme The grand Oz parade will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday June 4. The weekend offers a wide variety of contests and events with the details and registration forms

available at oz-stravaganza. com. The third annual “Royal Historian of Oz” writing contest is now underway, offering four age groups from third grade through adult. Winners will receive Oz books from the International Wizard of Oz Club that will be autographed by two of L. Frank Baum’s great grandsons. Applications for the 5th annual Munchkin Mile Kid’s Fun Run are now being accepted for children through age 12. The first 100 to register will receive a specially designed Fun Run shirt. All participants receive a ticket for a free amusement ride at Oz-Stravaganza. The ever-popular Oz costume judging will be held prior to the parade June 4 and is open to all children age 12 and younger. All Oz movie and Baum book characters will be judged and awards will be presented to the winners following the parade. Costumed children are invited to march in the

Meet the Artists ...

parade as a group. Now is the time to book a hot air balloon lift off from the “Land of Oz.” Five launches are scheduled throughout Oz weekend. Reservations are required and may be made at Airborne Adventures 315 495 6544. Emerald City Idol singing competition auditions will be held May 27 and 28 with the finals being held June 4 at Chittenango High School. Details are available on the website. Free shuttles run all day June 4 and 5 from free parking areas located off Route 5 at both ends of the village, making for easy access to Oz-Stravaganza. The Oz-Stravaganza Committee welcomes new volunteers. All meetings are held at 6 p.m. at the Sullivan Free Library. Upcoming meetings are May 11, 18 and 26. Questions may be directed to Colleen (315) 415.8546 or Barb (315) 687.6250. Oz-Stravaganza details can be found at oz-stravaganza. com or by calling (315) 415.8546.

And ‘Let It All Hang Out’ at Parkside Gallery

(Hamilton) Just around the corner from the village green, tucked in the alley between Swank and the Curtain Call on Lebanon Street, the MAD Art Community Art Space Gallery invites all to “Meet the Artists.” Several local artists and artisans will be on hand to talk with you about their work during a small reception on Friday May 13 from 4 to 6 p.m. The current exhibit, “Spring in Hamilton,” with art featuring Colgate continues through June 4. Come meet the artists, have some lemonade and cookies, and enjoy the art. You’ll also be able to take in the art scene back on Broad Street at ‘park side.’ “Let It All Hang Out” is the theme for the coming exhibit in Hamilton’s temporary Parkside Gallery where the work of many local artists will be on display, as well as MAD Art and several other stores in Hamilton. The Parkside Gallery, located at 6 Broad Street in Hamilton, will be open from 10-5, May 12 – 15, weekends through June 5 and by special appointment. Call J. Deming at 824-2838 for more information. As part of the local artists’ exhibit there will be a special “3 Friends” installation entitled “What a Riot!” described as clothespins turned art happening. Come see what can happen when “3 Friends” were

left with a little free time, a pile of wooden clothespins, some paint and brushes, and the magic ingredient – laughter. MAD Art is a non- profit arts and arts education organization. Call 824-1843 for more information or visit the website at www.madartinc.org.


Madison County Courier

May 11, 2011

Page 13

Your News

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Around theWhitelaw County Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville,From West Eaton, West Edmeston,

Oneida Area Civic Chorale Presents ‘Big Band Bash’

(Verona) The Oneida Area Civic Chorale presents “Big Band Bash: A Century of Pop and Jazz Music,” Sunday May 22 at 4 p.m. at the VVS High School, Route 31 in Verona. Special guests will be Stage Music Big Band of Utica.  Tickets sell for $10 from Chorale members, at W.J. Hinman Jewelers, 115 Main St., Oneida or call 363-6892. 

Worn Again Shop to hold 5th Annual Sale (Hamilton) Worn Again second hand shop’s 5th annual sale will be held at the First Baptist Church, Broad Street in Hamilton

on May 13 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and May 14 from 9 a.m. to noon. No children’s clothes at this sale, nor will vouchers be accepted. Vouchers will be accepted at the store located at 45 Lebanon St.  Worn Again is sponsored by local area churches. It is run by all volunteers (most are members of RSVP-Morrisville) and proceeds are returned to the churches, Hamilton Food Cupboard and the Friendship Inn (St. Thomas Episcopal Church). Hours of operation are Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Closed on May 14).

‘Legends of a Landmark’ Madison Hall tour and open house held May 14 and 15

(Morrisville) Join us at Madison Hall, Route 20 in Morrisville during NY Heritage Weekend May 14 and 15. Free light snacks and refreshments will be served while you tour this famous landmark and hear the history and see the architecture of Madison Hall (the original center of county government for Madison County). Featured will be Legends Abram Antone, Sheriff William Bonney and Judge James Warren Nye. Historical photos of Morrisville will also be on display. Knowledgeable tour guides will be onsite from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. You’ll be amazed how this old courthouse has become a multicultural multifunctional community center for everything from weddings to farmers’ markets. For more information call Bob Wetherill 684-7553 or visit www.madisonhall.org for a preview. For more information, call Bob Wetherill 684-7553 or email mtnbob@mail.com.

“Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press…” First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

16


May 11, 2011

Page 14

Madison County Courier

Your History

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Highlighting Madison County’s Legends and Legacies

Peterboro

Journalist to Speak on ‘The Man with the Branded Hand’ (Peterboro) Alvin F. Oickle, author of “The Man with the Branded Hand: The Life of Jonathan Walker,” will speak and sign copies of his book at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 17, at the Gerrit Smith Estate National Historic Landmark in Peterboro. Walker was a Cape Cod sailor who was active in the abolition movement for 30 years. In 1844, Walker attempted to carry seven escaped slaves on his boat from Pensacola, Fla., to freedom in the Bahamas. The boat was caught by bounty hunters, and the fugitives were returned to the two men who claimed to own them. While undergoing two trials, Walker spent a year in a Florida jail. In court, a United States marshal used a hot iron to mark Walker’s right hand for life with the brand “SS” to show that Walker was a slave stealer. Walker’s courage was an inspiration to abolitionists, including “The Abolition Poet” John Greenleaf Whittier , who wrote the poem by the same name, “The Man with the Branded Hand,” in 1846. The branded hand became a symbol of dedication to the abolition cause. Oickle, who lives in Florida, will be on tour in New England as of the May 1 publication date of his new book. A veteran journalist and author of six nonfiction

Alvin F. Oickle

history books, he wrote for daily newspapers and the Associated Press. Oickle was a lecturer in journalistic studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He retired from Stony Brook University on Long Island and is writing the biography of the first black police officer in Washington, D.C. Oickle’s presentation is the first program in the 2011 Peterboro Heritage season. “The Man with the Branded Hand” will be available from the Peterboro Mercantile. Admission is $2 and free for students and stewards. The Gerrit Smith Estate is located at 4543 Peterboro Road in Peterboro. For more information on Oickle’s program and the 2011 Peterboro program schedule, visit sca-peterboro. org or call (315) 684-3262.

McDowell from page 11 authored by Morrisville State College alumni and faculty. The book is available through his publishing company at logcabinbooks.com. All proceeds benefit the college’s journalism program to fund scholarships and other initiatives. A former member of the Communications Committee for the National Abolition Hall of Fame, McDowell works each summer with the American Legion Boys’ State of New York, serving as their communications advisor for their daily newspaper, annual yearbook and website. He holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Potsdam State College and a master’s degree in culture and policy studies from Empire State College. McDowell lives with his wife, Margaret, in Hamilton; the couple has a daughter, Megan.

Peterboro

Docents Receive Conference Support

(Peterboro) The National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum received a GO grant to support the attendance of NAHOF and Gerrit Smith Estate National Historic Landmark docents to attend the Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region 10th annual Conference in Troy April 8 and 9. The grant from the New York State Council on the Arts and administered by Museumwise allowed the Peterboro volunteers to develop interpretation manuals and tours at the two New York State Underground Railroad Trail sites in Peterboro. Docents Carrie Martin and Max Smith presented a PowerPoint program on “Emancipation Day: Connecting to a Legacy during The Past Connects with the Present” theme at the conference. The Peterboro presenters shared their journey as they recounted their reclamation of African American family legacies and their meanings as the docents work to preserve the voices of the past that speak to us in the present. Docents attended an all-day educators’ training on Friday, April 8, at the Rensselaer County Historical Society that addressed the teaching of slavery, the intersection of art, history and student empowerment and interpreting local Underground Railroad sites. Workshops on Saturday at Russell Sage College included a wide range of

Beth Spokowsky, a docent at the Gerrit Smith Estate National Historic Landmark, prepares for an interpretive tour of the Gerrit Smith Land Office in Peterboro. The site will open Saturday, May 14, at 1 p.m. Docents at Peterboro heritage sites received funding from the state Council on the Arts through a grant administered by Museumwise.

information on a great variety of subjects important to the development and sustainability of heritage sites. Volunteers at Underground Railroad heritage sites in Peterboro will be developing exhibits, docent manuals, and interpretive tours in the 2011 season, which opens for weekends beginning May 14 and 15. For more information AbolitionHoF.org and sca-peterboro.org.

Dann to Present: Peterboro Man to Speak on Battle of Philippi (Peterboro) On The Battle of Philippi Thursday, May 19, at 7 (then Virginia, now West p.m., Peterboro’s Dr. Virginia), is regarded Norman K. Dann will by many as the first speak at the town of organized land battle DeWitt Community in the Civil War, taking Room, 148 place on June 3, Sanders Creek 1861, two months Parkway, East after federal Syracuse (off forces were Thruway Exit 35 attacked at Fort at Carrier Circle). Sumter. The Onondaga While an initial County Civil War Union victory, it Karlene Becker/File Photo Round Table was to be only Norman program will one of a series D ann feature a joint of battles fought presentation in what is known by Dann and A. Scott as the Western Virginia Cauger regarding the Campaign. Battle of Philippi in the It also catapulted the context of the larger career of Major Gen. strategic importance of George B. McClellan, the western counties of who shortly thereafter Virginia, other key battles assumed command of of the Western Virginia the entire federal army. Campaign and the role The program is one that abolitionism played. of a series of events

being sponsored by the OCCWRT in commemoration of the Civil War Sesquicentennial. Dann is professor emeritus Morrisville State College, the author of numerous works, including a biography of the abolitionist Gerrit Smith, and a member of various historical organizations. Cauger, president of OCCWRT and a member of the Civil War Trust and other Civil War groups, has studied and traveled to Civil War battlefields all over the U.S., including sites in West Virginia. For more information, visit occwrt.blogspot. com, or call Bill Goodwin at (315) 4373887.


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 15

Your History

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Highlighting Madison County’s Legends and Legacies

Peterboro

4:30 a.m. April 12, 1861, Shot Fired on Fort Sumter Sesquicentennial of First Civil War Shot Observed by Relative at Peterboro Civil War Weekend

College physics and math professor, Douglas’s hobbies now include local history and her family history. Raised in Arkansas, Douglas’ family lore has it that (Peterboro) At 4:30 a.m. Ruffin considered April 12, 1861, it an honor to have Confederate Troops fired the first shot under General Pierre of the Civil War. G.T. Beauregard Secessionist Ruffin began shelling had left Virginia Fort Sumter, an because Virginia was island garrison Nancy not as quick as South in the harbor of Douglass Carolina to secede. Charleston, S.C., held Devastated by the by Union troops Confederacy’s loss of the under the command of war and driven by his hatred Major Robert Anderson. of Yankees, Ruffin also may Edmund Ruffin, a 65-yearhave fired the last shot of old Virginian serving as an the war. honorary member of the South Carolina Palmetto Placing a pistol to his head, Guards, allegedly was chosen he ended his life June 17, to fire the first shot on 1865. Sumter because he was the Called the “Father of Soil oldest member. Chemistry” because of his The firing on Fort Sumter study of the soil depletion was the first action of the of tidewater farms, Ruffin War Between the States. had distinguished himself as an agriculturist. His success Nancy Douglas of with crop rotation and Morrisville, who shares using lime to raise the pH in a common ancestor with Edmund Ruffin, will present peat bogs made significant differences in southern information on her relative at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 11, agriculture. at the 19th annual Peterboro Ruffin published The Civil War Weekend. Farmer’s Register. He A retired Morrisville State also served in the Virginia

legislature and was president of the Virginia State Agricultural Society. The public is encouraged to attend Douglas’ family perspective on the famous relative. Peterboro Civil War Weekend is an educational and fundraising event sponsored by the Town of Smithfield, the Smithfield Community Association, and private donors. Proceeds from the event support the preservation and promotion of the heritage of the town of Smithfield. During the event Peterboro relives the period of the mid 1800s when the hamlet held national recognition because of Gerrit Smith’s Underground Railroad station, the visitations of famous abolitionists, and the connection with John Brown that sparked the War Between the States. Peterboro sites are on the Heritage NY Underground Railroad Trail and on the National Park Service Network to Freedom Underground Railroad Trail. For more information, contact (315) 684-9022 or visit sca-peterboro.org.

Peterboro

Mercantile Opens for New York Heritage Weekend The Peterboro Mercantile, a community heritage shop, will open for the 2011 season during New York Heritage Weekend May 14 and 15. The Mercantile is open 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays until Oct. 23, and e-Mercantile, the online shop, is open 24 hours a day for 365 days a year at mercantile.gerritsmith.org. The Mercantile is located in the Visitor Center at 5304 Oxbow Road in Peterboro. The shop has publications, tee shirts, stationery, mugs, totes, jewelry, period toys and other articles connected to the history of Peterboro. The sales benefit the Gerrit Smith Estate National

Virginian Edmund Ruffin fired the first shot of the Civil War on Fort Sumter SC at 4:30 a.m. April 12, 1861. Nancy Douglass of Morrisville, who shares a common ancestor with Ruffin, will present on her relative at 11:00 a.m. Saturday June 11 at the 19th Annual Peterboro Civil War Weekend.

Long Term Care Insurance? Long-term care insurance may be the right approach to longterm asset protection for those who are now in good health and are reluctant to either give away assets or commit to an irrevocable trust. If nursing home care is required, the three or four years of benefits under the long-term care policy cover the nursing home bill while the policyholders divest themselves of assets and wait out the Medicaid "penalty period" that results. For those who can avoid a nursing home Margaret Kolodzie but need assistance to stay at home, Caregiver's Corner long-term care insurance can be especially helpful. Medicaid can be sought for home care, but the financial eligibility requirements force individuals to reduce their liquid assets to the poverty level. In addition, any monthly income beyond approximately $600 to $700 per month must be used for the home care, and Medicaid picks up only the rest of the expense. An individual on home Medicaid may retain a home or cooperative apartment, but that asset is subject to a claim by Medicaid for reimbursement after death. Home care typically costs less per day than nursing home care, and thus the benefits of the long-term care policy may be spread out over a longer period such as five or more years. The costs of long-term care insurance vary depending on the size of the potential daily benefit chosen and some other options such as inflation protection, but individuals in their early 60s can expect a yearly premium in the range of $2,000 to $2,500. A husband and wife who purchase the coverage can usually obtain a discount on their basic premiums. One attractive feature for some couples is the option to have any unused coverage on the husband's policy pass to his wife after his death, or vice versa.

ElderHaven is here when you need us. The Peterboro Mercantile, a community heritage shop, will open for the 2011 season during New York Heritage Weekend May 14 and 15. The Mercantile is open from 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays until Oct. 23, and e-Mercantile, the online shop, is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year at mercantile.gerritsmith. org.

Historic Landmark and the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum. The development of the store was funded, in part, by a PACE grant from

the Central New York Community Foundation. The Mercantile is recruiting volunteers to

Store - 16

or email elderhaven@twcny.rr.com

309 S. Peterboro St. Canastota, NY Call 697-3386 for more information Look for the next Caregiver's Corner in our June 1 Issue.


May 11, 2011

Page 16

Madison County Courier

Your History

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Highlighting Madison County’s Legends and Legacies

S m i t h f i e l d C o mm u n i t y C e n t e r N e w s

Come Join the Abolitionists as Painting is Dedicated (Peterboro – May 20, 2011) On Friday, May 20, at 7 p.m., the public is invited to the Smithfield Community Center in Peterboro to see Hugh Humphreys’ new painting. After the viewing opportunity in the abolition museum, Humphreys will reveal what he envisioned during the years it took him to create, “Come Join the Abolitionists,” an imagined antislavery meeting on the green in Peterboro in 1850. According to the artist, the 40” x 84” acrylic on gessobord work contains “numerous mini-scenes of people talking, yelling, singing, gawking, laughing, scowling, rubber necking, rushing about,” etc. Humphreys, a retired Madison County Judge, has been a strong supporter and participant in the development of the 19th Century reform history of Peterboro and, in particular, the anti-slavery movement. His contributions to Peterboro heritage projects have been many and generous. Humphreys wrote Balm in Gilead, a play about freedom-seekers in Peterboro, and has created

the educational entertainment for the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum inductions and commemorations since 2005. In 2006, he donated his earlier “Dreams of Madison County” for Madison County Historical Society-sponsored Madison County Bicentennial events. Humphreys’ research on the At 7 p.m. Friday, May 20, the public is invited to the Smithfield Community Center in Peterboro to view Hugh Humphreys’ Fugitive Slave Law new painting and to hear the artist’s description of the anti-slavery meeting on the green in Peterboro in 1850. Convention in celebrates Humphreys’ generosity of and Historic Preservation, to tell 1850, the famous daguerreotype of the event, and the time, talent and treasure. The project the story of the historical event that was also supported by the Central occurred in the SCC in 1835. subsequent publication of Madison New York Community Foundation. National Abolition Hall of Fame County Historical Society’s bestRefreshments will follow the and Museum exhibits will also be known annual Heritage #19 have program. open. provided increased knowledge The public is invited to come of this history and prompted Admission is $2. Students as early 6 p.m. to view a short local events – like the 160th and stewards are free. For more media production at the Smithfield Commemoration of the Cazenovia information, visit sca-peterboro.org Community Center produced in Convention held in Cazenovia in or AbolitionHoF.org; email mail@ 2010 by the state Underground August 2010. AbolitionHoF.org, or call (315) 684Railroad Heritage Trail, a program 3262. This evening of the dedication of state Office of Parks, Recreation of “Come Join the Abolitionists”

Events of Historical Note

assist at the shop during afternoons on weekends. Contact (315) 893-7636 for more information. Residents of the town of Smithfield who have products connected to the history of Peterboro and want the items sold at the Mercantile should call 6843262. The Gerrit Smith Estate and the National Abolition Hall of Fame will be open from 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays from May 14 to Oct. 23. Admission to each site is $2. Stewards and students are free. For more information, write Gerrit Smith Estate National Historic Landmark, 4543 Peterboro Road, Peterboro N.Y. 13134 or National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum, 5255 Pleasant Valley Road, Peterboro, N.Y. 13134; visit sca-peterboro.org or AbolitionHoF.org or call (315) 684-3262.

(Madison County) Summer is just around the corner and we have some fun events coming in the next few months, and I hope to see you at a few of them. As always, if there is something I missed or if you have something Oneida Community. coming up, please let me know. For more information about the Louisa May Alcott May 12 programs, stop by the * The Oneida Community Oneida Library, 220 Broad Mansion House will host St., or call 363-3050. lectures by Dr. Tom Murray and Dr. Anthony Wonderley. May 14 Murray, of the Oneida 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: The Public Library, will talk about Oneida Community Mansion Louisa May Alcott’s roots House will charge no in the transcendentalist and admission in celebration of radical reform movements New York state’s Heritage before the Civil War. Weekend. Visit them at 170 Kenwood Ave., Oneida. For Wonderley, the Mansion more information call 315House curator, will 363-0745 talk about the role of women in the utopian 10 to 11:30 a.m.: The Oneida Community. Both Friends of Lorenzo men will then discuss will host a walking tour the links between the of Cazenovia’s historic Transcendentalists of water-powered industrial Concord and the ultradevelopment, in honor of radical reformers of the Preservation Month. The

Matthew Urtz

Store from page 15

tour will be led by Jerry Munger and Ted Bartlett. The heart of Cazenovia’s forgotten industrial area along Chittenango Creek from the lake to Clark Street will be featured. The tour will begin promptly at 10 a.m. at Carpenter’s Barn, One Forman St. and conclude on the Clark Street Bridge near Route 13. Space is limited for this free walking tour, and advance reservations are required. Comfortable shoes are a must. Call Diane Voss at (315) 655-3200 for more information. * The Oneida Public Library and the Madison County Historical Society will host “Louisa May Alcott through her own eyes,” at Cottage Lawn in Oneida. The program’s setting is a lavish tea served in the formal rooms of Cottage Lawn by the gourmet cook Maureen Christianson in the style of a proper 19thcentury Boston Tea. The

program will start with an introduction to Alcott’s place in 19th-century American Literature by Dr. Tom Murray, the Oneida Public Library’s assistant director. Roxana Spano, assistant professor of English at Cazenovia College, will follow with a presentation on Alcott’s life and relationships. The program will close with Bambi Niles of Oneida performing popular salon music from the 19th century on the harp. For more information, call 363-3050. 1 p.m.: The Cazenovia Public Library will host “A Look at Cazenovia History.” Celebrating its 125th birthday this year, the Cazenovia Public Library has been a pillar and popular meeting place in the community. To honor both the town and library’s rich and vibrant history, the Library’s Gallery will feature portraits of both well- and

Urtz - 36


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 17

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Your History

Highlighting Madison County’s Legends and Legacies

(Wampsville, Hamilton) When you wished to learn a trade in the early years, you became indentured to a craftsman of the profession you wished to learn. After a certain period of years of instruction as an apprentice, you would be certified as a journeyman able to perform the duties of that trade and be released from the indenture. This was used as a method of placing children who were inmates at the Poor House in local homes to learn a trade. There was considerable difference in the treatment these indentured children received. The usual trades to be learned were housewifery for girls and farming for boys. The following is a standard

of the

Dust

Robert Betz

Indentures

Out

printed form used for this purpose. When a child was indentured, it was no longer an expense on the county or the town where the child originally lived. THIS INDENTURE, made this fourteenth day of May one thousand eight hundred and thirty three, Witnesseth, that Erastus Cleveland, John Knowles, Ephram Gray, and Ellis Morse, Superintendents of the Poor of the county of Madison and State of New York, have put and placed, and by these present put and

place Margaret Cleveland (sent to the poor-house of said county, for the relief from the town of Hamilton) a poor girl of said county, aged eight years 14 Oct last apprentice to Obediah German of the Town of Norwich and county of Chenango with him to dwell and serve from the day of the date of these presents, until said apprentice shall accomplish the full age of Eighteen years, according to the statute in such case made and provided; during all which time, the said apprentice, her said master faithfully shall serve on all lawful business, according to her power, wit and ability, and shall honestly, orderly and obediently in all things demean herself towards her said master during the said term. And the said Obediah

Betz - 35

G uest C o lu m n

Madison County has one in Brookfield: The Crystal Labyrinth Mary Messere World Labyrinth Day was held Saturday, May 7, and in Syracuse people shared in the excitement by visiting a labyrinth and walking a meditation pathway at the First Baptist Church of Syracuse’s campus in Jamesville. The Labyrinth is open daily, dawn until dusk, for self-guided tours and is located in the rear of the church. Labyrinths have a long history dating back to ancient Greek mythology; by the 12th century they were used as a ritual path. Unlike a maze that it is often confused with, a labyrinth has only one way in and the same way out. It was designed to take the walker on a symbolic journey, creating a space away from the world by causing the world to drop away as you lose your direction in its many twists and turns. In particular, it is meant as a journey where we can relax, unwind, and think about our relationships with ourselves, others and, in

particular, God. The First Baptist Church also has a remarkable history, having Baptist services in Syracuse that have been held with regularity since about 1819. The First Baptist Church organization itself dates to February of 1821. The church was originally on West Genesee Street, was enlarged in 1839, and was used until 1848 when it moved to a lot east of it. The cost of the building erected on this new site was $15,000, but this new edifice burned on Aug. 23, 1859. The most famous of the First Baptist Church buildings was completed in 1914 at 215 Jefferson Street and much later became known as the Mizpah Tower. The building’s upper stories were originally connected with the YMCA next door and were used to take care of the YMCA’s overflow. In the 1940’s this passage was closed, and the Mizpah Hotel opened. There was also a well-known restaurant in the basement connected with the hotel called the Mizpah. The church was listed in Ripley’s “Believe it

or Not” as a church with a hotel over it. After the hotel closed, the space functioned as apartments and rooms for single women. The First Baptist Church of Syracuse also is generally thought of as the birthplace of the “Bible Class” movement, dating to when Marshall A. Hudson organized a men’s Bible class on the premises in 1890. In 1988, the congregation moved from East Jefferson Street to its present location on Seneca Turnpike in Jamesville and built a new church building that welcomes all and also serves as the home of the River of Joy Korean Baptist Church. Some exciting projects and events have occurred since the move such as the creation of the 11-circuit labyrinth and the meditation pathway. The labyrinth and meditation pathway projects came about as the result of a suggestion of Pastor Scott Kavanagh to Chris Halbert, who sought his advice for a project to help

Messere - 35

TUNE IN TO WMCR - FM 106.3 Trading Post with host Todd Emanuelli Mon – Thurs • 10am – 10:30am Friday 10am-11am

Open Line with host Joel Meltzer Mon – Fri • Noon - 12:30pm


May 11, 2011

Page 18

Madison County Courier

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Your Farms: Field to Table

Spotlight on Madison County’s No. 1 Industry Th e G r a s s W h i s p e r e r

Planting Hope Troy Bishopp

(Madison) American poet, Lucy Larcom wrote “He who plants a tree, plants hope.” The more than 220 residents of Madison and surrounding counties who bought saplings from this year’s Madison County Soil and Water Conservation District’s 25th anniversary tree sale must be bursting with optimism. And why not? The net cooling effect of a young, healthy tree is equivalent to 10 room-size air conditioners operating 20 hours a day; healthy, mature trees add an average of 10 percent to a property’s value, and one acre of forest absorbs six tons of carbon dioxide while pumping out four tons of oxygen to meet the annual needs of 18 people. Trees also break the cold winds to lower your heating costs, stabilize riparian areas and top soil with an added benefit of being a carbon sink and provide food for wildlife while sustaining a community with local lumber, fruit and maple syrup. The success and 25-year legacy of this annual program comes from a four-month planning process headed by district staff in a joint venture with generations of residents. This family affair of conservation speaks to Nelson Henderson’s timeless quote: “The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit.” For more information on your local conservation partner’s initiatives contact the Madison County SWCD office at (315) 824-9849 or visit madcoswcd. com.

Tom Keenan and sons Matthew, Maura and Michael

Troy Bishopp is grazing specialist for the Madison Co. SWCD/Upper Susquehanna Coalition. He can be reached at (315) 824-9849 Ext. 110, troy-bishopp@ verizon.net or thegrasswhisperer.com.

Fiber Artists, Producers’ Festival Expands Weaving, felting, braiding workshops offered; demonstrations planned

(Bouckville) The June 11 and 12 Annual Showcase – from Animals to Art, sponsored by CNY Fiber Artists and Producers, is expanding. Shearing demonstrations, a FAMACHA workshop for livestock owners, and a variety of fiber-related workshops are planned. A sheep will be shorn hourly on Saturday and at intervals on Sunday during the festival, to be held at Butternut Hill Campground on Route 20 in Bouckville. Workshops will be held both days at 11a.m. and 2 p.m. and many informal opportunities to learn about fiber animals and the fiber arts will be available. Guild members and vendors will demonstrate spinning, weaving, and felting; other experts will get beginners started on knitting or crocheting. There will be games and crafts for children, including a chance for them to try wet felting, needle felting, or weaving, to become part of a “human loom,” or try to

Festival - 21

Ryan Wilcox and son Peyton

We Want Your Farm News!

David and Bobby Tanner

We welcome your news, photos, press releases and more. Submit them to e-mail madnews@m3pmedia.com. Have an idea for the City Slicker? E-mail Linda at linda@ m3pmedia.com Jennifer and Olivia Wong


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 19

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Your Farms: Field to Table

Spotlight on Madison County’s No. 1 Industry G uest C o lu m n

At first I could see no good way out and now had a wife and three children to support. I became depressed. I talked to a lady in the local employment office about possible jobs but made no decision. Alberta worried about my depression, and I started taking “happy pills.” But we finally came up with solutions that satisfied our changing needs. At least there was no hounding by creditors. My children were not old enough to question our decisions, as other farm families had. So that eliminated one problem. It was just our own decision. We sold our cows and machinery at auction, along with part of our land, keeping the house and about 16 acres. We took six weeks’ vacation, a camping trip with tent and three kids and traveled through some neighboring states. We became more relaxed. We still had our home to live in, and we took a rational look at our problems. First, I took a job with a farm machinery dealer demonstrating tractors, and later with the farm cooperative, GLF. I drove back and forth to work each day, while looking for another farm to buy nearer Oneida. One reason why we wanted to move in closer was to allow our kids, now approaching school age, to be able to attend what we considered to be the superior quality Oneida school system. After much searching, we found what we were looking for about five miles outside of Oneida: a little more than 100 acres with a livable house and other buildings. With the changed conditions and our differing needs, the productive quality of the land became secondary to location. We still had, however, all our requirements for subsistence living, woods, fields and meadows. We took our farm sale

Charles E. Page

Our Changing Farm Part 4

money and as a down payment paying half of the cost price, mortgaging the rest. Then we sold our old

home back on the hills to a neighboring farmer, which he added to his acreage. From then on, I adjusted my part-time farming operations with each changing condition of the economy. At first, we continued with our purebred calf-raising. We had learned how to produce large, wellgrown heifers ready for breeding in two years. There

was a good market for them. We paid off the rest of the mortgage, and I no longer was “tied down” to the twice-a-day job of milking cows; however, as I had learned, times were forever changing, and after a few years, I found I was raising young stock “just for fun.” That project was no longer profitable, either! That ended that one! Keep

ahead if it! Keep ahead! In the meantime, I made a living from my off-farm job, and we still produced much of our food and fuel. What should I do with the farm? Grow grain and hay to sell? I did that for a few years, and I usually grew a few acres of oats to sell as a cash crop for our “vacation money.” Page - 28


May 11, 2011

Page 20

Madison County Courier

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Your Farms: Field to Table

Spotlight on Madison County’s No. 1 Industry

Crops from page 1 Local farmers have extremely wet soil to contend with for crops, and soggy pastures are ripe for sod damage by grazing livestock. Madison County Board of Supervisors Chairman and town of Sullivan Supervisor John M. Becker, who has farmed for nearly two decades, said the weather will prove to be harder for some in the agriculture business than others. “I think that the muck or produce farmers in the area are going to be the worst off of any farmers,” Becker said. “Onions should be planted by the 10th of May at the latest. There is about 700 acres between three or four farmers that may not get anything planted.” Gary Will in Lebanon said he is worried about pasture damage. “At the moment, I don’t have any lambs,” Will said. “I expect them in midMay. Grass is a little behind schedule, and I’d be reluctant to put them out to pasture because they could destroy a pasture and make it less productive for the remainder of the season. I don’t plant crops, yet some of my farmer neighbors in dairy are complaining.” Will said he has been mending and establishing new fences without difficulty. In Brookfield, Chuck Blood of Rocky Top Acres, a certified organic dairy and beef operation, said the weather of the 2010-11 winter wasn’t the issue; the length of it was. “Milk production suffers when we don’t get the daylight,” Blood said. “We don’t do much tillage, so that’s not the issue. We do rotationally graze, and the grass is starting slow, but the excess water makes it difficult to determine how long the animals should be on it so they don’t destroy the sod.” Myron Smith echoed some of Blood’s opinions. “Are you sure it was the

harsh winter or the length of the winter?” Smith asked. “It was extremely hard on calves, as well as cows, with the duration. Keeping them healthy was a difficult task. Corn was being planted April 25, and we just started plowing this year. Years ago, we never started planting corn until May 10, due to the wet, cold weather. On the other hand, I don’t recall any year being as wet as this year has been.” Smith said production for the season is a crap-shoot. “As far as the yields go, your guess is as good as ours,” Smith said.

Loss Application. “Producers with NAP coverage should report their losses within 15 calendar days after the disaster conditions occurred, or damage to the crop became apparent,” Fuess said.

Crops not covered with a private insurance or NAP policy should still be reported to the FSA office, and producers should file a Notice of Loss Application. This will provide FSA with a historical record of

your crop should disaster assistance become available. For more information about reporting prevented planting or failed acres, contact the Madison County FSA office at 315-824-9076 ext. 2 or visit fsa.usda.gov.

Students Help with Restoration

FSA Weighs In Laurie Fuess, executive director of the Madison County Farm Service Agency in Hamilton said when bad weather delays planting or damages crops, producers must immediately report their crop losses. “When wet conditions or natural disaster prevent planting, producers must report the acreage to FSA within 15 days of the final planting date of the crop,” Fuess said. The requirement applies to all crops, whether covered by crop insurance, not covered by insurance, or covered by FSA’s Non-insured Assistance Program. Final planting dates vary among counties and crop types. If producers suffer crop production losses, Fuess said it is especially important to report failed acres before disposing of the crop. Producers who have their crops insured through a private crop insurance company should contact the insurance agent immediately and advise them of the damaged crops. Additionally, a CCC-576, Notice of Loss Application, must be completed in person at our local FSA office and your failed acres reported. For those crops covered under FSA’s NAP, producers should immediately contact our FSA office to report the acres and file a Notice of

Troy Bishopp/Madison County SWCD A group of teenagers from Hamilton FFA are pictured with advisor Johanna Bossard. The group worked on a wetland restoration project at White Eagle Farms, planting trees under the guidance of the Madison County Soil & Water Conservation District.

Students Take Business to New Level Cook up ideas in class, produce them at Nelson Farms and Ag Incubator

(Morrisville, Nelson) Sweet N Spicy Apple Mustard, Apple Splashers—these and other tasty temptations are making their way to consumers’ palates. The new products join a savory line of goods being cooked up by students in Morrisville State College’s agricultural business development bachelor degree program. Also making a spicy debut is a new allpurpose seasoning, Apples N Spice and Everything Nice. Consumers can spot the college’s product line under a new label, Morrisville Fresh LLC, a business formed this semester, the operating entity of the Agriculture Business Program, which is putting goods within their reach. They’ll be available this summer at various local farmers markets and also at Nelson Farms, the college’s small-scale food processing plant, where the product line is produced. In addition to adding flavor to local diets, Morrisville Fresh LLC spells opportunities for students and will

Nelson Farms - 24

ABOVE: Ag business students prepare caramel for Apple Splashers, a product produced by Morrisville Fresh LLC at Nelson Farms. From left are Lauran Hanehan of Saratoga and Anna Cline of Kennedy. RIGHT: Jen Masters, an agricultural business development major at Morrisville State College, helps make cheese curds. Masters, a native of Marcellus who now lives in Fabius, has also been involved with creating products for the college’s line, Morrisville Fresh LLC and is also producing her own product at Nelson Farms – and old-fashioned country crunch (peanut brittle coated with chocolate and ground nuts) from a 1940 recipe that belonged to her grandmother.


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 21

Festival from page 18 identify the strongest fiber in the world. Admission to the event is $4 for adults, and children under 12 are free. Anyone who enjoys animals, appreciates historical crafts, admires artistic expression, is interested in learning new skills, or is seeking an interesting and enjoyable day in the country for the family, should make plans to come. The festival runs from

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. This is the first year for the festival, although many of the organizers took part in a small-scale fiber fair within the Madison County Fair in 2009 and 2010. The response to a new, independent fiber festival has been very enthusiastic, and CNY Fiber Artists and Producers had to stop accepting requests from fiber artists and vendors

at the beginning of April. More than 50 vendors, exhibitors, and demonstrators will fill more than 80 booths. Shoppers will find raw fleece, pelts, handspun and hand dyed yarn and roving, and hand-knitted, handwoven, and felted artwork and clothing. Other farm products, spinning and knitting equipment, food, and handcrafted jewelry and pottery

will round out the offerings. Bouckville has been home to antique festivals for many years and is easy to reach from major cities in Central New York. Anyone who wishes to learn more about the event may contact the group through Pamela.Haendle@ bnymellon.com or by calling 315-8997792.

Built to Last Priced to Move

EX2900 TL

28.7 HP1 3-CYLINDER DIRECT INJECTION DIESEL ENGINE

$261

ONLY /MONTH SALE PRICE $15,9952 Price Includes Loader

(taxes, freight, & Setup EXTRA) Call For Details.

Hydrostatic Transmission with selectable 4WD  Fully Hydraulic Steering  Compact and Maneuverable Design 

NO DOWN PAYMENT3 See Details Below

Only While Supplies Last.

Offer Expires 05/31/2011.

4154 Rt. 31 Canastota 8207 Rt. 26 Lowville (315) 697-2214 (315) 376-0300 962 Rt. 12 Waterville (315)841-4181

www.whitesfarmsupply.com 1

as rated by engine manufacturer 2 Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. 3 *Rate as Low as 4.99% for 72 Months (APR of 5.39%)* (Monthly payments required. Valid on purchases of all new Cub Cadet Yanmar tractors, made between 03/01/11 and 05/31/11 on a Cub Cadet installment loan account.) *Offer is subject to credit approval by GE Money Bank. Fixed rate of 4.99% - 16.99% will be assigned based on credit approval criteria. Examples: Based on Amount Financed of $13,000 over a 72-month term with a $150 Origination Fee and a rate of 4.99%, required monthly payments will be $211.72 with a 5.39% APR; and with a rate of 16.99% over a 72-month term, required monthly payments will be $292.46 with a 17.45% APR; Minimum amount financed is $2500.


May 11, 2011

Page 22

Madison County Courier

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Your Farms: Field to Table

Spotlight on Madison County’s No. 1 Industry

‘Jamie of all trades’

Morrisville State College Celebrates Ag Day

Photo by Kelly Gardner, alumni coordinator Kara James (left), marketing assistant at Morrisville State College, and her daughter, Finley, 3, pet quarter horse, Banjo, during Ag Day at Morrisville State College. Finley is the daughter of David and Kara James, of Hamilton.

Troy Bishopp/Madison County SWCD Jamie Hart of the Madison County Planning Department ,who has been on the job since December 2010, has added some diversity to the office by working with the Madison County Soil & Water Conservation District Grazing Program on creating farm maps specifically tailored to grazing system management charts used by local farmers.  These on-farm resources complement work she does for the county on smart growth initiatives, developing climate change action plans, geographic information system mapping systems and helping towns and villages with land use issues. “I find applying the GIS mapping tools as a way to help farmers plan their grazing operations enjoyable and interesting,” Hart said. “I can’t wait to see the plans in action this spring.” In addition to her work with farmers, she is passionate about vermiculture and home composting.

Peterboro Street Elementary School Celebrates ...

(Photo by Kara James, marketing assistant Mariecarmella Bernard (left) and Jennifer Beauvais, pet quarter horse Banjo during Ag Day at Morrisville State College. Beauvais is a business administration bachelor degree major from Long Island. Bernard is an associate degree business administration major from New York City.

... Arbor Day

Photo by Kara James, marketing assistant Carly Canning, of Hamilton, pets a calf during Morrisville State College’s Ag Day event. The annual event also included a tractor display, hay rides, cows, calves, horses, and a chance to taste the college’s homemade ice cream, Molly’s Choice. Canning was accompanied by children from The Children’s Center at Morrisville State College where she is lead teacher.

(Canastota) Madyson Klenotiz, 7, a student in Mrs. Rinaldo’s class at Peterboro Street Elementary School in Canastota, played host to grandfather Dewey Romagnoli of Romagnoli Tree Farm in Oneida Valley last week. Romagnoli visited the school and donated 300 blue spruce trees for students to take home and plant.


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 23

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Your Farms: Field to Table

Spotlight on Madison County’s No. 1 Industry

Hamilton FFA Banquet May 20 Hamilton Chapter Seeks Past Members, Supporters Submitted by Evy Crumb (Hamilton – May 20, 2011) The Hamilton FFA Chapter is searching for all past members and supporters of the agriculture program and FFA, and we are interested in inviting them to help celebrate the accomplishments of our current members. The Hamilton FFA will hold its annual

banquet and silent auction May 20 at the Hamilton Central School cafeteria. The auction begins at 5:30 p.m.; dinner begins at 6 p.m. Please bring a dish to pass. Barbecue chicken, pulled pork, rolls and dinner services willb e provided. For more information, call advisor Johanna Bossard at (315) 824-6300 ext. 6386 or email jbossard@hamiltoncentral.org.

Support Madison County Agriculture Become a ‘Member’ of a Farm Today

stunning floral bouquets, and Alambria Springs Farm has its own wood-fired (Madison County) Spring bread oven. has officially arrived and Madison County’s many Madison County Agricultural Economic farmers are already hard at Development Program work. Over the past decade, recently interviewed one of Madison County has Madison County’s newest witnessed a growth in farms CSA farms: Greyrock Farm. that market their products When asked what separates throughout the community this CSA from others in the through farm membership, county, owner Matt Voltz also known as Community- replied, “Most CSAs in Supported Agriculture. this area offer vegetables By participating in a and sometimes eggs for CSA, the consumer pays the growing season, which a membership fee at the typically means June to beginning of the season October or November. in exchange for a weekly The Greyrock Farm CSA share of the farm’s harvest. is year-round and includes Madison County now has grass-fed beef and lamb, eight CSAs from which to pastured pork and chicken, choose. eggs from pastured laying Each CSA works a little hens, and raw milk, as well differently – some include as seasonal vegetables and fruit, meat, bread and storage crops. other locally-grown and “Also, instead of giving processed products – others members a box of food include pick-your-own each week, members of the crops and feature on-farm Greyrock Farm CSA get events for the whole family. to pick and choose what At Common Thread they want to take and how Community Farm, you much. In other words, CSA get a variety of heirloom members get to customize vegetables from their their shares to fit their Northeast Organic Farming tastes.� Association pledge farm Being part of a CSA is for pick-up at their barn a fun-filled experience for or at drop-off locations the whole family. Children throughout Central New can learn about how healthy York. fruits and vegetables are Stone Brothers Farm & grown and work with their Greenhouse is launching parents to cook and taste their CSA this year and new recipes. will provide members with To learn more about a hydroponically grown fresh CSA near you, contact the vegetables during the colder farms below: season – including the * Alambria Springs earliest strawberries of the Farm, 834 Musician Road, season. Earlville; 315-837-4769, Sommer’s Harvest alambriafarm.com provides its members with

* Aunt Bee’s Farm, Cody & Mutton Road, Cazenovia; 315-564-6596, auntbeesfarm.com * Common Thread Community Farm, 3424 Lake Moraine Road, Madison; 315-893-7767, commonthreadcsa.com * Greyrock Farm, 6100 East Lake Road, Cazenovia; 484-888-6254, greyrockfarmcsa.com * Lucky Moon Farm, 4976 Lincklaen Road, Cazenovia; 315-655-2283, luckymoonfarm.blogspot. com/ * Smitty’s Market Farm, 4761 Old State Road, Morrisville; 315-684-7779 * Sommer’s Harvest, 7 University Ave., Hamilton; 315-527-3429, somersharvestfarm.com * Stone Brothers Farm & Greenhouse, 3652 Milestrip Road, Fenner; 315-655-3213 If you are interested in other ways to support local farms, Madison County has several farmers’ markets. The Village of Hamilton Farmers’ Market opened for the season Saturday, May 7. The hours of operation are from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cazenovia Farmers’ Market commences the same day and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The town of Lenox Famers’ Market begins later in the season on July 9 and is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. More information on where to find locally-grown products can be found at madisoncountyagriculture. com.

We Want Your Farm News!

We welcome your news, photos, press releases and more. Submit them to e-mail madnews@m3pmedia.com. Have an idea for the City Slicker? E-mail Linda at linda@m3pmedia.com

We Take A Personal Interest — Protecting What You Value Most Farm • Business • Home • Auto • Life Jim Buddenhagen, Agent (315) 637-0284 222 Highbridge St. Fayetteville, NY

TO ADVERTISE IN THE NEXT FARM SECTION JUNE 8 CONTACT MIKE BOVA 315-404-8200 mike@m3pmedia.com

             

                          !

         


May 11, 2011

Page 24

Madison County Courier

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Your Farms: Field to Table

Spotlight on Madison County’s No. 1 Industry

Protest from page 1 Market Federation of New York, who spoke on the important role the markets play in keeping farmers and consumers connected. State Sen. David J. Valesky (D – Oneida) talked about the growth of farmers markets in Central New York and how they benefit the economy and local families, restaurants and institutions that buy locally grown products. Assemblyman Bill Magee (D – Nelson), chairman of the Assembly Agriculture Committee, called farms and farmers the largest and most important industry in New York state and talked about how vital agriculture is to CNY’s future. Matthew Morgan, deputy commissioner from the state Department of Agriculture and Markets talked about new initiatives to enhance state agriculture and the farmers market program. Also participating in the ceremony were Village Trustees Margaret Miller, Suzanne Collins and James Bona and Mayor Sue McVaugh.

The Hamilton Farmers Market, in operation every summer since 1976, now has 25 vendors selling produce; 17 selling eggs, dairy and meat; 16 selling honey, jams and syrups; 54 selling crafts; 27 selling baked goods and prepared foods; and 12 selling plants. The market is open every Saturday from May through October from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., rain or shine. During the ceremony, several town of Hamilton residents took advantage of having their state representatives for an audience and circulated throughout the crowd, then stopped in front of the speakers’ platform holding signs expressing anger over the recent assessment increases in town properties. All believe the assessments are unreasonable, and most suggested there is a hidden agenda driving the exorbitant increases. Former Hamilton Town Councilor Scott Mills said the assessments done by the Maxwell Appraisal Service from Syracuse were seriously flawed. “They did no field work,”

Mills said. “The base formula for land assessment used sales that occurred before the real estate bubble burst and, in many instances, total sales prices were used for land with a home and a barn on it, with no adjustments for the structures, producing an unreasonably high price per acre.” According to Mills, there are massive inequities in the cost per acre of properties contiguous with land in a different township. “You can have a parcel in the town of Brookfield assessed at $400 per acre right next to another parcel in the town of Hamilton assessed at $1,600 per acre, with no significant physical difference between the two pieces of land,” Mills said. Resident Joe Koen said his assessment was raised 300 percent, and another resident held a sign for Mike Hotaling’s father, whose land assessment was raised 610 percent. Many expressed the opinion that these kinds of increases will ultimately force people to move out of the area, including farmers with

Chris Hoffman/Contributing Writer

ABOVE: State Sen. David J. Valesky (D – Oneida) addresses the crowd on opening day of the 36th Hamilton Farmers Market. Seated are Assemblyman William Magee and Hamilton Village Trustees Margaret Miller, Suzanne Collins and Jim Bona. RIGHT: A resident of the Town of Hamilton holds a sign that speaks for itself

large land holdings. A downloadable grievance form (Form RP-524) and instructions, as well as in-depth information and a booklet entitled “What To Do If You Disagree With Your Assessment” can be

found on the website of state Office of Real Property Tax Services at orps.state.ny.us/.

Nelson Farms from page 20 provide another avenue for local farmers to market their products. “Students [the LLC] will purchase produce and other commodity products from area farmers,” Sheila Marshman, assistant professor of agricultural business, and chair of the Department of Agriculture Science, said. “Students will add value to these products then market them at area farmers’ markets, specialty stores and restaurants.” Adding value to agriculture commodities means adding value to the rural economy. A goal of Morrisville Fresh is to stimulate the growth and development of the rural economy through the foods system. “With Apple Splashers, for example, apples will continue to be purchased from New York apple growers,”

Marshman said. “The grower spends the money in the rural community, then value is added to the apple at Nelson Farms through packaging and shelf life extension.” Morrisville Fresh now offers a line of six savory recipes: Slather Sauce (original, hot, and smoke); Maple Madness, a topping for fruits and ice cream; Pina (pineapple) Salsa; Apple Splashers, sliced apples with caramel dip (made at Nelson Farms) or peanut butter; Sweet N Spicy Apple Mustard; and Apples N Spice and Everything Nice, an all-purpose rub/ seasoning. The college’s own hydroponic butter crisp lettuce is also available through the LLC. To cheese connoisseurs’ delight, cheese curds are also being added to the mix.

Students in the Agriculture Business Management class, along with the Morrisville Collegiate Future Farmers’ of America (CFFA) are churning out cheese at the college’s Agribusiness Dairy Incubator. There’s garlic, plain and hot flavors to choose from. A cheese curd route in Madison County is also in the works, along with an online ordering website. The public will have a chance to purchase Morrisville Fresh LLC products this summer at Hamilton and Chenango farmers’ markets and at the Regional Market in Syracuse, and at the Nelson Farms Country Store, located on Route 20 in Nelson. The Country Store highlights some of the products produced in the kitchens of Nelson Farms in addition to Pride of New

York products from all For more information regions of New York state. about the Morrisville Fresh LLC product Dave Evans, director of line, e-mail MorrisvilleNelson Farms, and his staff freshLLC@morrisville.edu.  are assisting with teaching everything from marketing Products Offered and distribution techniques through Morrisville to working with specialty Fresh LLC food products and labeling laws. 1. Slather Sauce: original, hot and smoke Nelson Farms has a statewide marketing program 2. Maple Madness (a topping for shelf stable Pride of for fruits and ice cream) New York products and 3. Pineapple Salsa offers Morrisville Fresh 4. Apple Splashers (sliced products throughout the apples with caramel dip state giving them exposure (made at Nelson Farms), or outside of just central New peanut butter York. 5. Sweet N Spicy Apple “This statewide program Mustard assists in expanding the 6. Apples N Spice and Morrisville Fresh products Everything Nice (all-purpose market penetration of these rub/seasoning) unique products and it also gives exposure to the 7. Hydroponic butter crisp agriculture programs offered lettuce by Morrisville State College,” Evans said.


Madison County Courier

May 11, 2011

Your Voice

Page 25

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw

Letters from page 2 huge success, due to many civic groups, businesses and individuals. On behalf of the village board and the Parks Commission, I would like to thank: Chittenango Lions Club, Chittenango Rotary Club, Chittenango Creek Walk Committee, Trout Unlimited, Knights of Columbus, Boy Scout Troops 33 and 11, Girl Scout troops 117, 15 and 353, Cub Scout Pack 35, Advance Auto, Chittenango Garden Club, Sharon Runkowski and her granddaughter, Bob Freunscht, John and Barb Delaney, Pam and Kayla Dennee, Chittenango Department of Public Works, the Chittenango Fire Department and the Chittenango Leo’s Club, and special thanks to Nelson and Maureen Smith, Marge Walters, and Dick and Martha Sullivan. I would like to give the manager and staff at Tops Supermarket in Chittenango a big thank you for donating the bottles of water and doughnuts for Betterment Day. I would also like to thank Rev. Michaela Ste. Marie and the Chittenango United Methodist Church for donating free hot dogs and soda to all the participants. It is because of the cooperation of so many groups, businesses and citizenry that Chittenango is the wonderful place that it is today. Melinda “Mickey” Kopp, Village Trustee and Parks Commissioner

Conservatives Urge County to Keep Mortgage Tax Level To the Editor: (Hamilton) The Madison County Board of Supervisors should rescind the resolution passed last Friday and abandon its efforts to raise the mortgage tax in Madison County. The Board proposes a 50% increase in the tax. That amounts to an additional $250 to a homebuyer with a $100,000 mortgage. It is unjustified and bad policy.

The recent census data showed that Madison County was one of the few Counties in upstate New York that grew in the last 10 years. Part of the reason is that closing costs are less in Madison County than our neighboring counties. Realtors, builders and bankers make that point to home buyers. Growing the tax base with more homeowners is the key to keeping property taxes low. Increasing our mortgage tax takes away a selling point for buying in Madison County. That is bad business

policy and the last tax that the County should raise. The second reason is that this tax increase is unjustified. The County should cut expenditures before raising taxes. Last year the Conservative party in Madison County called on the County to institute a hiring freeze to save money now and hope that we would get pension and retiree health benefit reform this year. Each new hire made after reforms are passed would probably save the taxpayers tens of thousands

Opinion and Editorial

of dollars per employee over the years. The County has refused to institute a hiring freeze. A hiring freeze

is one of the first things any business would do if it was in a financial problem. Letters - Next Page

For Sale Fine Art & Collectibles Lots of paintings from well known artists. Hard to find items. Several collections, antiques and more...

Call 337-5500 or stop in to RA Dudrak 9210 State Rt. 365 Holland Patent


May 11, 2011

Page 26

Your Voice

Madison County Courier

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw

Letters from previous page Why should the County be different? The County is paying $300,000 per year (1% of the total tax levy) to hire lobbyists; that is very pricey, even if one concedes that Madison County should pay people to get other parts of our government to do what government should be doing in the first place.  We applaud the recent privitizing of the home health care workers, but that saves the County money, which makes the need to raise taxes now less plausible. It is a virtual certainty that our Supervisors will be campaigning this fall on the fact that the County tax levy did not go up this year. As we have previously pointed out, it was done by raiding almost half of the unappropriated reserves (about 18% of the total levy) and taking $1 million dollars from the highway rebuilding fund to get a zero increase. Four months later, they are trying to raise other taxes and cell phone fees saying they need the money. This is the same kind of budget gimmick stuff that Albany (excepting this year) and Washington are infamous for, and it is behavior beneath the good people who serve on our Board of Supervisors.  We urge all Madison County residents to let their Supervisor know that this 50% increase in mortgage tax is a terrible idea. We urge the Board of Supervisors to rethink this tax increase, and we urge State Senator Valesky and State Assemblyman Magee to make sure the bill that needs to be passed to allow this local increase stays safely bottled in committee in Albany. Executive Committee of the Madison County Conservative Party,Deborah Dougherty, Cazenovia; Lise McGrew, Morrisville; Jennifer Bernstone, Canastota; Christopher Kendall, Hamilton

Open Letter to Stanley Roe

To the Editor: (Cazenovia) Stanley, I am replying to your letter appearing in the April 27 edition of the Courier. I was hoping people would wait and read all of my four-part column before commenting on parts of it. Please let me know then what you think of the individual points and in total after considering all four parts. I am not sure you fully understand the points I have been making so far. Regarding the “old” Madison County Republican vote, I am certain the Republicans did not routinely take 90 percent of the votes in Madison County. I’m no more suspicious of a rural population than of an urban one. I don’t agree that a person “is who they are” based on other people’s impression of the person. That is very subjective. About half your letter is about me, someone you say you don’t know. Regarding my appearance, I am OLD and have survived several heart attacks. But I am a very happy person. I hope you are not biased about a person’s age or appearance. Regarding single-word terms like “new” and “change,” without a detailed context, they could mean about anything. To jump off a bridge would be “new” and a “change” for me but not something I’d be interested in trying. Something “new” I’d like to see is a President Condi Rice, or a President Clarence Thomas or a President Michele Bachmann. After you read my work in its totality, I hope we can meet at Dave’s Diner in Cazenovia sometime. I’ll buy you a coffee and we can chat.

Ron Wright, Cazenovia

Reconsider Dog Licensing Fees To the Editor: (Sullivan) The dog tag license in the town of Sullivan has increased from $6 for a neutered dog in 2010 to $20 in 2011 (more than tripled). These fees

have been turned over to the town of Sullivan this year from Madison County, so Sullivan is receiving revenue that it was not getting before. We would like to know why such a big increase. Towns, villages, counties, etc., should be for the welfare of the citizens. The citizens are having to tighten their belts. Social Security and military annuities did not include a cost-of-living raise this year, but we are losing money on our housing and paying more for health care, utilities, taxes, food and gas while food packaging shrinks. Thus those given charge of all levels of government should tighten their belts also in ALL areas and not burden the citizens any further. This includes the town of Sullivan. Senior citizens especially find it difficult to pay more. Veterinarian services are expensive. Many seniors have dogs as their only companions and would find it difficult to give them up. Also aren’t shelters asking people to adopt dogs? Higher prices would prevent this for many families, so this means many more dogs will have to be euthanized. In summary, we don’t see any concern for the plight of the ordinary citizen from Sullivan officials and others who were elected to do what is best for their constituents. Ellie Phelan, Diane Brundin, Marge Pratt, Melanie M. Bex, Donna Lynch, Linda Rainwater, Joan Dalton, Karen Lawyea, Kathleen Cagnier 6873508

Spirit House Group Presents to Georgetown Board To the Editor: (Georgetown) I attended the Georgetown Town Board meeting to give an update of our progress. As it stands, we have about 30 members-donors and another 20 interested parties or followers. Our focus is on expanding to include a historical and architectural

Opinion and Editorial

perspective. We have begun applying for grants, but it will be a tough go. Noted preservation architect Carl Stearns thinks the inside construction and architecture is just as grand as the outside. The gutting of the house has exposed much of the original structures and design: large beams, wide two- to threefoot foot floor beams, and eclectic unusual designs. For example, Stearns said that center roof funnels were common, but he had never seen such a design as there is at Spirit House. I am not a contractor or architect, but Stearns was impressed and rattled off all sorts of features that I was ignorant about. There was some innocent good-humored questioning about ghosts. The issue and perception about ghosts at Spirit House is a BIG problem for both the Spirit House Society and for the town of Georgetown. It will take a lot of work and effort to change those perceptions so that people begin to see Spirit House as a historically significant, architecturally incredible and sacred structure. Madis Senner, Syracuse Madis Senner will speak again May 25 at 6 p.m. at the Oneida Public Library; July 13 at 7 p.m. at the Erieville-Nelson Historical Society, Erieville; and Aug. 19 at 2 p.m. at the Quincy Square Museum in Earlville. For more information, email madiss@verizon.net or visit spirithousesociety.org.

Fire Department Elections Held To the Editor: (Canastota) The Canastota Volunteer Fire Department recently held its annual elections for chief and officers. The following people were elected as chiefs and line officers for the department: Chief John Massarotti, First Assistant Chief Antonio “T.J.” Tornatore, Second Assistant Chief Lyle Chafee, Captain John Palamara, Captain Dario Damore, Lt. Greg Hanley, Lt., James Sullivan, Lt. Frank McFall

and Lt. Matt Freund. Company officers are President Anthony Palamara, Vice President Dario Damore, Secretary Rick Stagnitti and Treasurer Steve Perry. Members of the board of directors are Dario Damore, Stephanie Edwards, Frank McFall, Anthony Palamara, Steve Perry, Rick Stagnitti and Tim Smith. Please check your carbon monoxide detectors and smoke alarms to make sure they’re working. Change the batteries. If your smoke alarms are more than seven years old, replace them. Jay Cowan, Public Relations Director, Canastota Volunteer Fire Department

Disputes ‘Mo Hoe’ Claim To the Editor: (Morrisville, Moravia) I was both pleased and disappointed to read the April 12 article in your paper about Morrisville State College’s ‘Mo Hoe.’ Pleased because I engineered the oscillating wheel hoe design they are using and disappointed because the article asserts that the hoe was designed by Morrisville students. This is simply not true. The so-called Mo Hoe is a copy of the Planet Whizbang wheel hoe that I developed and tested in my garden during the 2007 and 2008 growing seasons. Then, in May 2009, I introduced my new hoe design to the world at WhizbangWheelHoe.com. My website provides a free, step-by-step photo tutorial that explains exactly how anyone can easily make their own Planet Whizbang wheel hoe. For those who need a little help with the project, I sell a bolt-together metal parts kit. The Morrisville horticulture class purchased a parts kit from me in 2010. Assistant Professor Soucy emailed me a couple of months later to ask if I

Letters - Next Page


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Your Voice

Page 27

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw

Letters from previous page would be willing to share my source for the spring steel used to make the stirrup blades, and I was more than happy to do that. I have no problem with anyone using my basic wheel hoe design to make wheel hoes for people in the community. In fact, I would like to see this done by enterprising individuals all over the country. America would be a better place if more people grew more of their own food, and a wheel hoe sure does make gardening a whole lot easier. My only objection is that the hoe design I developed and gave freely to the world has been taken, renamed and passed off as the product of a college engineering class. This is disingenuous at best, and simply unethical at worst. Morrisville State College should be careful to give credit where credit is due. Herrick Kimball, Moravia

Memorial Golf Tourney Planned To the Editor: (Chittenango) The St. Patrick’s Knights of Columbus Council No. 10924 in Chittenango will hold its 14th annual Golf Odyssey fundraiser Sunday, May 15, at Poolsbrook Golf Course in Kirkville. Sponsorship is $50 with an 11-by18-inch poster sign displayed at the hole. All of the sponsors are mentioned in our monthly “Knightline” newsletter, and we always acknowledge their contributions at the dinner and prize award time slot; you are welcome to join the golfers,

if you’d like. Last year, we had 84 golfers participate in this fundraiser. Checks can be made out to K of C #10924 and mailed to Jim Vittorio, 7009 Bolivar Road, Chittenango, N.Y. 13037. For more information, call coordinators Frank DiChristina at 687-7364 or Jim Vittorio at 6879015. Frank DiChristina and Jim Vittorio, coordinators

In Memory of Robert Buell To the Editor: (Canastota) During 2003, Robert Buell’s family and friends donated money in his memory. We were able to do something he enjoyed greatly – watching kids learn how to fish. Again this year, we are pleased to donate 10 tackle boxes to the Canastota Over the Hill Gang for their annual kids’ derby in June. We are pleased to make this donation in Robert’s name. He would be very pleased to see the happy smiles on the faces of many children on June 5, fishing in the Erie Canal in Canastota, NY.

Jim Caldwell

Teens Invited to Bereavement Weekend To the Community: (Eaton) I would like to invite any teenager that has suffered the loss of a friend, relative or someone special to Bereavement Weekend at Camp Look Out. Bereavement Weekend is July 15 to the 17 and

is free to attend. It is a weekend full of camping, swimming, boating, hiking and having fun; all while healing and learning to understand your emotions and the bereavement process. You are allowed to cherish the memory of your loved one alongside others who have had similar experiences. The staff are trained The Baker Family professionals who have also experienced grief. Please contact me with any questions or for further information at 829-2406 or 761-5299. We look forward to meeting you. Tonia Matzke Davis

Baker Family Thanks Community

Tackle boxes To the Editor: (DeRuyter) Travis and Austin is doing really well I would personally like to thank right now, and we would like to everyone from the bottom of let everyone know that after his our hearts for all the support and induction phase of chemotherapy, contributions that were made for he has reached remission. Austin Baker’s spaghetti dinner/ He still has a long seven months kitchen drive on April 17. of intense chemotherapy to go, and We are very blessed to live in then his treatment will taper off to such a great community and be once a month until he is 10 years surrounded by so many wonderful old. people – both family and friends and Thank you so very much again for even strangers – that took time out all the love and support. of their day to come support us in All our love. our time of need. Travis, Austin, Dakota and Words cannot express how grateful baby Hunter, DeRuyter we are.

Ca zenovia Curmudgeon

Donald Krueger

One Day at a Time… (Cazenovia) That’s what they say, but must they all be April Fool’s Days? Like those we spent in a tizzy – all a-twitter – over, get this, a “royal wedding.” That, and we’ve got to keep up with all the celebrity peccadilloes on our side of the Atlantic, while exhausted from working two jobs, if we’re fortunate enough to have them, to pay credit cards – cards, plural – interest and the too-manyto-count different taxes for which we have no say in how our money is spent… and we’ve got our Tea Party meetings to attend.

Opinion and Editorial

All Fool’s Year? Take taxes. We pay with no say, while the multi-billion-dollar corporations and multimillion-dollar CEOs – who pay to say – get by with no taxes at all or way less than by right they should by paying. Warren Buffet admits that his tax rate is less tan that of

his secretary. The Government Accounting Office reports that a fourth of the largest corporations pay no income taxes at all and, like Buffet, 115 of the wealthiest 500 pay a tax rate that’s next to nothing, compared with the rates we ordinary folk pay. We ordinaries need what the “New York Times” calls “the world’s best tax law firm,” the 200 tax lawyers thanks to whom General Electric had from 2006 to 2010 a tax rate of minus – that’s right, minus – 15.8 percent. Or we could do as many

of the rich and not-quiteso-rich do and underreport our incomes and overstate our deductions … or file no returns at all. From the Cayman Islands? These folk, along with other varieties of tax cheats and fudgers, create a “tax gap” estimated this year to be something like $500 billion. Here at home, in Cazenovia, anyway, we’ve an All Fool’s Tax Day, May 17. It’s when we – parents, mostly, with too few naysaying contrarians – will don our motley and foolscaps and – the parents – march in lockstep to the high school

to vote for yet another school tax increase. I’m told the last noincrease year was in the 1970s; I believe it. The years since have been Santa Claus ones (or our school administratorsbudget-makers (must have been those yearly cute-butilliterate letters to him our second-graders are assigned every year). As with our supposedto-be representatives in Congress, we elect our school boards but have no say in how our school-tax

Krueger - 29


May 11, 2011

Page 28

Your Voice

Madison County Courier

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw

Fr o m H e r e & B a c k A g a i n

The Family: A Conspiracy of ‘Love?’

The Family has had in getting their devotees elected, seeking to bring Christian values and dogma to legislation and activities everywhere. Their secretive nature itself should set off alarm bells, but why in fact should we be concerned? To hear of operation. them speak they seem to Even the name, “The seek good works. They work Family,” is useful to this with the leaders of many secrecy. Try to Google it, and nations and “touch their see what you have to wade hearts” so they in turn touch through to get something the poor, oppressed widows about “The Family.” and children. It’s so insidious, that most They work to develop people don’t recognize how youth groups developed it has tentacles penetrating under the thoughts of Jesus, the federal and other levels including the Golden Rule. of government. You may Notice they do not work (should) recognize the names with the poor, they work of a partial list of its former with leaders, the favored of and current members: god, so benefits may trickle Dennis Bakke, Sam down, and if the leaders Brownback, Tom Coburn, keep 80 percent of the U.S. Charles Colson, Jim DeMint, money these legislators see Pete Domenici, John Ensign, is sent to them and give only Chuck Grassley, Mark 20 percent to the poor, so Hatfield, Jim Inhofe, Melvin be it. Laird, Steve Largent, Mark In Uganda, they and other McIntyre, Ed Meese, Bill Christian evangelists were Nelson, Don Nickles, Chip instrumental in bringing Pickering, Joe Pitts, Mark about legislation that Sanford, Heath Schuler and criminalized homosexuality, Bart Stupak. including the death penalty Along with many others for serial homosexuals, not mentioned here, the and even penalties for not list attests to the success

reporting a homosexual, and advertise Uganda’s actions as a model for other countries. Doug Kou, a staffer in George W. Bush’s Office of Faith Based and Community Initiatives (with the “community” thrown in as a sop and distraction), and a member of The Family, has called Focus on the Family and the Christian Coalition and other Christian groups “truly insane.” But The Family, according to Kuo, is just a fellowship, “a loosely banded group of people who have an affinity for Jesus.” Again it sounds innocuous, even praiseworthy. But later he adds, “Family leaders consider their political network to be Christ’s avant garde, an elite that transcends not just conventional morality but also earthly laws regulating lobbying.” “The more invisible you can make your organization,” current leader Doug Coe says, “the more influence you can have.” The Family sees itself beyond the fact that that is why we have laws requiring lobbyists to identify themselves as such. They

lament the “substitution of democracy for religion,” while Coe proclaims, “Moral orders, that’s for kids. God’s will is beyond morals.” They are so clever, they can say these things and be quoted and still maintain a position of strong influence with “our” leaders. Rice University sociologist, D. Michael Lindsay studies the evangelical movement and says, “…there is no other organization like the Fellowship (The Family by any other name; it works through many guises with interlocking boards and finances), especially among religious groups, in terms of its access or clout among the country’s leadership.” Lawmakers name it number one when asked to name a ministry which most influences their faith. The Family’s concern is not about thinking Jesus thoughts so much as it is in the doing, taking action. The life they expect from their devotees and wish to impose on the country and world is that of obedience to god and tradition, of course as they interpret these.

I liked that job and had the best of both worlds. In the beginning paragraphs of this article, I discussed the problem of passing the farm on to younger generations. I have learned that there cannot be as many large farms as there were small farms. There can’t be as many Walmarts as there once were independent meat markets and grocery stores … and all farms can’t be “passed on.” Ponder this! The present 80- to100-cow farms will or have already gone to 500-plus-cow “milk factories.” The son who takes over must decide if he will want to commit himself to that type of operation. He will not, for long, be operating the same enterprise as what he and his father have been used to. He will be forced to grow.

I foresee a resurgence of the “back-to-the-smaller farms” where many farmers grow safe, organic food for themselves and local consumption. A limited amount of locally grown fresh vegetables, at least, and maybe fruit (berries) and eggs can compete with big chain grocery stores. Of course, there already are “pick-your-own” crops. More farms could have a small roadside market. Wouldn’t have to be “big.” In each locality, there could be more “farmer’s markets.” We have to change our traditional thoughts about the definition of a farm and what it produces, if we want to keep the small, family farm. Some farms operate part-time “bed and breakfasts” with farm tours on the side. Some have “fall festivals”

with hayrides and corn mazes. There are maple celebrations in the spring with tours, pancake breakfasts, etc. What other ideas for projects can you young folks think of ?? Don’t jump into one so large you have to go into debt. Keep your financial skirts clean. Remember that changes are inexorably coming. Keep with them. Or a bit ahead! We can still keep farmland and enjoy country living.

James Coufal

I’m about one-third through Jeff Sharlet’s book, “C Street: The Fundamentalist Threat to American Democracy,” a follow-up to his best seller “The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power,” a best-seller. It occurs to me, and I’m surprised and upset to have it so, that very little is written or even commented on about ‘The Family’ in the public media. The high-profile Christian radical right, with its overt fundamentalism and believers loud and open in espousing their views – and in denigrating the views of anyone else – receives most of the attention. They dominate the conversation about fundamentalism most everywhere along with, of course, that of radical Islam. Perhaps this is not surprising since The Family operates in an insidious manner. The stated goal of one of its parts is to see that the finest and best invisible organization is developed and maintained at all levels of the work. Transparency is not a favored word or way

Opinion and Editorial

Coufal - 30

Page from page 19 We called it our “oat money.” I knew of a reliable father/ son neighbor, honest and trustworthy who wanted to rent our land to grow crops for his expanding dairy. We agreed and gave him a free hand to work most of our land as if it were his own. This lasted quite a number of years, as long as he stayed in farming, no written contract, and he brought over the rent money without fail every year at Christmastime. He said, “Probably you could use the money about this time of year.” Not many years later, I took and passed a state civil service exam to become a farm employment representative and commuted to Utica each day while still living on the farm and growing most of our food and fuel.

He would not last long if his costs of production were higher than those of the “big boys.” However, it doesn’t mean you must abandon the home farm and the farm life. It just means you have to change your operations and life style to mesh with the changing times. Use creative thinking! Parent and child together can find ways to keep the farm land, or at least part of it. There may be a program that keeps the land from being taxed as city lots. Change the kind of operation with the changing times as you go along. The younger people can think of new operations suitable to their likings. It might mean taking an offfarm job at first and, from there, developing your possible full-time strategy.

This is the final installment of “Our Changing Farms.” Charles Page died in March before being able to see it printed in its entirety. He was 90 years old. Charles Page was an Oneida resident interested in all things rural, farming and historical. He died in March.


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, MadisonCountyCourier.com DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, Georgetown, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw

Your Voice

Opinion and Editorial

Musings

Famous Floods Part 1

Hobie Morris (Brookfield) The dawn of April 28 found Central New Yorkers staring in disbelief at the watery deluge that had fallen overnight in a thunderand-lightning Wagnerian fortissimo that made sleeping nearly impossible and strong dogs cower and quiver helplessly in fear. This simple country man and his lovely wife Lois knew a soggy day awaited as they waded through ankle-deep flowing water to an outhouse (yes, we have for over 30 years) that was flooded to a precarious height. Later, in leaving our hilltop, woodsy location in our old pickup, two flooding streams had to be “motorboated” across before reaching the safety of the black-topped country road leading into the hamlet of Brookfield. (There is a much larger town with the same name.) Coming into the village, you cross on the county

of a

Simple Country Man

bridge a roaring and turbulent Beaver Creek. A usually meek and tranquil stream, it had suddenly risen to gigantic dimensions with days of incessant rains. Overnight, the water had risen, spilled over its banks and into the adjacent community park. All across Central New York, sirens, flashing red police and fire engine lights, barricades, detours, flooding, downed trees, impassable – except by boat – rural roads and city streets, damaged and destroyed houses, extensive property damage of every description, new lakes appearing where none had been the day before. Cruel April with its record rainfall had unleashed an unanticipated grand finale – with no encore wanted by anybody! How quickly we forget, and maybe that’s how it should be. Do you remember that in June 2006, central and southern New York received a colossal amount of rain in a three-

day period that was not only incredibly destructive, but also a killer? Experts predicted its severity “…may not be duplicated gain for possibly 200 years.” Even here in the lofty Brookfield hills, more than 14 inches of rain fell in a 72-hour period. People had plenty of “water stories” to reminisce about. For most Brookfielders, the 2006 flood may be the defining one of their lives. For one local man, the flood benchmark was set 101 years earlier on Sunday afternoon and evening Sept. 3, 1905. A flood with incredible destructive power occurred that devastated many communities in a multi-county area. (It had been 40 years before, in 1865, when the last severe flood had wreaked such havoc.) My late friend’s name was Clifton Calhoun. When he passed several years ago, he

dose of reality. (Do our high school English classes count as a foreign language?) And then there are those most-scared of programs. A Cazenovia parent, I guess, writes a letter to the editor of another paper: “Now couldn’t be a better time to support our athletic program(s).” How wrong you are, dear lady! Now, especially, in this time of less state money and our schools wanting more from us, it’s time to look critically at the value, or not, of these major budgeteaters, football and ice hockey. Good for image-making and media coverage – and ego-boosting for the less academically inclined student – but are they good for students’ minds? Not if you and school officials and sports advocates will attend to the reports, so far ignored or dismissed, of the research into the frighteningly almost certain brain damage to young

football and ice hockey players…and of the football factories our high schools have become. You, and certainly school officials should take time out (!) to read the book or see the film, “Friday Night Lights.” Then to drive home the nail – we sincerely hope not of a coffin, but that has been so with high school football players! – you should, must, see the PBS Frontline program, “Football High” (frontline@pbs.org or order a copy for your school and its officials). Certainly, parents and taxpayers should question $upport for these programs. A NO vote for schools’ budget proposals will send the makers back to their drafting boards (where they and school board members can imagine the possibility of lawsuits to come). Stay tuned.

Page 29

4” Drainage Pipe x 10 FT Length

Only $2.50 per 10' Length 20 PC. Minimum

Holland Patent Lumber

865-5517 Open Monday - Saturday

I CAN HEAR! “Sound hearing aid advice in a skilled and caring manner.” CALL TODAY!

BETTER HEARING Of Madison County, LLC 18 E Main Street Morrisville 315-684-1005

121 Main Street Oneida 315-363-7869

betterhearingmadison.com

Morris - 30

Krueger from page 27 money is spent. Rich years and poor, the budget-makers ask for more, in the poor years – this one – with tales of woe about how hard they work to cut personnel and materials while continuing to fund all the “feel-good” stuff they’ve added over time. Cazenovia’s school superintendent and vice superintendent said they “…heard clearly from the community they didn’t want program cut.” By ‘community’ he, of course, means the minority that is of parents. There are those of us with real world experience teaching “products” of public schools who know there are programs that should be cut. Oh, where are the reformers when we need them … the Michelle Rhees, the Joel Klines, the KIPP – Knowledge is Power Program – people, even Amy Chua? It’s not just the big-city schools that need a good

Donald W. Krueger of Cazenovia is a retired professor and active contrarian. Readers can email him at madnews@m3pmedia.com.

Does Print Advertising Work?

In the Madison County Courier newspaper, it does... “Working with Mike Bova is great. He knows all the ins and outs of advertising and makes it so easy for me. The prices are very affordable and the results have been remarkable!” Meg Kolodzie, Elder Haven Adult Daycare, Canastota, NY

Want to increase your business? Contact Mike Bova today at 315-404-8200 or mike@m3pmedia.com


Page 30

May 11, 2011

Your Voice

Madison County Courier

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw

April 2011: Make a Difference We Did!

Wellness…and More

(Sherburne) There’s a wonderful little shop in properly disposed of. Terry N. Manning Earlville that I just love, for It is a true test of (Bridgeport-Lakeport) many reasons, not the least commitment and friendship of which is that the owners In recent years April has to come out, work hard by historically been “Make A try to source everything bending, scooping, lifting Difference directly with producers. This and just generally doing the Month” in the hamlet of eliminates one or two layers kind of nasty hard work that of the supply chain, which Bridgeport. This year, we most people find less than started off a week earlier translates to better prices for than originally planned, with satisfying. the consumer. Everything To all of you who Bill Pindle’s Project Pride you buy here comes with helped, a great, big thank Team. This group of guys good karma and a clean you; your efforts are truly met and swept, shoveled conscience. appreciated, and your efforts and cleaned the bridge and The shop is called Mezza certainly have helped make a Luna Wellness Center, and sidewalks like every last one of them were auditioning for difference. it’s owned and operated by God bless all of you! the final job slot on Donald Kathryn Stefan (Katy) and Trump’s show. Katherine Robinson, who Around the Hamlet To top it off, about a have been business partners Many of us have been week later, by no mere since 2003. doing a whole lot of circumstance, I am sure, the Formerly located in complaining about the recent paid Department of Public Hamilton, they moved to rainy weather we’ve been Works crew came, swept up Earlville in November of experiencing in the area the piles and hosed down 2010. Mezza Luna reflects of late, and I could most the bridge to give it that one their commitment to certainly put myself in that final touch. category. I am going to stop protecting the environment, A great, big thank you now and count my blessings. their belief in fair trade goes out to all of you who principles, and a desire to Our weather compared to participated. Your efforts make organic, fair trade, ecothe devastation in Georgia certainly made a difference! friendly products available and Alabama is a picnic. at very reasonable prices for Earth Day this year was Many of us are complaining the CNY consumer. blessed with blue, dry skies because we can’t mow our and sunshine. The weather Mezza Luna has many lawns. At least our houses was a real treat for those of are standing, we are standing, unique and interesting items us sun-deprived Central New and our loved ones are throughout the shop – Yorkers who are starting to organic fair trade chocolate, intact. grow webbing between our organic cotton and hemp Yes, we have had some toes. We had a great turnout clothing, DVDs and CDs tough, violent weather and innumerable bags of from Earth Aid (see http:// and some relatively minor trash and other assorted www.facebook.com/ treasures were gathered and earthaid), reusable shopping Manning - 31 bags, Gaia yoga towels, and backpacks and belts from Coufal from page 28 Splaff. Splaff makes ecoconscious sandals, belts, Thus the actions they examples of how to act. bags, and accessories of wish are anti-homosexual, For example, the Red natural hemp, used bike anti-abortion, pro-military, Guard is an example of how industry de-regulation to hold “covenant” when a Morris from page 29 and pro-rich, who are the young person would bring favored of god. a parent to be beheaded was confined to a wheelchair, Interestingly, but in a rather than go against the calculating way, they may principles of the Red Guard. crippled by painful arthritis. In his younger farming be called tolerant. They The Family asserts that days, he was a powerful welcome anyone into the it is not a conspiracy but man capable of lifting at the family – Christian of any rather a religious worldview same time in each hand a sort, Muslim, Jew, Hindu, working through “kings” 100-pound milk can onto a Buddhist, etc. – so long (legislators, the rich). But in truck that collected milk cans as they accept “Jesus plus fowl fashion, it looks and from local dairy farmers. nothing” in obedience. Just acts like a duck. as Islam means “submit,” Despite his later We cannot allow this duck The Family expects infirmities, Clifton always to waddle around without submission. had a smile and a friendly challenge, and bringing it to They expect these people public attention is one major greeting. He was a local legend because of his to maintain their faith and be challenge. remarkably keen and clear able to operate in both areas Jim Coufal of Cazenovia is a mind right up to his death toward the goals of The part-time philosopher and full-time Family. To be Janus-like. And observer of global trends. He can be at age 98. His power of recollection of the life, they hold Hitler, Goebbels, reached at madnews@m3pmedia. times and personalities of Himmler, the Red Guard com. this community made him a and other such to be prime

Th i n k L o c a l

and are priced at Mezza Luna at $9.99 and $19.99, respectively. I’ve seen hemp clothing in other stores, and it’s expensive. This same skirt would probably carry a price tag of $89. Speesees, which makes clothing for babies and children, “believes in playing inner tubes, and recycled racecar tires. Their products fair and being nice.” From their website at http:// are carefully handcrafted www.speesees.com: “Our in North America in a 100 cotton is 100 percent skalpercent waste-free, earthfriendly process in which all certified organic, which means no pesticides or leftover materials are either chemical fertilizers has reused or recycled. Katy makes Mezza Luna’s been used in its cultivation. Speesees fabrics are treated skin care and bath products with low-impact and herbal in small batches from organic ingredients. Products dyes, prints are made with include baby care, body care, pigments and pvc-free aromatherapy, salves, lotions, plastisols, and we skip the dioxin and formaldehyde shampoos, conditioners, altogether. Meanwhile, in soaps and cleansers, as well a small village in India, as household cleaners and surrounded by an organic products. garden, our factory’s The shop has beautiful limestone walls create an clothing items made open, airy ambiance, and from hemp and organic chai breaks twice a day cotton by several different make workdays pretty manufacturers. Mountains sweet. Our factory is of the Moon (www. certified SA8000, a social mountainsofthemoon.com) accountability standard for “goes beyond the traditional decent working conditions eco-fashion company by (including workplace safety, striving to represent the remuneration, fair working blending of fine art, style, hours, no discrimination, ethics, and environmental no child labor, etc). The and social responsibility and money earned by our awareness.” factory supports not only its A selection of gorgeous workers, but also is extended oversized silk scarves and to help the community.” beautiful wrap skirts made A company called Mariachi of colorful hemp prints Imports makes “Mad come directly from the manufacturer in India, Hoffman - 39

Chris Hoffman

B r i d g e p o r t- L a k e p o r t C i v i c O r g a n i z at i o n N e w s

Opinion and Editorial

highly venerated and muchbeloved man. When Clifton was a boy, his family farmed in the western part of the township. Today, that land is heavily forested with only an occasional long-forgotten farmhouse cellar hole to remind our generation that this land was once cleared and widely farmed. When it rained in those years, what the ground couldn’t absorb quickly ran into the region’s numerous small streams, larger creeks and eventually the valley rivers. While today’s forests, fallow land and extensive

vegetation act as nature’s gigantic sponge, such natural water stoppers were few when severely tested by large amounts of water from heavy rains and winter’s runoff. Mill dams in particular were highly vulnerable to sudden high water surges. (Before electricity, dams were built and the water collected provided the power to run the various kinds of mill machinery.) To be continued. Hobie Morris is a longtime Brookfield resident and simple country man.


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 31

Your Voice

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, West Eaton, West Edmeston, Whitelaw

R a n d o m A cc e s s

When Something Breaks

devices. This next generation of gadgets was still fairly easy to repair since some of the same techniques to produce them were still in use. The chips either plugged into sockets or were soldered to the circuit board and were easy to diagnose and replace as needed. that expensive costing a few Time again moved forward dollars at most to obtain. and as the years passed the The electronics devices devices we use became more we used were mostly analog and more complex. The in nature. Digital devices first personal computers were still years away, as far appeared in the late 70s and as consumers went. Sure, have become a part of our there were a few computers daily lives. Digital cameras and some other devices around, but they were mostly and camcorders have now replaced film and videotape laboratory curiosities. The computers used on board the while memory-based devices have now replaced cassettes, early NASA spacecraft had and reel-to-reel audio about as much computing recorders. Vinyl records were power as one of the early replaced by CDs, and even pocket calculators. they are now being replaced As time progressed, the by digital downloads over the development of modern Internet. consumer devices moved When devices fail these forward, due the many days, it isn’t as easy to decide advancements made in the 70s because of the space program. to fix them or replace them, since many have been The development of digital designed to be “disposable.” devices was largely driven Cost is a big factor. If it will by our country’s race to the cost more to fix the device moon and beyond. The need than replace it, most people for smaller gadgets and more will replace it. There are many powerful computers helped old gadgets now lurking drive the development of in drawers and need to be integrated circuits to replace properly disposed of, since drawers full of discrete parts. they may contain lead and The development of ICs other toxic materials. helped to make the devices We’ve got an easy way now we used in our daily lives smaller and less costly to make to get rid of all that electronic junk: the Madison Cortland in comparison to previous ARC, along with the Madison

Robert Arnold

(Canastota) It happens sooner or later: one of the electronic gadgets that you’ve come to rely on decided to die at the worst possible time. I’m not certain, but I think that the basic concept is a variant of Murphy’s Law: anything that can go wrong, will go wrong. I’ve had some experience in dealing with this problem. Many years ago, back in the relatively “primitive” – the 1970s, my occupation was as the repairperson and technical advisor at a Radio Shack store in Oneida. The store is long gone (it’s been replaced by another store under company ownership, I believe), and I no longer do any repair work for anyone other than myself so don’t even THINK of asking! Back then, most electronics gear was designed using individual components. Separate resistors, capacitors, inductors and transistors soldered to a circuit board made up the stuff we used. If one of those parts went bad, it was quite possible to simply replace the bad part or parts and restore the device to normal operation. The costs involved in doing that were just a small fraction of the replacement cost of buying a new widget or whatever it was, so it made sense to fix instead of replace. The biggest expense in a repair then was the time it took to do it. The parts themselves weren’t normally

Manning from page 30 flooding but, it could be a whole lot worse. Let’s celebrate what our area has to offer. There is some new stuff going on in the area. We now have a Kayak Club at Stoney’s Marina on North Road. I need to get over there and check it out and see what they are all about. You can expect to hear more about them in the next issue. Speaking of things going on... What’s with the doublewide Field Project trailer between the SunTrac and Colonial? Being of inquisitive nature, I saw a bunch of papers on the bulletin board out front

Opinion and Editorial

and 99 percent of them are Labor Law postings. The only clue was multiple references to a paving company. A town of Cicero representative was at the Earth Day meeting point and had no knowledge, so stay tuned! On a not-so-good-news basis, the Nice N Easy Grocery Shoppe in Lakeport will definitely not make the Memorial Day opening they had hoped for. Probably opening closer to Labor Day at this point, after a couple of wrinkles get ironed out. On a very-good-news basis, Summer Concerts at Chapman Park are back! They will again be sponsored

by Oneida Savings Bank and Peggy Bohm of Hunt Real Estate. This year, we are expanding the play dates to five consecutive Monday nights beginning July 11. Like last year, Monday nights also will be “Cruise Night” for all you car buffs, and there will be hot food on premises. It just keeps getting better and better! Folks, a cheerleader for our community I am, so I encourage you to get out enjoy and make it all it can be – it is what you make it! Terry N. Manning is chairman and volunteer publicist for the Bridgeport-Lakeport Civic Organization. He can be reached at blco-cny@twcny.rr.com.

County Department of Solid Waste and Sanitation, has opened a recycling center at 327 Farrier Ave. in Oneida. They’re open from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday through Thursday and the first Saturday of every month from 9 a.m. to noon. They take almost any home electronic gadget and will make sure that it gets taken care of properly.

Don’t just put your electronic waste in the garbage can! Dispose of it correctly so the materials in them can get properly disposed of or re-used where that is possible. The environment thanks you, and I thank you. Robert Arnold is a longtime writer and technology pro. He resides in Canastota. You can contact him at rndacc@ralabs.com.

THE PERFECT PLACE FOR YOUR PARTY Everything You Need At the Chittenango American Legion Now Fully Air Conditioned

Located in the Veterans Memorial Building Legion Drive, Chittenango Call Town of Sullivan Parks & Rec to book it now 315-687-3471

Secure Storage Units Available Six Sizes To Choose From • 24 Hour Access Secure Lock & Key Provided • Police Patrolled New Facility • Pro-rating • Paved Premises • Trussed Roof

Chittenango Self Storage · 687-9131

Subscription Form Get The Madison County Courier delivered to your home every week: 13 weeks-$13, 6 months-$20, 1 year $35 Complete the form below and mail to: M3P Media LLC, 119 Genesee St. Chittenango, NY 13037 Name: Address: City: State: Phone: ( Email:

Zip: )

Credit Card #: Security Code: Cardholder Name: Billing Address: Billing Zipcode:

Exp. Date:

For more information or to subscribe by phone, call 315-404-8200


May 11, 2011

Page 32

Madison County Courier

Your Veterans

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, Georgetown, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, and in Whitelaw the Service Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville,Our WestMen Eaton, WestWomen Edmeston,

MadisonCountyCourier.com

M o r r i s v i ll e S tat e C o ll e g e N e w s

Men’s Lacrosse Raises $2,877 for Wounded Warrior Project

Detachment 520 Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corp. (ROTC) from Cornell University and area sponsors and veterans came out to support an event to raise funds for the Wounded Warrior Project.

(Morrisville – April 16, 2011) The Morrisville State College men’s lacrosse team, together with the Morrisville and surrounding communities, raised more than $2,800 Saturday, April 16, for the Wounded Warrior Project, raising awareness about the program which helps injured service members returning home from battle. All proceeds from the contest against Medaille were donated to the program, including admission, 50/50 ticket and other raffle sales, along with general

donation buckets. Morrisville State also sported special camouflage Wounded Warrior jerseys, which were auctioned off, and collected additional funds for the cause totaling $2,277. “The support we received from the public for the Wounded Warrior Project, and the generosity of area businesses allowed us to exceed our goal,” Morrisville State head lacrosse coach Jason Longo said. “We were thrilled to be a part of the program’s cause and look forward to working with the WWP again in the future to

support their mission.” Founded in 2003, the WWP was created to honor and empower wounded warriors who incur servicerelated wounds, injuries and illnesses while serving in our country’s military branches since Sept. 11, 2001. The Mustangs were also joined by several veterans who had served in various military branches, as well as the Color Guard from Detachment 520 Air Force Reserve Officer’ Training Corps (ROTC) at Cornell University, for the special event.

Memorial Day Ceremony Planned

(DeRuyter – May 29, 2011) A wreath presentation at Maplewood Cemetery (Berwin), LaFayette, is planned for Sunday May 29 at 5 p.m. On May 30, a parade steps off at 10 a.m. am in front of the Legion Hall on Seminary Street in DeRuyter, proceeding to Utica Street, Cortland Street, Cemetery Street to the cemetery,

culminating in a memorial ceremony. Following the ceremony, observers are encouraged to return to the Legion Hall where refreshments will be available at the parish house by the United Church. The Hall will host more refreshments, military videos, music, demonstrations, etc. You can see we are

changing to a more eventful day and encourage your thoughts and ideas, for now or future years, building toward an old home day atmosphere. Please submit ideas and your interest to get involved to William Staley at (315) 852-6153, wjjs1948@yahoo. com, or Box 407, DeRuyter, N.Y. 13052.

We Want Your Veterans’ News Send us all your news about fundraisers, appointments, promotions, transfers, honors and more.

Don’t be overwhelmed thinking you’ve got to write a 500-word press release, either; send us off a picture with a

couple of sentences to madnews@m3pmedia. com. For more information, call 315.687.7561.

Veteran Briefs

Madison Man Extends Service (Madison) Major General Patrick A. Murphy, the Adjutant General, announced the recent reenlistment of members of the New York Army National Guard in recognition of their continuing commitment to serve community, state and nation as part of the Army National Guard. Among them was Sgt. Joseph Schenk from Madison, who has reenlisted to continue service with the Company E (Forward Support Company-Infantry) 427th Brigade Support Battalion. “Over the past 3 years the New York Army National Guard has come from far below authorized strength to 100 percent strength,” Murphy said in remarks to the force. “Our priority is to provide ready forces for both state and federal missions and readiness starts with maintaining our strength. We have more than 16,000 men and women in the Army and Air National Guard with each individual member having an important role.”


Madison County Courier

May 11, 2011

Page 33

Your News

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville, Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Around theWhitelaw County Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville,From West Eaton, West Edmeston,

Three Vie for Two Seats on M-ECS Board Morrisville-Eaton Central School Budget, Trustee Vote May 17 Martha E. Conway (Morrisville-Eaton Central School District) Three candidates are running for two seats on the Morrisville-Eaton Central School District Board of Education. The vote for trustee will be held at the same time as the budget vote May 17. Cynthia Busic-Snyder is challenging incumbents Murry Ames and Marian Whitney to serve a threeyear term on the board. In addition to the trustee and budget vote, district residents will have the opportunity to vote on the purchase of two 66-passenger and one 29-passenger school buses, part of the district’s fiveyear rotation program to keep maintenance costs down and the safest buses on the road. The estimated cost of the purchase is not to exceed $194,000 and is subject to reimbursement through state aid. The new vehicles would replace the three oldest buses in the district’s fleet. According to district officials, transportation aid remains based on the amount that the district spends. The district will still receive 90 percent of the cost of the new buses paid over five years. If the bus proposition is voted down this year, the current proposed budget will not be affected. Following are short biographies of the candidates, recently published in the school newsletter

Marian Whitney I have been honored to be a member of the M-ECS Board of Education Marian Whitney for nine years, also serving as a member of the Shared Decision-Making

Group for seven years. My husband Mark and I have raised our two sons, Kyle and Eric, in Morrisville for the last 17 years. Both of our children attended M-ECS from elementary school through graduation. Across New York state, school districts are seeing their funding cut and have to figure out how to give our children the best education we have with decreasing financial support. The M-ECS Board of Education always puts the needs of the children first. The school board and the M-ECS administrative team work diligently to develop a budget that can be supported by our residents. I believe that my nine years of experience working with the school budget, as well as other school issues, will allow me to help the district move forward in tough economic times. I was fortunate enough to have both of my children benefit from the education they received in the M-ECS District. I am asking for your support on May 17 so that we can continue to provide quality education to all the students in our district.

Cynthia BusicSnyder I have resided in the Morrisville-Eaton School District since 1993. I reside just outside of the village of Morrisville with my Cynthia husband Busic-Snyder William, two children, three dogs, two cats and several dozen wandering chickens. I hold a bachelor of science in industrial design (visual communication) and a master of arts in industrial design education with a graduate minor in instructional design from Ohio State University. After practicing professionally as a graphic

designer and art director in Columbus, Ohio, for almost a decade, I taught for 18 years at the community college level. Utilizing creative problem-solving skills and methodology in industry and academia have provided experiences to support a search for solutions that are in the best educational interest of our children and community. Having been responsible for managing personnel and clients, chairing numerous college-wide initiatives and serving on the board of The Children’s Center and the Morrisville Public Library exemplify my continued interest in supporting in the community. As a recipient of the SUNY Chancellor Excellence in Teaching Award and Genesis Foundation Excellence in Teaching Award, I feel that formalizing my community service by becoming a member of the school board is my next logical leap, and I look forward to the opportunity to serve.

Murry Ames I am a lifetime resident of the M-ECS School District and live on Lebanon Murry Ames Hill Road, Eaton. I am married to Naydene, and we have two adult children, Travis and Stephanie. We are all M-ECS graduates and care deeply about the education of the children in our district. This June, I will have completed my third threeyear term on the M-ECS Board of Education. I have decided to run for another term for Board of Education. With the financial strain that the school district and community are facing, I believe my experience with school budgets will benefit our school district. The next few years will be very challenging to provide the best education

possible with limited resources. Experience on the Board will help find the balance of what is attainable, yet affordable. As a school board member, I have also

been a member of the M-ECS Audit Committee (Fiscal Oversight) since its inception and a member of the M-ECS Facilities Committee.

Two Locations 2541 Route 20 E Cazenovia 2352 State Route 12B Hamilton

751-8395

Tuesday - Friday 9:30am - 5pm ● Saturday 9am - 3pm

● ● ● ● ●

Grading Trucking Excavating Septic Systems 24 Hr. Towing

● ● ● ● ●

Topsoil Driveway Stone Mulch • Sand • Fill Gravel • Limestone Landscaping Rocks (Large & Small)

“No Tow Is Too Big”

Small Deliveries Available

CROUSE CONSTRUCTION 687-6560 ●142 Route 173, Chittenango

Fiore Funeral Homes Serving Families for Over 50 Years CREMATIONS ▼MEMORIAL SERVICES URNS DISPLAYED ▼CASKET SHOWROOM FINANCING AVAILABLE ON THE PREMISES 315-363-6100 315-697-2296 303 Main St. 317 S. Peterboro St. Oneida, NY 13421 Canstota, NY 13032


May 11, 2011

Page 34

Madison County Courier

Your Events

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

There’s Always Something

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, Eaton, West Edmeston, to doWest in Madison County, Whitelaw New York

Canastota May 14 Grace Lutheran Church will hold a garage sale to benefit Relay for Life from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the church on Route 13 and Carter Road. For more information, call 697-2128.

May 17 The Canastota FBLA and alumni committee will hold a chicken barbecue at the Canastota High School, cafeteria A, 101 Roberts St. at 4 p.m. Take-outs available. Tickets available at the door for $8.50 per person.

Cazenovia May 14 The Red Cross will hold a blood drive at the Cazenovia Volunteer Fire Department, 121 Albany St. from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. with double red cell machines. To donate, call (800) 733-2767 or visit madisononeidaredcross.org.

June 2 The MOMS Club (Moms Offering Moms Support) will meet at Common Grounds, 35 Albany St. at 9:30 a.m. Children welcome. For more information, call 655-8481.

Chittenango May 15 Dr. Anil Verma will speak on “medication” at Jim Marshall Farms Foundation, 1978 New Boston Road. Lecture designed to help the

mental health of attendees. For scheduled time, call 6875064.

Hamilton May 13 Spring in Hamilton Exhibit and meet the artists; held from 4 to 6 p.m. at MAD Art Inc. on Lebanon Street. Free event. Chenango Valley Scribes Writing and Illustrating Contest Awards Reception will be held at the Colgate Bookstore Community Room at 6:30 p.m. Open to the public.

May 13 and 14 Worn Again second hand shop will hold its annual sale at the First Baptist Church, Broad Street from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on May 13 and from 9 a.m. to noon on May 14. No children’s clothes at this sale. Vouchers will be accepted at the store located at 45 Lebanon St. Proceeds returned to churches, Hamilton Food Cupboard and Friendship Inn.

May 14 The Hamilton Farmers’ Market will be held on the Village Green from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

May 17 Story Time with Guest Storyteller Alison Kenyon and Library Director Barb Coger at the Hamilton Public Library begins at 10:30 a.m. 

Hubbardsville May 14

Business Directory Info Cleaning Services

The Brookfield Riding and Driving Association will hold its first memorial trail ride and poker run at Taylor’s Tack and Field, 9192 Skaneateles Turnpike from 8 to 11:30 a.m. Games and prizes included. The fee is $20 per rider. Also taking a collection of items for our troops. For more information, call 750-8518 or email charhall90@yahoo. com.

Leondardsville May 15 The Leonardsville Fire Department will host a donation pancake breakfast at the Fire Hall, 11306 Mill St. from 7 to 10:30 a.m. Donation is whatever you can afford.

Morrisville May 14 and 15 An open house and tour of historic Madison Hall will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Snacks and refreshments provided. For more information, call 6847553 or visit madisonhall. org.

Munnsville May 11 Wednesday night is wing night at the Munnsville American Legion beginning at 5 p.m. Several varieties of wings are offered in dozen or half-dozen portions.

May 13 Friday night’s are fish fry dinners at the Munnsville

American Legion from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Other menu items also available.

May 15 An all-you-can-eat breakfast will be held at the Munnsville American Legion from 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. The cost is $6.

May 17 Tuesday nights are buffet nights at the Munnsville American Legion served from 5 to 7:30 p.m. All-youcan-eat for $7.

Ongoing The Munnsville American Legion continues to collect non-perishable food items for the Feed Our Vets Organization. The Crazy 8 Can and Bottle Return Center in Lairdsville will pay six cents per bottle or can to the organization. Unable to get to Lairdsville? Call 495-2028 for pick-up arrangements.

New Woodstock May 16 The New Woodstock Federated Church will hold its annual meeting at 6 p.m. at the New Woodstock Free Library. Bring a dish to pass and place setting. The New Woodstock Historical Society will meet at the Depot at 7:30 p.m.

May 17 Story hour at the New Woodstock Free Library begins at 11 a.m.

Call 315-404-8200 For Advertising Marketing

To Advertise Here Call 315-404-8200 Electrical

Eyecare

Bill Pindle

Canal Town

Electric & Heating Sales & Service

Optical

Installation & “Servicing” of all types of Electrical, Heating and emergency generator systems.

Residential & Commercial 35 years experience

633-9333 Bridgeport, NY

Family Focused Eyecare 174 Canal St. Canastota 315-697-3334

Gold & Silver Buyer

Oneida

Big Hall at 7:30 p.m.

May 14 Lovin’ Your Library Club meets at the Oneida Public Library at 2 p.m. For kids 7 to 11 years old.

May 16 Music and Motion for preschool aged children is held at the Oneida library at 10 a.m.

March 16 and 17 AARP sponsored driver safety course is held at the Oneida library from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. each day for motorists 50 years old and older. To register, call 3638357.

May 17 The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) support group will meet at the Oneida Public Library at 6 p.m.

May 18 Ready to Read for children up to 2 years old will be held at the Oneida library at 10 a.m. New women’s group out to explore new ideas for growth and enrichment meets at the Oneida library at 6:30 p.m.

May 22 The Oneida Area Civic Chorale presents “Big Band Bash: A Century of Pop and Jazz Music” at 4 p.m. at the VVs High School, Route 31 in Verona. Tickets available from chorale members, at W.J. Hinman Jewelers or by calling 363-6892.

Peterboro

May 20 A program and Ready to Read dedication of a painting of for children up an Envisioned Antislavery to 2 years old Meeting by Hugh C. is held at the Oneida library at Humphreys, retired Madison County Judge, 10 a.m. artist, and playwright will May 12 be held on the Green at 7 Ready, Set, p.m. Admission is $2. Read for Poolville children 3 to 5 May 11

years old is held at the Oneida library at 10 a.m. Oneida Community and Transcendentalism (lectures) will take place at the Oneida Community Mansion House,

May 14

The Second Saturdays Farmers’ Market will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at the Poolville Community Center, Route 89. To have your event listed in the calendar, email MadNews@ m3pmedia.com.


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Your Events

Page 35

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

There’s Always Something

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, Eaton, West Edmeston, to doWest in Madison County, Whitelaw New York

Betz from page 17 German for himself, his executors and administrators, doth covenant and agree to and with the superintendents of the poor, and each of them, and their and each of their successors for the time being, by these presents, that she, the said Margaret Cleveland the said apprentice, in the art or Branch of Housewifery which he now uses and carries on, shall and will instruct, or cause to be taught and instructed, and during all the time aforesaid, find, provide, and allow unto said apprentice, competent and sufficient meat, drink and apparel, washing, lodging, mending and all other thongs necessary and fit for an apprentice; and shall cause such apprentice to be taught

to read and write, and also to be instructed in the general rules of arithmetic, and will so provide for the said apprentice that she be not in any way a charge to the said county, or the said Town of Norwich or the inhabitants thereof, but of and from all charge, shall save the said county and town harmless and indemnified during the said term. And at the end of the said term, shall and will make and deliver unto said apprentice, one good new suit of holiday clothes, of the value of Twenty-five dollars, and two suits of every day wear, and one new bible. In consideration whereof, the superintendents of the poor, have paid the said Obediah German the sum of – dollars

at the execution of this Indenture. IN WITNESS THEREOF, the said parties to these presents have hereunto interchangeably set their hands and seals, the day and year above written. John Knowles Ellis Morse G. Gray E. Cleveland Obediah German

This indenture was filed with another one, it was for the girls’ sister Clarinda Cleveland, age 10 years, 5 Oct last. She was taken in by Albert German, brother of Obediah, who was a resident of the Town of Plymouth.

Bob Betz is an independent historian who volunteers in the Madison County Clerk’s Office Archives. While working there, Betz has recaptured stories of Madison County’s past ‘out of the dust.’ His columns are taken from historic documents and written in the language of the era. He can be reached at history@m3pmedia.com.

John Myers Licensed Salesperson 6512 Wes Road Hamilton, NY 13346 (315) 837-4445 DIRECT (607) 226-3110 MOBILE (315) 824-8991 FAX john@eagleriver-realty.com

www.eagleriver-realty.com

HARD WORK PAYS OFF! Radio Sales Professional For Oneida Radio Advertising Sales is a great career for a creative person that loves a challenge.

Messere from page 17 him earn his Eagle Scout Award. With the help and guidance of his father, Lyle Halbert, Chris gathered together building materials and volunteers and, as a “labor of love,” built the labyrinth. The Meditation Pathway was added to the 27acre campus setting, as well. Since then, the labyrinth has been listed on the international network of labyrinth places, and the First Baptist Church has a large sign placed out

All terms of the indenture are identical to the one issued for Margaret. If the indenture was for a boy, it would be for husbandry or farming, and the term would be till the age of 21.

front, inviting the community to come in and experience it and the meditation pathway. So come out and enjoy a quiet walk and join the world in a contemplative journey. For more information you can visit fbcsyracuse.org or call (315) 469-2000 and speak with Sara Green, administrative assistant. Mary Messere of Eaton is former Madison County historian.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Attention Business Owners: Advertise in the Madison County Courier Weekly and on MadisonCountyCourier.com and get a return on your advertising dollars. Call Now For Affordable Rates Discounts & Current Specials!

Mike Bova, Publisher 315-404-8200 mike@m3pmedia.com

Everyday you meet new people in all kinds of different businesses. Your 'challenge' is to identify what problems they're facing, and then develop a marketing and advertising plan to solve the problem and help their business grow! This career requires excellent written and communication skills, creativity, and a desire to succeed. Leatherstocking Media Group, Inc. consists of WSEN 92.1 FM, Mix 106 WMCR FM, Oldies 1050 WSEN AM, CNY Talk Radio AM 1390 WFBL and AM 1600 WMCR. We're a growing company that seeks enthusiastic hard-working individuals to join the team. Mail or email resumes to: Don Wagner Leatherstocking Media Group PO Box 1050 Baldwinsville, NY 13027 d.wagner@lmgiradio.com

CLASSIFIED AD FORM Classified ads are only $5.00/week for up to 20 words. Additional words are 10 cents/ea. You can call 315-404-8200 to phone in your ad, email your classified to madnews@m3pmedia.com or use this form. Deadline is Thursday at 5pm.

M3P Media LLC Attn: Classifieds Department 119 Genesee Street Chittenango, NY 13037


May 11, 2011

Page 36

Your Events

Madison County Courier

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

There’s Always Something

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, Eaton, West Edmeston, to doWest in Madison County, Whitelaw New York

Urtz from page 16 lesser-known residents. Join us for a talk as we learn about these people and explore how they shaped the Cazenovia we know today. For more information contact the library at 315.655.9322 or visitwww. cazenoviapubliclibrary.org. 2 to 4 p.m.: The Quincy Square Museum will be opening its doors for its new displays that were prepared over the winter. The museum is located on East Main Street in Earlville. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: The Chittenango Landing Canal Boat Museum will host a “Community Open House.” Come and celebrate New York Heritage Weekend in cooperation with the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor at the museum. Children will have an opportunity to earn a Junior Ranger Badge after playing

NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT, JOHN ZBYDNIEWSKI AND JENNIFER L. ZBYDNIEWSKI a/k/a JENNIFER ZBYDNIEWSKI: Nature of the action: foreclosure action involving real property commonly known as 8720 S Hamilton Road, Hamilton, New York seeking a judgment of foreclosure and sale for the amount due and owing to the Plaintiff, CNB Realty Trust, under the Note and Mortgage with a current principal balance of Forty Eight Thousand Two Hundred Forty and 40/100 Dollars ($48,240.40) together with interest, late fees and other charges. SUMMONS Index No.:  20111102 STATE OF NEW YORK, SUPREME COURT, COUNTY OF MADISON CNB REALTY TRUST, as assignee of NBT BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, -againstJOHN ZBYDNIEWSKI, JENNIFER L. ZBYDNIEWSKI a/k/a JENNIFER ZBYDNIEWSKI, and JOHN DOE and MARY ROE, said individuals being fictitious and intended as possible occupants of the

canal games. Girl Scout Troop No. 734 will have a bake sale both days. View the exhibits, the blacksmith shop, sawmill, and a model of a canal boat being constructed. Admission will be free both days. For more information, call (315) 687-3801.

May 14 and 15 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Madison Hall will host the “Legends of a Landmark.” Join us at Madison Hall, Route 20, in Morrisville, during Heritage Weekend for this open house. Free light snacks and refreshments will be served while you tour this famous landmark and hear the history of Madison Hall (the original center of county government for Madison County, New York). You’ll be amazed how this old courthouse has

become a multicultural multifunctional community center for everything from weddings to Farmers Markets. See a preview at madisonhall.org. For more information contact Bob Wetherill 315-684-7553 or email: mtnbob@mail.com 1 to 5 p.m.: The Gerrit Smith Estate National Landmark and the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum will be open in honor of New York State Heritage Weekend. Exhibits in the Barn and Land Office will be open along with the Peterboro Mercantile at the Visitor’s Center at the Gerrit Smith Estate National Landmark. The National Abolitionist Hall of Fame begins its first season of regular hours at the Smithfield Community Center. For more information, the complete program schedule, and how to become a steward, contact 315-684-

1058, sca-peterboro.org, or gerritsmith.org.

May 15 Noon to 3 p.m.: The Oneida Community Mansion House will charge no admission in celebration of New York State’s Heritage Weekend. Visit them at 170 Kenwood Ave., Oneida. For more information, call 315-3630745.

May 16 6 p.m.: The New Woodstock Regional Historical Society will hold its annual meeting at the Fellowship Hall of the New Woodstock Federated Church, Main Street, New Woodstock. There will be a covered-dish dinner at 6 p.m. followed by a presentation at 7:15 p.m. by Ann Berlew, speaking on the history of schools in the town of Cazenovia. Ann is author of the

Public Notices

premises which are the subject matter of this action, and whose identity is unknown, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above action and serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or if the service of the Summons is made by any means other than by personal delivery to you within the State of New York, within thirty (30) days after such service is complete.  In case of your failure to appear or Answer thereto, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint.  The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may Answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. Madison County is designated as the place of trial, the basis of venue in this action is the location of the mortgaged premises. NOTICE: YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME

If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated:  February 4, 2011, Clifton Park, New York BURGESS & ASSOCIATES P.C.                                                                        /s/ Melissa H. Pugliese, Esq. Melissa H. Pugliese, Esq.

Attorneys for Plaintiff Office and P.O. Address 646 Plank Road, Suite 103 Clifton Park, New York 12065 (518) 371-0052 ----Notice of Formation of Prestige Limousine of CNY, LLC Art. of Org. filed w/ Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/25/11. Office location Madison County. SSNY designated agent of LLC for svc. of process. SSNY shall mail process to 119 Genesee St, Chittenango NY 13037. Purpose: All lawful activities. ----NOTICE OF FORMATION FLEUR DE LIS NATURAL COSMETICS, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/08/2011. NY office location: Madison County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon

him/her to: FLEUR DE LIS NATURAL COSMETICS, LLC, 6980 Knolls Ave N, Canastota, NY 13032. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. ----NOTICE OF FORMATION ROUTE 5 MOTELS, LLC Route 5 Motels, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. Of Org. with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on March 24, 2011, pursuant to Sec. 203 of the NY LLC Law. Office Location: Madison County. Principal Business Location: 2369 Route 5 East, Chittenango, NY 13037. SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served and SSNY shall forward process to Route 5 Motels, LLC, 2369 Route 5 East, Chittenango, NY 13037. Purpose: any lawful business purpose for which LLCs may be organized under the law. ----LEGAL NOTICE COUNTY OF MADISON Pursuant to Section 103 of the General Municipal Law, sealed Proposals for: The Transportation of Early Intervention and

Preschool Children with Disabilities on behalf of the Madison County Department of Health will be received at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, Madison County Office Building, Wampsville, NY 13163 until 10:00 AM (Local Time) on Tuesday, May 31, 2011. Specifications available at: madisoncounty.org. Right reserved to reject any or all bids. A bid security in the form of a bid bond, certified check, bank/ cashier/teller/treasurer’s check, payable to the County of Madison, or cash in the amount of Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), must accompany each proposal as a guarantee that if the proposal is accepted, a contract will be entered into. A performance bond will be required of the successful bidder(s) in the amount of twenty-five thousand ($25,000.00) dollars. The bond may be a bond of a company licensed to do business in New York State on a form acceptable to the County, a certified check, or standard form irrevocable letter of credit, payable to Madison County. The bond is to be submitted to and received by the Purchasing Agent

book, “Cazenovia Central School District, 1796 to 2002.” There will be a short business meeting with election of officers at the end of the evening. For more information, call (315)-662-3841 or visit our website at newwoodstocknyhistory. com.

May 17 7 p.m.: The Gerrit Smith Estate National Historic Landmark will host author Alvin F. Oickle. Oickle will talk about his book, “Jonathan Walker: The Man with the Branded Hand.” For more information, the complete program schedule, and how to become a steward, contact (315) 6841058, sca-peterboro.org, or gerritsmith.org. Matthew Urtz is Madison County Historian. He can be reached at matthew.urtz@ co.madison.ny.us.

no later than ten (10) business days following the date of notification of award. Failure to adhere to this requirement may result in the award being rescinded. REQUIRED FOR DEPARTMENT: Dept. of Public Health DELIVERY TO: As Specified DATED: May 11, 2011 Cindy Urtz Purchasing Agent ----Legal Notice Village of Chittenango Quote for topsoil service PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT THE Village of Chittenango will be accepting quotes for pulverized topsoil delivered within the Village limits for the period June 1, 2011 through May 31,2012 with a minimum order of five (5) yards. Please submit your quotes to the Village Clerk’s Office, 222 Genesee Street, Chittenango, NY 13037 by Tuesday, May 16, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. Specifications may be obtained by contacting the Village Clerk’s Office at 222 Genesee Street, Chittenango, NY 13037. Phone 315-6877043. The Board reserves

the right to accept or reject any or all bids received. Jill A. Doss Village Clerk ----Legal Notice Village of Chittenango Soliciting Bids for Asphalt Top, Tack Coat, Binder and Milling NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the Board of Trustees of the Village of Chittenango, County of Madison, State of New York solicits bids for asphalt top, tack coat, binder & milling. Specifications may be obtained by contacting the Village Clerk’s Office at 222 Genesee Street, Chittenango, New York. Phone number (315) 687-3936. Sealed bids will be accepted at the Village Clerk’s Office, 222 Genesee Street, Chittenango, New York up to 10:00 a.m. on Monday, May 16, 2011, when bids will be opened and read aloud. The Board of Trustees reserves the right to reject any or all bids received. Jill A. Doss Village Clerk


Madison County Courier

May 11, 2011

Your Events

Page 37

Bennetts Corners, Bouckville, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Canastota, Cazenovia, Chittenango, Clockville, DeRuyter, Earlville, Erieville, Eaton, Fenner, GeorgeMadisonCountyCourier.com town, Hamilton, Hubbardsville, Kenwood, Kirkville, Lakeport, Lebanon, Lenox, Leonardsville, Lincoln, Madison, Merrillsville, Morrisville, Munnsville,

There’s Always Something

Nelson, New Woodstock, North Brookfield, North Chittenango, Oneida, Peterboro, Perryville, Pine Woods, Poolville, Pratts Hollow, Puckerville, Quality Hill, Randallsville, Rippleton, Sheds, Siloam, Smithfield, Solsville, South Bay, Stockbridge, Sullivan, Wampsville, Eaton, West Edmeston, to doWest in Madison County, Whitelaw New York

Community Briefs

C hittenango Garden C lub A spring plant sale sponsored by the Chittenango Garden Club is scheduled for Saturday, May 14, from 8 a.m. until noon at Stickles Park in Chittenango. Geraniums, annuals, hanging plants, house plants and vegetable plants from Sorbello’s and Brookside Greenhouses will be available. Also for sale will be perennials from garden club member’s gardens and used garden tools. Stickles Park is located at the triangle formed by Routes 13 and 5 in Chittenango adjacent to the Sullivan Free Library on Falls Boulevard (Route 13). Come early for the best selection, as this is a very popular plant sale.

C hinese Auction Planned (Leonardsville) The Leonardsville Fire Department will host a Chinese Auction at the Leonardsville Methodist Church, 2051 State Route 8, Leonardsville. The Chinese Auction will be held Monday, May 30, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Winners will be announced at 3:30 p.m. Venders and Crafters Needed (Canastota) Vendors and crafters are sought for a flea market in conjunction with the 39th annual Over the Hill Gang Club Fishing Derby. The derby will be held June 5 from noon to 4 p.m. on Canal Street in Canastota. Goods and wares only; set up is 10 a.m., and booth space is $10. For more information or to reserve a space, call Rose Rose at (315) 697-7735.

Bridgeport C ommunity Food Pantry

Presbyterian Church.

The Bridgeport Community Food Pantry announced new evening hours recently. The new hours are 5 to 7 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month. Regular hours for the morning pantry are 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. The volunteer workers for the food pantry wish to thank everyone who supported the corned beef and cabbage dinner March 12. So many workers gave of their time! Thanks to Maurene Shigo and the wonderful Irish step dancers from McDonald-Ashford School of Dance and George Corkran for his “aboveand-beyond” dee-jay skills. What a great dinner and entertainment!

Sponsored by the New York Food Bank (fourth Wednesday, 3 to 4:30 p.m.), this program in the past has issued numbers based on a first-come, first-number basis. A new system will begin in May for issuing numbers called “Lottery Pick.” Numbers will not be given out until 1:30 p.m., and anyone wishing to come to the program will pick a number from a jar, lottery style, to enter. This is a common practice with other distribution sites, and hopefully those attending our site will not feel the need to show up for a number so early. Remember, 1:30 for the first “Lottery Pick.” The Food Distribution Program offers fresh food from our local markets and is provided free of charge; there are no requirements for eligibility to come. We are grateful for this program here in Bridgeport, and we appreciate the volunteers and space donated by St. Francis Church.

Vacation Bible S chool Preview Planned

The Canastota Area Association of Churches invites Christians from local churches who are interested in reaching out to all area young people from preschool through high school (4 years old and up) to preview this year’s community-wide, ecumenical Vacation Bible School entitled “Inside Out & Upside Down on Main Street.” The preview will be held Wednesday, May 11, at 6 p.m. at Hope Christian Fellowship, 119 South Peterboro St. Vacation Bible School will be held nightly from Aug. 8 through 12 at the United Church of Canastota, 144 W. Center St. Each evening a light meal M-ECS E xtends I nvitation will be served by the Loaves and You are cordially invited to attend the Fishes Hospitality Center from 6 to following activities to be held on May 17th: 6:30 p.m. A general opening assembly The M-ECS Art Show sponsored by the with lively skits and songs will elementary and middle/high school art begin at 6:30 p.m., followed by agedepartments will be held May 17 from 5 to appropriate classes, crafts and games 8 p.m. Visitors are encouraged to visit the until 8:30 p.m. exhibits, which will be on display throughout “Main Street” will be an the gymnasium and the gymnasium hallway. inspirational and educational The Morrisville-Eaton Parent/Teacher experience for all area youngsters. Organization will host its annual Community For more information or to preAppreciation Dessert reception from 5 to 8 register, contact director Rene p.m. to thank members of the community for Burgess of Hope Christian their support. Fellowship at (800) 294-9131. Please be sure to stop in the Edward R. Youths may also register at the Andrews Elementary Library for some door. refreshments. The Canastota Area Association BLCO Garden C lub of Churches includes Believers’ The May meeting of the BLCO Garden Club Chapel of Canastota, Church of the Nazarene, Clockville Methodist will be Wednesday, May 18 at 7 p.m. at 1426 Lestina Beach Road, Bridgeport. This will be a Church, First Baptist Church, Hope Christian Fellowship, New planning meeting for the year. Beginnings Free Methodist Church, Also, bring to share any excess or stray Oneida Lake Congregational Church, plants for which you have no room in your Redeemer Lutheran Church, Saint garden. Agatha’s Roman Catholic Church, New members welcome. Call 633-9605 or Trinity Episcopal Church, United 633-9590 for more information. Church of Canastota and Whitelaw

Food D istribution Program

OUR FAMILY SERVING YOURS... Peter Denney, Broker Associate

peter@peterdenney.com www.peterdenney.com Kelly Denney-Erickson

Licensed Agent kelly@thedenneyteam.com

(315) 247-1910

Submit Your News

We welcome your news, photos, press releases and more. Email madnews@m3pmedia.com

Contact Phil or Rebecca at: 315-939-6303 https://www.advocare.com/10021116/


May 11, 2011

Page 38

Madison County Courier

MadisonCountyCourier.com

Your Farms: Field to Table

Spotlight on Madison County’s No. 1 Industry

My farm school classes are winding down, only five left, but they saved the best for last-farm tours! Yea! I love all kinds of learning, but there’s no substitute for the real thing – seeing how it’s done, lessons learned by the host farm and what new ideas I might bring to my future farm. First up was a dairy farm! Twin Oaks Organic Dairy of Truxton, owned and operated by the Arnold family, Rick, Kathie, Bob and Kirk. I have never been to a dairy farm before – it was fascinating! This farm does rotational grazing; turning their cropland into permanent pasture, work toward an organic goal was achieved in 1998. Today they’re a totally organic operation offering raw milk to the surrounding community, while selling off the remainder for processing. We began by meeting “the girls.” Each cow snacks away in her individual slot, just hanging out. They all had a number and a name. I was surprised how curious they were. They weren’t warm and fuzzy, but they weren’t freaky either. And they’re HUGE! As big as my friend’s Chevette in

Linda J. Haley

Cowabunga!

Cit y Slicker

college. Everyone worked around them like their size was nothing. If they needed to sweep or hook up a milking machine, they’d talk to the behemoth and nudge or push it over a bit. I’d heard about cow kicks and was keeping my distance. A newly employed milker noticed my “safety zone” technique. She generously showed me the best approach, nudging in close while still being observant and getting the task done. Priceless! I finally got up the nerve to pet one and ran to catch up to the class heading out to the outdoor areas. While the barn was certainly clean and comfortable, I liked the open area. The herd rotates from inside to outside, so all cows get a little outdoor time. It’s like recess when we were kids.

(I wish we still had recess, dodge ball would do a lot for office politics.) It’s a cow spa –a big open area to hang out and chat up other cows. Places to graze or get a drink, or just hang out and enjoy the fresh air. Then it hit me. Where’re the kids? They show me an area full of calves; cow daycare! While still in mom’s sight, calves are grouped together with other calves their age. Cool; mom gets a break, and the kids aren’t lonely. The calves are busy feeding out of bins with teat-looking devices sticking out to latch onto. Calves are way more curious than mom, very sweet and friendly. They have the weirdest tongue, all slobbery and slick, except for this weird sandpapery section. Get this: they have cow coats! Canvas wraps they use for temperature control. Say you’re just born, wet and freezing? There’s a calf tanning bed, or cow cooker – a clam shell that circulates 70-degree air to warm and dry the calf in a dark soothing environment. Man … what a deal; so Cow (Club) Med.

People say cows are dumb, but I say no one feeds, waters, milks or medicates me while scooping up my poop and cleaning my house! Cows at Twin Oakes have it made. They showed us where and how they store feed, how they moved and processed manure and a pasture full of solar panels to generate power. What an operation. Back to the office to study how a dairy is run. This is where I realized dairy farming is not oldfashioned and sweet. Dairy farming is high science and technology. Our mentor was the herdsman for this farm. She showed us binders and computer spreadsheets documenting every single detail of dairy operation. Everything is tracked in minute detail, so the farmer can make well-thought-out decisions regarding process or

herd changes. Every cow has a sheet detailing every event in her life, her parents, who she dated, mated and calved, what she’s produced for milk, when she’s been sick, high points, low points, everything! She said it’s an industry standard used to decide breeding, selling and maintenance. Oh! It’s a Cow Fax! So cool! Dairy farming is way out of my league, an overwhelming – but amazing – operation. If people knew of the intense work, care and science involved, they wouldn’t complain about milk prices: they’re a bargain! I am grateful to the people who carry on the tradition of dairy farming, a true labor of love. Linda J. Haley is a freelance writer specializing in rural and agricultural topics. She can be reached at linda@ m3pmedia.com.


May 11, 2011

Madison County Courier

Page 39

Hoffman from page 30 Mats,” colorful area rugs created from recycled plastic bottles, available in several sizes and styles. You’ve got to see this to believe it – I wouldn’t have guessed that a plastic rug could be appealing, but they’re really quite spectacular and very affordable. Blue Q Shopping Bags are made from 94 percent post consumer recycled materials, and come in many different colors and patterns – perfect

for anything you might need to lug around. As if all this wasn’t enticing enough, the shop also has a selection of herbal and homeopathic pharmaceutical products, including Pukka herbal teas (http://www.pukkaherbs. com). Both Katy and Katherine are licensed massage therapists. Katy specializes in deep tissue and pregnancy massage and reflexology, and

she is also a Doula (birth assistant). Katherine, who has a master’s in Anthropology from Yale, studied massage therapy at the Swedish Institute in NYC. She specializes in therapeutic touch and Reiki. They also offer hot stone therapy, oncology and sports massage, and massage for anxiety and depression, as well as energy therapy for those living with chronic

illness, chronic pain, or any condition resulting in physical fragility. Currently in the process of redesigning its website, Mezza Luna is on Facebook at http:// www.facebook.com/ mezzalunawellnesscenter. They offer discounts and monthly specials to Fans. Mezza Luna is located at 5 East Main Street, telephone 315-824-8689. Mezza Luna is a special,

one-of-a-kind place in the nascent eco-artists community that Earlville is becoming. I encourage you to check it out! Chris Hoffman of Sherburne is a gardener and voracious reader. She worked with STOP NYRI Inc. to help defeat the installation of high-tension power lines in the area and passionately pursues various avenues with like-minded friends to preserve and protect a sustainable rural lifestyle for everyone in Central New York.

Overstock Sale! 2010 Left-Overs** WhiLe suppLies Last ProCut™ S • 26HP Briggs & Stratton Professional Series Engine • Rugged 5.5 Gallon Fuel Tank • 61” Cutting Width • Electric Deck Lift Raises Cutter Deck • Out-Front Deck Provides Exceptional Trim-ability • Heavy-Duty Steering Hub

SPECIAL REDUCED PRICING! ! Ca l l f o r de tails

0% FOR 36 MONTHS!

*

CANASTOTA : 4154 STATE ROUTE 31 : (315) 697-2214 LOWVILLE : 8207 NY ST RT 26 : (315) 376-0300 WATERVILLE : 962 STATE ROUTE 12 : (315) 841-4181

www. WhitesFarmSupply .com *The offer is subject to credit approval on your Yard Card or Yard Card Plus credit card account on purchases over $2000 between 4/1/11 and 5/31/11. During the promotional 36 month period the minimum monthly payment is calculated by dividing the Purchase amount by the length of the promotional period. No Interest accrues during the promotional period. If your account becomes 60 days past due the penalty APR will apply. After the promotional period expires, interest will be charged at the standard APR for Purchases on any remaining balances until paid in full. Current standard APR for Purchases is 28.99%%. Current Penalty APR 29.99% will be applied to your account if it becomes 60 days past due. APRs may vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge $2.00. A one-time promotional fee of $125 will be applied to the account for this transaction. See dealer for details.


May 11, 2011

Page 40

Madison County Courier

CANASTOTA ONLINE CLASSES May 31, 2011 - August 20, 2011

CANASTOTA DAY CLASSES May 31, 2011 - August 20, 2011 Ac.101 Principles of Accounting I M/W 12:00-1:40 3 Ac.102 Principles of Accounting II* M/W 12:00-1:40 3 Ac.204 Cost Accounting* M/W 8:00-9:40 3 Ac.205 Financial Statements Analysis* T/TH 1:50-3:30 3 Ac.206 Federal Tax Accounting* M/W 9:50-11:30 3 Ac.208 Intermediate Accounting* T/TH 12:00-1:40 3 Ba.207 Management Processes T/TH 9:50-11:30 3 Cs.101 Computer Concepts M/W 9:50-11:30 3 Cs.102 Computer Applications with T/TH 12:00-1:40 3 Spreadsheets and Database* Ec.101 Macroeconomics T/TH 8:00-9:40 3 En.101 English Communication M/W 8:00-9:40 3 En.102 English Composition* M/W 9:50-11:30 3 Lt.201 Legal Terminology/ M/W 9:50-11:30 3 Office Administration* Ma.101 Mathematics T/TH 9:50-11:30 3 Ma.203 Statistics M/W 8:00-9:40 3 Me.101 Anatomy & Physiology M/W 12:00-1:40 3 Me.108 Introduction to Pharmacology* M/W 8:00-9:40 3 Oa.101M Medical Office Administration* M/W 9:50-11:30 3 Om.202 Administrative Seminar* M/W 8;00-9:40 3 Re.101 Office Procedures T/TH 1:50-3:30 3 Sp.201 Speech/Oral Communication M/W 1:50-3:30 3 Ty.101 Keyboarding I M/W 1:50-3:30 3 Ty.102 Keyboarding II* T/TH 12:00-1;40 3 Wp.101 Word Processing T/TH 8:00-9:40 3 Wp.103 Word Processing/Machine T/TH 9:50-11:30 3 Transcription* * Prerequisite May Be Required Schedule Subject to Change

CANASTOTA EVENING CLASSES May 31, 2011 - August 20, 2011 Ac.101 Principles of Accounting I M 5:45-9:30 3 Ac.102 Principles of Accounting II* M 5:45-9:30 3 Ba.105 Human Resource Management TH 5:45-9:15 3 Cs.101 Computer Concepts W 5:45-9:15 3 Cs.102 Computer Applications with W 5:45-9:15 3 Spreadsheets and Database* Ec.101 Macroeconomics W 5:45-9:15 3 En.101 English Communication T 5:45-9:15 3 En.102 English Composition* T 5:45-9:15 3 Ma.101 Mathematics TH 5:45-9:15 3 Me.101 Anatomy & Physiology TH 5:45-9:15 3 Me.104 Medical Insurance and Coding* TH 5:45-9:15 3 Me.107 Diseases of the Human Body* F 5:45-9:15 3 Me.204 Advanced Medical Coding* W 5:45-9:15 3 Oa.101M Medical Office Administration* W 5:45-9:15 3 Om.202 Administrative Seminar* T 5:45-9:15 3 Ps.101 Introduction to Psychology F 5:45-9:15 3 Re.101 Office Procedures M 5:45-9:30 3 Ty.101 Keyboarding I F 5:45-9:15 3 Ty.102 Keyboarding II* F 5:45-9:15 3 Wp.101 Word Processing M 5:45-9:30 3 Wp.103 Word Processing/Machine T 5:45-9:15 3 Transcription* * Prerequisite May Be Required Schedule Subject to Change

Locations:

Utica Campus 201 Bleecker Street Utica, New York

Ac.101 Principles of Accounting I 3 Ac.209 Non-Profit Accounting* 3 Ba.105 Human Resource Management 3 Ba.202 Marketing 3 Ba.205 E-Commerce* 3 Ba.213 Small Business Management 3 Ba.215 Community Relations and 3 Fund Raising Cs.101 Computer Concepts 3 Cs.102 Computer Applications with 3 Spreadsheets and Database* Cs.112 Logic and Program Design* 3 Cs.116x Networking Essentials 3 Cs.211 Automated Accounting* 2 Cs.213 Networking Ethics and Security 3 Cs.215 Programming II:C++* 3 Cs.217 Programming I: Visual Basic* 3 Cs.218 Internet Concepts & HTML* 3 Cs.219 Systems Analysis and Design* 3 Ec.101 Macroeconomics 3 Ec.102 Microeconomics 3 En.101 English Communication 3 En.102 English Composition* 3 La.101 Business Law 3 Ma.101 Mathematics 3 Me.101 Anatomy and Physiology 3 Me.102 Medical Terminology 3 Me.107 Diseases of the Human Body* 3 Me.108 Introduction to Pharmacology* 3 Ps.101 Introduction to Psychology 3 Sk.101 Study Skills 1 * Prerequisite May Be Required Schedule Subject to Change Please Note: Students, pursuing a program, are limited to 50% of their courses online

Oneonta Campus 17 Elm Street Oneonta, New York

Canastota Campus Route 5 & Dominic Bruno Blvd. Canastota, New York

Madison County Courier Weekly  

The Madison County Courier Weekly covers news from all across Madison County New York.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you