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MINIMAL

Celebrating creativity & the meaning of life

Interview

Germain Louvet

Interview

Cameron Boyce

Interview

Sigourney Weaver


F Beauty | Lifestyle | Marketing

Promo Magazine Business & Lifestyle Insider

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WELCOME

ello everyone! This months issue is something speacial, something made and tailored to you. As Promo begins to reach a broader audience and become aware of what our readers really want, that's the step in the right direction.

This issue features some of the greatest minds in the fashion marketing industry who talk about all the new new that's happening culturally and politically. People often say that fashion is too much to handle because it always changes, which is 100% correct. There is a always something new to introduce, and thats the beauty of it. Figuring out what makes the culture tick. This months issue expresses the culture in design with the many elements that goes into a new collection. Can we just all agree that we are amazed at what different designers around the globe come up with?

Sometimes, a new fashion season can seem overwhelming, with trends, images and must-have pronouncements slamming us from all sides. I can do minimalism, Parisian polish, rock ’n’ roll and full-on glam. But there is one style that I will never be able to grasp: off-duty model. When they are dressing themselves, models have a nonchalant way of throwing pieces together that looks so right. If I attempted a riding jacket over a pouf skirt, or a sequined mini with white bucks, I doubt it would have the same modern charm. So I stick to my usual (safe) way of styling myself and envy those who are more daring. What I really need is a full day at home alone, the services of an expert stylist and an open mind. But some of you don't need that, so I will leave you with this beautiful style guide to help you this fall. Enjoy and stay you. XO

FRONT COVER

PHOTOGRAPHER

MUA/HAIR

CONCEPT/STYLIST

Jackson Cung

Ann Doan

BoongBi

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MODELS

Hong Dao Giang Luu


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FOUNDER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Michael Suber

CO-FOUNDER & BRAND DIRECTOR Waverly Gunter CREATIVE DIRECTOR Vanessa Bennish

Absolute LOVE

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brentton Wilson PR & MARKETING Marina Dojchinov

EDITOR & CONTENT CREATOR Liridona Gjokaj EDITOR Anna Szeto

YOUR LIFE IS YOUR BEAUTY, YOU CAN CHANGE IF YOU ALLOW YOURSELF TO BE COMFORTABLE WITH WHO YOU ARE AS A PERSON.

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ISSUE 60 All rights reserved, no part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photographing or other electronic or mechanical methods without prior written permission of the editor, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission request, write to the editor, addressed “Attention Promo Permission,” at the address below. info@promomagazinenyc.com www.promomagnews.com The Views expressed in Promo magazine are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily shared by the company or its staff. SUBSCRIBE Promo is published monthly. To subscribe, visit https:// promomagnews.com/purchase-digital/ CONTACT US If you have any questions and or comments, please write us at info@promomagazinenyc.com. For advertising inquiries, get in touch at submission@ promomagazinenyc.com

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Content

ALL THINGS

Editorials

GROW

Shaarleen Evergreen Into The Wild

IN STYLE

Amanda D Pôles Opposés R U D E R Thank You Into Fall

Readings Meet the Man Behind the Cult Korean Brand Rokh Germain Louvet: Dancer in The Stars Cameron Boyce: Boy of Many Talents

Amsterdam Heritage

Sigourney Weaver Is Living Life on Her Own Terms Cat Levy Diamond Atelier Zuhra

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Shaarleen Photographer: Maryna Yazbeck Makeup Artist: Karla Cruz Model: Sharleen

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You started dancing at age 4 and, by the age of 12, you were accepted into the prestigious L’Opéra de Paris. You have been on a professional ballet pathway from a very young age. Has there ever been a point when you get tired of ballet and want a break? Since I can remember, I’ve always been passionate about dance, and physically in need of moving. So, even during hard periods, when the body is tired or the mental is down, dancing is a therapy and a way to escape the troubles. Also, I’ve always been kind of hyperactive, and I’m happy to have found a job where I can always be in movement. However, I can admit that it’s been 2 years that I didn’t take a normal vacation and sometimes I miss the idea of waking up and have nothing to do… But I’m trying to have a good balance of rest and work to avoid the burning out! Are your parents dancers? Do they have a similar passion for ballet as you do? Nobody is an artist in my family. My parents and my brothers are very sportive, so we all are used to performing and to surpassing ourselves. They learned to like ballet with me and are now very happy to come to the Opéra Garnier when I’m dancing. You perform all across the globe. How do the audiences change where you go? Can the culture of the place you perform in affect the performance? We feel a big difference in the way the audience react to the show in the different places we go to perform. I think it depends a lot of the culture like in Japan where everybody is very polite and in self-control, the audience applauds longer but wisely, but it depends also of the prize of the tickets… I feel a lot more supported and a warm reaction in the audience when the tickets are affordable! t What is perfection to you and what role does this play in your work? Are there both negatives and positives to the idea of perfection? Perfection is the motivation and the frustration of our work. I try everything I can to reach it knowing that it will never happen. I think the most important thing in that is the way of looking for perfection. Dance is all about that.

Photography by Joe Lai

Germain Louvet: Dancer in The Stars By: Caitlin Hicks

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His soul sings in tune with the way his body moves. He jumps with grace and leaps with passion. Germain Louvet is acclaimed as one of ballet’s brightest stars. Having preformed lead roles in shows such as Swan Lake and Romeo and Juliet, Louvet won the AROP Dance Award in 2017, which points to a bright future and great things on the horizon for Louvet. How does dance make you feel? Why do you think dance can be so emotional? Dancing is a way for me to not think about routine, about problems and very pragmatic stuff. It makes me feel more alive because I can feel every part of my body, my joints stretching, my muscles contracting, my veins and my heart beating, my sweat flowing, the sound of my breathing, etc… I think it becomes emotional when you understand that all these physical sensations are fully related to your sensitivity and your emotions. So, when in ballet, we add an intention, a character or a story, the emotions felt and given to the audience use all that self-control/letting go to express them- selves.

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A single injury can wipe out your ballet career. Is this a fear that ever lays in the back of your mind? Have you ever thought to look forward to prepare for such a tragedy? This is something all dancers are confronted with. I’m the kind of person who just trusts in life and take everything as is coming day after day. I’ll always find a way to dance and express myself even if my body is not res- ponding anymore. How do you maintain such mental strength and stamina with such long hours training and traveling? The answer is simple: pleasure. The desperate need to move, to go beyond, to express, and also the music of course! Everything is lighter and easier with music, don’t you think? Put pleasure, emotions and music together… what else could you ask for?

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Photography by Joe Lai

“I CAN FEEL EVERY PART OF MY BODY, MY JOINTS STRETCHING, MY MUSCLES CONTRACTING, MY VEINS AND MY HEART BEATING, THE SOUND OF MY BREATHING…” – GERMAIN LOUVET

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Photographer: Cameron Postforoosh

Are there any actors or films that inspired you to start a career on screen? My inspiration comes from a lot of different places. Judd Nelson’s performance in The Breakfast Club, Donald O’Connor in Singin’ in the Rain, and Samuel L. Jackson in Pulp Fiction are just a few.

We often hear about the toll an acting career can have on a young person, but you seem to have coped incredibly well. How did you balance work and growing up like anybody else? I think what it ultimately comes down to is who you have around you. After that, it is who you choose to become close with and who you choose to have a professional relationship with. I have always been of the mindset that acting couldn’t and wouldn’t change who I am as a person. My personality will never falter. I’ll never become someone I’m not. It’s kind of simple when I put it in those terms and the reality is there’s a lot more nuance to it, but that’s always been at the core of my perspective on this lifestyle.

Photographer: Cameron Postforoosh

Do you rely on your family for support? 100%. They’ve had to adjust to my career as much as I have. And they are incredible at knowing what I need and loving me through anything. They’ll always have my back and they’ll always support me no matter what. I recently got sick on the movie I’m currently shooting, and my dad dropped all of his responsibilities and flew from LA to take care of me for a week. That’s just who they are. My 16-year-old sister is also a huge part of it and I’m not even sure she knows how much she impacts me.

Cameron Boyce: Boy of Many Talents

After establishing a career in acting at the tender age of 9 years old, Cameron Boyce is an actor who has taken the United States by storm. Boyce, who is now 19, has just finished starring in the Disney production Descendants 3, which is primed to up the anti for its 3rd rousing instalment. But Boyce’s talents do not stop at acting. With both black and Jewish roots, Cameron is also a proud advocate for racial inclusivity and, in 2017, raised over $27,000 for the Thirst Project, a project striving to end the global water crisis. For a 19-year-old, you have a world of experience when it comes to roles on film and television. How old where you when you first started? I was around seven years old when I got into acting. What was so appealing about acting at that age? At that age, it was less about the acting and more about the performing. I was a dancer when I was even younger than that, so my whole life I’ve always been “on stage.”

By: Hannah Beach

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You are currently filming the third instalment of Descendants. Were you aware of how popular the film series would be? I knew it would be big based on how successful the Kenny Ortega-Disney Channel pairing has been. I honestly don’t know that I’ll ever quite understand the magnitude of the franchise because I’m a part of it. Looking from the inside out can blur your vision. Between your film work and Disney series you have earned a loyal following. How does it feel having so many fans over the world? That’s another thing I won’t ever quite grasp. People tell me I am their favorite actor and my first thought is you must not watch a lot of film… but I really am some people’s favorite actor! When you look up to so many people it’s hard to accept that others put you at the top of their pedestal. Do you prefer to work on films or TV shows? At this point film. There’s something very attractive about diving deep into a character for a month or two and having to say goodbye.

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If there were any other job for you than acting, what would it be? I would be a choreographer. How has coming from a Jewish and black background affected your approach to life in the spotlight? My life in the spotlight stems from my life in general. Growing up as a mixed kid in LA wasn’t abnormal. However, learning about where I came from and the suffering my ancestors went through on both sides has molded not just me, but my entire family to be grateful, loving, and educated. Your grandma is a particularly influential figure in American history, is that where your will to speak out for others and support charitable causes came from? She’s a big part of it, yes. She, like a lot of people in my family, encourages me to use my voice in a positive way. What she went through and who she is now because of her experience is an inspiration to everyone who knows her. You use your platform to give a voice to those without. What do you hope to achieve in the coming years from your philanthropic work? I might have one that reaches more people, but I believe no one is without a voice. Especially when we can come together and scream at the top of our lungs in unison. I want to help make the world a better place just like a lot of amazing youth that have spoken up recently and demanded change. The future leaders are fierce and unafraid. Can you tell me a bit about your work with the Thirst Project? Thirst Project is a non-profit organization that raises money through donations to build wells in third world countries for people who, without them, wouldn’t have safe, clean drinking water. I teamed up with them on a couple of projects, spearheading one of their initiatives and, later, doing my own campaign to raise even more funds. Together we’ve raised thousands of dollars giving thousands of people water for life. My campaign alone granted over 1,000 people in Swaziland clean water for life. How do you picture your impact on the current generation through schemes and projects like this? It’s a domino effect. Not only does the charity help those in need, but I’m also hoping that by leading by example, I’ll inspire more kids to get involved and be passionate about causes that speak to them.

While your fame helps you in your charitable work, have you ever felt like being well known is a disadvantage for you in your day-to-day life? Every celebrity has their own relationship with fame. Mine has changed and evolved over the years. It went from debilitating to www.promomagnews.com

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aspects of life, so this shouldn’t be much different. We’ll see where it goes and which direction it pulls me. You seem so busy with so much going on in your life. What do you do with any free time you have? Downtime is actually pretty important to me. It helps you gear up for taxing days and long nights. A lot of it I spend resting and recharging, but when I feel inspired I’m taking photos, listening to music, and following my Lakers who just got LeBron! However, the most important thing to me is spending time with blood and chosen family. With actor, dancer, singer, philanthropist and designer all under your belt before 20, is there anything you would like to add to that list in the future? In an ideal world, I would also have writer, producer, owner, choreographer and director under my belt… Anything you can see yourself doing I believe you should explore. And, when you surround yourself with people who push you to fulfil that dream, it makes you all the more inspired. I watch other people create and I think to myself I want to be like them. They seem free.

Photographer: Cameron Postforoosh

When can fans expect to see you on screen next after Descendants 3? I’m working on a film currently that could not be more different than Descendants. All I will say is it’s a story of neglectful adults that turn a blind eye to the children they are responsible for. The kids that are hopeful enough to escape their hometown are the ones who end up having to watch their dream start to slip from their grasp. I couldn’t be more excited to finally make the change up I’ve been craving for a long time.

empowering as I grew to understand it. What I used to find challenging is now stuff I don’t pay much attention to. Just like anyone else, an actor who is known can still choose to look at things in a positive way and create their own happiness, even if the lifestyle isn’t what you’d call normal. If you were in total control of your own movie, who would be your dream cast mates and director? All of my friends with Quentin Tarantino as the director.

Photographer: Cameron Postforoosh

After the #MeToo and Time’s Up movement in recent months, have you seen a positive change in the way your industry operates? Or is there still a long way to go? There will always be a long way to go because not only is the Time’s Up movement exposing people in the industry, but also people in the real world. It’s empowering victims to come forward and receive the love and support that they deserve. This movement is here to stay and will only get stronger. It’s imperative to the safety of entertainment industry members and non-entertainment industry members that it does. You recently launched a jewelry line. What first motivated you to move in to design? I’ve always been into fashion. I find that most artists are. It gives you an opportunity to bring something to life that only you have envisioned. I wanted to combine my love of creating with my love of philanthropy, and I felt like a bracelet line where proceeds go to a cause of my choosing was the way to do that. But taking pencil to paper with an idea is just the half of it. I’m learning a lot more about business as well. Do you see the line expanding in to fashion? It’s something that we will explore for sure. I’m pretty ambitious in all 18 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

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Evergreen 20 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Photographer: Vu Thi Thanh-Tinh Model: Katrina Sly Retoucher: Vitaly Gerasimov Assistant: Holly Kalsy Makeup Artist/Creative Director: Tri-Anh Nguyen Hair Stylist: Trang Doan Model: Courtney Burling @Wink Model

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Meet the Man Behind the Cult Korean Brand Rokh

In your opinion, to what extent is the talent of a designer what makes him achieve success and not the buzz around him that leads him to be in the head of a big fashion house? For me, buzz is also a strong talent. Fashion is not only a form of art and craft, it is also about strong communication. In the middle of this spring, and while working on your pre-collection, you said that “it’s a natural course of the business. It makes commercial sense to widen the audience. It’s something that is actually needed in the industry; it’s kind of boring otherwise. If you’re only doing main collections, by the time the customers receive the goods, they’re expo- sed to it differently from the way you want.” However, there is another group of people that differs from this idea. Can you explain a little more on what ideas are you based on to make this statement? This statement has been perhaps misunderstood. I was commenting on the commercial and business side of the fashion cycle. If you are doing four collections per year, by the time the audience encounters the previous season, the brand will be releasing a new collection. It does make sense commercially for a brand to expand but, for the audience, to encounter the collection at a different time could be less exciting. So, from the start of the brand, I am focusing on a strong production and development to have more of a fluid delivery timing to reach out the audience.

By: Isaac Perez Solano

Can you share with us your biggest dream at this very moment? I want to make sure the vision of Rokh could be carefully communicated to the audience without a loss of storytelling. Constant direct gaze of my point of view is my dream.

he nascent fashion label Rokh has behind it a designer with a creative pedigree that leaves no doubt that big things are in store for the brand. Rok Hwang, trained with the legendary tutor Louise Wilson at Central Saint Martins, learned the ropes working at Louis Vuitton, Chloé and Céline and he landed a Special Prize at the 5th edition of the LVMH Prize with his start-up house: ROKH. You recently received a Special Prize in the 5th edition of the LVMH Prize. Can you draw an overview of your experience as a candidate? Full of excitement and interaction. The experience was less of a competition but more of celebration of designers and pure focus on highlighting the talents individually. There were certain moments of intensity, but the most amazing experience.

What was the hardest part of having your cubicle at the Louis Vuitton Foundation for the biggest names in the industry to evaluate your vision? The hardest part was the first initial moment when you face all of the industry’s biggest names in one room. But, after a while, you realise they are purely interested in your work and to support the vision. For the young designers out there, what would be your advice in case they want to be part of the next edition of the LVMH Prize? It is a platform that purely highlighting creativity and talent and, therefore, each person has their own way of going through this process.

I have a friend who attended junt the summer courses at Central Saint Martins, he was always highlighting how deep they [tutors] encourage students to go in order to create a moodboard, a storyline for whatever your project may be. What’s your relationship with references and how do you work with them? I try to reference my own collections and engage actively with the fitting process. For me, it is the only way to be true to yourself. Many things have been done in the industry, but it is the way you engage during the process that could be the form of originality. How is your relationship with muses? Are they always from the past, from the present, from the future or non-existing at all? My women and vision have always been very clear from the beginning. I try focusing on the more fragile and raw side of women. Real, genuine women are my muses and have no link to a timeline.

Do you follow a certain formula to share your vision but with your team? How does this process work?

Before getting in touch with muses, how did you discover yourself? I don’t know. Still not sure of who I am.

We have a full structure and organisation in the Rokh atelier. There isn’t a certain formula, but I like to keep all the ideas in order but no limitation on experiments. My team and I have a very open relationship and we share the vision directly and daily.

What’s your favorite color right now (and why)? My obsession is the colour nude. Matte, dry nude and a variety of skin tones. Just pure obsession. Do you have a theory regarding the use of color? Not at all, I just love to use colour, print and textures. Isn’t it more fun to have more mediums?

What things can you learn by yourself, by your own experiences, and what others can you learn by being mentored? It is not an easy question to answer without experience. I don’t know what could be achieved. To have the education is part of the experience, but to do the work itself is another kind of experience.

Can you tell us a story of something imperfect where you have found perfection? The whole process of the collection is defined during the fitting and I often love to stop when it is not complete as I find it absolutely beautiful. For example, when part of the piece is half cut or has a raw edge and is pinned perfectly with a French-seamed sleeve. I could see the beauty of the imperfect moment and from that moment I will try to construct perfectly.

What is the most life-shaking experience you have lived until today? When I realised you could download episodes from Netflix!

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identity to clothing so you are engaging into the story of Rokh.

What’s the importance and the connection between feeling and function? I think the feeling and function are one in the same in this current age of fashion. The idea of luxury or the idea of cool streetwear is at the end form of communication and feeling. These days, streetwear style is made with some of the most luxurious savoir faire. For me, I want to give my emotion and brand

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Into The

WILD

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Photographer: ioannis koussertari Model: Cristal Model: Roger Wardrobe Stylist: Darryl Anderson Makeup Artist: Anastasia Novich

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Amanda D

Photographer: Elfego Solares Model: Amanda DeVries @BMG Chicago & FH agency Makeup Artist/Hair Stylist: Erica Sรกnchez-Alcรกntar Wardrobe Stylist: Ry Douglas

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About Atelier Zuhra Established in 2015 by the family matriarch Mousa Al Awful who supported to build a unique couture atelier in Dubai. She has always been dreaming of dressing up a women with glamour and perfection which she passes on to the new generation, her daughter, the business entrepreneur, Rayan Al Sulaimani who took advantage of the scaling up the scenes and designs to a more sophisticated and outstanding quality. Atelier Zuhra magnifies the femininity of a woman with the expertise of fabricating delicate embroidery, outstanding quality and artistic design using precious kind of elements which makes Atelier Zuhra’s times dresses. Describe yourself in 3 words. Exceptional, Design-focused, Educated What made you pursue a career in designing? The fashion industry is something that is interesting for me growing up. I took up business courses in college and ended up in a corporate environment, but eventually, my passion for fashion succeeded when I decided to engage in the family business fully in a designing and managerial functions — a decision I never regret. 44 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

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What does fashion means to you? For me fashion brings out your unique personality, it’s in the way you style or dress up. What is your favourite part about being a designer? Being able to dress up clients with our unique design aesthetic weaved with high-quality craftsmanship. How would you describe your personal style? I would say my fashion style is chic. I tend to go on the creativity matched with high-quality craftsmanship. Who is your dream client? Every fashionable women is our dream client. What is your advice to aspiring designers? I would advise aspiring fashion designers never to stop learning and to keep up with their dream. The business of fashion is a very competitive industry, and they need to hone their creativity and distinguish their design aesthetic.

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Photographer / Retoucher: Jackson Cung Makeup Artist and Hair: Ann Doan Creative Concept and Wardrobe Stylist: BoongBi Models: Hong Dao & Giang Luu

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Into

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FALL

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INTO FALL

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Pôles Opposés Photographer: John Harrison Model: Stephany Da Silva Assistant: Andres Piñate Wardrobe Stylist: Crisdalis Duarte Assistant: Veronica Lopez Makeup Artist: Genesis Taymar Montalvan Wardrobe Stylist: Maria Paula Carrasquero Model: Karla F. Vieira

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tious than what we did before, so it’s quite exciting. And you’ve had to learn free dive and scuba diving? It was fun because my husband actually trained with me. We started before the film, we went down to Florida Keys, we were certified and had the most marvelous instructor, who worked with Jim all the time on the other side of his life which is, you know, inventing, developing, and building submarines. So, he worked with Jim on all the deep sea exploration and he was our teacher, so we couldn’t be in better hands. What is it like to be under water like that? I mean, I’ve only ever snorkeled, what is that experience like? Well, it’s wonderful, you feel like a whole new universe is opening up in front of you, that you never were allowed to go in. And suddenly, like we’re in Hawaii, we went there for rehearsal in deep water before we started shooting. One time we did a night dive and we went to this place where the manta rays love to congregate. And we were all laying on the bottom of the ocean and these manta rays, these beautiful 8/10feet long manta rays, just went right over us. Sometimes, skinning your forehead, they were kind of playing with us. So it opens up this world, it’s just extraordinary! And then the free diving, Jim Cameron decided that we’re not going to pretend that the actors are under water, but we’re going to teach them to hold their breath for three minutes, so we can do takes under water. It’s been incredibly challenging because there’s so many things about shooting in water that they had to deal with, like the reflections. The surface was covered with these plastic balls, very easy to swallow by mistake, you don’t want to do that! But, to cover the surface, when the camera’s under water, it’s just one thing after another and we got these amazing tanks that can change into all kinds of different environments, but you know it’s very very ambitious.

Sigourney Weaver Is Living Life on Her Own Terms By: Jessica Michault 62 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Sigourney Weaver is an icon and a role model for women

across the globe. Not just for the breadth and width of her work as an actress in films as varied as the Alien and Avatar series, as well as Gorillas in the Mist, The Ice Storm, Galaxy Quest and Dave; but also in the way she has lived her life and career fully on her own terms. Weaver has worked consistently over the past 40 years while raising a daughter alongside her husband of over 30 years, stage director Jim Simpson. If she has one defining characteristic, it is her endless curiosity about the world around her. And it is this inquisitiveness that makes her such a delight to watch on screen and to speak with in person. I know you are currently shooting back to back films Avatar 2 and 3 with James Cameron, so let’s talk about what it is like to work 24/7 in a capture suit that tracks your movements to create a totally virtual character? Yes, we’re doing 2 and 3, and it’s been a very exciting year. But we have been in capture suits or in sort of silver, wet-capture suits, and then we have a third capture suit for when we’re half in the water and half out. It’s kind of technical, but yeah it’s been a wild year and I’ve had a lot of fun! I can’t really talk about the part but it’s been great to work with Jim again, he’s in great form. I think this one as much as the first one. The story is so compelling and so moving, full of action, but also tender and funny. And I think, technically, we’re working at a completely new level, I can’t understand half the conversations the tech guys have! I only know that whatever we’re going for is much more ambiNew York City

But I mean, honestly, between you and me, do you do anything other than ambitious films? Because Gorillas in the Mist, Aliens, Galaxy Quest and Dave, I mean all of that is really ambitious stuff. Is that what drives you to your roles, pushing yourself? What do you look for as far as that is concerned? Oh, gosh. Well, you know, I never look for anything in a role. I never look for the role, I look for the story and if the story, to me, is something I would want to see and something that I think is relevant and has a good beginning middle and end, and a very good structure.When it passes all those tests, and the biggest test is: is it about something more than just a character? Then, if it passes this, if there’s enough for me to make something out of this, because I feel like in some of the movies you’ve mentioned, I’ve been very fortunate to be involved in, so many good movies that I think hold up pretty well because of the stories. I certainly don’t consider myself charming enough to sustain an audience’s interest for two hours if I’m not riding on a fantastic story. And I don’t really think any actor is. So that’s what I look for. I’m not seduced by a role if it isn’t a project that I want to be a part of, or a director that I would like to work with because I have structured my career that way. It allows me to bounce around to so many different genres and work with all kinds of directors. You do bounce around, so it’s the story that brings to a comedy or to a drama, but what about the director? You’ve read the story, you liked the script, do you prefer a director that’s hands on or one that lets you go with your gut and let things roll a little bit more freestyle? Where do you feel comfortable? Well, you know, you have to be just opened to whatever happens. I think that there are some directors, like Roman Polanski, who is very hands on, and that can be also liberating, although it takes the whole film to learn how to deal with that. But it is very liberating when someone has a very specific idea of what it is, and I find that most directors, especially ones that I’ve worked with before, kind of trust me, and kind of let me go. The only kind of director I don’t like to work with would be one that is New York City

caught up in how to shoot the day’s work, you know, who isn’t interested in talking about the scenes or talking about the characters. But that’s very rare and you get that, frankly, mostly in television, because they’re trying to make their day, using all the cool shots they can and it seems like they could care less, which kind of leaves you high and dry. I like to be directed. Have you actually directed anything yourself, and if not is it something that you’ve ever fantasized about doing? You know, I have thought about it because I think I would work well with actors. I could certainly tell them what not to worry about. Actors worry about so many things! What shouldn’t they worry about? You know, they are always worrying about how they look, stuff like that, and they don’t realize probably that the reason they’re cast is because of who they are, actually, as people. The sense of character, within the character they’re playing. You sense their character, who they are as a person in the character, and I would encourage actors to be more themselves. It sounds like a contradiction, but brings your life forth to your character, I think that’s what people want to see. And I think that this can hold young actors up because they feel that there’s a certain thing that they’re supposed to be doing, they don’t realize that they’re already doing it. They don’t have to worry about it. Ok, so you’ve done all these amazing roles. Which character do you feel that was the closest to you in real life? Well, I’m not trying to be difficult but really the one that’s closest to me, and the most challenging, is the one I’m doing now in Avatar 2 and 3, but I can’t talk about that, sorry! I know it’s ridiculous, and some day you’ll see the film and you’ll laugh because you’ll remember that I’ve said it’s the closest to me and it really is. And it is kind of wicked that they’ve cast me as this character because they know me very well, it’s not a side I show. Can you tell me if it’s a new character? www.promomagnews.com

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I’ll play the queen in the next one… you know what I mean? I just like to jump around and do different things. It all makes sense to me because I’m in this sort of invisible repertory company of actors where we all take turns doing different things ad having different responsibilities. I love that, I love being part of an ensemble. My part in Avatar is not the biggest part but, to me, of course, it is the most interesting part! Let’s talk about your voice now, because while researching you I’ve discovered how much voice work you’ve done on Wall E, Dory, and everything, does that use a different creative muscle for you? What is that kind of acting like? I love doing it, first of all some of the things I have done are just so interesting. And what I find is since I know nothing about narration, really, I kind of go in and take a whack at it and let them kind of tell me who I should be. In other words, for Planet Earth I had to very much flatten down what I said, and so I did quite a few of those and that was very interesting for me because it was more narration that I have ever done before. And other times, clearly, they want to have a more personal approach; so I would say every single job is quite different and I have a wonderful voice over my agent who’s always coaching me to bring more of myself to the narration, which is a tricky thing. Not necessarily narration, but sometimes I read for other things and to put yourself or your voice and have that represent you is a very interesting challenge. I enjoy it, but it’s not easy I must say.

It’s a totally new character. Other than that, I’m just trying to think who would be like me. Oddly enough, I think of Tawny, Gwen, in Galaxy Quest. Which was what I’ve said to the director. You know they didn’t want to see anyone who’s done any science-fiction for that movie, my agent told me that and I thought, “They’re out of their mind!” You know, if anyone can make fun of this genre, it’s the people who have done these movies. I had to kind of talk my way in. And then it was my decision to make her blonde, and she was already insecure, but I just decided to go with how I would sometimes feel if I had to go to outer space, really as Sigourney, and play that. So really, Tawny and Gwen are pretty close to me. Is Tawny the character you’re recognized most for these days? Do people still come up and quote a line she says from that film or is it a different character from another film? You know it’s all over the map. Certainly, kids think of me from Alien, or Avatar, or Finding Dory because my voice is in that. And then, people who are older, recall Gorillas in The Mist, Years of Living Dangerously, The Ice Storm, things like that. It really depends and it’s so nice to jump around a lot because, to do comedies and more serious kinds of films, that’s the joy of being an actor. Why do you think you’ve never have really been pigeon holed? I mean, that’s exceptional. You never had a low, you’ve really been able to move throughout the Hollywood system all these years. What is your secret? Well, it’s not really a secret. I was told when I was at drama school that I had no talent and that I’d never get anywhere. So, I remember thinking I was crushed because what my goal was. My mother was a British actress, she worked in Repertory theater for a couple of years and that was my dream. To be in a company, and do big parts, small parts, comedies, and just do everything! And when I was told I had no talent I though, “Ugh, now I have to rethink everything.” So, eventually, I got out of that place and I started working on all these new plays with my friends and I was thinking, “Well, I can’t work in a repertory company, but I can think about creating my own repertory, doing the same thing but with whatever jobs I’m offered. So that being my kind of structure, like I don’t care if I’m playing the maid,

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That’s really interesting to know. We were talking earlier about the motion-capture suits that you were wearing and, because this is an interview for a fashion magazine, I’m wondering if you can talk a little about fashion in your life, like clothing getting you into a role, or may- be a moment when fashion really was impactful for you, like when you were growing up something your mother wore or something you wore at the Oscars. Do you have a moment when you really felt the power of clothing in your life to a certain extent? You know, I think one of the funny things about doing motion capture is you don’t get a costume. I’m so dependent on costumes, and it’s such a big partner for me for all the roles I play. I would say the best example would be The Ice Storm because Janey was such a cypher and I felt that thanks to Carol, who designed the costumes and found these old fabrics, all these horrible polyester fabrics. The clothes were practically falling apart by the time we finished, but my costume was so incredible, and between that and my hair and makeup, the outside absolutely told me where I was going. Same thing with Galaxy Quest. Sometimes, the costume is so simple, like in Death and the Maiden, that red, white and blue costume, and that tells you everything. I get more from costumes than just about anything else. I think of my capture suit, which is unique to my character. And we have stickers we put on this like Velcro. Patches we put on, we stick them on each other’s costumes and they say ridiculous things like, “Follow me on Tinder!” and things like that. Because they’re just black with a few bright markings. So you have to develop a costume even if you have no costume. You have to develop an identity. What do you attribute your long and happy married life to, in Hollywood, which really doesn’t have that great of a track record when it comes to marriages? Well first of all we live in New York. I think it’s a big plus. We’re not a Hollywood couple, and I’m not sure that anyone is. And, you know, we’re a very normal, boring couple. My husband ran a theater company for 20 years. We’re very active downtown with this wonderful group of young actors, young writers and directors. And, you know, I just think when you’re in the world, you forget it’s such a tiny microcosm where you’re a movie star and it’s fine. You go on the red carpet… but that is such a micro part of what you do.

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What about ageing in such an image-driven business. You are in your 60s now, what are your impressions, reactions or your life history been as far as you’ve been experiencing this progression through your career? I think it’s an amazing time for women now and in every way. I think that we’re seeing so many women directors, women writers and so many actresses starting to direct like Greta Gerwig. Not waiting, but just jumping in! I just feel, in spite of what may be going on politically, in this country in many other ways it’s the most interesting time for women. But I also feel there’s been a great sense of sisterhood and pride in who we are. And the women coming forward about #MeToo really changed the landscape. I don’t think the same stuff will be able to go on like that. We have a long way to go. In Hollywood, for instance now, there really are more roles for women, but when you look around and it would be nice to see women in all these different capacities: in sound and in construction, in lighting and all these different things, that has not happened. I think partially because the unions have training programs, but maybe they don’t have enough support to train people to make sure your crew is diverse. I think the bigger worry for me is not Hollywood, but when I look at the fast-food industry and the hotel industry: think of how much might be going on there that can keep women down. A manager who requires sexual favor if you want to keep that low level job. We have a lot of work to do in these various industries. In November we’re going to see this army of women running. I don’t know when, but they are certainly out there now. What kind of advice would you give to your 25-year-old self or a young person coming into the industry ? It is very hard to give anyone advice I think, but I would say to myself, “Don’t be so serious.” And, in fact, I think Jim Cameron has observed. I’m much less serious about my work than I used to be. In my 20s especially, I missed out a lot of things because I was thinking about work and looking for work. I would say to my 25-year-old self, “Just relax, don’t stop having fun because you’re hoping for a job.” I feel like the universe will sort this out for you. I think you can just be in the moment and you know life will let you know pretty quickly whether you’re on the right path or not. So just go for it. I wasn’t sure if I was in the right business I kept being offered work, but I couldn’t actually say out loud or to myself, “I want to be an actor” until I had my first paying job, which wasn’t till I was in my early 20s. What is it like to be nominated for an Oscar? Well, it’s a terrific acknowledgement by your community. That’s what’s so cool about it. The nomination is a kind of a “job well done” clap on the back. To actually win is the whole community vote. And it’s quite an amazing night to be there with all these people. You have so much in common with many, most of whom you’ve never met. People outside think you all know each other really well. I don’t of course! But it’s a chance to be with your community and celebrate what you do. I think, ironically, that I’ve done better work that has not been acknowledged, but that’s just because you have to be in a movie that catches fire and that has support. That’s a large part of what seems to get you to the Oscars. The movie has to catch the attention of the audience and the community. And I think that’s perfectly valid, but they do miss out on a lot of wonderful films like Detroit, which was an amazing film last year. Awfully difficult to watch and I was very shocked. You have done dream things like going and hanging out with gorillas in the wild, freediving and scuba diving, traveling the world for your work. What’s left on your bucketlist of things you still really want to do? Wow, what a wonderful question! I think now that my husband is retired, it’s also funny because he’s younger than I am but he’s retired! And he’s been out here really for the first time ever in my career. I’ve been in a loca-

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tion where my husband and my daughter are both out here and we’ve had the most wonderful year to sort of enjoying life in California and the farmers markets and the wonderful L.A. Philharmonic and all the things that are out here. What I would say is I’m looking forward to doing more traveling with him. We’re just trying to figure out all the places we would like to go. Also I feel like I’m at the top of my craft and I’d love to sink my teeth into something that’s very challenging. So, I am looking around for that kind of story. But, on the other hand, I feel like there’s so many things I haven’t done: I’d love to go around the world just listening to music. Just immerse myself in the world music and see more of the world. Being able to travel for my job is one of the greatest things I’ve been given in my career. This chance to work all over the world with people from those countries doing something we all love.

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RUDER THAN YOU

Photographer: Yi Jeat Kwan Wardrobe Stylist: Kaylin Warnock Male Model: Peter King

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MINIMAL-Issue 60  
MINIMAL-Issue 60