Page 1


Beauty | Lifestyle | Marketing

Promo Magazine Business Insider

T

V VIBE

he Promo Business Insider explores how visionary ideas take root and ripen into successful businesses, whether they are established on the strength of a single vision, brought about by the power a partnership or serve to create communities. Join Michael Suber and Promo Magazine team as they visit more than 40 brand owners around the world and explore the myriad ways in which the pursuit of meaning and passion, and the experiences of dissappointment and defeat can motivate professional success. Featuring insightful interviews with leaders from the worlds of publishing, fashion, design, and beyond. The Business Insider captures the ambitions and realities of today’s creative class and offers tips, advice and inspiration for anyone hoping to forge their own professional path.

New York City

New York City


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Blumarine 4 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Blumarine New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 5


PROMO

FOUNDER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Michael Suber CO-FOUNDER & BRAND DIRECTOR Waverly Gunter CO-OWNER Lendell Simmons CREATIVE DIRECTOR Vanessa Bennish EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Michael Chaney PR & MARKETING Marina Dojchinov EDITOR & CONTENT CREATOR Liridona Gjokaj SOCIAL MEDIA Anna Szeto

Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

ISSUE 52 All rights reserved, no part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photographing or other electronic or mechanical methods without prior written permission of the editor, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission request, write to the editor, addressed “Attention Promo Permission,” at the address below. info@promomagazinenyc.com www.promomagnews.com The Views expressed in Promo magazine are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily shared by the company or its staff. SUBSCRIBE Promo is published monthly. To subscribe, visit https://promomagnews.com/purchase-digital/ CONTACT US If you have any questions and or comments, please write us at info@ promomagazinenyc.com. For advertising inquiries, get in touch at submission@promomagazinenyc.com

Mihano Momosa 6 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 7


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Mihano Momosa

Part One

Editorials

SS18

12 Unconventional Ballet 20 Man's World 26 Freeze Me 36 Sisterly Act 44 In The Shadow 48 Reformation

Part Two

Features

18 The Row: The Exceptional is the Rule

32 Runway Shows: The Importance of the Experience in Today’s Media Stories 34 The Secret to Measuring & Monitoring Media Strategy in Fashion 56 Interview with Daniel Lismore 58 Interview with Tina Craig 60 Interview with Julien David

8 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 9


2 Beauty 5 Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

SPRING

A

WELCOME

s we developed this issue of Promo, across the United States fashion brand owners were using their tremendous visibility to dra attention to racial inequality, discrimination and the disproportionately high rate of police violence against people of color. By taking a knee or raising a fist to the industry who is suppose to be all about equality and acceptance. The essence of this issue shows how to peacefully show and illustrate the beauty of ever race around the globe. The fashion industry has become more diverse, more inclusive. More open. It is less them-vs.-you. It is us. Yes, fashion still has its flaws. Designers often still have tunnel vision. The industry still makes head-smacking gaffes. There are far too many cases of profound insensitivity and cavalier cultural appropriation. (Will those Kardashians ever learn?) But in the past decade, it has opened its doors to more people of color, plus-size women, transgender women and those who simply don’t fit the industry’s classic definition of beauty. Most importantly, fashion is talking about diversity in more nuanced ways - and learning from its mistakes. the conversation about diversity has expanded to include the role of immigrants in the industry and the rights of women. Diversity is not just about the imperative of an inclusive runway. It is also about identity: both personal and national.

10 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 11


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Unconventional Ballet

T-shirt Bowie: vintage item Latex items: Spielbar Latex Collant: Calzedonia Shoes: Converse All Stars Crinoline: Atelier Sylphecorsets

T-shirt Bowie: vintage item Latex items: Spielbar Latex Collant: Calzedonia Crinoline: Atelier Sylphecorsets Photographer: Federica Trevisan Makeup Artist: Tania Canovi Stylist: Daniela Scattolin

12 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 13


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine T-shirt Bowie: vintage item Latex items: Spielbar Latex Collant: Calzedonia Shoes: Converse All Stars Crinoline: Atelier Sylphecorsets

Latex items: Spielbar Latex Collant: Calzedonia Crinoline: Atelier Sylphecorsets

14 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 15


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Latex items: Spielbar Latex Collant: Calzedonia Crinoline: Atelier Sylphecorsets

16 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Latex items: Spielbar Latex Collant: Calzedonia

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 17


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

You have opened your world to include other brands in the store… what was the thinking behind that… with even the artwork on the walls for sale. MKO: We have a strong appreciation for all forms of art. It was part of the narrative, thus we felt strongly about incorporating these elements into the spaces. Can you talk about how you work together. Do each of you have a part of the business that you excel at or enjoy the most? AO: We both do everything together. MKO: There is a balance – a ying and yang relationship. What was the thinking behind the decision to support high-end fashion manufacturing in the US? AO: Localization is very important to us. The craft to create quality pieces exists in the United States. With this, you also have efficiency. – MKO: Overseeing and nurturing the samples until we deliver the garments gives us more control over fit and quality. With so many talented top tier brands now showing in Paris (and I know you have presented in France in the past) is it still important for you to continue to present your work in the United States? MKO: It’s important for The Row to be true to our clients and customers. We show internationally when it’s the right time. AO: When we present our collections, we show within a context that makes sense for that season and for our clients, wherever that location may be at the time.

The Row:

What would you say sets your brand apart… there is a sort of stealth understated elegance to it?

The Exceptional is the Rule

MKO: Consistency. We don’t look to trends. We don’t believe we are trendy. We do what we do and constantly look ahead. AO: We are owner operated and have a very consistent mindset when designing. We practice restraint. You now have ready-to-wear, eyewear, handbags and footwear. Are there any other lines you would like to develop?

By: Jessica Michault

M

ary-Kate and Ashley Olsen have carved out a unique niche for themselves in the fashion industry. The twins are exacting and crystal clear about what they want and what they think a very select group of wealthy women desire — understated and refined designs of exceptional quality. Garments that exist in the rarified air above trends, fast fashion or everyday attire. Instead, pieces from The Row reside outside of sartorial time. They do not age. They do not become obsolete our out of touch. They do no relinquish their evergreen grace for anything. And that is why they have become some of the most “major” designs of the modern age. Can you talk about how the luxe minimal nature of The Row‘s aesthetic came about… is it just an extension of your own personal tastes, did you see space in the market for this style?

18 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Mary-Kate Olsen: The Row was inspired by quality and fit. What we wanted to wear, but was not available in the market at the time. The concept that quality product can sell even without a logo. Ashley Olsen: The Row started with the idea of the perfect t-shirt. We saw a need in the market for essential pieces that were the perfect fit and of the highest quality. You have a “store” in LA and one in NYC… but I put the word store in quotes because both spaces feel less like boutiques and more like homes. Why did you take this approach to presenting your oeuvre? MKO: Architecture is another passion of ours. Our spaces dictate our stores, the stores don’t dictate the spaces. AO: We wanted to take the opportunity to present The Row to our customers in the way that we had envisioned. It was never just about shopping, but the experience you have within the world of The Row.

New York City

AO: Yes. MKO: All in a matter of time. Doing collaborations with other brands is a big trend in fashion right now. Is that something you would like to explore…and if so… what brand would you like to creatively team up with? AO: We have partnered with other brands in the past and will do so again in the future when it makes sense. Can you tell me a story about a time when you saw someone wearing one of your designs out in the street. What was that experience like? AO: During our second market in Paris, I saw a woman wearing the leather leggings outside of a restaurant. It’s always a very humbling feeling. There are many options for women, so I never take it for granted. MKO: Every time I see someone in the brand, whether it was 10 years ago or today, it makes me smile. Random question… what is your favorite fabric? MKO: Hard to answer. When fabrics are treated well there are many fabrics that are considered favorites. AO: It’s hard to pick one. Besides making covetable clothing do you both have any other hidden talents that you excel at? MKO: It’s hard to excel if you can only do something part time. AO: What she said.

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 19


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Man's World Photographer: Natalia Mrowiec Stylist: Monika Sendecka Makeup Artist: AGNIESZKA PIKUS-KLEMCZAK 20 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 21


Promo Magazine

22 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Promo Magazine

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 23


Promo Magazine

24 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Promo Magazine

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 25


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Freeze Me Photographer: Retoucher: Sophie Shefer Makeup Artist: Marina Vafina Assistant: Arina Prokopieva Model: Victoria Nikitina 26 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 27


Promo Magazine

28 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Promo Magazine

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 29


Promo Magazine

30 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Promo Magazine

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 31


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Runway Shows:

The Importance of the Experience in Today’s Media Stories By Julie Tsai

Forw

ard

F

32 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

success in generating media impact through the activation of different voices and experimenting with different runway show formats and off-runway initiatives. One of the designers, Tom Ford, generated a total of $17.2 million in Media Impact Value (MIV), which is a proprietary audience-driven algorithm unique to Launchmetrics that measures the impact of relevant media placements on all online, social, and print channels. While Tom Ford already saw success in generating MIV through its star-studded runway show, the luxury house hosted an exclusive after-party and launched its “FUCKING FABULOUS” fragrance campaign shortly after, extending the buzz and experience off the runway, further boosting media mentions and placing them in headlines of top fashion industry news. Indeed, while social media coverage drives a large share of media impact during fashion week, traditional media is still a powerful source for generating media value, contributing to approximately 23 to 32% of global media impact during the four international Fashion Weeks last season. With the help of technology and social media, editors now have the ability to connect with their readers through new mediums. Along with bloggers and YouTubers, this new age of influencers are bringing the runway experience directly to their audiences and giving them a sense of inclusiveness in this once-exclusive industry event. Another prime example of a designer extending the experience beyond traditional runway shows while experimenting with innovative fashion show ideas is Tommy Hilfiger. Three seasons in, the designer continues to curate an Instagram-friendly, snap-worthy environment for both industry insiders and public devotees by stimulating and engaging them with the brand’s experiential elements such as pop-up merch booths, live performances, amusement rides and food stands. With these fun and playful elements, the brand successfully made headlines in almost every major fashion media publication, while democratizing fashion and making the exclusive industry more accessible for consumers. Evidently, the success of their see now, buy now approach came shortly after the #TOMMYNOW show at Tommy Pier. The brand saw 60% increase in sell-throughs, 900% jump in website traffic, with 70% of inbound traffic coming from visitors who never visited the site before.

New York Fashion Week is officially here and as the fashion month kicks off, runway shows become the hot topic of the fashion industry. Through the power of social media, the once private, industry-only event has become a global cultural moment, attracting not only industry insiders, but also end consumers.

While the see now, buy now approach may not work for all designers and after-parties may not be part of the brand ethos for some, it’s clear that there has been a noticeable shift in media consumption in this industry, and being reshaped by globalization and technology, designers are now faced with new and exciting challenges to rethink the way it delivers the experience of Fashion Week and how it approaches runway shows to better fit in this digital era. To learn more about the voices driving global Fashion Weeks and how brands are overcoming the shifts in the industry, download the Launchmetrics x CFDA Front Row to Consumers: The Voices Driving Fashion Week in Today’s Digital Era report.

To garner both audience and media attention, fashion show themes have diversified and now the show experience has extended beyond the traditional runway, aiming to convey the brand philosophy while creating an engaging, entertaining experience that translates into sales. This continuous diversification has made Fashion Week much more inclusive and consumer-focused, yet with an increasingly saturated market it has become more difficult for brands to build brand resonance and emerge through the crowd. In the co-branded report, Front Row to Consumer: The Voices Driving Fashion Week in Today’s Digital Era, Launchmetrics and Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) highlights eight designers who saw

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 33


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

MARKETING

The Secret to

Measuring & Monitoring

Media Strategy in Fashion

Content quality plays an important role as well. Articles or posts that focus solely on the brand or contain images and video also have a greater impact on brand equity than posts that simply have high engagement metrics. Wouldn’t you rather have a blog post dedicated solely to your company…

M

Brand equity has always reigned supreme. What’s your name worth? And how does it compare to your competitors?

(Image Here)

edia performance is one of the strongest indicators of brand equity but formulating the right media strategy can be tough, especially considering how strategies and media voices have changed over the years. Consumers are turning to peers, influencers and celebrities for advice and entertainment leaving brands faced with navigating omni-channel media strategies. In fact, thanks to social media, consumers themselves have become increasingly important voices that can drive media impact for brands. During London Fashion Week last S/S 2018 season, consumers alone generated 42.2% of overall global impact. But how do you determine which voices are generating the most impact for your brand? How do you know if your media strategy is really working? Measuring media performance is challenging for a number of reasons: • You can’t apply a general formula to evaluate media performance. Fashion, Luxury and Cosmetic industries (FLC) are different from other industries. Images and videos are more powerful than text. And specific voices are more influential especially from the likes of Vogue, GQ, Aimee Song, Chiara Ferragni and so on. Quality of coverage is just as, if not more important, than quantity of coverage. • Influence exists in different ways on different channels. The digital revolution has brought different ways to connect with consumers. Now you’re juggling varying voices–whether its an influencer, a publication or simply your brand–across various channels and between paid, owned and earned initiatives. The possibilities are endless making it even harder to calculate media impact. • It’s difficult to compare performance. Because there’s no consistent way to measure impact,

34 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

it’s challenging to compare performance across different strategies. How does a sponsored Instagram post compare to an editorial placement in Vogue? Without knowing which initiatives are outperforming the rest, it’s hard to allocate budgets and resources strategically. So where do you go from here? Start by breaking away from standard reach and engagement metrics. Then revamp your media monitoring and measurement process to focus on quality instead of just quantity. Quality matters when it comes to media strategy & monitoring It’s more than just how many followers someone has. The overall quality of publications or influencers plays an important role – especially their relevance to Fashion, Luxury and Cosmetics. For example, a placement in Harper’s Bazaar is much more powerful than a placement in a travel magazine; and therefore it has a larger impact on brand equity. Same with influencers. Coach has seen a significant rise in brand equity from its partnership with Selena Gomez. Her voice strongly resonates with Coach’s target audience as her posts archive 81% more likes compared to other posts according to a Piper Jaffray analysis mentioned by People.

…rather than share the space with other brands? (Image Here) These are just a few ways to assess media performance much more accurately. The result is a more holistic view of performance across various voices, channels, media types, regions, products and more. This comprehensive evaluation gives you a better picture of which investments are paying off so you can arbitrate media budgets more effectively. Want to learn more about media monitoring and measurement? Download our eBook:The PR Monitoring Survival Guide.. It covers everything you need to know about measuring your efforts effectively.

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 35


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine On Amy (Right): Turtleneck: Oak & fort Jacket and Pants: Zara

Turtleneck: Oak & fort Jacket and Pants: Zara

On Hunter (Left): Faux Fur: Zara Top: Tory Burch Skirt: Topshop

Sisterly Act Photographer: Jian Von Esmane Wardrobe Stylist: Cach Cruz Hair Stylist: Elyse R Model: Amy Kinnon @The Nobles Management Model: Hunter @The Nobles Management Makeup Artist: Manuelita Remy @Numa Models 36 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 37


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine On Hunter (Left): Top: Highline Pants: Zara

Top: Zara Pants: Topshop

On Amy (Right): Top: Aritzia Pants: Simons

38 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 39


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Blazer: Zara Pants: Oak & Fort

40 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Inner Top & Outer Top: Zara

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 41


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine Blazer: Topshop

Blazer: Topshop

42 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 43


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Skirt: Hugo Boss Boots: Venice Hat: Zara

Coat: H&M Sweater: Lacoste

In the shadow Photographer: Magdalena Dyrda Model: Krzysztof Sowiński ,,Sowek"

44 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 45


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Skirt: Lee T-shirt: Big Star

Shawl: Reserved

46 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 47


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Reformation

Photographer: Amy Barton | Hair Stylist: Chloe Heth | Wardrobe Stylist: Jordan Dennett | Makeup Artist: Emily Wallace | Model: Miriam Sornprommas

48 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 49


Promo Magazine

50 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Promo Magazine

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 51


Promo Magazine

52 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Promo Magazine

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 53


Promo Magazine

54 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

Promo Magazine

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 55


D

Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

aniel Lismore is an artist from every angle. He is like one of those Gustav Klimt’s muses, but not a socialite living in a 2D world. Instead he came alive as a fully formed 3D creature whose sartorial creations have conquered the likes of Rita Ora and Nicki Minaj. He is the prince who danced with George Michael, he has been photographed by Mario Testino, posed with Lady Bunny, sat down with Marina Abramović and now he’s interviewed for ODDA in order to uncover what’s underneath his hijab. Q: Let’s start with the latest news: the release of your book, Be Yourself, Everyone Else is Already Taken. It was accurate when Oscar Wilde dropped this line, but it’s even more powerful title for an art book these days. What are you actually referring to?

Daniel Lismore: The Eccentric Sartorial Artist

A: The title of my book Be Yourself, Everyone Else is Already Taken refers to my fundamental belief that you must live your life being true to you. As long as you are doing no harm to anyone else, forge your own path in life and follow your instincts. Don’t let society and outdated concepts define your life. I’m asking people to think outside preconceptions and outdated boundaries. I lived for a while defined by convention and others concepts. I looked at others for inspiration but then, one day, I decided to stop looking and look inside myself and be the person I wanted to be and knew I was. We live in a copy and paste world where few people have original concepts and take the easier path of copying others. The moment you stop searching you realize you had what it takes all along.

Q:What does “ambiguity” mean to you? A: Ambiguity is the key to life. Q: What kind of movement would you like to start? A: I suppose I started a movement 15 years ago in London. I collect friends – all different types of people, from wildly different lives, backgrounds and experiences and I pull them together. Kind of like a social alchemist. I think in the future it may be seen as something that happened but not till I write about it or a bit of time passes and we can look back on it. Boy George told me to start my own religion. It’s been on my mind for a while but I think it would be more an anti-religious cult! Q: What’s underneath the many layers of Daniel Lismore as we see him? A: I’m just a person, from Fillongley Village with an open heart and an open mind.

BY: Isaac Perez Solano

Q: What does “individualism” mean to you? A: We’re all the same but the things we think, say and do in our lives define us. I think someone is an individual when they live life true to themselves, and those aspects which make them unique are well curated and understood. Q: After working with different artists and organizations – from Mario Testino and Azealia Banks to the Tate Britain – one can sense your willingness to break down borders and highlight the fact that we can always join forces no matter how different our approaches are in a certain field. How does a strong personality like yours do this? A: I enjoy communicating and connecting with people, I always keep my eyes open and I like to solve problems. I’m a great believer in collaborations. I’m not the average fashion fanatic. I look outside trends and commercial ideas as I don’t believe in them. I feel if you put your mind to any collaboration you can create something amazing and exciting if you keep true to both parties’ visions and can find a creative center ground. I’ve worked with a lot of different brands throughout the years

56 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

often taking my credit out of the equation. I think it’s important to do this when it has not been possible to find that center ground and the ideas haven’t met somewhere in the middle. Media refers to you as “the most eccentric designer and stylist”. Q: What’s your first reaction to that? A: Not guilty.

New York City

New York City

Q: What do you think is the worst vice a fashion designer or stylist can have? A: I see so many womenswear designers fail because they design for themselves and do not understand a woman, her needs or her body. I think menswear designers need to re-invent menswear as it’s often all too similar and bland – too governed by outdated conventions. I think designers are scared to break boundaries because of how they may look from outside their worlds. Q: Can you share your most precious memory? A: I have many precious memories. One was recently in Iceland where I walked up a volcano with a friend at 2am to go to a hot river. We were the only people there. I lay back with just my face out of the warm water and looked up and thought about my uncle who I was very close to who was stabbed the week before. I realized how precious life is and all my stress and anxieties had gone when I got out. It really was a life changing moment for me. Q: You’ve done collections, exhibitions, published a book and worked to make the world a better place. Can this legacy help to erase the stigma of artists living in XXI century? A: I hope I haven’t even started yet – I really feel that my real work and purpose is yet to come. I try to do my best at everything I do. I feel if anyone has stigmas about living artists they should reconsider and open their minds. They need to see past their negative views. Creating art is what defines us as human. I think it’s ignorant to ridicule art.

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 57


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Tina Craig A Quick Q&A

By: Jessica Michault

T

ina Craig is the founder and CEO of one of the internet’s first and most influential fashion blogs. Launched in 2005, BagSnob – as the name suggests – started out with a focus on the fascinating world of luxury handbags. But since then has expanded out to include a full spectrum of luxury lifestyle subjects. Over the past 13 years Craig has also become a successful brand ambassador and luxury consultant, having worked with top tier companies like Valentino, Dior,Cartier, Estée Lauder, Victoria Beckham, Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman. Here she talks about how fashion helped her make friends growing up, her culinary skills and why mothers are what inspire her everyday.

A : My favorite trip was to Phuket Thailand with my husband and son. We called it our Family-moon.

Q : How did you first get interested in fashion? A : I have always loved pretty clothes but fashion became a way of communication for me when I came to the US at 8 years old and didn’t speak English. Kids are not the most accepting of foreigners at that age but I wore my rainbow shirt to school and the girls all smiled at me and invited me to play hop scotch. Fashion became, and still is, my universal language.

Q : When are you happiest? A : I am happiest when I am in my kitchen blasting 90s music and cooking for my family with a glass of wine.

Q : How were you first discovered? A : I am a serial entrepreneur and constantly need to be challenged. Launching jewelry and bag collections under my name felt like the right thing to do. Q : What has modeling taught you? A : The first collaboration I ever did was with DKNY over 7 years ago. It was one of the first major collabs between a global brand and blogger. We sold out most of the styles within hours of launch on Net-aporter. com. If I had to define a big break moment, it would be that. Q : Who inspires you? A : Mothers inspire me. Not just working moms, but stay at home moms, single moms, etc. There is no job more difficult (or rewarding) as motherhood. Q : Who living or dead would you love to be able to have dinner with? A : I would love to have dinner with Oprah. Who wouldn’t?

Q : What is the biggest challenge you are currently facing? A : Challenges At home: My son just turned 13. It’s been a fine balance of teaching him independence while establishing boundaries appropriate for his age. Challenges At work: I am working on a new beauty tech start up, putting together the deck has been the hardest thing I’ve had to take on in a long time. Also the most fun. Q : What is your secret talent ? A : My secret talent is not to secret as I often share it- I’m a trained a-capella singer, lol. My other talent is the ability to cook anything I’ve tasted once. Q : What is your motto or the best piece of advice you ever got? A : My grandmother taught me to treat everyone with the same respect, whether they bring you lunch or sign your paychecks. That has taken me very far in life. Q : What emoji do you use the most? A : My favorite emoji? It’s a tie between LOL and Sparkles emoji Q : What is the latest Instagram feed you decided to follow? A : Diet_Prada.

Q : What is your favorite trip? 58 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 59


Promo Magazine

Promo Magazine

Q: What motivated your move to Tokyo and the recent relocation to London? A: I like to change and discover new places, I also like the feeling of being foreigner somewhere, I’m used to it.

INTERVIEW

Q: You still source your materials from Japan, even once using a construction company to make BMX helmets. What is the creative process like with Japanese manufacturers? A: I have been making clothing in Japan for nearly 10 years now, It works well for me, I enjoy the dialog between my designs, the mills and the makers, how one influence the others and vice versa. Q: Your Fall 2017 ready-to-wear took inspiration from the “military, Boy Scouts, and mountain living,” meanwhile one reviewer called it classically British and romantically Victorian. Were you aiming for a particular era? A: The truth is in the eye of the beholder. When a collection is done, different people see different things in it which is ok with me. I was not aiming at a particular era but somehow it came to be with melancholy, something of an unknown past maybe. Q: That show was also set to “Masters of War” by Bob Dylan. Can you talk about song choice and overall concept on the runway? A: It’s an amazing song I love, I don’t think my collection can live up to it but it’s such a beautiful track I had to use it. I think at that moment I wanted something quite substantial in that space, Paris was very cold, the news was gloomy, it felt right. Q: In the years since you started making your own street-influenced clothing, streetwear has certainly crossed over to “luxury” status with the price tag to match. How do you keep streetwear accessible? A: Because my collections are entirely made in Japan, the price is quite high, especially when it’s exported to Europe or the US. On the other hand, I know the people who make my clothes and I feel good about it. I don’t think of it as streetwear or not streetwear, I hope it’s modern clothing that people want to own, and are willing to pay the price for it. Q: Our next issue is themed to the “major,” the notion of having a profound personal response. What in your own collections speaks to a lifelong devotion? A: My collection intend to reflect the time we live in through my perspective, it’s my lifelong devotion, it’s not easy! Q: You’ve teamed up with concept shops like Tom Greyhound and Colette in the past. Are there more collaborations on the horizon? A: Yes, there are, I am in talk with major sport brands, I can’t say more right now… I hope it will come through. Q: What creative concepts are churning behind the scenes for your SS18 collection? A: The spring 18 is about ordinary dressing and ordinary materials made extraordinary.

By: Anna Hilderman

Julien David is Blending Cultures to Craft Covetable Clothing 60 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

The French-born, New York-trained designer Julien David creates lines of structural streetwear crafted in Tokyo. Influenced by Japanese tailoring, David’s label began with seasons of scarves and coats before launching into readyto-wear that mixes proportion into a new brand of modern uniform. Q: Tell us a bit about how you came to work at New York fashion houses before launching your own label. A: I studied two years at Parsons in New York and in my class the teacher advised us to look for an internship which I did and started working at Narciso Rodriguez, I stayed there 3 years and learned a lot. After I looked for another job and I got hired as a designer for Womens Collection at Ralph Lauren with a focus on tailoring.

New York City

New York City

www.promomagnews.com

| PROMO | 61


PROMO MAGAZINE NEW YORK CITY

New York City

Design-Issue 52  

PROMO MAGAZINE ISSUE 52 INTERNATIONAL FASHION EDITION 92 PAGES The International Fashion Edition Showcases some of the most talented fashion...

Design-Issue 52  

PROMO MAGAZINE ISSUE 52 INTERNATIONAL FASHION EDITION 92 PAGES The International Fashion Edition Showcases some of the most talented fashion...