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Welcome To The New Year

Promo Magazine Business Insider

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he Promo Business Insider explores how visionary ideas take root and ripen into successful businesses, whether they are established on the strength of a single vision, brought about by the power a partnership or serve to create communities. Join Michael Suber and Promo Magazine team as they visit more than 40 brand owners around the world and explore the myriad ways in which the pursuit of meaning and passion, and the experiences of dissappointment and defeat can motivate professional success. Featuring insightful interviews with leaders from the worlds of publishing, fashion, design, and beyond. The Business Insider captures the ambitions and realities of today’s creative class and offers tips, advice and inspiration for anyone hoping to forge their own professional path.

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Mytheresa Spring | Summer 2018 Womenswear

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PROMO

FOUNDER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Michael Suber CO-FOUNDER & BRAND DIRECTOR Waverly Gunter CO-OWNER Lendell Simmons CREATIVE DIRECTOR Vanessa Bennish EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Michael Chaney PR & MARKETING Marina Dojchinov EDITOR & CONTENT CREATOR Liridona Gjokaj SOCIAL MEDIA Anna Szeto

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ISSUE 51 All rights reserved, no part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photographing or other electronic or mechanical methods without prior written permission of the editor, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission request, write to the editor, addressed “Attention Promo Permission,” at the address below. info@promomagazinenyc.com www.promomagnews.com The Views expressed in Promo magazine are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily shared by the company or its staff. SUBSCRIBE Promo is published monthly. To subscribe, visit https://promomagnews.com/purchase-digital/ CONTACT US If you have any questions and or comments, please write us at info@ promomagazinenyc.com. For advertising inquiries, get in touch at submission@promomagazinenyc.com

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Mytheresa Spring | Summer 2018 Womenswear

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Part One

Editorials 12 Army of One 16 Not That Classic

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24 Cheers

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30 Desert Beauty

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36 Wild At Heart

Renaissance

Made For Everyone Beautiful?

48 Who's That Girl

Part Two

Features

22 Interview: Carlo Capasa

46 3 Trends To Remember

58 3 Reasons the Supply Chain in the Fashion Industry Is Changing 74 Interview: Fashion Photographer Andrew Moralas

78 Interview: Latasha & Lamar Jewelry

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ChloĂŠ Fall 2018 Ready to Wear New York City

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ChloĂŠ Fall 2018 Ready to Wear 10 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

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ISSUE

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WELCOME

s we developed this issue of Promo, across the United States fashion brand owners were using their tremendous visibility to dra attention to racial inequality, discrimination and the disproportionately high rate of police violence against people of color. By taking a knee or raising a fist to the industry who is suppose to be all about equality and acceptance. The essence of this issue shows how to peacefully show and illustrate the beauty of ever race around the globe. The fashion industry has become more diverse, more inclusive. More open. It is less them-vs.-you. It is us. Yes, fashion still has its flaws. Designers often still have tunnel vision. The industry still makes head-smacking gaffes. There are far too many cases of profound insensitivity and cavalier cultural appropriation. (Will those Kardashians ever learn?) But in the past decade, it has opened its doors to more people of color, plus-size women, transgender women and those who simply don’t fit the industry’s classic definition of beauty. Most importantly, fashion is talking about diversity in more nuanced ways - and learning from its mistakes. the conversation about diversity has expanded to include the role of immigrants in the industry and the rights of women. Diversity is not just about the imperative of an inclusive runway. It is also about identity: both personal and national.

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of

Army One

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Photographer: Malik Daniels | Model: Sofi Jaureguiberry | Makeup Artist: Ashlynne Padilla | Assistant: Kat Marin-d | Hair Stylist: Melissa Ordonez Fashion Designer: Hopeless + Cause Atelier | Accessory Designer: Minu Jewels

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Promo Magazine Marie Sophie Basedahl: T-Shirt: Adolescent Clothing Skirt: Asos Lina Marie Schulz: Blouse: Asos Skirt: Mango

C Not That

lassic

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Dress: Vesper

Photographer/Retoucher: Lea Rieke | Makeup Artist: Julia Czapla | Assistant: Elizabeth Tsevi-Unterdรถrfer | Model: Lina Marie Schulz @Mgm Models | Model: Marie Sophie Basedahl @Mgm Models New York City

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Dress: Liquorish Blazer: Vero Moda

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Dress: Asos

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Top: Asos Trousers: Levi's Shoes: Converse Earrings: Asos

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Jumper: New Look Shorts: Pull & Bear Sunglasses: Asos

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Tech on the Runway: Carlo Capasa, President of the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana

Carlo Capasa took over from Mario Boselli as president of the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (the Italian Chamber of Fashion) in April 2015. Capasa is a long time member of the non-profit group that promotes the development of Italian fashion in the national and global markets. In this new position, Capasa has set out a 12-month plan that focuses specifically on supporting emerging Italian design talent and encouraging the fashion industry’s engagement with Milan as a fashion capital. Capasa will look to work with the Italian government to nurture the country’s emerging talent, through improved education and state funding. Capasa told The New York Times that innovation is his top priority, and that this means offering “real support, infrastructures, training and financial support” to young designers. He also intends to create a “hub” — a physical space where the designers can develop their businesses. Capasa is looking to harness the power of collaboration with the designers in the group, asking members of the chamber to cease squabbling and support each other with the common goal of elevating Milan fashion week in the fashion calendar. Capasa cites Giorgio Armani as an example of willingness in holding his show on the final day of Milan Fashion Week in order to use the brand’s following to keep people in Milan for the duration of its schedule. He has instituted the “fashion train” from Pitti Uomo in Florence to Milan men’s week, facilitating the movement between major events. He has also added special events to the Milan’s fashion calendar, including organised tours of Expo Milano and the Prada and Armani museums.

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Carlo Capasa was the chief executive and co-creator of Costume National, a brand he founded with his brother — and the company’s designer — Ennio Capasa until the brothers announced their resignation in March 2016. hile putting together our Data on the Runway report about the four major global Fashion Weeks, we interviewed a selection of impactful fashion insiders about their opinion on the current state and future of the fashion industry on a global scale. Here is what Carlo Capasa, President of the Camera Nazionale delle Moda Italiana (CNMI) had to say.

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In your opinion, what is the most challenging obstacle Italian brands face today? The hardest obstacle is sustainability: it is one of the founding pillars in the strategy of CNMI and we are constantly working to assure that sustainability can be measured by: providing concrete data, publishing specific guidelines related to the different issues and by organizing an international event dedicated to this topic, The Green Carpet Fashion Awards, Italia.

We should worry about people, about the planet, about the future of our children. Everything came from this idea – we worry! Our objective is to bring the entire fashion supply chain closer to sustainability, beginning with the textile producers, the tanneries, the artisans, and involving all these processes, including the creative one, which should be at the head of the sustainable strategy. How do you think technology and digitalization have changed the fashion industry? Digitalization has changed the relationship between the consumer and the corporation; before there were filters (buyers, stores, the media), but today the relationship between the brand and the end consumer is much more direct. Consumers feel involved in the lifestyle of a brand and can be proactive towards it. The communication channels between the brand and the end consumer are no longer meaningless, but bidirectional because, in terms of image, the massive diffusion of digital communication has changed the way a brand sells its lifestyle and its products: the key role today is played by images and online activities. Do you think “See now, buy now” will conquer Italian brands too? What’s your opinion on the phenomenon? High-quality companies are obsessed with their own standards and I don’t think “See now, Buy now” is the right way to guarantee that. Designers work to create a desire; fast fashion works to meet needs. Personally, I think that instant fashion works better for streetwear and product-focused collections. The situation gets complicated when there is a strong creative guide supporting the inspiration for designers. The market needs more time to mature and understand the product, and consumers need time to metabolize and be ready for new creations. The same problem is encountered by emerging brands that do not have sufficient resources to begin this demanding process.

Designers work to create a desire; fast fashion works to meet needs. How are Fashion Weeks changing? What will they be like in 10 years time? I see a future that is very fluid, with fewer and fewer rules; the difference between menswear and womenswear shows has become very minimal and is destined to disappear. The seasons themselves are less rigid and both fashion shows and presentations are no longer strictly linked to seasons. The mission of our association is to allow each brand to tell its story in ways that are more consistent to its own vision. What do you think of the influencers who sit front row at Fashion Week? Will they have a future? We live in a world of communication. You share your ideas, your lifestyle, and make sure everyone is involved. At the same time, the offering of products of any kind is really very wide. In this scenario influencers are becoming increasingly important. There have always been influencers, but they change according to the times, keeping up with the digital and web-oriented communication.

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Photographer: Laura Ma | Wardrobe Stylist: Kyojino | Makeup Artist: Kashmugler | Fashion Designer: Rebelle By Daisy | Model: Khleopatre

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Desert

Beauty Photographer: Emma Wainwright Fashion Designer: Ms Manthey Model: Jennlee Shallow

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WILD AT HEART Photographer/Creative Director: Andrew Morales | Model: Claudia Liberova (New York Models) | MUA: Michelle Marie Viera | Hair Stylist: Rachel Hopkins | Wardrobe Stylist: Latasha Lamar Coats: Belle Fare | Jewelry: Latasha And Lamar New York City

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New York Fashion Week:

3 Digital Trends to Remember This Season By: Rosanna Ryan

New York Fashion Week: the iconic event that unites all fashion professionals, consumers and lovers of the industry – geographically and digitally – in one whirlwind of a week, all to relish in the excitement of designers debuting their latest creations. Once upon a time, NYFW may have only belonged to the fashion elite, but now with digital innovations and the success of social media, any fashion lover can attend via social channels. After analyzing the four major fashion weeks – New York, London, Milan and Paris – and putting together the Data on the Runway report, we couldn’t help but notice 3 digital trends that have resulted from the undeniable takeover of social media.

Influencers: From the Front Row to the Catwalk Celebrities, influencers and opinion leaders of all kinds are increasingly involved in the international Fashion Weeks, either through collaborations with designers or simply by attending and posting their fave looks from front row. Even old school celebs who were initially against putting their lives on display via Instagram, Twitter or Snapchat have plunged into the sea of hashtags. Thanks to this boom in activity on all social channels, we’re able to track, measure and analyze their participation at each Fashion Week. New York generated close to two billion interactions on social media during the SS 2018 season, approximately 12% more than Paris, which came second. Even though influencers only created 7% of the posts related to NYFW, they’re responsible for 57% of those two billion interactions! This overall trend is present at all Fashion Weeks and is likely to continue, as experts are predicting that the power of the influencer will only increase in 2018. New York generated close to 2 billion interactions on social media during the #SS18 season An influencer’s ability to engage and attract a wide audience is an increasingly important factor that more and more brands are taking into account for their shows. Whether collaborating with a reality TV star, famous music artist, successful supermodel or a social media star, ultimately it’s 46 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

about the coverage they’re able to generate for the brand. Oscar de la Renta’s unexpected, yet spot-on collaboration with Nicki Minaj sparked 7.6 million interactions. Talk about a match made in influencer-marketing heaven! Overall, Nicki Minaj was the top influencer during SS 2018, generating over 11.9 million interactions with just 22 posts. To give you an idea of just how powerful this digital trend was at New York Fashion Week, we’re giving you this sneak-peak of our report listing the top 10 influencers, something to bear in mind for the upcoming season.

Brands for All: the Democratization of Fashion Another widespread phenomenon that has become more prevalent in recent Fashion Weeks is the democratization of fashion. As Carlo Capasa, the President of the Camera Nazionale delle Moda Italiana mentioned in our interview, “before there were filters between fashion shows and consumers”; the buyers and traditional media journalists and editors were the only ones that used to get a first glance at collections. Now, thanks to digitalization, consumers can see new collections instantaneously and brands have direct access to the end consumer; this allows brands to build a relationship with consumers without any intermediaries. Therefore, fashion shows are no longer simply presentations of new collections, they are global platforms on which they can build their brand identity and lure new consumers. New York City


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Fashion shows are no longer simply presentations of new collections. Mass market brands are now participating in Fashion Weeks alongside long-standing luxury houses, for example at London Fashion Week Topshop and Tommy Hilfiger accompany Burberry in the top 3 ranking of the most talked about brands in the media. Further evidence of the democratization of fashion is the coverage by online editorials which are not solely specialized in fashion. AOL, for instance, was the media channel that generated the highest media impact value, approximately $1.9 million. The Daily Mail and Vogue followed closely behind. The fact that a non-fashion publication managed to rank number one for it’s New York Fashion Week coverage only leads us to believe that the general public is increasingly interested in fashion.

New York Fashion Week: an International Affair Digitalization and Internationalization certainly go hand in hand, and this is especially evident when looking at the impact that each Fashion Week caused across the globe. It wasn’t just the American crowd who had their eyes on the catwalks in the Big Apple, consumers in the UK, France, Spain and Italy created a total of 72K posts about #NYFW. Following these top 4, interest was generated internationally from Germany, India and Mexico to Brazil and Australia! This digital trend is also apparent at the other Fashion Weeks; India, for example, was the third country which posted the most about London Fashion Week. Here’s another little preview of the report where you can see exactly how much interest these countries showed during #NYFW.

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GIRL

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Photographer: Charmaine McManus | Makeup Artist: Alina Rekshta | Model: Alona Coles

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Renaissance New York City

Producer: ADITORIAL STUDIO | Photographer: Biryukova Anastasiya | Location: Saint-petersburg School Of Television | Stylist & Creative Director: Christina Anokhina Makeup Artist/Hair Stylist: Katherine Cusack | Model: Irina Orlova @New Models | Designer: Aditorial Studio www.promomagnews.com

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3 Reasons the Supply Chain in the Fashion Industry

Is Changing

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n the fashion industry, the supply chain is at the center of many debates now more than ever, especially when considering the acceleration of processes companies are going through. Today, fashion companies are faced with unprecedented challenges thanks to internationalization, the acceleration of the trend cycle, the consumer demand for quality and for transparency, as well as a need for a reduction in losses and an increase in profits, established by an increasingly competitive market. According to the State of Fashion 2018 report published by McKinsey and The Business of Fashion, the third biggest challenge fashion companies will face this year is the improvement and digitalization of the supply chain. In fact, 75% of the executives surveyed confirmed that Artificial Intelligence will be implemented, in one way or another, in some part of their companies’ supply chains to achieve greater flexibility in this new, fast-paced and fleeting era. 75% of fashion companies will implement Artificial Intelligence in 2018 Implementing technology is key, not only in regards to the supply chain and the consumer, but in all of the other internal processes as well. What are the changes that are affecting the industry and forcing companies to re-think and re-strategize their processes within the supply chain? What

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are companies doing to improve it? In this post, I’m giving you a breakdown of the 3 key elements that are propelling fashion companies to implement change in their supply chains.

Flexibility Throughout the Supply Chain Mobile payment systems, smart fitting rooms and interactive screens to search for garments: these are just a few innovations fashion brands are coming up with and implementing in their brick-and-mortar in order to accelerate and make the shopping experience easier for shoppers. However, a lot goes on behind the scenes to achieve these changes within the design-produce-distribute lifecycle, which is invisible to the final consumer. There are two main elements that are changing the backend processes in the industry:

An automated supply chain system Flexibility in reaction time is only possible when a company is able manage data and obtain information quickly. Possible scenarios that require quick reaction time include the need for an increase in production of a certain product that became successful overnight thanks to the product launch campaign, or when there’s an issue with the sizing of a shoe

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which needs to be sent immediately back to production to not experience any more losses. These situations are common for any company within the retail sector but can only be dealt with, in a timely manner and with minimal impact, when the processes are completely automated. Procuring and monitoring data at each step of the supply chain allows fashion companies the possibility to make more accurate

collections. By using sample tracking tools or other tools related to the measurement of product launch campaigns, brands can gauge the popularity of an item by observing which looks were requested the most by press, influencers or stylists, and predict the demand for each product before the full collections hit the market. This allows for more accurate predictions of production needs, reducing potential losses and optimizing resources.

Quality and Transparency in the Supply Chain Another factor which is forcing change within the supply chain is the demand for quality and transparency, thanks to an increasingly conscientious and socially responsible consumer.

decisions, as well as increase the efficiency at all levels. Flexibility in reaction time is only possible when a company is capable of managing its own data. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems were first used in the fashion industry in the 90’s in order to control inventory. In the last couple of decades, software solutions have evolved to meet the needs of each department within companies and can now combine different data to be used at every level in a retailer. In fact, according to Gartner Consulting, companies who migrate their systems to ERP by 2020 will have improved their response rate by 75%.

Team Work: On the Cloud Companies are becoming increasingly de-centralized and internationalized. And, the only way to save all of the information that these teams manage, as well as optimize work flow between teams, is through a cloud system. Utilizing a digital asset management system on a cloud–to store images of collections and shows–allows teams to sync information among the design, production, merchandising and PR departments, and to store and keep track of all of the company’s valuable information.

Adapting to the New Consumer Buying Cycle Social media has brought upon many changes in consumer behavior, and among these is the need for immediacy. In order to adapt to an increasingly demanding consumer, more and more brands are taking on the ‘See now, buy now‘ strategy, as shoppers are used to adopting new trends almost as soon as they come out. Fast Fashion companies have also contributed to this change in the consumer buying cycle and even luxury houses, such as Burberry, are now adjusting their strategies to keep up with competition and increase profits. Being able to identify consumer needs ahead of time is vital, and the way many companies do this is by measuring and monitoring their product launch campaigns or collection presentations. Some companies such as Kate Spade and Fenwick, take it a step further and use an ERP system which allows them to control their stock and sample

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In 2013, the terrible news of the Rana Plaza disaster in Bangladesh left the world in shock as the death toll rose to more than 1,000 workers. The clothing factory collapse, which was responsible for the production of collections by many big players in fashion, was a wake up call for the industry. Many consumers, companies and institutions raised their voices and protested against a system which had been exploiting developing countries for many years, all to satisfy the needs of consumers in developed nations. This was a key moment in the history of the industry in which companies began working on CSR strategies and the optimization of supply chains, with the aim of working towards a circular economy. Increasingly conscientious and responsible consumers demand transparency from fashion companies. According to McKinsey, in 2018 fashion brands will work on ways to take better advantage of materials, from the initial sourcing stage to the creation of the final product, and many others will also work on achieving sustainability through technology. 42% of companies in the industry will openly offer their consumers information regarding their suppliers and production processes in 2018. Stella McCartney is a great example of how a luxury fashion brand can be ethical and socially responsible. The British designer has expressed her belief that style can never be at the cost of sustainability, and because of this, along with Ellen McArther, McCartney co-presented the launch of their report A New Textiles Economy: Redesigning Fashion’s Future around the same time as the launch of her 2017 winter campaign. In the next few years, it’ll be interesting to see and analyze just how companies in the industry will take on these challenges and adapt their supply chains and product life cycles. How do you think fashion brands will adjust to these changes? Share your opinion in the comments below.

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Dress: K Collection Vintage By Velour Jacket: Coachella by H&M Earrings: Tribe Of Lambs

Everyone Made For

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Model: Chanel Hulston @Free Lance | Hair & Makeup Artist: Emilia Kuczma-Porębska | Photographer: Eluvier Acosta Guevara

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Dress: K Collection Vintage By Velour Jacket: Coachella by H&M Socks: La Maison Simons Sneakers: Zara Earrings: Tribe Of Lambs

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Dress: Studio by Zara Hat: Vintage by Velour Socks: Aldo Shoes: Zara Jewelry: Aldo

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Dress: Studio by Zara Hat: Vintage by Velour Jewelry: Aldo

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Dress: K Collection Vintage By Velour Jacket: Coachella by H&M Earrings: Tribe Of Lambs

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Jacket: vintage Body: Naa Naa Cap: Barts Emmet Shoes: vintage

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Beautiful New York City

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Top: Raga ank Necklace: reclaimed vintage Jeans: Philipp Plein

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Top: Y.A.S Pants: Glamorous

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Jacket: Philipp Plein Jeans: MOUSSY

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Short: Philipp Plein

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BEAUTYFUL The purity of a person is often perceived as beauty. You look around and see pure faces who are smiling and looking amazing while they doing nothing. Beautiful? What is beauty and what does it do with you? It's not important always to be perfect. The mistakes that belong to a human makes it incredible. Its more than a look from the outside. Take time and trust your inner beauty. Beautiful? Showing your open personality means fight for it. Fighting makes you a strong person. Deal with dirt through hard times get strong. Get Beautiful? If you look at the words. BEAUTYFUL IT is like the nicest place in your head. It's like thinking with the eyes when you understand the things you see. Only when you understand what you think, things could be beautiful to yourself. Be FULL of yourself BEAUTYFUL is made in yourself you build it up! With all your thoughts all your kindness and your scars. Show your strengths. Be nice. Be brave. And look closely. It is not always perfect. But beauty never is. Its just an Illusion.

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Jeans: Distressed

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Interview Fashion Photographer

Andrew Morales New York City

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STYLE & BEAUTY

Promo: First off, can you tell us about yourself and how you got started in photography? Andrew: My name is Andrew Morales. I was born and raised in the Bronx, New York. Photography had been a hobby of mine since I was 13. I enjoyed photographing architecture. Fast forward nearly 10 years and I receive my Bachelors Degree in Psychology. After graduating I realized I wanted to pursue something I truly enjoyed. P: How would you describe your work to someone who has never seen it? A: Fashion focused, and ever changing. I would never want to be labeled or put in a box. I am always hungry for beauty, and I want my work to reflect that. P: At what point did you realize that photography is what you wanted to do as a career? A: I felt sure of my talent, and having someone like Scott Schuman as an idol and watching him become successful by documenting street fashion was really inspiring. It was a well thought out decision, but very difficult. I dropped a stable life to pursue my dreams and start a photography company. Life In Reverie is everything to me, and though it has been extremely difficult to get to where I am now, (and I still have a long way to go) I have never regretted my decision. I couldn’t be happier. P: What are the biggest challenges of working in your area? A: New York is the biggest city in the world. With that, comes a lot of competition, because of this we get amazing talents from all

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around the world trying to make it at the same time. I truly believe there is room for everyone here in the photography game, though I’ve found success because of branding and my work ethic. P: Your projects are a collaborative process. Tell us what it is like to always be working with new stylists, models, and designers. A: The collaborative process is what I enjoy the most about working on editorials. It has been what has helped my work get stronger. Being able to produce photo shoots is one of my favorite things. Other creatives and entrepreneurs inspire me. It has been my pleasure working with talented individuals. P: What kind of impact do you hope to make in the fashion world in the next 10-15 years? A: My favorite part of my job is working with untapped talent and giving them a platform to showcase their work. That will always be something I strive to do because I have been given a chance, and I know first hand how difficult it is to make it in this business. P: Can you describe one of your favorite projects that you have worked on and why was it your favorite? A: To be honest this editorial we are getting published for is very important to me. I started shooting film late last year and for one of our shoots to make a cover really means so much. There’s a lot more focus on the fundamentals of photography when shooting film. There’s that excitement from getting the film developed each time. This has been something I put off doing for a few years, for the fear of not being great. However, transitioning to it was the right choice. P: What does fashion mean to you? A: Fashion is a way of introducing yourself without speaking. It’s a first impression. Fashion is a way of self- expression and can be an outlet from the everyday stress or struggle. P: What projects are you working on now? A: I’m currently gearing up for New York Fashion Week. All my creative projects are on hold until afterwards. P: How much equipment do you typically bring to a photo-shoot? A: It depends on the job. For some projects I can pack light, while with others I like to be prepared for any scenario. For fashion week, for example, I carry a digital body, 70-200, 24-70, speedlight, 35mm camera etc etc etc. P: If you could shoot an editorial anywhere in the world, where would you go? Why is that? A: I would love to shoot in Africa and incorporate wildlife. We don’t have many wild animals in New York City haha.

enjoy the independence and freedom that comes with freelancing without an agency. P: Tell me about the shoot that you created for us. What was your vision when you created it? A: For all my editorials I aspire to empower women. The extravagant outerwear was the basis of the shoot and we built off of that. I enjoy the contrast of shooting in grungy places, so we shot in warehouses in Brooklyn. P: What photographers from the past or present have influenced you the most? A: As I mentioned before, Scott Schuman inspired me. I love how he captured people on the street. I have admired Bill Cunningham’s work ethic as well. Once I started shooting editorials I looked at people like Peter Lindbergh, Mario Testino, Rankin, & Patrick Demarchelier, to further better my craft. P: What makes a great fashion photograph? A: Passion. P: Of all the images you’ve made so far in your career, which is your favorite and why? A: I can’t say that I have a favorite. But shooting in Paris was really exciting and I didn’t expect to be there for work so early in my freelance career. P: Who excites you the most (Celebrity) & why? A: I enjoy following multi faceted artists. Why only be known for one thing?! People like A$AP Rocky, Kanye West, & Virgil Abloh. P: If you had to pass on a suggestion for someone starting out in photography, what would you tell them? A: Carry your camera wherever you go. Shoot everything you see. The skills you’ll learn by practicing will take you far. Utilize the resources around you. Surround yourself with fellow artists. It’s important to be around people with the same creative energy and drive. P: How is your style of photography different from others different from any other photographers? A: I don’t spend much time looking at other photographers work. It’s important for me to shape my own style. P: What’s the most important thing you want potential clients to know about you? A: I take my work very seriously. It’s my full-time job and there’s nothing else I would rather be doing. P: What is your world-dominating goal? A: I intend on making a difference in the community via photography starting with the Bronx, then hopefully the world.

P: What are the biggest challenges facing you now? A: Exposure. I’m currently unsigned and the difficulty in that is that I am limited in the market that can be exposed to my work. However, I do

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Promo Magazine

INTERVIEW

Latasha & Lamar Jewelry

Promo: What & Who is your brand (Name)? Latasha & Lamar: Hi, I’m Latasha Sellers owner of Latasha and Lamar Jewelry. We are a luxe, modern line that carries masculine and feminine styles. P: What sparked your interest in fashion? LL: My interest in fashion was sparked at an early age when I began watching “House of Style”. It was a show focused on trends, designers, and models. From there, my interest grew and I began watching runway shows on cable tv. P: What made you take fashion more seriously and make a career out of it? LL: I always knew I needed to have a career where I could be creative. Fashion is the most exciting creative path because it is constantly evolving. P: Are you self taught or did you study fashion design? LL: I studied textile design at Philadelphia University and I am now taking classes at The Fashion Institute of Technology for jewelry design. However, I began designing jewelry for my friends’ 10 years ago. 78 | PROMO | www.promomagnews.com

P: How has your work evolved since you began your own label? LL: My work has become more complex since starting my own label. I really sat down and thought about who I am and how I can share that through my work. P: Have your pieces become more appealing to people as a result? LL: Yes, I do think that my pieces have become more appealing since creating my own label because it has become more unique. P: Are there any types of clothing that you avoid wearing? LL: I avoid any type of clothing that is itchy, or rough against the skin. I love being draped in soft, cozy fabrics. P: Does your approach differ when designing menswear compared to womenswear? LL: My approach does not differ when designing menswear vs womenswear. I always want to design pieces that are luxe and modern, things that make the wearer feel sexy and confident.

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P: How is your work received internationally? LL: I have had success with selling overseas and have clients in London, Australia, and Hong Kong. P: How do influences from outside of where you live find their way into your work? LL: Influences from outside of where I live find their way into my work via runway shows, fashion blogs, and international films. P: What are you fascinated by at the moment and how does it feed into your work? LL: At the moment, I’m really fascinated by trend forecasting. I love learning about where trends come from and how they are influencing current fashion. P: What is the biggest lesson that you have learned since you started your brand? LL: The biggest lesson I’ve learned since starting my brand is “You need to love it first, the rest will come”. P: What advice would you give to young designers? LL: The advice I would give to young designers is “ Don’t be afraid to put the work in, good craftsmanship is essential”. P: What would you like to achieve before the end of the year? LL: Before the end of the year, I would like to achieve more retail locations that carry my brand as well as a collaboration for New York Fashion Week.

LL: The only rule I live by is to always appreciate what you have. P: What’s your motto? LL: My motto is to always treat others the way you would like to be treated. P: Tell me about your latest collection. What was your vision when you created it? LL; My latest collection was truly inspired by my recent move to New York. I incorporated more sterling silver chain and hematite into this collection, which was a direct reflection of my modern, urban environment. P: If you could showcase your designs anywhere in the world, where would you start and why? LL: If I could showcase my designs anywhere in the world I would pick Paris. It is where I got engaged and I’ve always wanted to go back and explore the fashion abroad. P: Who excites you the most (Celebrity) & why? LL: Nicole Richie is the celebrity that excites me the most because she is always leading a new trend and not afraid to experiment with her look. P: How is your brand different from any other designer brands? LL: My brand is different from other designer brands because it encompasses different types of metals, textiles, and semi precious stones forged together to create a unique collection with layers and depth.

P: Are you superstitious or do you have any rules you live by? New York City

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PROMO MAGAZINE NEW YORK CITY

New York City

KNOW YOURSELF-Issue 51  

PROMO MAGAZINE ISSUE 51 INTERNATIONAL FASHION EDITION 70 PAGES The International Fashion Edition Showcases some of the most talented fashion...

KNOW YOURSELF-Issue 51  

PROMO MAGAZINE ISSUE 51 INTERNATIONAL FASHION EDITION 70 PAGES The International Fashion Edition Showcases some of the most talented fashion...

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