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THE REPORTER

Volume 51, No. 49

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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Sunday December 9th, 2018

Price: $1.00

UHS AWARD NOW CLOSE TO $100M Judge to Decide if GOB Must Pay

Thursday, December 6, 2018 he Belize Bank this week in the Supreme Court moved to collect the $90 million UHS award owed to it by the government of Belize in a decision handed down last November by the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ). Attorneys for both sides made arguments before Chief Justice Kenneth Benjamin as the bank seeks an enforcement of the award. Financial Secretary Joseph Waight was cross examined by Belize Bank’s attorney Eamon Courtenay and made several surprise admissions regarding GOB’s ability to make the payment, which Prime Minister Dean Barrow has previously said the country is unable to do. Courtenay presented an offer it said the bank had made to GOB to settle the award in installment payments. According to Courtenay, the offer had been sent to the government months ago but said the Minister of Finance and Cabinet had not responded.

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Police Cagey About Aborted Gang Figure Shot by Girlfriend

Drug Plane Landing Pg. 2

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PUP and UDP are ‘Efficient Corruption Machines,’ Says Shoman

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ometimes the men and women opposed to the idea of Belize taking our case to the ICJ express the view that it is humiliating for Belize, an independent state, to subject her sovereignty to the authority of the International Court of Justice on a high-stakes claim such as Guatemala is making against Belize. If Belize were being accused of a criminal offence there would be grounds for shame or embarrassment, but this claim is not about that! It is a claim for compensation, a claim for something which Belize did not promise and over which she had no control. The International Court of Justice is the principal judicial arm of the United Nations. It settles disputes between member states who go to it for help. Many nations have sought the help of the ICJ. They include many of the states of Europe and Asia, Africa and the Americas. Since June 26, 1945, the year the ICJ came into being by resolution of the United Nations General Assembly, the International Court of Justice has presided over dozens of disputes involving land and sea boundaries, including: UK vs Norway, 1949 UK vs Argentina, 1955 Switzerland vs the U.S. (1956) Belgium vs the Netherlands (1957) Ethiopia vs South Africa (1960) Germany vs Holland (1967) Greece vs Turkey (1970) Canada vs the USA (1981) Greenland vs Denmark (1968) Nicaragua vs Honduras (1999) Romania vs Ukraine (2004) Congo vs France (2003) Nicaragua vs Costa Rica (2010) There are many others, but this shortened list provides evidence that the ICJ is universally recognized and respected by the nations of the world as a court of international jurisdiction for nations which need help in settling their disputes.

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER

Christmas Cheer and its Reminders

Dear Editor:

“I believe that there will ultimately be a clash between the oppressed and those who do the oppressing. I believe that there will be a clash between those who want freedom, justice and equality for everyone and those who want to continue the system of exploitation.” ― Malcolm X Christmas cheer is a good idea. Many marginalized families need the assistance to spread the joy of the holy season in their homes. The allocation of the funds is a different matter. It is wrong to allocate $25,000.00 as Christmas cheer for each UDP member in the House, but only allot half that amount for Opposition members of the same body. Since all of us pay the taxes that are used for Christmas cheer, members of the House should be given the same amount of funds to assist the residents of their divisions in the season of advent. It is also wrong and unfair to allocate Christmas cheer for UDP political officers (persons who are not members of the House). As stated earlier, all of us pay the taxes that are used for the worthy event; therefore political officers from both the governing UDP and the Opposition should receive the same amount of funds to help spread the joy of Christmas in their constituencies. Christmas cheer also reminds us that despite all the sweet talk of the ministers and their cronies, this is one of the most corrupt governments in the history of Belize. Below are two examples of the many instances of malfeasance perpetuated by the crowd in Belmopan. The administration has allocated $650,000.00 for Christmas cheer for the entire nation. But with the assistance of a certain crooked minister, Sharon Pitts and Andre Vega each got $400,000.00 of taxpayers’ money in a bogus land compensation. Together those two UDP political cronies walked away with $800,000.00 of taxpayers’ money for themselves. That is $150,000 more than the Christmas cheer for the entire country.

This year less than 3/4 of a million dollars is allocated for Christmas cheer for Belizeans countrywide. In this same year crooked members of the administration made a killing for themselves with the $8 million bloated contract for Faber’s Road. At a press conference in Belize City the administration stated that the hefty $8 million price tag for Faber’s Road included a mile of properly concreted street, the paving of Krooman Road, and the building of a canal to drain water from the area to the sea. Construction work on Faber’s Road concluded months ago. Surprise! Surprise! Due to shabby work, the street is so bumpy that expectant mothers or persons with heart conditions are warned that the terrible shaking as they travel on the road in a vehicle could compound their health issues. Krooman Road is still in terrible condition, as not even a foot of it was paved, and no canal was built. The Faber’s Road project was highway robbery by some members of the administration. According to reputable local road contractors as well as a former Minister of Works, that project should have cost no more that $4 million dollar, including the paving of Krooman Road and the construction of the canal. Nevertheless, the entire $8 million for the Faber’s Road project is finished.Apologists for the Ministers have failed miserably in their efforts to convince the people that $8 million was spent to concrete a mile of Faber’s Road. We don’t need a Belize in which our people are given “pickins” for Christmas, after corrupt politicians and their cronies have made millions for themselves. This crowd in Belmopan are the masters of mismanagement and corruption. They have to go. We need a Belize in which the many resources of the country are used for the benefit of the people throughout the year, not only at Christmas time. Sincerely yours, Gilroy Usher, Sr.

Police Cagey About Aborted Drug Plane Landing Thursday, December 6, 2018

By Michelle Sutherland

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oday, Police had no further details to share on the events which occurred in the pre-dawn hours of last Friday, including the aborted landing of a jet carrying drugs, a shootout between the Police and men in a pickup and the abduction of two farmers. Police have even been unwilling to confirm that the three incidents in Progresso in the Corozal District are related. On Monday, ACP Joseph Myvett confirmed that three men had been detained, and we know that a grey Dodge Ram pickup in which men involved in the shootout were travelling is impounded by Police. But despite repeated queries up to press time today, the Police have refused to identify the three men detained, or to reveal if there have been any charges brought

against them. Myvett told media at the beginning of the week that around 1:30 a.m. on Friday, Corozal Police were called out to an area on Progresso Road where they observed portable fluorescent and revolving lights lining the side of the road. He, however, say that no one was found in the immediate area. Myvett went on to explain that around 3:40 a.m. on the same date, Police again got a tip of what appeared to be suspicious activity occurring near the Pueblo Viejo Ferry. When authorities got on the scene they met two men on separate motorcycles and two vehicles carrying passengers. Authorities say that the group of men unleashed heavy firepower on them, but luckily no one was injured. Information gathered from additional sources

indicates that during the high-speed chase and shootout with Police one of the vehicles crashed into a tree. Further information is that sometime around 4:00pm on Saturday, December 1st, a farmer and a 17-yearold visited the Police Station and reported that around 1:00am Friday morning they left Chunox Village and were en route to Belize City to sell vegetables when they were stopped by four armed men in a Dodge pickup truck. The complainants reported that the men tied them up and left them on the side of the road. Sometime later the two individuals were able to untie themselves and told Police that they also observed the lights lighting the road. Police have refused to confirm if the incidents are related. But neither the Deputy Commissioner of Police Chester Williams nor the Ministry

of National Security were shy about taking credit for the foiled landing. Mexican media reported over the weekend that a large 12-seater Jet landed at the Chetumal International Airport early Friday morning, at around the same time Police were on the scene on the Progresso Road. According to the media, the pilot radioed the tower stating that he was having mechanical problems, so he was allowed to land. Two men allegedly then departed the jet and escaped by jumping the fence of the airport. In an interview Monday, Williams stated that "Indeed the Police were so effective that we were able to thwart the landing and the plane went and landed at the Chetumal Airport where the Chetumal Federales have a base and they were not effective as the Police in Belize were. That's the bottom-line…If the plane could have

landed in the backyard of the Mexican Federales, then something is wrong. Despite the fact that they have all the equipment, more than we do, we were more effective than they were. That's the truth." According to a Ministry of National Security release earlier this week, “The criminal use of the aircraft was

confirmed hours later in the night, as federal agents and experts carried out the inspection of the aircraft, and inside found a large shipment of cocaine. The counting and weighing of the illegal load were underway until early Saturday, which first estimates being more than a ton and a half of narcotics.”

THE REPORTER

Phones: 501- 227-2503 / 227-1767 Fax 501-227- 8278 P.O. Box 707 e-mail: reporternewspaper@gmail.com editoreporter@gmail.com website: http://www.reporter.bz Publisher Editor Assistant Editor Financial Controller

General Manager Lithographer Journalists Video Producer Desktop Publisher/ Graphic Designer Accounts/ Advertising Chief Printer Office Assistant

Harry Lawrence Mike Rudon Jr. Marion V. Ali Rosa Maria Lawrence Lisbeth Ayuso Rodolfo Castro Benjamin Flowers Michelle Sutherland Alexis Milan Jackie Fuller Rodolfo Castro Leroy Bood Misael Muñoz


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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UHS AWARD NOW CLOSE TO $100M

Cont’d from pg. 1

Waight said he had not discussed the matter with the Prime Minister and was not given any advice or instruction on the matter. Waight, however, disclosed that theoretically, it was indeed possible for GOB to settle the award making payments in installments by way of a blend of cash and Treasury Notes. O n We d n e s d a y, Chief Justice Kenneth Benjamin instructed Waight to deliver the proposal to the Minister of Finance and provide a response to the Court. Waight, however, did not appear in Court on

the second day of the hearing. "The government came with what I would describe as a disingenuous explanation today and I told the Court that the government was not respectful of the Court. It was not frank with the Court. It was not honest with the Court in its answers and I hope the CJ treats their answer with the contempt that it deserves,” Courtenay told the media following the hearing on Thursday. “The litigation is at an end. Be honorable, be respectful and perform your duty,” Courtenay added, noting that the judgement

must be settled and continues to accrue interest at 6 percent. He noted that by now, the total with running interest may be closer to $100 million. Waight’s disclosure that GOB is able to make the payments, without affecting the 2 percent primary surplus agreed to as one of the terms of the previous restructuring of the ‘Superbond’, places more pressure on Cabinet to settle the long complex political saga which originated with the previous PUP administration. A decision will be handed down by the Chief Justice on January 11, 2019.

Tanice Mejia, 32, who now remains in Police custody pending investigation for allegedly shooting Lucas during a heated argument. Police, however, say that none of the two individuals were licensed firearm holders, therefore it is believed that the weapon which was used was an unlicensed one. Around 9:15am on Wednesday, at least three gunshots were heard from out of Mejia's apartment. When the last blast subsided, Lucas was seen limping away from the apartment and he eventually made his way onto Vernon Street where he was carted away to the hospital by a Police patrol. Inspector Wilfredo Ferrufino explained that Lucas did not live at the residence and had only gone to visit Mejia at her home, "What Police know so far is that Lucas and his common-law were involved in a domestic dispute and somewhere in that dispute a firearm was produced and the injuries were inflicted on him." Ferrufino con-

firmed reports made by neighbors which suggest that the couples' relationship was of a toxic nature "There have been numerous reports from both parties lodged at the Domestic Violence Unit." Accounts from neighbours are that on numerous occasions, Lucas could be heard beating Mejia. While those instances were reported, it became a norm in the neighborhood because the couple would eventually end up reunited. The neighbors, however, added that Mejia told them that she was tired of the alleged abuse but that she was afraid of leaving Lucas. According to Ferrufino authorities have obtained statements from both parties involved and have forwarded those to the office of the Director of Public Prosecutions. There was no witness to the shooting, and while Police found three expended 9mm shells on the scene, the gun has not been located. Lucas remains in a stable condition at the KHMH.

Gang Figure Shot by Girlfriend

By Michelle Sutherland

A

n early morning shooting inside the lower flat of a two-storey concrete structure at the intersection of Magazine Road and Vernon Street on Wednesday has left well-known Majestic Alley figure Bartholomew Lucas, 32, recovering from a gunshot wound to his groin area. The shooting has resulted in the detention of his girlfriend,


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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER

PUP and UDP are ‘Efficient Corruption Machines,’ Says Shoman F

Thursday, December 6, 2018

ormer PUP Foreign Minister Assad Shoman has blasted both his former party and the UDP administration, for which he now works as part of the ICJ Education Campaign, for being "efficient and creative corruption machines." Shoman made the remarks during Tuesday night's ICJ forum in San Ignacio, Cayo. "We have much bigger problems than the Guatemalan claim to worry about: - rampant corruption. ...And I can add out-of-control crime; massive poverty; gross inequality, etc., etc. ...At the moment we only have two real choices, (political parties) let's face it. And both have proven term after term after term to be efficient and creative corruption machines. Yes or no?" Shoman charged. PUP Leader, John Briceño has since told the Reporter that "Mr. Shoman is entitled to his opinion, but I don't necessarily agree with him." The Reporter also contacted UDP Chairman Alberto August, who declined to comment because he said that he had not heard the comments. August did say, however, that “he (Shoman) made no such statement when he met with UDP Leaders earlier that same day in Belmopan.” We contacted Shoman following his comments on Tuesday night and in clarifying his comments about the two major political parties' corruption, he said: "I don't think that anyone would doubt that. The fact that I was a part of the PUP government that included corrupt persons is irrelevant. Indeed, even when I was such a member I criticized the corruption in government." During the forum, Shoman also accused new political aspirants of distorting the facts,

making up stuff and preaching "doom and gloom" about the facts on the airwaves and on social media. "They say the way to fix all of that is to vote "No." So we bring down the government and then we elect a corruption-free government. Magic! Easy. Just like that. Really? Wow! What party is that? I say enough of the lies and enough of the false truths. It's time to call out the misinformers in our society. It's time to recognize that many people say and do these things because they have a political agenda. Many of the loudest naysayers are people who are or have been candidates of a political party and want to boost their political capital, especially as general elections zoom ahead." There were also harsh words between Shoman and Paul Morgan, former leader of the Vision Inspired by the People (VIP), who was also part of the panel on Tuesday. It happened when Shoman, who was questioned about the Heads of Agreement, which he as a PUP Minister of Government, signed onto in 1981, and which caused riots in Belize when people thought that Guatemala may have been given rights over the Sapodilla and Ranguana Cayes and southern waters. He told the gathering that he and the then government only signed the document because the negotiations were not getting us anywhere and that Great Britain needed to see some type of strides being made towards a settlement; but that signing the document was not conceding anything to Guatemala. "'Can you sign a paper that says that you will discuss these various topics in the future and try to reach an agreement?” We said 'fine.’ Everything that was in that Heads of Agreement was subject to Belize agreeing to it in the

negotiations. We felt very confident about that, because if we have the power to negotiate and to say 'NO' every time they suggest something, then we have no problem," Shoman explained. That drew strong words from Morgan, who called him a liar. "You just heard from the horse's mouth how, on an international basis, he and his colleagues did not intend to honor something that they signed. That, my friend, is a lie. It's a lie. That is a bad thing and perhaps and I'm saying this very seriously now, perhaps, just from that one statement there recorded, we should not send Assad back to negotiate anything for us, because he is a liar," Morgan charged. We asked Shoman today to respond to Morgan's words and he did by saying: "Mr. Morgan appears to be a nice guy, so I don't think he had any malicious intent. I think he was just put out by some piercing questions posed to him by the San Ignacio people and called me a liar out of frustration and confusion.” And although Shoman criticized the UDP and the PUP for being corrupt parties while in government, PUP Leader John Briceño came to his defense, stating that "He (Morgan) should not attack Mr. Shoman like that because Mr. Shoman has been a leading member of the Belize-Guatemala negotiations for a long time."


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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Man Murdered Weeks After Seeking Settlement for Amputated Leg Thursday, December 6th, 2018

By Marion Ali

D

eath came knocking for Francis Gill, 47, just weeks after he was seeking to receive monies after winning a civil suit for a leg he lost during a confrontation four years ago in Belize City. Gill, who in 2014 got embroiled in a heated dispute with Devon Jones in front of Key Lee, formerly Li Chee fast food joint on Freetown Road, lost his right leg when Jones got into a truck and reversed it twice into Gill, who was standing in front of the food outlet awaiting his take-out order of food. Gill's right leg was crushed and had to be amputated. Jones was charged criminally with aggravated assault and maim. Gill also brought a civil suit against Jones and won the

judgment, but after Jones failed to come up with the payment, Gill tried a few weeks ago, through legal recourse again, to crowfoot Jones' assets as payment. Gill did not live to receive his money or assets that equaled the amount because shortly after 1:00 Monday morning, a gunman paid him a deadly visit at the apartment complex at #1128 Barracuda Street, Coral Grove area, which he managed for the owner who lives in the US. The gunman broke the motion lights on the apartment building and waited for Gill and his wife, Betsy to reach their yard. There, before Gill could alight the grey Nissan Altima car which he had just driven inside the yard, the gunman fired four bullets from the driv-

Devon Jones er's side at close range at Gill, hitting him in the left cheek and left side of the neck, killing him on the spot. Gill's wife also suffered gunshot wounds in both feet for which she is being treated. The killer never tried to rob the couple before fleeing.

Police have no one detained, but they are taking a keen look at whether the attack was linked directly to the incident of four years ago, the law suits and the payments that Gill was supposed to collect. On Sunday night prior to the attack,

Francis Gill, deceased the couple, who had the father of three bejust gotten married six came an active memmonths ago, had gone ber of the Belize Asto the casino for a few sembly for Persons hours. with Diverse Abilities When Gill got in(BAPDA) and did not volved in the exchange let his amputation imwith Jones in 2014 pede him from making and he lost his leg, he an honest living. Aside had just returned from from managing the the US, where he had apartment complex, he lived for many years. was also a car dealer. After he lost his leg,


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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Of This and That

Last Saturday I had the pleasure of participating in a forum discussion organized by a candidate for the PUP, Mr. Gary Ayuso, to debate why Belize should or should not go to the ICJ for an arbitrated resolution of the Guatemalan claim. I made it clear that I would go anywhere, if invited, to explain why I am in favour of going to the ICJ. The discussion was stimulating, and I enjoyed the verbal jousting with Mr. Richard Harrison, who spoke out against taking the case to the ICJ. Mr. Harrison made two points which seemed to sum up the views of the opposition. He declared that the ICJ was a recourse of last resort. In his view Belize has not reached that point. There is still room for negotiation, he said. The second point he made, and one which gained resonance with his listeners, is that it was humiliating for Belize, an independent state, to have to submit to the judgement of the ICJ on a claim which we know is connived, trumped up and without merit. Reflecting over the first point, I recall that the Government of Belize had expressed precisely this same point of view in the year 2000. Mr. Assad Shoman, who was Foreign Minister during that time, in his foreword introducing the second Lauterpacht Report, put the matter into historical perspective. This is what Mr. Shoman had to say: “In 1991 Guatemala finally recognized Belize as an independent state, and in 1993 the claim was on the verge of a definitive resolution, with Guatemala agreeing to accept Belize’s land borders as defined in the 1859 Treaty, and Belize agreeing to give up some of its territorial sea rights in order to afford Guatemala an outlet to the high seas through its own territorial sea. “But a constitutional crisis in Guatemala interrupted the process and the following year the new Government formally re-instated its claim and later demanded that Belize cede to it more than half of its

territory as the price for Guatemalan recognition of a truncated Belize. “Hopes that a new government installed in 2000 would negotiate a just settlement soon faded as it (Guatemala) began a policy of provoking military confrontations and encouraging peasant invasions. “The new government insisted that the territorial dispute was essentially a legal one and that the only possibility for a resolution was to submit the case to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) for arbitration. “The Belize Government felt that this represented an unnecessary expense of time and money, and proposed a process under the auspices of the Organization of American States, with each country naming a Facilitator and both sides presenting their case to the facilitators so that they could propose a just and durable solution. “The process began in July 2000 and has been successful in implementing confidence-building measures along the border and in hearing the positions of both parties... “At the same time however, conscious that if Guatemala remained intransigent, the matter might indeed have to be submitted to the ICJ, the Belize Government approached four eminent international lawyers and instructed them to write an opinion that would, strictly on the basis of international law, consider whether Guatemala could validly question Belize’s sovereignty over the territory of Belize, or any part of it. “They were not asked to prepare a brief for Belize’s prosecution of a case, but rather for an impartial opinion, well founded on international law which would give a clear and unbiased opinion of the true situation in strict accordance with the law. “The Belize Government chose a high-powered and multi-national team of highly respected and renowned international lawyers headed by Professor Sir Eli Lauterpacht Q.C., a British lawyer with impec-

THE REPORTER

cable credentials as an academic and great experience as a practitioner of international law. It includes Judge Stephen Schwebel, a citizen of the United States of America who until recently was a Judge and President of the ICJ; Professor Shabatal Roseanne, an Israeli citizen who is considered a world expert on the jurisdiction and jurisprudence of the ICJ and the highly respected and experienced Latin America jurist, Professor Francisco Orrego Vicuna, a Chilean national. “Together they have spent over a year in extensive research and consultation, and have now submitted their opinion.” The above extract from Mr. Shoman’s Foreword to the Lauterpacht Report shows that Prime Minister George Price was aware of Guatemalan intransigence since 2001 and realized that the time would come when Belize would have to go to the ICJ. That was 18 years ago! Since then Guatemala has shown unmistakably the cut of her jib. Guatemala is now asking the ICJ to validate her claim against Belize. The ICJ today has become a “make or break” route for Guatemala. Belize has done her home work! Belize has not only internationalized this dispute so that the nations of the world have expressed their support for her. She has also prepared for her legal defence with care so that she can repulse the Guatemalan threat whenever and wherever it comes. We know that Guatemala has now formally brought her claim before the ICJ. A national referendum in April this year binds her to a judicial arbitration, and she has pledged to respect the result, whatever it may be. This is an unprecedented opportunity for Belize to deal Guatemala a knockout punch, if we choose to do so! It is a break for Belize because the ICJ will have to rule on the validity of Belize’s borders, not on the doctrine of uti possidetis and not on any dispute which Her Majesty’s government may have incurred with Guatemala. If Belize’s borders are properly constituted as we claim, under the 1859 Treaty and the 1931 Exchange of Notes, Belize wins, and Guatemala gets nothing at all!


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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All about The People

Mike was right! Neri Briceno This week after reading the local news, I decided that I was either going to write about the PSU versus Belmopan City Council scandal or the plane up north, but Mike Rudon Jr. completely changed my mind. After all, questionable land transactions and illicit plane landings have become such the norm, that it’s almost like Belizeans have a - “tell me something new” attitude. And no, Mike did not pick up the phone, text me or tell me what to write about. His articles in this newspaper completely changed

my mind. This may be hard for most of our readers to believe, but while Mike and I work for the same organization, I do not know him personally. I try to visit the Reporter’s head office whenever I am in country but have never run into Mike or most of the staff for that matter. I think I may have met him one time many moons ago through a friend in a none professional setting and the encounter lasted maybe a minute or two. I may have to change that on my next visit. I don’t know whether Mike’s article about the challenges of excessive alcohol consumption was from personal experience or hypothetical, but he is on point. Alcohol consumption especially by the male population in Belize is destroying the fabric of the nation. As males we are failing in our parental responsibilities and the decaying

state of the Belizean society is evidence of that. This trend has got to change. This problem did not develop overnight and the solution will not come that way either. It will take the combined effort of civil societies, NGO’s, the government of the day, schools, churches and society in general, coming together to help solve the problem. We may need to limit the availability and the need to have alcohol at, as my Mom would say ‘every pan whe knock’ event. We need to look at alcohol-free events as a positive move and remove the ingrained belief, that an altered state of mind is equivalent to fun. We need to turn the tide because excessive alcohol consumption, like any other excess, destroys. In this case the family structure is the first to suffer from it. However, the negative effect that is almost never seen

or mentioned is the cost that it has on a nation. This includes, healthcare which is almost completely financed by tax payers’ monies. It also includes damage to infrastructure, deaths, crime, insurance costs, replacement costs and probably the greatest is the psychological effect it has on children, adolescents and adults. There is almost nothing positive that I can think of at any level that alcohol consumption creates. Banning the production and distribution of alcohol has been tried in other countries and shown to fail. Hence I advocate for restricted availability and the establishment of programs to help with addiction. I challenge the government to pass legislature that taxes production and distribution and to establish programs which assist frequent consumers. Some believe that

a population that has an addiction problem is a windfall for those at the top of the production pyramid But that is simply not the case. Producers and distributors likewise, are tax payers and they too feel the effects of all the ills associated with addiction. It is therefore in their best interest to ensure that a respectable balance exists between recreational consumption and it’s effects. Then there is the issue of availability. Alcohol in 2018 has become easily accessable to the masses. If you look at the entire country there is not a single district, village or community that is considered ‘dry’. Some may say Spanish Lookout or some of the other Mennonite communities are dry, but we all know that is a myth. There needs to be a national policy on alcohol which controls

where alcohol can be sold, made available, distributed and consumed. Some may say that the Liquor Licensing Board is such a body, but we all know that with a fist full of dollars or with proper connections, these politically appointed boards become a mere bump on the road. The biggest culprits are the ‘Chinieman stores’ who will sell to anyone alcohol at any time, as long as the person buying reaches the counter. These stores need to be aggressively policed so that do not make an “adult” product available to kids and minors. To Mike, if this is your personal struggle, then stay strong and hang in there. If not, then thanks for bringing this critical issue to the forefront, because you are right, as fathers some of us are failing and miserably. It’s all about the people!


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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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Beautifully Belizean

The Strength of a Woman H

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

er love for baking from a very young age and her persistence in making her mark as a young business entrepreneur despite all odds, has literally earned Ziollara Martinez, 27, owner of Zemar's Bakery, the title of breadwinner of her family and has led her on a journey of constant growth and success. From age 7, Martinez started out inside the comfort of her mother's kitchen, making the family’s Christmas cake using the usual ‘pack-cake’ mix. Over the years she started reading and researching recipes and trying them out. Then when it was time for her to go to university her parents found themselves in a bind and it was a financial strain to send her to school. But instead of that being the obstacle which would crush her dreams and goals, it brought out the fight in Martinez as she was more determined than ever that she was not going to miss out on her education, despite money shortages in the family. She placed her hair in a bun, tied on her apron, jumped behind a bowl and started making her own cakes to sell inside her mother's snack shop. Her simple start quickly blossomed in the neigh-

Ziollara Martinez borhood and she went from selling one cake per day to selling two, and before she knew it she was adding jam rolls and cinnamon rolls to her menu. "I eventually started getting a good response from my customers, so I was able to finish my

Zemar’s Bakery, located near the Pound Yard bus stop Sixth Form with the profit from my sales. By that time I was 18 and working at a law firm. I eventually managed to save enough money and I decided that I would quit my job and just go fully into my business," Martinez recalled. At age 21, the demand for Martinez’s products soared and she opened up her own bakery on Youth for the Future Drive in Belize City. From there she sold cakes and added Creole bread and bun. Again capitalizing on her profit, she managed to purchase an industrial oven and machinery, and soon there was a need to expand to a better location. After two years, Martinez moved to her current location near the Pound Yard Bridge and has been there for four years. She has enlisted the assistance of four employees and additional help from her husband. From there the ‘one-stop bakery’ now offers milk cakes, Creole bread and bun, whole wheat bread, ham and cheese croissants, glazed cinnamon stick bread, waffles, breakfast wraps, sandwiches, pizza, garlic bread, lemon tarts, coconut tarts, powderbuns, cinnamon rolls, bread pudding, plain cake, dinner rolls, hot dogs and many more delicacies. According to Martinez, on any given day Zemar's Bakery is accessed by hundreds of commuters and students who take advantage of the great products fresh from the oven and the affordable prices to meet any budget. The bakery has even moved to meeting the wholesale needs of shops for banana cakes, cinnamon rolls and plain cakes. They are eventually planning to add powder-buns, French bread, and sliced bread to those sales. Success! But it never came overnight or easy for Martinez, and she says that she has had her fair share of challenges, from being discouraged for being too young, to sabotage by other businesses, unreliable employees, problematic customers, sleepless nights, long shifts and sacrifices. But looking back at it all, there is one piece of advice she wanted to leave with aspiring young Belizeans - "something very important to note is that you must be focused. Focus on what you want. You just have to have that mindset that you need to pursue your goals and accomplish them. You just can't start and stop halfway. Once you start, just continue pushing. Never think that you are too young to start your own business. It is actually better that you start when you are young!" The mother of a newborn baby and a three-yearold son says that she could never have accomplished her dream without the assistance of her mother and husband. She says that for the first six months, she did not make any profit but her mother stuck by her side with words of encouragement. Zemar's Bakery has once again outgrown its limitations at its current location and Martinez is looking to relocate soon. The company is also working on creating a brand and logo for its products. The Reporter encourages anyone who hasn’t tried out her products to do so.


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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER

The Reason Why the Referendum Question Mentions "Any and All" Claims Wednesday, December 5, 2018

By Marion Ali

B

elizeans still have until the end of March to register if they want to have some say in the Referendum on April 10 on whether or not Belize should go to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) with Guatemala. If we vote "Yes" to that, then we would be going to the ICJ on the terms of the Special Agreement both our Foreign Ministers signed in 2008 in Washington, D.C. The purpose of the Special Agreement, as explained by the ICJ's legal expert last week Tuesday, is to clearly define the dispute, which up to now has not been outlined. The Special Agreement also sets out the process for which the Court would preside over the matter, giving both sides equal time and opportunity to present their case, and to respond to each other before there is a judgment. Last week Wednesday a group of Belizean

journalists who visited the Hague met with Belize's Ambassador to the European Union (EU), Dylan Vernon. He explained why the question in the Referendum mentions "any and all" claims that Guatemala has against us. "The question was very carefully defined, especially by the Belize side to include all claims that Guatemala might have," Ambassador Vernon said. "Over the years Guatemala has made very many parts of Belize as its claim - from a piece of Toledo, to a slice, to a caye - most recently, in 1999, it was as much as half of Belize. That is most likely what will be taken there, but Belize does not know so we have to say any and all claims...They are the ones who are claiming so they are the ones who have to define and say what they are claiming." Ambassador Vernon says that Belize is prepared to counter

Guatemala's arguments and the end result will be binding for both parties. "For any claim that they might have for Belize, the Belize side has arguments that will - from the point of view of our legal experts, our government - easily, easily refute those. So, if we go to the ICJ, we're going there with the understanding that when we leave, there will be no more opportunity for Guatemala to say 'we missed out this piece; we missed out that piece and we come again. There's no coming again after the ruling from the ICJ." The Ambassador explained that the EU has taken a neutral position over which country it supports, but that it does encourage both countries to resolve our dispute at the ICJ. Near the ending of October, the EU allocated 3.5 Million Euros (about US$3.9 Million) towards assisting the OAS office near the Adjacency Zone and in confidence-building measures. That money will also assist civil society organizations on each side of the border

ICJ Education Campaign Disbursements Approach $1M By Marion Ali

Joseph Waight, Financial Secretary

T

he Education Campaign on whether Belize should settle our territorial dispute with Guatemala at the International Court of Justice (ICJ) has about four months remaining until Referendum Day and it has d is p en sed j u st under $1 Million so far of its $2.5 Million budget.

Thursday, December 6, 2018 But heading into A l e x i s R o s a d o e x the final leg of the plained that the funds campaign might re- being received from quire more than the the international comremaining $1.5 Mil- munity, including the lion as the campaign US, the UK, Mexico, intensifies, Finan- Turkey, and the Eucial Secretary, Jo- ropean Union come seph Waight told the through either the Ormedia on Wednes- ganization of Ameriday. Hence, Waight can States (OAS) or projected that per- t h e U n i t e d N a t i o n s h a p s s o m e t i m e i n Development Program February or March (UNDP), rather than there may need to through the governbe an allocation for ment. m o r e m o n e y, a l s o Wa i g h t i n f o r m e d because there will that the disbursements b e o t h e r c o s t s a t - have encountered "no tached, including the slowing down, no hicfunding of the elec- c u p s a n d n o s p e e d tion process itself on bumps.� He mentioned April 10. If the vote that the monies are is a "Yes", then there spent on travel, hotel, w i l l b e a d d i t i o n a l subsistence, gasoline costs for preparation and vehicle rentals to for the ICJ. Waight get the job done. referred to that proInitially the Refercess as "stage two,� endum Unit had made i f i t r e a c h e s t h a t a proposal of around point. $8 Million for the At the end of Oc- c a m p a i g n , b u t t h a t tober, Head of the f i g u r e w a s n o t a p R e f e r e n d u m U n i t proved.

that will work along the Adjacency Zone on economic development projects. The international community on a whole has supported the notion that Belize and Guatemala settle our dispute at the ICJ. It is an opportunity that Ambassador Vernon feels Belize would have missed out on to get a final settlement and to have the support of the rest of the world, if come April 10th, 2019, Belizeans vote "No". The Ambassador also told us that Belize has received support from the African Caribbean Pacific group of states to pressure Guatemala to agreeing to the use of a Protocol that would govern how Belize and Guatemala operate in the Sarstoon River. Guatemala had agreed to sign a protocol that would deal with that matter, but so far, she has not.

Dylan Vernon, Belize’s Ambassador to the EU Ambassador Vernon we tell our side of the said that the Belize Mis- story. Ambassador Vernon sion to the EU, which is based in Brussels, will travel back to BeBelgium is tasked with lize in the next three letting the EU know weeks to join the Govwhat Belize's position ernment's ICJ education is with respect to the campaign. He says Guatemalan claim - that that as the weeks and we reject it and that months draw closer to we want a peaceful the day itself, the camsettlement to it, and that paign will intensify. when incidents happen,


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Page 11

SRH Admin to Meet with SWU Over Alleged Negligent Deaths Tuesday, December 4, 2018

By Benjamin Flowers

T

he Administrator of the Southern Regional Hospital (SRH) has agreed to meet with the Southern Workers Union to discuss increased complaints that the care given by the SRH is resulting in patient death or additional suffering. Hospital Admin Ernestina Hill agreed to meet with the SWU sometime this week, following a letter sent by the union on November 29, requesting a meeting to discuss the tragic demise of Jayiesha Parchue, Elroy Flores, and Heston Bregal which happened in October and November respectively. The SWU also addressed the meeting request to Minister of Health, Pablo

Marin, Chief Executive Officer in the Ministry of Health, Dr. Ramon Figueroa, and Area Representative Frank Mena. The SWU’s contention is that both Parchue and Flores are dead after decisions made by SRH personnel that could have been handled d i f f e r e n t l y. P a r chue’s family said that she went to the SRH complaining of pain in early October and the staff gave her two bags of drips and then sent her home without any further diagnosis. Parchue died on October 7 at the SRH, while awaiting to do an X-ray in preparat i o n f o r a s u rg e r y after her condition worsened and the proper checks revealed that she was

critically ill. The SWU said that In November, Flores reportedly went seeking treatment at the SRH, to be told that he was well enough to leave the hospital only to fall down dead hours later. The SWU said that Bregal was reportedly discharged while his condition was deteriorating to the point where he had lost the ability to walk and was repeatedly urinating on himself. He died at his home days later. The SWU added that an elderly patient also reportedly received medication that caused a reaction that brought her close to losing her life. “The question is, are we the poor people of the South children of a lesser God? Many of our people

SWU calling for change at the SRH have become another statistic at the Southern Regional Hospital. We the People of the South are calling on GOB and the Ministry of Health to please listen to the lamentation of

your people that the continued indignities and injustice being afflicted on the young and old...” the SWU said. In November the SWU held a peaceful protest outside

the SRH, to express their discontent with the ongoing situation there, and decided to request the formal meeting when it did not garner the results for which they had initially hoped.


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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Belize People's Front Prepares

for 2020 General Elections By Marion Ali

T

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

BPF Leader, Nancy Marin

here will be another option for Belizeans in the next General Election, with the reintroduction last week of the Belize People's Front. The party's leader is businesswoman, social activist, columnist and philanthropist, Nefretery Nancy Marin of San Ignacio, Cayo. T h e B P F ’s c o r e members held their first meeting in late November in Santa Elena Town where it formed its executive body to govern its internal affairs for the next two years. This will be a crucial time for the party since that will be the period within which it will chart its course to effectively compete at the polls in the next General Elections. Marin said of the party: "The Belize People’s Front is a grassroots peopleoriented movement which brings radical, tangible changes as an integral part of

their lead by example mentality, with empathy and compassion for all Belizeans. We have reached out to include the Belizean diaspora, to be an integral part of the electoral process, a right as enshrined in our Constitution." The BPF pledges to cut the salaries of elected officials, remove Ministerial discretion and rampant spending, as well as hand-outs to party cronies. With Marin as the party leader, the other members are: Martin Allen as its Southern Regional Director; Anthony Noralez as the Deputy Southern Regional Director; Louis Diaz as the National Secretary General; Seidy Gomez: as the Vice S ecretary General; Dwight Gabb as the Director of Information and Technology; Jaime Marin as the National Campaign Director; Alvan Gentle as the Director of Disci-

plinary Affairs; John Carr as the National Director of Fundr a i s i n g a n d Tr e a surer; Salim Ahmed Bin Etadmmad as the International Fundraising Director; Roman Sabal as the Director of Candidate Recruitment; C a r l t o n Va l e n t i n e as Political Advisor; and Wellington Ramos as Director of Belizean Citizens Abroad and Political Analyst. Of note is that Anthony Noralez was up to a month ago the UDP Executive Vice-Chairman for the Dangriga, Sarawee and Hope Creek Constituency. Noralez tendered his resignation to the UDP's Secretary General, Pearl Stuart informing: " I have made a decision to dissociate myself from the (UDP) party at this time when it seems that my service is no longer wanted or needed. Please also inform the Dangriga branch of the Belize Bank to remove my signature from the party account." Noralez ended his letter mentioning that he holds to grudges against any member of the UDP. While he did not say so specifically in his letter, the Reporter has been informed that Noralez is joining the ranks of the BPF. The Belize People's Front was originally formed in 2013.

THE REPORTER


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Page 13

Retired Canadian National Beaten and Shot Monday, December 3rd, 2018

By Michelle Sutherland

O

ver the weekend a retired Canadian national living in Hope Creek Village, Stann Creek luckily escaped death after he was beaten, shot and tied up at his home by two masked men. Police say that Pierre Blais, 71, sustained a single gun-

shot wound to his neck as well as abrasions to his left knee and upper arm. The victim was taken to the Southern Regional Hospital and has since been treated and discharged. Blais told Police that on December 1st around 7:40am he had just exited his home and was entering his vehicle when two dark complexioned men,

wearing rags tied over their heads, jumped out of hiding and approached him. Blais stated that one of the individuals placed a firearm to his head and fired a single shot which caught him between his left ear and neck. Blais claimed that the other individual then pulled out a baseball bat and beat him with it. The two men then

proceeded to tie up the elderly man while they ransacked the interior of his home and escaped through the Coastal Road in his blue Toyota Echo car. The thieves did not reach far and apparently lost control of the vehicle and collided into a ditch where Police later recovered the stolen vehicle with extensive damages. The Reporter questioned Police on the motive of the attack at the retiree’s home and they confirm that while they are still awaiting an official report from the victim, authorities suspect that the motive was robbery. Since Police were still awaiting that report, they could not comment on

Stolen vehicle found wrecked on the Coastal Road whether anything was ties whether they plan stolen from the home. to enforce additional Over the past month presence in the area. there has been a sig- They noted that police nificant increase in operations in that area criminal activity in the continue. areas of Hope Creek, There are no susPomona and in the pects in this incident vicinity of the Coastal b u t i n v e s t i g a t o r s Road. At Monday's confirmed that they p r e s s b r i e f i n g t h e are pursuing several press asked authori- leads.

Ladyville Youth Drowns in Pond Monday, December 3rd, 2018 By Michelle Sutherland

A

Lionel Bennett

Ladyville family is mourning the loss of their loved one, 17-year-old Lionel Bennett whose life was cut short by a tragic drowning incident. Police say that just after 11:50am, on December 3rd Officers in the community were called out to the Lake Garden Area of the village after receiving reports of someone going underwater and failing to resurface. Authorities say that with the assistance of persons on the scene they immediately made checks within a pond where they later retrieved Bennett’s lifeless body from the water. At Monday's press briefing Police could not provide much details to the media because the incident had only just occurred. The Reporter reached out to Bennett's family for a comment but they declined. This newspaper has learned that two months ago Bennett relocated back to Belize from Chicago.


Finnegan vs Hyde in 2020

Page 14

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER

Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

By Benjamin Flowers

A

s the United Democratic Party wraps up its convention season, political newcomer Dianne Finnegan has become the new UDP Standard Bearer for the Lake Independence Constituency in one of the closest races since the activities began. At the convention, held on December 3 at the Sadie Vernon High School compound, Finnegan managed to get 273 votes of a total 752 votes cast. She edged out her closest competitor, former Belize City Councilor Cecil Jenkins Sr. by 41 votes, with Jenkins getting a total of 232. Jenkins also beat his competitor, another former Belize City Councilor Jason Edwards by an even smaller margin of only 4 votes, with Edwards walking away with 228 votes. There was also a fourth competitor, Samuel Cutkelvin, who managed to get six votes and there were 13 votes that were rejected. F i n n e g a n ’s v i c tory did not surprise many critics, when considering her endorsements by Prime Minister Dean Barrow and her husband, senior UDP Minister Michael Finnegan, coupled with her years of social work with atrisk youths, many of whom are from Lake I. Campaigning on a platform of integrity and determination to reduce poverty in Lake I, Finnegan told the Reporter that her strategy going into the convention was not to try and buy votes, but to offer people a meaningful change to the status quo. H o w e v e r, o t h e r critics have pointed to the turnout for the convention and her m a rg i n o f v i c t o r y being a major concern in the grander scheme, going into the 2020 General Elections. Lake I remains one of the

largest constituencies in Belize City, with over 5,000 registered voters in the division as of the 2012 General Election. While it is unclear just how much voter re-registration will alter the figure, there remains a high probability that the number could actually increase. A turnout of less than 1,000 people may be a genuine concern for any political aspirant in an area that large, given the fact that the People’s United Party Standard Beare r, C o r d e l H y d e , has never lost an election that he has contested in that division. Hyde took the division in 1998 at the rise of the Said Musa administration with 2,422 votes, then took subsequent elections in 2003 and 2008 with 2,764 votes and 1,998 votes respectively. Arguably, the seat only changed hands to the UDP in 2012 with a victory by Mark King because Hyde did not run that election. While the debate has many angles that could be fleshed out, such as King’s controversial night at the Corozal casino that was caught on video, or his even more controversial comments about “UDPs first, Belizeans second, and PUPs last,” to explain his success o r ’s p e r f o r m a n c e in the next general election, the fact remains that Hyde re-emerged in 2015 with a decisive 3,124 votes. Finnegan told the Reporter that her greatest strength lies with meeting people, something she will have to be doing a lot of between now and 2020 if she has serious hopes about unseating one of the most formidable political opponents the P U P h a s t o o ff e r. The Reporter will be periodically checking in on Lake I as the elections draw n e a r e r. T h e n e x t

Hon. Cordel Hyde UDP convention will cember 9, at the St. be held in the Toledo P e t e r C l a v e r R . C . East division on De- Primary School, fol-

Dianne Finnegan lowed by the final December 15, at the c o n v e n t i o n i n O r- Trial Farm Village ange Walk North on Government School.


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Page 15

Nat Geo Gives Belize a Big Shout Out Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

By Benjamin Flowers

T

he world renowned publication, National Geographic gave Belize an enormous amount of positive public exposure by featuring the country on its Best Trips 2019. The list, published at the end of November, places Belize at the number 14 slot coming in just behind New Mexico and before Italy (let that sink in for a moment). Nat Geo placed Belize on the list among famous destinations in Switzerland, France, the United States, Greenland, China and Egypt. Nat Geo applauded

Belize for its conservation efforts and the milestone of getting the Belize Barrier Reef System off of the UNESCO World Heritage site danger list. The piece attributed the milestone to “extraordinary ocean protection and restoration measures,” noting the moratorium on maritime oil exploration, increased regulations to safeguard mangrove forests, and the Government of Belize’s plan to ban single-use plastic-foam cups and plastic products by Earth Day 2019. “One of the most biodiverse reefs on the planet, the Belize Bar-

Belize featured in Nat Geo publication for2019 Best Trips rier Reef is home to several rare and threat-

ened species, such as the red-footed booby,

West Indian manatee, and loggerhead turtle,” Nat Geo said. The piece also goes on to highlight the Caracol Archaeological site as one of the country’s prime destinations, noting that it

is even larger than the Tikal site in Guatemala. Mexico City, the Peruvian Amazon, and Fanjingshan, China, took the top three slots, while South Walton County, Florida, ended off the list. The Belize Tourism Board said that it “heartily” welcomed Nat Geo’s accolade, emphasizing that it views the mention as an important recognition of Belize as one of the fastest growing tropical vacation destinations in the world. Earlier this year, National Geographic highlighted Belize’s waters in a guidebook on the 50 best destinations for diving in the world, which added to accolades from various famous publications such as Rough Guides in the United Kingdom, and a travel writing article by the US media company CNBC.

Cost of Living Continues

its Upward Trend Monday, December 3rd, 2018

D

By Benjamin Flowers

uring the month of October the cost of living continued to remain above what it was in 2017, according to the latest data released by the Statistical Institute of Belize. The SIB’s Consumer Price Index for October, released last week, showed that Belizeans had to pay an average of 80 cents more for goods and services this year than they did in 2018. While the Transport sector primarily leads the overall increases, the month of October deviated from the remainder of the year, having the Housing, Water, Electricity, Gas & Other Fuels category as the main contributor to the increase. A combination of home rental costs, which were up by 1 percent; the cost per 100 lb. cylinder of butane, almost $15; and electricity tariffs being over 6 percent higher than they were last year, were the major drivers behind the increase in that category. The Transport sector was still in close proximity, being the second largest contributor to the overall increase. As with the previous months of 2018, the high cost of gasoline was the driving factor behind that increase, followed by a 5.6 percent hike in the cost of international airfares. Food and Non-alcoholic beverages did see a 0.9 percentage decrease, with lowered prices for several meat products, such as pigtail and whole chicken, along with some vegetable and fruit items, including sweet peppers, limes, and cabbages. The ‘All other goods and services” section of the CPI also saw a 1.1 percent increase. By municipality, San Ignacio/Santa Elena saw the highest increase in consumer prices countrywide for the third month in a row, while Dangriga Town actually saw consumer prices going down by 0.9 percent. Consumer prices have fluctuated in 2018, with prices starting off the year with a 90 cent increase for January, before going down for February, March and April by 50 cents, 60 cents, and 50 cents respectively. Since then, consumer prices have stayed higher than last year, going up as low as 30 cents, and as high as $1.00.


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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER

Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Helping People through Social Programs Monday, December 3rd, 2018 By Marion V. Ali

S

ince establishing its presence in Belize in November 2013, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Belize has been quietly helping people through various social and charitable programs aimed at improving the quality of life for the less fortunate. Leader of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at, Imam Naveed Mangla shared with the Reporter that his religious sect does these things because reaching out to people is key in the beliefs of Muslims, who try to fulfill two duties: to serve God and to help mankind. "With whatever resources we have, we try to help in every way possible," the Imam told us. "We have a soup kitchen that we run regularly, the Ahmadiyya Basketball League - that is big with 400 kids coming from all over the country and Chetumal from January to May. We also clean up the city on January first. Then we have the cellphone repair course where we have certified around 500 kids from around the country who are now able to open cellphones and fix problems. These are just small contributions because we're small here." At present, the Jama’at is willing to provide assistance to the Belize City Council in its effort to relocate people living in desolate conditions in the Krooman Lagoon and Gungulung areas of Belize City. That housing project, however, is still in its infant stage

and will come to fruition after several proposals are reviewed and discussions are finalized to see what the scope of the assistance will be. One of the challenges has been to locate land to move the families to, and based

Imam Naveed Mangla, Leader, Ahmadiyya Muslim community, Belize

on the resources available, the exact number of families and areas that can be assisted. The religious group, which goes by the motto: With Love for All, Hatred for None, has also provided for politicians and journalists each year to attend its international conference in London where its headquarters are based, to observe the way the Ahmadiyya Muslims hold prayers, plan and coordinate worldwide charitable events, and communicate among themselves. They also disassociate themselves from acts of violence that terrorists carry out, identifying themselves as Muslims. Imam Naveed said that the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is willing and able to assist the Ministry of Education wherever possible. "We have professionals, teachers and professors all over the world…We have a database of all of the members...and how much time they can give towards the community. So when they get vacation from their work, instead of going out somewhere else, they spend that vacation in helping the community," the religious leader shared, adding that the community's next mission in Belize is to conduct a medical camp early in the New Year for underprivileged Belizeans. In addition to these programs, the Ahmadiyya Muslim community also gives scholarships to kids excelling in school during its annual convention, visits the orphanage, and deliver lectures at schools about the commonalities of Islam and Christianity to bring about religious harmony.


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Page 17


YOUR WEEKLY SPORTS UPDATE

Page 18

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER

Stars U-16 Win BDVA Division II Volleyball Championship T

Gareth Bruce hammered 15 hits, 1 ace

Belize City, November 30, 2018

he Stars U-16 won the Division II volleyball championship when they swept both finals of the competition, organized by the Belize District Volleyball Association (BDVA) at the SCA Auditorium in Belize City last Thursday and Friday nights, November 29-30. The Stars U-16 dominated their older sisters, the Stars U-19, in two sets in the first final last Thursday. Gareth Bruce led their offensive, hammering 15 hits at the net on plays set by Iman Safa. Gareth also had a service point and dug up a big save. Jayda Smith hammered home another 12 kills; while Iman Safa scored a hit and served an ace. Letisha Lamb had a kill block, Ingrid Novelo scored a hit, and Jaidan Reyes served an ace to win the first set: 25-17. Juliana Ramos led the Stars U-19 counterattack, scoring two hits on plays set by Ashli Habet, who also served two aces. Dhwani Gurnani and Camryn Hinds each scored a kill block and Ashlee Cabrera and Morgan Miles each scored a hit; but the Stars U-16 profited from their opponents’ 18 errors to win the second set: 25-21.

The Stars U-19 went to extra points to win the first set of the second final on Friday night. Morgan Miles led their attack, scoring seven hits at the net and two service points. Juliana Ramos also hammered four hits and served an ace; while Ashlee Cabrera scored two hits. Dhwani Gurnani scored a hit and two service points, Camryn Hinds scored a hit, and Ashli Habet served an ace to win the first set: 30-28. Jayda Smith rallied the Stars’ counterattack, hammering 12 kills at the net and serving two aces on balls set by Halley Thurton and libero Sofia Solano. Gareth Bruce followed suit with 10 hits and a service point. Ingrid Novelo and Letisha Lamb each scored five hits at the net, Novelo also serving two aces, while Lamb had one service point. Iman Safa served four aces and scored a hit for the Stars to win the second set: 25-14. The Stars U-16 also profited from their opponents 25 unforced errors and service faults to win the third set: 15-10. The Stars U-16 received the championship trophy and individual first place medals from the BDVA committee members in the award ceremony after the final, while the Stars U-19 took home the sub-champions’ trophy.

Red Dragons U-16 Wins BDVA Div. II Volleyball Championship T

Belize City, November 30, 2018

he Red Dragons U-16 won the Division II male volleyball championship, taking both finals of the competition, organized by the Belize District Volleyball Association (BDVA) at the SCA Auditorium in Belize City last Thursday and Friday nights, November 29-30. The Red Dragons dominated their older and more experienced brothers, the Yellow Dragons U-19, in two sets in the first championship final last Thursday night, led by Ernest Broaster Jr. hammering 11 hits at the net on plays set by Kevin Cortez and libero Tyrell Locario; Broaster also had a kill block. Gavin Taylor scored two hits and four kill blocks; while Ethan Dawson scored five hits, a kill block and four service points. Landon Cocom scored three hits, Michael Castillo had two kill blocks, and Kevin Cortez scored a hit and served an ace to win the first set: 25-20. Xander Bennett led

the Yellow Dragons’ counterattack with four hits on plays set by Ryan Arnold, while Kaylen Ingram scored three hits and Tavion Ford had a kill block. Miguel Rosado served an ace; but the Yellow Dragons were sorely missing the services of Reuel Black and Latrell

Solis, who were missing in action. The Red Dragons also profited from their opponents’ 15 errors to win the second set: 25-18 though they conceded many more points by their own errors. Broaster Jr. was in top form in the second final on Friday, hammering 10 hits and a kill block. He also dug

Ernest Broaster Jr. hammered 11 hits

Sports 2

up many saves. Landon Cocom and Gavin Taylor each scored four hits, and Ethan Dawson had two hits and served two aces. Michael Castillo scored two hits and Kevin Cortez served an ace to win the first set: 25-20.

Bennett led the Yellow Dragons with four hits, Kylen Ingram scored four hits and served an ace; while Tavion Ford had four hits and two blocks. Miguel Rosado also scored a hit, but it was all over as the Red

Dragons took the second set: 25-19. The BDVA committee members presented team trophies and individual medals to the champions and sub-champions in the award ceremony after the final.

Red Dragons U-16 won the Div. II championship

REPORTER

December 9th, 2018


YOUR WEEKLY SPORTS UPDATE

THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Page 19

SQ Dragons Win Inter-office Volleyball Championship T

Belize City, November 30, 2018

he S.Q. Dragons won their second Inter-office volleyball championship by dominating the Belize Defence Force in both finals organized by the Belize District Volleyball Association (BDVA) at the SCA auditorium in Belize City last Thursday and Friday nights, November 29-30. The S.Q. Dragons scorched the BDF in three sets in the first final last Thursday. Ernest Broaster Sr. hammered 11 hits at the net on plays set by Cynthia Salazar and Mia Miles. He also had four kill blocks. Terique Avila also scored seven hits and a block; while Delbert Thompson scored four hits and

a block. Francis Usher scored two hits to win the first set: 25-18. Veteran Larry Bennett led the Dragons’ counterattack, hammering 15 kills at the net. He also had a kill block. Delio Arruebarrena scored nine hits and served an ace; while Nelissa Ramirez hammered nine kills at the net to win the second set: 25-18. Dragons’ Ben Wu scored four hits, Julian Quan also scored a hit, and Karen Quan served an ace. The Dragons also profited from their opponents’ 25 errors to win the third set: 15-10. Cuban coach Arruebarrena was in top form in the second final; as

he hammered 16 kills at the net and had two kill blocks. Larry Bennett also scored 11 hits and a block as the Dragons swept the first set: 2510.

December 9th, 2018

Dragons’ Nelissa Ramirez also scored five hits, served an ace and dug up a big save; while Ben Wu added three hits and an ace. Broaster and Delbert

Thompson rallied the BDF counterattack as each scored seven hits, and Terique Avila scored five hits and a block. Francis Usher also scored two hits and four

service points to win the second set: 25-23. The SQ Dragons also profited from the BDF’s 23 errors to win the third set: 15-9 for the championship.

S.Q. Dragons win 2nd Inter-office championship

REPORTER

Sports 3


YOUR WEEKLY SPORTS UPDATE Lucky Strike & Barrack Road FC Win in CYDP Football

Page 20

Floyd Jones scored Lake I’s 1st goal

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Devaugn Zuniga equalized 1-1 for Barrack Road

and Daniel Gregorio with FC Elite in the ers Shawn Thurton, joined the fray, but the third match of the af- Joseph Mohamed Ali, game was in its final ternoon. Sean Young L e o n R o w l e y a n d minute of play when struck first for the Mark Grant. Keiron “Benny” Jamie Wade got the village boys after 23 Patnett and Orlando ball past goalkeeper minutes of play, but “Bredds” Velasquez Elias Hercules, for the M a r l o n G u t i e r r e z Coast Guard’s only equalized two min- sought to get the City consolation goal: 2-1 utes before intermis- Boys on to the scorefinal. sion, and Leon “Lem” board first, with the Barrack Road FC Jones scored a second help of Kareem “Tonhad to come from be- goal a minute later for ton” Flowers, Delroy hind to score a 3-1 FC Elite to lead 2-1 at “Thinman” Andrews, Brian Martinez and v i c t o r y o v e r L a k e intermission. I FC in the second Stefan “World” Di- K i s h a n e S w a z o a t match of the morning. ego, Jorge Aleman, midfield. But Tyrell Hubert Baptist and Quince Briceño and Rowley anchored the Floyd Jones led the Naim “Nemo” Wilson Caesar Ridge defense Lake’s attack, with the pressed FC Elite’s ad- with the help of Pathelp of Kevin Young vantage, as they sought rick Chavez, Kishane and Delroy Flores on to increase their lead Magdaleno and Delthe wings and Gil- after the break. Mat- ton Williams to secure bert Gomez and David thew Leal anchored a scoreless draw up to “Dav” McCauley Jr. at the Ladyville defense intermission. Steven Baizar scored Barrack Rd Michael Robinson midfield. There was with the help of Keron FC’s 2nd goal little goalkeeper Char- Wade and David Sol- reinforced the Caesar lie Slusher could do orzano to deny FC Ridge midfield after Belize City, December 1, 2018 about it when Floyd Elite any more goals, the break, and on a ucky Strike FC it was the village elev- Jones caught up to a and Sean Young em- corner kick, Robinson a n d B a r r a c k en who struck first, pass from Baptist and barrassed goalkeeper headed the ball into Road FC both enjoyed when a shot from Fedi launched a shot to the Alvin Mangandi with the back of the net, big wins when the Estivern deflected off top right corner of the a second goal to equalPeace Cup football a defender into the goal, just under the ize 10 minutes before quarterfinals, orga- back of the net: 1-0. crossbar; Lake I led the long whistle: 2-2 Alfred Garnett and 1-0 after 20 minutes nized by the Confinal. scious Youth Develop- Augustine Smith came of play. The City Boys FC ment Program kicked off Lucky Strike’s D e v a u g n “ B e c k - also held top-ranked off the MCC Grounds bench after the break, ham” Zuniga equal- Caesar Ridge FC to in Belize City last Sat- as Frederick “Shorty” ized for Barrack Road a 1 - 1 d r a w i n t h e Garbutt, Samuel Tor- 13 minutes later for a urday, December 1. fourth match of the L u c k y S t r i k e r e s , D e l w i n J o n e s 1-1 draw at intermis- evening. Kenny Lins t u n n e d t h e C o a s t and Malcolm L es- sion. Steven “Bredds” arez and Jalen Babb Guard with a 2-1 upset lie pressed for more Baizar embarrassed led the Caesar Ridge in the first match of goals. Keenen Gillett goalkeeper Anthony offensive, supported the morning. Shemar embarrassed the Coast “Buck” Arnold with a by Gilroy “Bredda” “Mini” Thompson and G u a r d g o a l k e e p e r second goal 14 min- Thurton and Jadon Arthur Garbutt led the Guillermo Ramirez utes after the break “Cheetes” Macgregor Coast Guard attack, with a second goal and Harold Thompson on the wings, and Ensupported by Jamie when he caught up to scored a third goal 10 rique Valdez and ElWade and Jason Cue- a forward pass from minutes after for the more Godoy at midvas on the wings, and Delwin Jones: 2-0. 3-1 win. field, but they made Kris Innis and Jamel Coast Guard’s Oscar Ladyville FC strug- little impression on Jones at midfield. But Vidal, Delbert Diego gled to a 2-2 draw City Boys’ defendSports 4 REPORTER

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THE REPORTER

when Gilroy Thurton centered the ball into the goal area: 1-0. Then the Caesar Ridge defense blundered into conceding a penalty, and Orlando Velasquez converted to equalize 1-1 final. The winners of each matchup will be decided by goal-aggregate, so Lake I FC will need a 3-0 win over Barrack Road FC when the return matches continue on Saturday, December 8. City Boys and Caesar Ridge FC will decide a winner in the second match of the day; the Coast Guard will see redemption against Lucky Strike FC in the third match, and FC Elite needs a win to advance over Ladyville FC in the fourth and final game of the day.

December 9th, 2018


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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YOUR WEEKLY SPORTS UPDATE

Dwayne Wade Wins Mark Gentle Birthday Race

Armando Moralez won 1st B Division

Dwayne Wade won 1st A Division

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Andrew Bennett won 3rd in B Division

December 9th, 2018

Nissan Arana won 1st Elite

Los Lagos, December 2, 2018

wayne Wade of the Belize Boyz won the “Ras” Mark Gentle birthday race, organized by the Weekend Warriors cycling club on the Philip Goldson and George Price Highways on Sunday, December 2. Wade clocked 2:27:13 on his 50-mile ride from the Upper Deck Lounge on the Philip Goldson Highway, via the Burrell Boom bypass to Hattieville on the George Price Highway, to the turning point at the Belize Zoo, and back to the start/finish line to win the $500 first prize and a trophy. David Balam of the Santino’s team was right behind to win the $400 second prize and trophy. Fitzgerald “Palas” Joseph of the Lampaz team won the $300 third prize and trophy in 2:32:39, while Preston “Moto” Martinez of M&M Engineering claimed the $200 fourth prize and a medal. Vallan Symns of the Kulture Megabytes team won the $150 fifth prize in 2:33:40. Barney Brown of the Scotiabank team took the $125 sixth prize, Eddie Usher of the DigiCell 4G team won the $100 seventh prize and Ray Cattouse Sr. of the C-Ray team won the $75 eighth prize. Santino “Chief” Castillo won the $50 ninth prize and George Abraham Sr. rounded out the top 10 to win a $25 prize in 2:35:00. Michael “Big Wire” Lewis finished 11th in 2:38:09, Sherman Thomas and Daniel Cano – both of the Santino’s team, rolled in 12th and 13th respectively and Ryan Willoughby of the M&M Engineering team was 14th. Mark Reid of the Santino’s team was 15th and Dean Boyce of the F.T. Williams team was 16th. Collet “Bunas” Maheia of the Kulture Megabytes team was 17th in 2:40:00. David Yearwood of the Santino’s team was 18th, Anthony Tun of the Valvoline team was 19th, and Kirk Sutherland of the DigiCell 4G team rounded out the top 20. Armando Moralez of the Valvoline team won the $300 first prize in the B Division race to Rockville and back, while Matthew Castellanos of the Big Blade team took the $200 second prize. Andrew Bennett of the SMART team claimed the $150 third prize, Nicole Gallego won the $100 fourth prize and Enrique and Alejandro Moralez, both of the Valvoline team, were fifth and sixth respectively. Steve Gill of the SMART team was seventh. Nissan Arana of Westrac won the elite category race, while Byron Pope of the Benny’s Megabytes team was second and Shawn Jones was third. Brandon Cattouse of the SMART team was fourth and Jose Choto was fifth.

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YOUR WEEKLY SPORTS UPDATE

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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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SCA Girls Lead High Schools’ Basketball

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Belize City, December 1, 2018

he girls of St. Catherine Academy will take on the girls of Wesley College in the championship finals of the Belize City basketball competition, organized by the Central Secondary Schools Sports Association (CSSSA) at the SCA auditorium on Monday and Wednesday evenings, December 3-5. The SCA girls eliminated the Anglican Cathedral College girls 43-26 in the semifinals at the St. John’s College gymnasium on Saturday, December 1. Breah Clarke led the SCA girls with 21pts, Afeni Lamb added 16pts and Sanaa Rowland tossed in four points, Vashti Bradley netted a final basket for the win. Jane Martinez led the ACC girls with 24pts to give them a 9-5 lead in the first quarter. Brittany Myvette added a basket. The Wesley girls qualified to the finals by eliminating the Gwen Lizarraga High school girls: 2215. Taliyah Hyde scored 1pts, Misty Mahler added eight points and Cherish Wade threw in two points. Mieka Goff chipped in a free throw. Essenie Ciego led Gwen Liz with 11pts, and Miyah Baptist and Amber Usher threw in a basket. The SCA girls got the easy bye to the semifinals, when the Ladyville Technical High School girls forfeited their quarterfinal game last Tuesday. The Gwen Liz girls advanced to the semifinals by eliminating the Sadie Vernon Technical girls: 23-21 in the quarterfinals at the SCA auditorium last Wednesday. Essenie Ciego led with 13pts, Amber Usher added six points, and Miyah Baptist chipped in a basket. Jane Martinez led the ACC girls with 20pts in their 34-23 win over the defending champions,

the girls of Edward P. Yorke high School in the quarterfinals at the SJC gym last Thursday. Brianna Gibson added 11pts for the win. Tikiyah Orosco led E.P. Yorke with 12pts, Kersha Lacayo added seven points and Marissa Ferguson and Ruby Sacalxot each threw in a basket. The Wesley College girls qualified to the semifinals by eliminating the Maud Williams girls: 43-7 at the SJ gym last Friday. Taliyahn Hyde scored 18pts, Mieka Goff added 11pts and Cherish Wade put up 10pts. Leandra Betson led Maud Williams with five points and Bernice Mckenzie threw in a basket.

Breah Clarke led SCA with 21pts

Sanaa Rowland tossed in 4pts Sports 6

Afeni Lamb added 16pts

SCA girls win 43-26 vs. ACC REPORTER

December 9th, 2018


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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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Coffee Tastes Bitter, So Why Do People Drink It? I

t may sound counterintuitive, but people who are supersensitive to coffee’s bitter taste actually drink more of it, a new study finds. This sensitivity isn’t simply a matter of taste, either, but rather is influenced by a person’s genetic makeup, the researchers said in the study, which was published online today (Nov. 15) in the journal Sci-

entific Reports. “You’d expect that people who are particularly sensitive to the bitter taste of caffeine would drink less coffee,” study senior researcher Marilyn Cornelis, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, said in a statement. “The opposite results of our study

suggest coffee consumers acquire a taste

[for] or an ability to detect [the bitterness

of] caffeine due to the learned positive rein-

forcement elicited by caffeine.” [10 Things You Need to Know About Coffee] Put another way, people who have a heightened ability to taste the bitterness of coffee, and especially the distinct bitter flavor of caffeine, learn to associate “good things with it,” Cornelis said. This finding is surprising, given that bitterness often serves as a warning mechanism to convince people to spit out harmful substances, the scientists said. Researchers conducted the study to understand how genetics influences people’s consumption of tea, coffee and alcohol, which tend to taste bitter, said lead study researcher Jue Sheng Ong, a doctoral student in the Department of Genetics and Computational Biology at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Brisbane, Australia. “While all bitter flavors might seem the same, we perceive the bitterness of Brussels sprouts, tonic water (quinine) and caffeine separately,” Ong told Live Science. “The degree to which we find these flavors bitter is, in part, determined by your genes.” To investigate, the researchers looked at the genetic makeup and daily bitter-beverage consumption of more than 400,000

people from the United Kingdom. “Using the genes related to our ability to taste bitterness, we were able to assess whether those that have a higher genetic predisposition to tasting bitterness are more likely to prefer tea o v e r c o ff e e , ” O n g said. The results showed that people with the genes to taste the bitterness of green vegetables (such as Brussels sprouts) or tonic water are more likely to prefer tea over coffee, the researchers found. In addition, people who were more sensitive to quinine’s bitter flavors and those found in green vegetables tended to avoid coffee. Meanwhile, people with the genes to taste the bitterness in Brussel sprouts were less likely to drink alcohol, especially red wine, than people without those gene variants, the researchers found. This insight may help scientists studying addiction, Ong said. Ong noted that the r e s e a r c h e r s d i d n ’t look at flavorings, such as cream or s u g a r, t h a t p e o p l e sometimes pour into coffee to temper its bitterness. “One can imagine that, at a personal level, there are a lot of factors that determine a person’s coffee intake — socioeconomic status, ability to metabolize caffeine and smoking,” he said. “On top of that, people drink all sorts of coffee — black coffee, flat white [and] cappuccino.” So, the researchers chose to look for big trends in how genes relate to bitter-beverage consumption, he said. “[The results] suggest that perhaps most types of coffee still share very similar bitter-taste profiles,” Ong said.


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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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Economy Sees Growth for Third Quarter Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

By Benjamin Flowers

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e l i z e ’s e c o n omy managed to grow by some 3.3 percent for the third quarter of 2018 (July to September) when co m p a r e d t o the same period last

y e a r, a c c o r d i n g t o the Statistical Institute of Belize (SIB). The SIB estimates that Belize produced some $670.9 million worth of goods and services for third quarter 2018, which was an increase of

$21.2 million from $649.7 million. The SIB also said that the primary and tertiary sectors recorded growth of 6.3 percent and 3.7 percent, respectively, while the secondary sector, on the other hand, contracted by 2.6 percent during

the quarter. The primary sector, which accounts for about one tenth of the country’s economic activity, grew by 6.3 percent during the reference period, due largely to increased market demand in livestock, which rose by 9.1 percent, while cattle production grew by 32.3 percent and poultry production rose by 1.9 percent. Pig production also recorded an increase of 43.2 percent, in preparation for a spike in the demand of Christmas ham. Marine exports recorded a 43.6 percent upswing due largely to increased shrimp sales, while banana production went down by a minimal 0.3 percent. “The secondary sector, which makes up about one-fifth of Belize’s economy, declined by 2.6 percent during the second quarter of 2018, as some major industries experienced decreases in production,” the SIB said.

The SIB cited reduced output of both petroleum and flour which resulted in a 3.3 percent drop in the “Manufacturing & Mining” sector, along with a 1.1 percent decline in “Electricity & Water” due to insufficient rainfall in the Va c a r e s e r v e a r e a and water generation rising only marginally by 0.1 percent. A decline in market demand reduced the amount of construction activity by an average of 4.7 percent in municipalities countrywide, while beverage production grew by 4.1 percent, mainly in response to an increase in market demand. The services sector, accounting for more than half of the country’s total e c o n o m y, g r e w b y 3.7 percent during the third quarter of 2018 led by sectors directly related to tourism. The “Hotels and Restaurants” sub-sector grew by 17.2 percent, due primarily to a 15.3 percent increase in overnight visitors for the period. As the number of direct flights to Belize increased, the number of visitors from the United States of America rose by 16.2 percent, while tourists from Europe

w e r e u p 2 2 . 7 p e rcent, and Canadian visitors increased by 56.7 percent. The number of cruise visitors also recorded substantial growth of 55.5 percent, as there were 27 more cruise ship calls during the quarter than in the same three-month period in 2017. “Wholesale and Retail Trade” recorded an increase of 7.0 percent, as evidenced by an expansion in merchandise imports, while “Government Services” rose by 1.2 percent during the quarter. While third quarter statistics looked promising at first glance, it is notable that exports have had a dismal 2018, with the exception of July and August, which were the only months to see export growth. While export revenues were up 14 percent in July, and 1.1 percent in August, export revenue losses ranged between 5.1 percent (October) and 21.9 percent (April). In fact, four of the eight months of export revenue decline saw losses of over 20 percent. It has yet to be seen what those losses will do to the final tally of the GDP performance, which will be released sometime next year.


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Weh Wi Ga Fi Seh

Sunday, December 9th, 2018 Poblish evri week, fahn di Nashanal Kriol Kongsl a Bileez: bai Silvaana Udz

Wi Mangro: Reed di Buk!

Yes aal Bileezhans! Di Kriol-Inglish verzhan a di buklet Di Mangro Dehn don deh owt! Bes ting…ih free pahnlain! Da wahn ejukayshanal poblikayshan a Mareen Kansavayshan widowt Boadaz. Dis da wahn groop weh di promoat fi tek kyaa a wi mangro dehn ahn mareen laif. Az wi tel unu wahn wail bak, di Inglish edita dehn da R. Wayne Van Devender, Grazzia Maria Matamoros Erazo, Sarah Zurhellen PhD, David Thomson Silvaana Udz PhD & Robert C. Thigpen. . Di Kriol edita dehn da Paul and Cynthia Crosbie, Ken Decker Ph.D., Yvette Herrera, Myrna Manzanares, ahn Silvaana Udz Ed.D. Ih ga pichaz, ahn dehnya jraa bai Madison Hetzel. Dis projek staat yaaz abak, laik 10 yaaz abak, ahn da Robby Thigpen da di mayn mareen saiyentis pahn dis projek. Di buklet deh eena 5 difrant langwij, ahn Kriol da wan! Di aidyaa da fi mek di teecha ga wahn baysik gaid fi mek ih kantinyu ron ih klaas dehn gud gud-wan. Plos, eena di buk, wi tel di teecha dehn weh yooz it noh frayd fi chaynj op dis ahn dat fi bes soot fu yu oan klaas. Ahn memba evribadi: Yu noh hafu bee teecha fi reed it! Evri payj ga wah shaat lesn wid di sayhn infamayshan rait eena Kriol ahn eena Inglish. Yu ku chooz fu teech wan langwij er di ada er di 2 langwij dehn if dat soot fu yoo teechin stail ahn prefrens. Chek it owt fi FREE! Protek wi mangro dehn! https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/bitstream/10125/58973/RT1004.pdf Pahn tap, if yu dongload ahn yooz dis lee buk, wi uda laik if yu ku tek lee taim (noh lang) fi gi wi sohn feedbak: Tanks fu dongload wi infamayshan bowt mareen kansavayshan. Pleez tek lee taim fi du wahn servay weh wahn help wi mek wi kansavayshan infamaysahn beta. Pahn tap, wi welkom eniting unu ga fi seh afta unu yooz wi buk. Yu kuh rait wi da di eemayl ajres weh deh da di en a di servay: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MCWBreader20170409 Silvaana Udz, Ed.D da fahn Bileez. If yu waahn tel shee bowt sohnting speshal fu put eena dis Kriol aatikl, eemayl: sudz142@ gmail.com Vizit: www.nationalkriolcouncil.org

THE REPORTER

Belize Observes World AIDS Day By Benjamin Flowers

T

he Ministry of Health (MoH) and various organizations which form a part of the National HIV response held a series of activities leading up to the celebration of World AIDS Day, observed internationally on December 1. The activities consisted of public awareness events such as health fairs and mobile HIV testing done countrywide, with the final health fair held on World AIDS Day, at the Battlefield Park in Belize City. The MoH and its affiliated bodies carried out the events under the 2018 theme for WAD “Know Your Status,” noting that according to data from the United Nations arm tasked with the global HIV response, UNAIDS, there were approximately 36.9 million people globally who were living with HIV at the end of 2017, with 1.8 million people being newly infected that year. “Belize’s Annual HIV Statistical Report 2017, indicates that there are still more women get-

S U D O K U Medium Puzzle

Sudok u rules are extremely easy: Fill all empty squares so that the numbers 1 to 9 appear once in each row, column and 3x3 box. Tip. Use a soft erasable pencil. Start with the easy puzzles, then move on to the harder ones. Make small pencilmarks to show which numbers are allowed in empty squares. This will come handy when analyzing techniques are used. Never guess! Only make moves based on logical deductions.

Tuesday, December 4th, 2018 ting tested than men, and treatment. The however, there were ministry also emmore males testing phasized that there positive. This indiare still barriers to cates the vital imporboth HIV testing and tance of the populatreatment adherence tion, and in particu- a n d m a n y p e r s o n s lar, males, getting to still only seek testknow their status in i n g s e r v i c e s a f t e r order to have timely becoming sick. access to treatment The MoH estiand care. The report mates that there are also points out that a r o u n d 4 , 5 0 0 p e rin Belize, there were sons living with 223 persons newly HIV/AIDS coundiagnosed with HIV trywide, giving BeInfection for 2017,” lize one of the highthe Ministry said. est infection rates The MoH added within the region. that, while signifi- E n r i q u e R o m e r o , cant progress has Executive Director, been made in AIDS NAC explained that r e s p o n s e o v e r t h e MoH 2017 statistics years, there are still s h o w e d t h a t t h e r e hurdles to overcome, were over 30,000 including reaching HIV tests, making those persons who the rate for a coundo not know their try with a populas t a t u s , a n d l i n k - tion size of less than i n g p e o p l e l i v i n g 400,000 “considerwith HIV to care ably high.”

Answer to Puzzle


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Fun at the Belize Zoo!

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RICHARD FOSTER LEGACY EVENT– A GREAT DAY

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hat a memorable time at The Belize Zoo! Good friends from the life and times of Richard Foster poured into the “Best Little Zoo in the World” throughout the day. Warmth and love filled the air. In the nearby Education Classroom, films produced over the years by Richard and Carol Foster played continuously. It was a great way to reinforce the impact this documentary film team had on Belize and also, the world. Richard’s very first documentary, AMATE THE GREAT FIG TREE, was a popular view for many at the event. The zoo crew, with outstanding help from people throughout the country, put together items for a Silent Auction. This assisted in raising funds which are directed to seeing the vision and natural history passion of both Richard and Carol Foster continue here in Belize. And what an original collection of items to choose from and to bid upon! Everything from a colonoscopy to a rocking chair, feather bouquets and tequila… superb overstays at the finest resorts in Belize…all contributing to something so very significant. Then, it was announcement time.All were warm-

C O L O R M E

Curved Bananas

ly welcomed and urged to have a piece of birthday cake, too. The Legacy Event day, December 2nd, was Richard’s birthday. And for sure, his favourite chocolate cake was on hand. A meaningful plan was shared with all. Recently, The Belize Zoo has initiated the Foster Wildlife Foundation. This will allow the expansion of ideas which would be a part of the creative profile of both Richard and Carol Foster. For example: Important projects like building and distributing nest boxes for the rare yellow headed parrot, the

printing and distribution of a new children’s book, developing vibrant conservation and education programs. Yes, the Foster Wildlife Foundation’s list of potential worthwhile and valuable programs is a plan most definitely poised to benefit Belize for years to come. The highlight of the day was when Carol Foster, looking radiant and smiling with such enthusiasm, said a few words about Richard’s work. She noted where they have travelled in order to film the wonders of nature, but

that their favourite place to be and to film, was here in Belize. What was the most favourite animal for Richard to capture on film? The glowing, iridescent, flying faster than fast, the HUMMINGBIRD. Having said that, Carol then lifted up the cloth which covered a beautiful hummingbird carving. Simply stated, the day was magical. The mood was spiritually elevating. Without a doubt, it was so clear to all, that the dreams and the vision of Richard Foster would always be a part of Belize.

Dolphins and Sponges

• A Formula One car’s exhaust gets hot enough to melt aluminum It can reach 1,000 degrees celsius, whereas aluminum melts at 660 degrees. As a result, it’s made out of exotic metals so expensive that the average road car costs less than a set of F1 tailpipes. • The average Formula 1 pit stop is less than three seconds In the time it took you to read that, the driver parked, the car was jacked up, nearly two dozen guys changed all four tires, and the car was off and running again. • Tons of race cars can drive upside down The amount of downforce an open wheeled race car produces will vary depending on what league it races in (among other things), but it’s frequently in excess of the car’s weight. In other words, once it reaches a certain speed, it can drive upside down...if it has to. • A top fuel dragster hits 300 mph in just over three seconds flat 3.05 seconds to be precise. Compare that to how long it takes your jet to take off on a runway. • And the fuel consumption required to make that kind of power is off the charts To get a feel for what 65-80 gallons per minute really means, turn about 30 showers to full blast simultaneously, and then imagine gasoline instead of water spouting out. • The top F1 teams spend around $500,000,000 each year You know, only around five times what the top NFL teams spend.


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INSIGHTS

THE EMASCULATION OF THE BDF: A NATIONAL TRAGEDY - Part 2 C

ombat exercises are important for any army because they allow commanders to test the soundness of their battle plans. To succeed on the battlefield; to execute any battle plan an army must be able to do three things: move, shoot and communicate. Major Lloyd Jones Painfully, the BDF is (Ret’d) woefully deficient in all three. Mobility is absolutely important in modern warfare and with regret I must tell you that the BDF does not have sufficient military grade transport to be able to deploy in the face of an invasion. In fact the BDF has mostly off-the-shelf civilian Ford trucks as its primary means of transport. It is doubtful whether the BDF has enough transport to deploy Belize’s entire army to combat. The challenge is not just about the size of the vehicle fleet but also about its condition. If the BDF is unable to move around the battlefield it will be easily outmanoeuvred. In terms of air assets, the BDF has a single defender aircraft that is obsolete. In fact Mayan Island Air has defender type aircrafts in its fleet that can outperform those of the BDF. With respect to rotary wing aircraft, it was Taiwan who gifted us two Bell Huey helicopters. Though we should be grateful for the helicopters, the BDF needs an entire fleet of troop carrying aircrafts if it is to have the necessary agility to defend Belize. I can hear the naysayers now: “we cannot afford such things”. Successful combat is about inflicting heavy losses on your enemy whilst minimizing his ability to do the same to your own forces. To be able to inflict casualties on your enemies you need effective weapons and since Belize does not produce weapons we must buy or beg from those countries that do. Today the BDF has only direct fire weapons; this means that members of the BDF must be able to see the enemy in order to engage him. Given the range of the BDF’s weapons we are talking about close combat: less than 400 meters. In combat indirect fire weapons (which the BDF no longer has) is a “force multiplier” as they help you to destroy your enemies from miles away. Mortars, artillery, missiles are all essential in modern warfare. Up until about a decade ago, the BDF had a platoon of 81mm mortars. Over the years, because of wear and tear and the lack of proper maintenance those mortars became unserviceable. They were in such bad shape that they could not be fired without a high risk of the round exploding in the barrel of the mortar. In the interests of safety they were decommissioned. To date the BDF has not reacquired any indirect fire weapons, NONE! So derelict have we been with our own defence that if every able-bodied man wanted to stand up and defend Belize they would not be able to because we as country possess less than 3,000 rifles. The third pillar upon which an army must stand is in its ability to communicate. The ability to securely transmit combat orders is critical to success on the battlefield. That is why when we look at the way in which the United States prosecutes wars, particularly in Iraq and Afghanistan, their first targets are always command centers and communications infrastructure. If a commander cannot deliver timely orders to troops on the battlefield the war is all but lost. In 2018, the BDF does not have sufficient capacity to securely communicate between the various combat units. It does not have the ability to encrypt its messages at the scale necessary to prevent interception by unauthorized entities.

This reality increases its vulnerabilities as one can reasonably assume that an opposing force can eavesdrop on its communications. In fact, I have been reliably informed that for some operations, incredibly, the primary means of communications for the BDF is cell phones. I have said these things to you my fellow Belizeans, not to frighten you about any armed action by Guatemala. I maintain that the use of force is not a legitimate option for the settlement of Guatemala’s unfounded claim and therefore we must not fear it. I have said these things to you so that you understand the extent to which we have undermined the ability of the BDF to perform its functions. I have said these things to you so that you can no longer say that you did not know of the emasculation of the BDF, and I have said these things to you so that hopefully you will tell your political leaders to fix our defences. The BDF is not expeditionary in nature; its sole purpose is to defend the territory of Belize from armed aggression. In that sense it does not need to be overly large but Belize needs nothing less than

a standing army of 7,500 a volunteer element of 2,500 and every citizen a soldier. We do not need to match the Guatemalans in absolute numbers but we need only a credible defence that says invade at your own peril. History has shown us that the surest way to invite aggression is to create and sustain military imbalance. The British did not teach us to be warlike for their own selfish ends but I point you to the wisdom of the Roman General Vegetius when he said “If you want peace prepare for war”. In just a few weeks the Barrow administration will dole out more than half a million dollars for “Christmas cheer”. Many of the people who will partake in this feast have loved ones serving in the BDF. Those very people will eat ham whilst their loved ones serving at the Sarstoon risk losing an eye because of the crumbling pier. They will eat turkey whilst their loved ones must share combat equipment because there is not enough to issue personal kit to each soldier, as it should be. They will feast whilst their army cannot defend them not even for three days. Eat drink and be merry Belizeans; eat drink and be merry!


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

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No Excuses

Past Governments Stole Opportunities

Nefretery Marin

T

he blatant corruption Belize has suffered since Independence has put our economic development, ethical values and justice at very high risk and has undermined our entire democratic process. The poor and the

working class are the ones at the bottom of the destabilized, crumbling pyramid economy, created by corrupt politicians. It is they who suffer the harmful daily effects of political corruption. It is they who we must now protect. Due to very bad economic planning and investments, Government has become the largest employer in Belize. Our poor depend on Government for jobs, for housing, for health care, education; this makes the poor, the young, the elderly and our women most vulnerable to corruption. Massive investments

in infrastructure development with over 20% kick-backs to various ministers, disgraceful concrete quality and lack of honest supervision are all due to political corruption. Corruption in Government, along with transnational crimes, have been damaging to Belize’s reputation abroad and have created obstacles to local and foreign direct investment and to our global competitiveness in the tourism and agriculture industries. Government has ultimately destroyed the development and upliftment of our people. Public money should

be for government services and projects. Taxes collected, bonds issued, income from government investments and grants for poverty alleviation are meant for social projects, education, hospitals and clinics, roads, the supply of electricity and water and to ensure the personal security and safety of our citizens. Yet our people are being deprived of all of these. Corruption and bad management practices have seen our national wealth and economic opportunities go to only 30 families in the country. Our elected officials have grown

accustomed to channelling the people’s money away from such projects and the very people most dependent on government for support. They grew accustomed to depriving our poor so they can sustain lavish lifestyles and their only investment in the poor is buying our votes on Election Day, Christmas cheers, cheap school bags, etc. These types of corrupt actions are their main investment into their sustained and secured political careers. While they have robbed our people of their integrity and have effectively made beggars of a once hardworking, proud people - what is much more alarming are the increasing levels of poverty and income inequality. Corruption has reduced the spending power of our country by reducing the economic resources at the disposal of the working class and the poor. If Belize continues to vote in the same corrupt people that have failed us, it will worsen poverty directly by reducing access to goods and services because our wages are stagnant and the price of fuel and goods have skyrocketed. Corruption also affects our people directly when they are unable to pay the bribes demanded of them and so, are denied basic justice, for example at the hands of the Police and the Courts where the Government does not provide legal representation for the poor; or at the Lands Department where we must pay bribes and kiss politicians’ asses, or offer our young daughters and sons for sexual favours to ministers of government in order to get a piece of land that should have been ours in the first place! This is the ugly reality of our people, and we need to stop it at once! Much corruption is experienced also at the local government levels. This happens when contracts are awarded for sector projects such as road construction,

parks, and such municipal projects. Contracts are awarded to cronies and family members of politicians without calling for tenders. Several contractors (whose names are withheld on their request) whom I have questioned said that funds are lost due to kickbacks demanded by politicians, even before contracts are granted. When asked about wastage of materials and poor quality of concrete by the contractors and their men, they said that they must cut corners because of the high percentages of bribes they must pay out to politicians. Our people suffer in all aspects through these acts of corruption. Remember that these are loans for road construction, and not only do we have to pay back in cash; but the potholes and rough roads along with low quality concrete on roads and bridges is also costing us damage to property and loss of lives in the increased number of traffic accidents. It is, indeed, our frequent experience to come across roads which have been recently built or repaired, being partly washed away or full of potholes after a shower immediately afterwards. This necessitates the diversion of funds to their repairs all the time - funds which could have been used for new investments or better increments to our military, police or teachers. These monies could be used in education or healthcare instead of filling the already overflowing coffers of our elected officials. Belizeans - we must decide and decide fast. Who do you love more? Your corrupt politicians who feed you with $100 on Election Day and starve you for the next five years? Or do you love your family and your children? It is not hard to turn our country around. It’s rather easy. All you need to do is put your X in the right place on Election Day and let the chips fall where they will.


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Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER

Sober Reflections

Can Beauty Come from Ashes?

Mike Rudon Jr. And when I pray to God all I ask is Can beauty come out of ashes? Did I mention that Deadpool is one of my favourite movi e s ? I s w e a r Ry a n Reynolds reminds me so much of me – charismatic, funny as hell, handsome. And

then today I heard this song which was in Deadpool – Ashes from Celine Dion. She has a voice straight from Heaven. Kinda like this young girl Jasmine Thompson who does this cover of REM’s Everybody Hurts. Somebody sent it to me last night and wow – powerful. But as I do so often, I digress, this time deliberately. Because I don’t want to write what I want to write. Hell, don’t try to understand that. I don’t think even I do. I didn’t write a column last week. And not one of my seven faithful readers no-

ticed. How messed up is that? I’m a little hurt. The truth i s b y Tu e s d a y l a s t week I had convinced myself that nothing was worth doing – not even my column which I’ve been pretty passionate about. It was one of those dark weeks. No smiles, no happiness. Just darkness. It was a real, extended one-man pity party. See, I wanted to bring hope with this column. So people would know they aren’t alone. I saw this almost as a calling. I wanted those struggling with ad-

diction to alcohol to realize that there are others who inhabit that particular darkness, and perhaps together we can find light. I wanted those fighting depression to know that there are others who fight as well, and to know that giving up is not an option. So I delved deep into my soul and poured out some of my own horrors. I know it may sound crazy, but I wanted to do something important with my writing, which is really the only skill I feel I possess. It is perhaps the one thing my drink-

ing hasn’t taken away from me. Oh, and my sense of humour. Because that may have gotten a little darker but it’s there. My sense of failure, and my disappointment in myself got the better of me along the way. Here I was, trying to help others, and I apparently couldn’t even help myself. It’s easy to spiral down from there. Because actions have real repercussions. And things you do while d r u n k d o n ’t m a g i cally disappear. The hurt you cause while under the influence doesn’t vanish. There is no pixie dust that can make all the bad things go away. And it is a vicious frigging cycle for me, and I’m sure for a lot of people very much like me. We are surrounded by the negative result of our actions – whether it is the silent or not so silent condemnation from a significant other, or the hurt on the faces of our children, or bills unpaid, obligations not met… that sort of thing. And if you are like me, it wears you down. And if you have a particular weakness, like alcohol, you run for that solace to forget how much of an absolute idiot you’ve been while under the influence. It’s insane. I know there are persons who believe that I have revealed way too much of myself in these columns. There are those who feel that I embarrass myself through my revelations, and by extension bring shame to my family. There are those who see what I write as an admission of abject weakness. And we all know men aren’t supposed to be weak. We are men, after all. The problem is that sometimes I agree with them. Because I don’t want people to look at me and see a weakling. I want men to admire me for my accomplishments and my character. I want children to see me as an example to follow. I want dogs to adore me because we all

know dogs are just about perfect judges of soul-deep goodness in a person. I want women to watch me with lust in their hearts – okay I maybe got a little carried away there but you get my point. I want to be a strong person. And there is a weakness in me. And I started believing that the weakness made me a weak person. But I’m not weak. Because even now that I’ve lost pretty much everything that means anything in my life, I continue to struggle, and I am determined to become the person I can be. I have met some incredible people along the way. People whom I have never met have reached out to me. And people who have seen me at my worst are still there. I lost some amazing people along the way, and I don’t blame them. I may end this journey pretty much alone, and I may fall some more times before it’s d one. But I’ ll keep going. Yo u k n o w w h y ? Because I need to prove to myself that I can. Sometimes we tell ourselves all kinds of fanciful things. I’ll do it for the wife. Or for the kids. Or for the sweetheart. Or for the dogs. Or for whoever or whatever. But the truth is that you cannot do anything for anybody until you fix what is broken inside you. I’ve been resentful when people have walked away. But in the end I realize that I have been toxic for a long time, and I have destroyed most of what I’ve touched. So I’m going to fix me. Oh damn this started out to be such a positive column. What the hell happened? Somehow I got sidetracked just after I realized how much like me Ryan Reynolds is. It happens. We get sidetracked. But I’m not giving up.


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

US Determining Effect of Sanction on Belize T

Thursday, December 6, 2018

he United States Embassy in Belize issued a statement on a Presidential Memorandum sent out by US President Donald Trump to the Secretary of State listing Belize as one of numerous countries to be sanctioned by the US government for failing to comply with minimum standards of international human trafficking regulations. According to the memorandum, the sanction was to include the US cutting aid for non-humanitarian, non-trade assistance. Trump, however, in his memorandum had noted that Belize had been granted a partial waiver in certain areas, as it was in the best interest of the US. For many countries on the list, Trump also directed multilateral developmental banks such as the IMF to refuse granting loans to those countries. "Consistent with section 110(d)(4) of the Act, I determine that a partial waiver to allow International Military Education and Training (IMET), Foreign Military Financing (FMF), and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) related to FMF with respect to Belize would promote the purposes of the Act or is otherwise in the national interest of the United States,� the memo said. According to the US Embassy, "Of the 22 countries ranked Tier 3 in the 2018 Trafficking in Persons Report, five countries, including Belize, received either full or partial waivers. The restrictions under the TVPA are intended to encourage the affected govern-

ments to make more significant efforts to meet the minimum standards for combating human trafficking." The restrictions apply to non-humanitarian and non-trade-related foreign assistance, and to funds provided through international financial institutions, to Tier 3 governments. In certain circumstances, restrictions also apply to educational and cultural exchange programs for Tier 3 government officials. The partial restrictions on Belize do not apply to funding by international financial institutions or to exchange programs for government officials, the release said. "The partial waiver for Belize will facilitate continuation of programming to enhance the ability of the Government of Belize to combat trafficking in persons, interdict illicit narcotics moving through its national waters and crossing its borders, and address other forms of drug trafficking and other transnational crimes, thereby reducing threats to the national security interests of the United States,� the US Embassy said. Belize received a partial waiver because it is in the national interest of the United States to support efforts in Belize to build capacity to stem human trafficking, narcotics trafficking, illegal migration, and other illicit trafficking to the United States southern border, it added. The U.S. Department of State said it is reviewing programming in Belize to determine what will be affected by the sanction.

Page 37

BPD Distributes Over 100 Bulletproof Vests Wednesday, December 5, 2018

E

By Michelle Sutherland

arlier this week Commissioner of Police Allen Whylie equipped over one hundred police officers from Belize City with pre-owned bulletproof vests. The distribution of the first set of vests was done primarily in Belize City, but other formations in the various districts will be similarly outfitted in the next couple of weeks. The vests were mainly distributed to operational teams, first responders and officers who are a part of the Quick Response Teams. The bulletproof vests are part of the batch of 500 which was donated last week by the Miami Dade Police Department to the Belize Police Department (BPD). Commissioner Whylie explained the use of the donation - "I want to reiterate that these vests have come at an opportune time because we have just commenced our Christmas anti-crime campaign and so I want to ensure that our officers are equipped with these vests that can help them whenever they respond. Because as usual when you respond there is uncertainty in terms of what the officers will face." At the distribution, Whylie explained that the vests were cataloged and distributed in sizes. As it relates to accountability, all vests have been marked. Their serial numbers, brands, descriptions and the persons they have been assigned to have also been filed. Whylie noted that the vests now become a part of the officers' operational kit for as long as they remain a member of the force. They are required to show up in them prepared for work regardless of comfort, because the department's primary focus is safety and security above all. The donation of the vests was facilitated through the Association of Caribbean Commissioners of Police, of which Belize is a member.


Page 38

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER

CLASSIFIED ADS

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION: Be it known that MILLFORD PORTFOLIO LTD., Belize International Business Company, is in dissolution, effective 29 November 2018. The liquidator for said Company is Marios Christodoulou of Nicosia, Cyprus. Global Formations and Management Ltd.  LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Jia Wei Li of George Price Highway is applying for the renewal of Publican General Liquor License for Tommy’s Shop to be operated at #6519 Central American Blvd., Belize City for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Erlin Moore of Caye Caulker Village, Belize District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for Wish Willy Bar & Grill to be operated in Caye Caulker Village, Belize District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Julian Sherrard of Mile 60 George Price Highway, Cayo District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for The Orange Guesthouse and Cafe to be operated at Mile 60 George Price Highway, Cayo District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Felipe Flores of Benque Viejo, Cayo District is applying for the renewal of Night Club Liquor License for Flores Villas Hotel to be operated at 92 Lomas Del Rodeo, Benque Viejo Town, Cayo District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Jorge Miguel Chi & Shamera Angelita Chi both of #2 Victoria Street, San Ignacio Town, Cayo District is applying for the renewal of Restaurant Liquor License for Marie Sharp’s Tourist Center & Culinary Class to be operated at #2 Victoria Street, San Ignacio Town, Cayo District for the year 2019 to 2020. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Isabel Gloria Gonzalez Rodriquez of Independence Village, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for Scorpion Bar to be operated in Independence Village, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Sylvia Williams of Sittee River Village, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for Local Paradise Restaurant & Bar to be operated in Sittee River Village, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Telma Aracely Esquivel of 3 Miles Stann Creek Valley Road, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for Princess Bar to be operated in 3 Miles Stann Creek Valley Road, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Hugo Vargas of Bella Vista Village, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for Blue Bird Restaurant & Bar to be operated in Bella Vista Village, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Violeta Lampson of Maya Beach, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for Maya Breeze Inn to be operated in Maya Beach, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Marva Augustine of Hopkins Village, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Restaurant Liquor License for Laruni Hati to be operated in Hopkins Village, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Santos Ysaguirre of Cow Pen Village, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for Olivos Bar to be operated in Cow Pen Village, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Pamela Guthott of Hopkins Village, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for Windschief Bar to be operated in Hopkins Village, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Tatiana Kruggel of Hopkins Village, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Restaurant Liquor License for Thongs Café to be operated in Hopkins Village, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Carmen Meldonado of Santa Cruz Village, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Night Club Liquor License for Bellamar Restaurant & Bar to be operated in Santa Cruz Village, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Jien Chen of George Price Drive, Dangriga Town, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Malt & Cider Liquor License for Lucky Star Entertainment to be operated in George Price Drive, Dangriga Town, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE: Notice is hereby given that Solomon Flores of #35 Isla Street, Dangriga Town, Stann Creek District is applying for the renewal of Publican Special Liquor License for Lakeland Recreation Center to be operated in #35 Isla Street, Dangriga Town, Stann Creek District for the year 2019. Under the intoxicating Liquors Act, Revised Edition of 2000.


THE REPORTER

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

Page 39

International Journalist Says He Trusts the ICJ...with his Life! Thursday, December 6, 2018

J

By Marion Ali

ournalists are usually the ones who interview others on issues that make the news, but last week one journalist became our interviewee when we visited the ICJ at the Hague, Netherlands. Jan Hennop, Correspondent with Agence France-Presse (AFP) in the Hague, has covered over 30 cases at the ICJ since 2011. He told us that he has so much confidence in the integrity of the ICJ that if it were his life or half of his country that hung in the balance, he would trust the judgment the Court makes. “I most certainly would have confidence in the ICJ. I think that one of the things that you see in this court is that the information is very well protected and the reason why they do that is to make sure that there aren’t certain rumours that

are leaking out at various stages of the process. ...Countries have come to the Court voluntarily. Some of them are big countries—Russia’s been here, the United States, Iran, India, Pakistan...to have matters resolved. And it is something that I really firmly believe in." Hennop reminded that one of the options that the Court has to impose a decision is to go to the UN Security Council, but usually, countries adhere to the decision by the Court because it is the United Nations' highest court and therefore, it carries a lot of weight. The senior journalist described the Belize/Guatemala dispute as an "extraordinary case" were it to wind up before the ICJ, simply because in his extensive coverage of ICJ cases, there has not been very many countries that have claimed half of another country's land mass.

Jan Hennop, International Journalist, AFP


Page 40

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

THE REPORTER

The Reporter Remix December 9  

The Newspaper with the most REAL, Credible and Accurate News in the Country

The Reporter Remix December 9  

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