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Name: MIKAELA INTERLANDI Tutor: DAVE/MARCUS

ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO_AIR SEMESTER ONE 2011


Studio AIR

contents WEEK 01 EOI; Case for innovation; Architecture as Discourse

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WEEK 02 EOI; Case for innovation; Computation in Architecture

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WEEK 03 EOI; Case for innovation; Parametric Design

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WEKK 04 EOI; Research Project; CUT//DEVELOP

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WEEK 05 EOI; Research Project; CUT//DEVELOP

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WEEK 06 EOI; Research Project; CUT//DEVELOP

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WEEK 07 EOI; Research Project; CUT//FABRICATE

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WEEK 08 EOI; Research Project; CUT//FABRICATE

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WEEK 09 Gateway Design Project 66 WEEK 10 Gateway Design Project 76 WEEK 11 Gateway Design Project 84 WEEK 12 Gateway Design Project 86


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DESIGN BRIEF WESTERN GATEWAY DESIGN PROJECT; SYNOPSIS

To produce an exciting, eye catching installation Gateway into Wyndham for city bound traffic on the Princes Freeway. The proposed site for the Western Gateway offers a high exposure location to those entering the urban precinct of the municipality, as well as to those travelling along the freeway. It will primarily be viewed by motorists travelling at high speed and provide the first indication of arrival into metropolitan Melbourne. enriches the municipality. Wyndham City has been addressing the issue of its image by undertaking significant works to upgrade the condition and aesthetics of its streetscapes, open spaces and parks. As part of this program, it has established the Gateway Project, aiming to enrich the municipality. The installation will enhance the physical environment through the introduction of a visual arts component, encouraging further reflection about the installation (and Wyndham) beyond a first glance.


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01_ARCHITECTURE AS DISCOURSE

week one readings & the EOI

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A Richard Williams states in ‘Architecture and Visual Culture,’ “works of architecture frame our lives; we inhabit them and they define our movement through cities.” Architecture is as much a philosophical, social or profes­s ional realm as it is a material one; through the consideration of architecture as discourse, I am to approach the EOI in terms of William’s three related, but distinct, approaches to architecture: Architecture as a form of art; Architecture, because of its unique position in the public realm, is a uniquely compromised art. In the case of the ‘Gateway Project’ it is the client who has determined the function of the project, its specification, location and parameters to work between. By this means, architecture can be seen as range of social and professional practices coming together. Architecture as sign; Architecture can be expanded to allow for the communication of multiple readings, this is done through considering architecture as something which can be consumed. When referring to the consumption of architecture, this deals with its apprehension by a non­ specialised public. Through an unbiased approach to forming the Wyndham ‘Gateway,’ we will achieve a broader audience, hence, a greater chance to advocate the ‘Gateway’s’ symbolic realm. Architecture as spatial experience; We need to consider the psychological effects that the ‘Gateway’ may have as the evoking of feelings is very much what the Wyndham city council is after. Experience is crucial to the ‘Gateway Project,’ especially when considering the location of the site.

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week one_ architecture as discourse task_ Select one (1) personal and two (2) state of the art projects and explain how they are (could be) advancing architectural discourse. Integrate into the Expression of Interest proposal


Studio AIR

01_ARCHITECTURE AS DISCOURSE

personal project grasshopper trials.

we expect them, if they are modern buildings, to be revolutionary in some way, to challenge existing assumptions about architecture. -richard williams

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Facades I created in Grasshopper demonstrate the use of computation to modify parameters instantaneously, as well as being able to observe their influence on the final design without the continuous need to redraw the geometry. The facades i created were only possible through the use of generative algorithms which allowed me to create interrelationships and links between components, whereby if you alter one component it directly affects other related components, broadening the scheme of trialing architectural design. The formation process of these parametric objects is advancing the architectural discourse of approaching architecture as art; rather than computerizing an already conceptualized design, I have created something only conceivable through the use of the computer, my design is however very much limited by a lack of computational skill.


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Personal Project Architectural Design Studio Water: 2011 Sem 2


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Last years studio focused specifically on ‘Learning from the Masters,’ whereby we applied the design principles of one of ten architectural ‘masters’ to develop our own design for the Studley Park Boat House. During this studio I focus on the work of Japanese architect Tadao Ando and gained a strong grasp of the basic commands of ArchiCAD. A program such as ArchiCAD does not utilize anything like the parametric design tools allowed through Grasshopper or the NURBS modelling allowed through Rhino. Although not as innovative and boundary pushing as Grasshopper or Rhino, I feel as though programs such as ArchiCAD, which are constantly being updated and improved, hold the key to the basics of formal architectural design and understanding.

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ARCHITECTURE DESIGN S

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01_ARCHITECTURE AS DISCOURSE

hard rock cafe Architects: Architectkidd Year: 2011 Location:Bangkok, Thailand


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01_ARCHITECTURE AS DISCOURSE

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project one The Hard Rock Cafe facade demonstrates a direct relationship to parametric design by taking visual solutions in a new direction. The digitally created architecture promotes the use of geometry which is a function of a finite set of parameters. The restaurant was built with the intension of connecting together music and architecture through design; focusing on the shapes and rhythms of sound.

Thanks to developments in parametric design tools, the resulting facade is composed of reflective black panels that are cantilevered from a curved steel structure. These panels are angled in a pushed and pulled wavelike fashion, so that in some places the existing building is revealed from behind.

Interpreting sound into physical forms and materials throughout the design became a collaborative effort combining design with branding, furniture and street art. Architectkidd

The structure advances the architectural discourse through its “tactile” presence on the street, the facade appearing in constant fluidity, not as as a stationary object. Its atypically manipulated form allows the architecture to be analyzed as a discourse; its public consumption being in relation to the unique aesthetic experience it provides, as well as through understanding it as a sign or symbol for the brand in which the structure promotes. Through its computation, the Hard Rock Cafe’s facade is expanding on visual architectural norms, its intriguing visual form is left open to interpretation by its consumer. The Wyndham City gateway project calls for innovation and the production of a landmark that celebrates the future. Much like the Hard Rock Cafe facade, the gateway must be a spectacle that cries out for the attention of passers by.


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01_ARCHITECTURE AS DISCOURSE

“ ’’

We design architecture with the future generations in mind.

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Jun Mitsui

De Beers Ginza Architects: Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects Year: 2005 - 2008 Location: Tokyo, Japan


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01_ARCHITECTURE AS DISCOURSE

project two

This project demonstrates that a design idea can be revolutionized within a few simple moves, particularly when using sophisticated digital tools. This structure doesn’t completely reinvent the skyscraper, it does however take the existing typology and reproduce it in a new and unique way. This consideration of structure as an intriguing and omnipresent urban and social experience is what I believe changing the discourse of architecture is truly about. Parallels can be drawn between De Beers Ginza building and the intention of the gateway project. Like the De Beers Ginza building the gateway aims to elevate itself as an instantaneously eye catching structure, resembling the excitement of a promising future. Using parametric design we aim to design a gateway that achieves this.

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The ‘De Beers Ginza Building’ takes the quintessential rectilinear grid based building form, bending it to create a significant visual departure from the norm. This atypical geometric difference alone is a point of change within the architectural discourse, allowing the building to become an integral part of its urban experience. The dynamic facade of the curtain wall varies continuously as it ascends, maximising the sun’s reflection. Its flowing, curvilinear nature reflects the excitement and importance of architecture’s ever-changing appearance.


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02_COMPUTING IN ARCHITECTURE

week two readings & the EOI Computer-aided design (CAD) technology has changed the practice of architecture, and it has the potential to change it even more radically. With ‘Architecture’s New Media’, Yehuda Kalay offers a comprehensive exposition of the principles, methods, and practices that underlie architectural computing.

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Kalay informs us that design can be an open ended search for new possibilities, not only a problem solving mechanism. Relating Kalay’s argument to the EOI, he makes the claim that the “brief that architects are given by their clients is much too vague, in most cases, to form a complete statement of goals. It is in general merely a statement of intents that defines a general framework for the solution and some of the constraints by which it must abide. Instead, architects develop the statement of goals gradually as they proceed through the design process itself.” I feel that we, as designers following a brief, are in search of a solution adapted from generalized precedents, metaphors, and symbols. The relationship between these generalizations and the par­ticular needs of the ‘Gateway Project’ can be discovered only as the problem becomes clearer, the adaptation itself cannot be accomplished prior to engaging in the search for solutions. This I believe is why, immersing ourselves in design precedents is so crucial. When designing using the latest Computer-Aided design tools, we must go through a search processes involve the two steps outlined by Kalay, ‘producing candidate solutions for consideration,’ and ‘choosing the “right” solution for further con­sideration and development,’ that is, finding an outcome which fills the clients wishes.

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week two_ computing in architecture task_ Using suggested readings and independent research present the unique innovations presented by contemporary computational design techniques. Integrate into the Expression of Interest proposal


Studio AIR

02_COMPUTING IN ARCHITECTURE

THOM FAULDERS THE MUTE ROOM

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The Mute Room was a temporary installation at the California College of Arts and Crafts in San Francisco in 2000. The undulating surface that wraps the walls and floor is a memory foam. As a room-sized device for listening to experimental electronic music, the contours of the foam’s surface operates as a sound baffle to enhance acoustical clarity; the tactile digitally designed surface exploits the evolution of non rectilinear forms. Using tools originally designed to produce airplanes, animations and other consumer goods, architects are able to produce digital typologies. Subtle blob like forms, such as in the Mute Room can be precisely produced through computerised cutting and milling of contoured, structural framing members. The current influx of digital technology is expanding production capabilities, opening once limited building trades. Using computing in architecture, we aim to develop a gateway design which similarly makes use of undulating surfaces, inspiring a recognizably modern outlook for Wyndham City.

Rose, Joseph. ‘Next generation Architecture, Contemporary Digital Experimentation,’ 2001, p76.


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02_COMPUTING IN ARCHITECTURE

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“Architecture in the digital era.”

The 2001 exhibition (held at the Heinz Architectural Center, Carnegie Museum of Art), ‘Architecture in the digital era,’ looked at the range of possibilities offered to architecture by digital technology, specifically through the means of what was described as ‘Folds, Blobs and Boxes’. Digital means allow a direct translation of complex shapes; challenging how we design, manufacture and construct buildings, producing forms that can be described as folds, blobs and new digital boxes. Projects in this exhibition reflected the changes in architectural software, manufacturing and production of the time. As Joseph Rose states in ‘Next Generation Architecture,’ the digital works displayed provided an architectural program for the future, “full of possibilities which were once unfamiliar and out of reach.” Digital production such as laser cutting with an unprecedented degree of precision have made these forms buildable. This evolution in architectural aesthetics resonates from the baroque age. Since the Baroque era, architects have been trying to cast off the traditional notion of the Cartesian grid. Today the term baroque, “an irregular shape” could be used to describe any of the precedents exhibited in ‘folds, blobs and boxes.’ In our form finding search for the optimal configuration of our gateway structure, we will explore, with the use of computational architecture, the possibilities allowed by the use of folds, blobs and boxes. Rose, Joseph. ‘Next generation Architecture, Contemporary Digital Experimentation,’ 2001, p 9-13.


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1. NEIL M DENARI INTERRUPTED PROJECTIONS, 1996 TOKYO, JAPAN Among the first built examples of a space created by folding. 2. BERNARD TSCHUMI SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, 2002 MIAMI, FLORIDA Reshapes the barriers in normative architecture, provoking the emergence of a digitally morphed box. 3. FRANK O GEHRY EXPERIENCE MUSIC PROJECT, 2000 SEATTLE , WASHINGTON Twenty-first century digital ‘blob’ architecture.

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FOLDS, BLOBS AND BOXES


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02_COMPUTING IN ARCHITECTURE

FLORENCE LOEWY BOOKS


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02_COMPUTING IN ARCHITECTURE

“From digital to physical.” Jakob and Macfarlane’s ‘Florence Loewy Bookstore’ is located in Paris (2001) and was digitally conceived as a large rectangular grid of wood, completely filling the interior volume of the retail space. The modulated and gridded interior volume is excavated to provide for the needed occupiable space circulation and the storage of books. As Branko Kolarevic stated in Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, “building projects today are not only born digitally, but they are also realized digitally through “file to factory” processes of computer controlled fabrication technologies such as CNC milling/bending molds. The highly curvilinear surfaces of contemporary digital age designs, such as that of the ‘Florence Loewy Bookstore,’ bring to force the question of contractibility.

STORE Both Gustave Eiffel’s 1886 Statue of Liberty (Fig 1) and Bernerd Franken’s 1991 BMW Pavillion (Fig 2) use contouring of their structural frames. The BMW Pavilion also utilizes CNC milling for the production of the laminated glass panels of its skin surface. (Figure 1&2 retrieved from Architecture in the Digital Age)

Fig 1.

Fig 2.

Rose, Joseph, ‘Next generation Architecture, Contemporary Digital Experimentation,’ Joseph Rose, p111. Kolarevic, Branko, Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, (New York; London: Spon Press, 2003), pp. 3 - 62.

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The fabrication of the building envelope is being increasingly explored for its potential to unify the skin with the structure, often embedded into or below the skin such as in the case of Frank Gehry’s projects. In the case of the bookstore, we see an exposed structure, revealing to us the fabrication method employed. Within the “Florence Loewy Bookstore” we see the use of structural contouring of NURBS geometry, in which planar, parallel sections are produced by modelling software to articulate the building shape. At this point I am particularly interested in contouring as a production strategy as this method of ‘unfolding’ seems like an achievable means for me to fabricate NURBS geometry created for the EOI.


Studio AIR 03_PARAMETRIC MODELLING

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Why our team should be chosen to design the Wyndham Gateway Project. Today’s society is witness to the rapid growth of digital design tools which are pushing the boundaries of design. Parametric Softwares, Plugins, Add-ons, and Scripts are developing every day. There is a growing interest between architects and designers to use these new concepts in their projects, pursuing a new line of form finding. The search for new possibilities, new material systems, new algorithms, and generally new methods of design and fabrication is in the front line of researchers and designers. In the midst of the rapid growth of Wyndham, what better tool to depict it with than digital design tools which allow us to depict and represent the generative notion of morphogenesis.

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week three_ intro to parametric modelling

task_ elect one project that expresses contemporary scripting/programming cultures and defend/critique the author’s design philosophy. Integrate into the Expression of Interest proposal


Studio AIR 03_PARAMETRIC MODELLING

Week three readings and the EOI. Mark Burry’s ‘Scripting Cultures’ investigates why designers choose to script, suggesting two primary motivations: productivity and control. After picking up scripting Burry says he still finds it difficult and time consuming – as do all of the other 30 scripters he interviewed. Burry’s asserts that the scripting process is not a dry utilitarian argument (despite appearances) but rather a refreshingly frank account of how scripting can augment the design process.

The scripting case studies are used to reveal the different ways inwhich scripting is used. They are characteristically honest about the challenges they faced and design method employed, I gained a lot of comfort from this fact. The book concludes by arguing for scripting as “an essential component of 21st-century design education.” Burry affirms the importance of the designer in the scripting process, suggesting scripting is at home with the many cultures of design practice. Scripting Cultures articulates a maturing in our understanding of digital practice, moving towards a time when scripting becomes a part of the everyday culture of design. The following projects show the capabilities of today’s ‘scripting culture,’ hence, the quintessential style of parametric design which the EOI aims to capture and reflect. We must keep in mind that parametric design is still relatively new, projects which push at the creative boundary of scripting design are often are yet to be realized beyond the computer screen.

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Burry sees the designer as central to the design process. His definition of design – the “mapping of an idea through to an intended outcome” – focuses on the designers aspiration rather than algorithmic effects. As such Burry views scripting as a means to enhance the design process, whether through utilizing its productivity to design faster, or whether it is using the control of scripting to break free from the confines of black-boxed drafting software.


Studio AIR 03_PARAMETRIC MODELLING

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MESNE DESIGN STUDIO NEW CITY VISION

scripting as a path to the answer

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Studio AIR 03_PARAMETRIC MODELLING

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MESNE is an architecture and urban design studio, working with a ‘hands-on’ approach to the use of advanced technologies, examining the potential opportunities for architectural design and practice through an informed engagement with digital technology and the benefits this represents to contemporary life and culture. It is trans-disciplinary and values connections between domains such as architecture, engineering and computer science. MESNE has not entirely lifted themselves out of the analogue design methods, utilizing scripting as a path to ‘the answer,’ rather than heartily embracing the role of accident and scripting without having any clear goal in mind. ‘New City Vision’ (Melb, 2009) is an unbuilt proposal for a 32.65 metre tall signage tower located on a prominent site in Melbourne, Australia. According to the original brief, the tower was to look unsteady, like it’s under construction. Therefore, the ‘New City Vision’ used scripting as a primary digital design agent but instead used it to extend an initial idea, reaching beyond analogue processes to seek deeper access to the imagination then perhaps the ‘pencil sketch’ allows.

As oppose to the ‘Seroussi Pavilion’ that was “grown” out of scripting, the ‘New City Vision’ resonates more strongly with the idea of employing computing performance to enhance an already formulated design, whereby the scripting process can tangibly lead to generating ‘better’ outcomes. In defence of this project, I believe Burry’s notion of ‘scripting as a path to the answer,’ follows strongly with the idea of designing to a design brief, much like the EOI. This project resonates strongly with EOI as it is an outward display of architecture as sign. We aim to design the gateway so that it too pays homage to the city of Wyndham. Burry, Mark (2011). Scripting Cultures: Architectural Design and Programming , pp. 8 - 71. New City Vision. 2009. Serouissi Pavilio. Accessed 22/03/12. < http://www.mesne.net>


Studio AIR 03_PARAMETRIC MODELLING

scripting as a voyage of discovery

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Biothing is a research-design laboratory whose structures are realized through digital technologies and parametric programming, engaging the culture of innovation and computing. This agent based design system is an example of a bottom up processing whereby scripting is used as a voyage of discovery. The ‘Seroussi Pavilion’ (Paris 2007) was “grown” out of self-modifying patterns of vectors based on electro-magnetic fields (EMF). Additional features built into the script allowed for an adaptation to the site in regards to the section (the pavilion is implanted into a steep hill ). The plan of the pavilion differs greatly from a classical notion of architectural plan drawing, its dynamic blueprint of algorithmic and parametric relationships play catalyst to possible materialization procedures and adaptation to the site conditions. Rather than using the scripting process to generate ‘better’ outcomes for an already formulated idea, Biothing claims to script without having any clear goal in mind, these systems are usually described as ‘generative’, with their outcomes being described as ‘emergent’. By inducing rapid iteration and variation, one is able to toy with the unexpected and delve into the unknown, this notion would be difficult to portray without the use of scripting tools as a driving force for 21st century architectural thinking. Biothing embraces the scripting Zeitgeist by using computer as digital design agent, replacing the artist’s hand.

Biothing. 2010. Serouissi Pavilio. Accessed 22/03/12. < http://www.biothing. org/?p=24> Burry, Mark (2011). Scripting Cultures: Architectural Design and Programming (Chichester: Wiley), pp. 8 - 71.

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Studio AIR 03_PARAMETRIC MODELLING

BIOTHING SEROUSSI PAVILION

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This project aligns closely with Burry’s key scripting culture of “Scripting as a voyage of discovery,” an aspect of which I will be considering and embracing when tackling the EOI, especially when it comes to recognizing the role of accidents when scripting. In defence of Biothing’s Seroussi Pavilion, I believe it delves into a relatively unprecedented system of designing, using scripting to increase creative potential. The idea surrounding mechanized design is intriguing. That act of designing is taken to a level where, rather than identifying specific content, we identify frameworks and rules within which content happens.


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PARAMETRIC WORLD

Snail eggs.

HUMAN TOOTH.


Studio AIR 03_PARAMETRIC MODELLING

generative algorithms & morphgenesis Zubin Khabazi’s ‘Generative Algorithms’ (2009), describes the development of parametric objects in Grasshopper/Rhino Environment using algorithmic solutions through experiments rather than pure geometrical/algorithmic subjects. This notion inspired me to consider the augmentation of Wyndham as a generative function, something which evolves and expands over time like nature. Generative design is a design method which is generated by a set of rules or an Algorithm, usually based on parametric modeling. It is a fast method of exploring design possibilities and variations. Generative design has been inspired by natural design processes and is mainly applied for form-finding processes and for the simulation of architectural structures. Generative design is becoming increasingly relevant due to new programming environments and scripting capabilities.

Khabazu draws comparisons between the natural morphogenesis of living organisms and their related algorithmic morphogenesis. Khabazi, Zubin. Generative Algorithms (using Grasshopper), 2009, pg 1-3. <http://www.morphogenesism.

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Looking at morphogenesis, the biological process causing an organism to develop its shape, linking it to the concept of form-finding. Digitizing morphogenesis though scripting, such as in Grasshopper, bears a close relationship to the processes of morphogenesis in nature. For the purpose of the EOI it could be said that the concept of ‘urban sprawl,’ including the city and its connection to the environment could be likened to the concept of morphogenesis as both contend with subjects under a perpetual state of flux.


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GROWTH THEVERYMANY

Grasshopper file.

Marc Fornes of TheVeryMany created ‘Growth’ (2009), a Grasshopper based custom tooling devise which stipulates the growth formation of an object through randomness and non linearity. This Grasshopper formation and its morphology model, apply aesthetically to how I wish to develop the EOI in terms of representing the ‘growth’ of Wyndham as similar to the morphogenesis of an organism.

Resulting morphology model.


Studio AIR 04_PARAMETRIC MODELLING

Expression of Interest concept formation.

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Drawing parallels between the city and organisms, my sketch explores the connection and intertwined relationship between the Wyndham â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;gatewayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and the broader context of Melbourne. It describes the intertwined relationship between Melbourne and Wyndham, signified by the roads, highways and freeways which act as veins, connecting together the heart of each city. The visceral feelings of connectedness and togetherness through the urban sprawl is something I aim to recreate through parametric design; as well as foreshadowing the dynamism of Wyndham, provoking a sense of anticipation for the future.


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Studio AIR 04_CUT/DEVELOP

CUT4 week four_

CUT/DEVELOP


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innovative design solutions

A poignant requirement of the project brief is that the Western Gateway consider the high speed movement of traffic along the Princess Freeway. Hence the concept of speed and motion is highly relevant to consider when designing the Gateway. The image below of Ian Curtisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face is comprised of a series of small, extruded cylinders. It infers the notion of focus, of seeing something as a whole rather than as the sum of its parts. This is an important idea to consider in relation to the gateway design; approaching the gateway from a distance may allow us to pervious holistic imagery, but as we reach the object we are intrigued to notice the comprised sum of its parts.

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INPUT_SURFACE GRID ASSOCIATION_IMAGE SAMPLER OUTPUT_EXTRUSION


Studio AIR 04_CUT/DEVELOP

OUTPUT_SHADING

OUTPUT_EXTRUSION

The use of pattern overlap allows for the application of multiple layers, emphasizing motion and speed.

MATHEMATICS

OUTPUT_SHADING

Boolean patterning allows for a data type which has two values, true and false, causing the offset of information into rows, hinting at movement through linear segments.

IMAGE SAMPLING

Arbitrary points allow for the randomization of an outcome, this is relevant to our studies as nature produces many naturally ‘random’ organic forms.

OUTPUT_SHADING

OUTPUT_SHADING

OUTPUT_EXTRUSION

POINT ATTRACTOR

OUTPUT_COLOR

PATTERN OVERLAP

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BOOLEAN PATTERN ARBITRARY POINTS

CURVE ATTRACTOR

OUTPUT_EXTRUSION

matrix_ associations_

OUTPUT_EXTRUSION OUTPUT_ROTATION

Surface grids allow for the illusion of movement due to the sizing differentiation and placement of circular forms juxtaposed against curvaceous surface area.

ASSOCIATION_USING SETS

OUTPUT_SHADING

OUTPUT_SHADING OUTPUT_ROTATION

SURFACE GRID

inputs_

ASSOCIATION_CURVE ATTRACTOR


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matrix in relation to Kalay_

INPUT_IMAGE SAMPLING

The use of surface normals allowed for the high malleable practice of generating forms which radiate the appearance of movement and dynamism.

IMPUT_ATTRACTOR POINT

SURFACE NORMALS

Kalay highlights that computational design can produce many more possible ‘candidate solutions’ than other methods and therefore more avenues of possible designs must be explored. Hence, before finalizing the gateway design we must immerse ourselves in the notion of trial and error.

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INPUT_SURFACE GRID ASSOCIATION_IMAGE SAMPLER OUTPUT_SHADING

Kalay informs us that design can be an open ended search for new possibilities, not merely a problem solving mechanism. He proposes a two step process whereby we must ‘produce a set of candidate solutions for consideration,’ and then ‘choose the right solution for further consideration and development.’ Here out group explored solutions for the Western Gateway Project we do not yet feel we have arrived at the ‘right’ solution as this can only be done through significant exploration.


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Studio AIR

Concept

INPUT_SURFACE GRID

ASSOCIATION_CURVE ATTRACTOR OUTPUT_EXTRUSION

the city as a living organism_

Our group has placed a focus on morphogenesis, the biological process that causes an organism to develop its shape. Here, though the use of Grasshopper, I have explored the concept of evolution by using a generative design process to demonstrate the gradual morphogenesis of a city. Within Wyndham City there is an intensive relationship between the natural environment and the activities of human settlement and associated industries. The city itself has undergone enormous expansion in recent years, experiencing the largest and fastest population and industry growth in all Victorian local government areas (Wyndham City Council, 2012). Hence, Wyndham truly demonstrates itself as a living, breathing, growing city; a notion we aim to capture in out gateway design. Wyndham City Council. 2012. Population and Demographics of Wyndham. Accessed Online 22/04/12 via < http://www.wyndham.vic.gov.au/ aboutwyndham/demographics>


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metamorphosis_ We aim to focus on this growth in the development of the Western Gateway. By exploring solutions for the Western

INPUT_SURFACE GRID

ASSOCIATION_USING SETS OUTPUT_SHADING

Gateway Project in terms of ‘growth,’ such as in the images at right, I began to consider the city of Wyndham in terms of metamorphosis, the biological process by which an animal physically develops through cell growth and differentiation. By likening to city to an organism, the ‘transformation’ and ‘change’ of Wyndham is what we aim to convey in our EOI.


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CUT5 week five_

CUT/DEVELOP


reverse engineered case study

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Banq Restaurant Office DA Boston, USA

Tools; Contouring. To contour the ‘Banq Restaurant’ I created a ‘metaball’ curve which i then divided into segments to provide the appearance of contouring. Using Grasshopper, I then offset, exploded and lofted the segments so that i could change the width of each contour. Contouring such as this produces an interesting effect as, from a distance we view the form as a whole rather than as a sum of the contoured parts which are only recognizable up close. The shifting planar forms achieves the dynamic and atmospheric appearance of movement which is something we aim to convey in our gateway.


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Airspace Tokyo Faulders Studio Tokyo, Japan

Tools; Voronoi patterning. In â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Airspace Toykoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the cellular design of the aluminium skin has no depth to it. Experimenting in grasshopper allowed me to offset the voronoi function and extrude it in the z direction, creating a 3D layered object.


Spanish Pavillion Foreign OďŹ&#x192;ce Expo 2005

Tools; Hexgrid, extruding and trimming.

The Spanish Pavilion incorporates an external skin that is composed of glazed ceramic hexagon forms. The lattice form is derived from Mediterranean architecture in order to help regulate the solar gains and spread of the thermal load over the space.

In recreating the Spanish Pavilion, I went one step further in downloading a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;VB.Hexyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; component which allows a hexgrid to be applied to any given surface, it is not restricted to 2D platforms. By combining this with circular attractor points and an extrusion output I was able to create a sense of movement within the hexagonal shapes due to the change in radius of the circles.

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In relation to the Gateway Project, the structure we design does not need to be an inhabitable space and therefore it is not essential that we consider its thermal properties. However what is relevant is the significance of the chosen material. Wyndham wishes to portray their reinvented image as a fresh, modern and highly reputable. I feel it is therefore vital that new, sophisticated and engaging materials be chosen to achieve this goal.


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Further Analysis; Airspace Tokyo

The use of Airspace Tokyoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skin, juxtaposed against its internal structure, brings the building to life at night. Lighting is an aspect we aim to consider in relation to the EOI.

Use of the voronoi pattern to depict cell growth.


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Behavior in the atmosphere/ Performance driven design methods/ Emerging design direction/ Thom Faulders’ Airspace Tokyo creates an exterior building skin for a new four story multifamily dwelling unit in Tokyo, Japan. Interestingly, prior to Faulders’ addition to the site, the building was uniquely wrapped by a layer of dense vegetation. Since the entire site was razed to accommodate construction for the new larger development, the design invents an architectural system of materials that perform with similar attributes to the demolished greenery, creating a new atmospheric protective layer of artificial vegetation. Inspired by the abundant greenery that previously occupied the site, the screen façade comprises four different overlapping organic patterns. With an air gap of 15cm in-between, the 3mm-thick curtain-like coverings of laser-cut aluminium, frames views, creates dynamic shadows and accentuates light according to the time of day.

The use of an enclosing ‘skin’ which frames the underlying structure definitely appeals to me in an almost visceral manner. It proposes a ‘performance based design’ method as appose to the prevailing ‘process based design.’ This means that the design outcome desirably achieves a “combination of form and function in a specific context.” Ultimately, the digital tools used in designing Tokyo Airspace, offers an opportunity to work in a more integrated manner than the sequential model of design, analysis and fabrication. Computation enables evaluative tools from outside disciplines to work within conceptual phases of the design process, enabling more informed design decision making. In the case of Airspace Tokyo and its ‘green’ building skin, performance based design is driven by the quest for more sustainable environments.

Infuture,thisishowtheparametric techniques we are learning could be extended towards a sustainable approach to living. Airspace Toyko is particularly relevant in accordance with our quest to develop our concept of the city as an organism. The Airspace Tokyo skin conjures imagery of morphogenesis, the organized spatial distribution of cells during the development of an organism. We can draw parallels between small scale cells developing their shape and Wyndham developing its shape within the broader context of Melbourne. Also, Wyndam is known for its rural/environmental character, therefore the stipulation of naturally occurring processes ties in with the sites’ history.

Airspace Tokyo. 2006. Accessed online via < http://www.faulders-studio.com/proj_airspace.html> Lecture 05 Slides - Why Computing? Performance-Driven Design_JeromeFrumar.pdf Accessed online via < http://app.lms.unimelb.edu.au > Kalay, Yehuda, ‘Performance-based design,’ University of California, Berkley, 1999, pg 7. Wyndham City Council. 2012. Population and Demographics of Wyndham. Accessed Online 22/04/12 via < http://www.wyndham.vic.gov.au>


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MATHILDE ROUSSEL LIFE OF GRASS


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Behavior in the atmosphere/

Soil, wheat seeds, fabric and structure from recycled metal form the basis of Mathilde Roussel’s installation which was first exhibited in 2010 at the Invisible Dog Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. The Life of Grass sculptures show the effects of transformation of the material as a metaphor of the transformation of the city of Wyndham. The behavior of the air and the atmosphere sculpt the forms, making their appearance change dramatically.

Through these organic sculptures made of soil and wheat grass seeds, I strive to show metamorphosis in terms of experiential materiality, paired with the metamorphosis of the city. An engaging natural material will cause the gateway to change and evolve over time like biological cells, intriguing its audience through a shift of aesthetics. Using a naturally sustainable material will not only benefit the atmosphere and air, but serve to strengthen ties between the fertile land and Wyndhams’ place within it as an organically developing city.

<www.mathilderoussel.com>

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Although Life of Grass is not a parametric structure, the same material could be applied in a parametric manner, perhaps paired with an ‘Airspace Tokyo’ type enclosing skin.


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development of an EOI. The Klee drawing below, taken from E.N Bacon’s ‘Design of Cities,’ expresses the concept of movement, tense lines of progression from one place to another, interwoven into a total fabric. Bacon advocates that “the architecture of movement and repose allow the concept of a city to be defined as a living work of art.” The product of city design, such as in the development of Wyndham, can be experienced by anyone, on an equal basis, without qualification. Through the “Wyndham City Gateway” I aim to produce a domestic statement on the life we share in common, dealing with Wynham city as an organism which in turn is connected to the larger, urban sprawl of Melbourne.

I wish my ‘Gateway’ to provoke an sense of growth and flux, as if symbolizing Wyndham as on the cusp of becoming a truly desirable destination. By linking urban growth to the growth of a generative form/parametric design I will be able to reflective the intriguing dynamism of a city’s evolution. Bacon, Edmund N, ‘Design of Cities,’ Thames and Hudson, 1967, pg 163-165.

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The image to the left, taken from E.N Bacon’s ‘Design of Cities,’ evokes a sense of movement and dynamism, allowing me draw connections between the growth of an up and coming city like Wyndham and generative design. This is an idea which I aim to explore further in relation to the EOI, especially considering that Wyndham is now home to numerous new housing estates in suburbs such as Point Cook and Sanctuary Lakes.


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Farshid Moussavi

’’

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Ornament is the expression of embedded forces through processes of construction, assembly and growth. It is through ornament that material transmits effects. It is therefore necessary and inseparable from an object.

week six_

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CUT/DEVELOP


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Week six readings and the EOI.

Moussavi, Farshid and Michael Kubo, eds (2006). The Function of Ornament (Barcelona: Actar), pp. 5-14

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In ‘The Function of Ornament’ Moussavi argues for the importance and sheer significance of which architecture’s materiality allows it to become connected to culture and society. Ultimately, this ties in with the gateway formation as we aim to relate culture to our object by creating sensations and effect through ornamentation. It unveils the function of ornament as the agent for specific affects, following the same train of thought as Adolf Loos, who believed that ornament should be derived from social functions; Moussavi works to dismantle the idea that ornament should be applied to buildings as a discrete or nonessential entity. This classification of ornament can be grouped into three components; depth, material and affect. These three components are applied to the form, structure, surface or screen of building. In relation to the EOI, through the use of provoking ornament we aim to stipulate our design in terms of the growing culture of Wyndham.


CASE STUDY DERIVED MODELS. Banq Restaurant

The form of the Banq restaurant is of undulating construction. Organic, rather than geometric shapes radiates the notion of growth and movement through the shifting dynamism of the individual surface planes. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m also drawn to its deconstructed, raw appearance of the contours, as if revealing the internal structure of something. When considering the EOI we aim to create the appearance of morphogenesis through similarly organic forms. I explored the used of contouring to achieve a sense of movement within the planes of my model. I found this to be an exciting experience in terms of learning, through Grasshopper, to divide a solid geometry into perpendicular planes which are then notched for fabrication.


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MATHILDE ROUSSEL MUES

Mathilde Roussels ‘Mues’ sculptures, (Exhibited at the 56ème Salon de Montrouge 2011, France) makes visible the metamorphosis of an organism through imprints of a body at the specific time. She uses paper and glue to create an undulating structural form which provides a textured affect. Advocating that we change everyday as if we are changing skin, leaving the past behind. This skin becomes the trace and memory of the time passing. The art work relates to the concept of Wyndham as an organism which has been through a metamorphic process, creating an ornamental and textural ‘skin’ as part of the gateway project would assist in our efforts to demonstrate Wyndhams’ evolution and attempt to reinvent itself.


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CASE STUDY DERIVED MODELS. Airspace Tokyo 49

It is our hope to convey Wyndham’s complexity as a multifaceted municipality that is continually improving its image. The concept of a ‘skin’ fragmenting and partially shielding something trying to break through, such as the light passing through the aluminum ‘skin’ of Airspace Tokyo, can be used to symbolize Wyndham emerging as a significant region in the broader fabric of Melbourne. It is for this reason that this case study is worthy of further exploration. It is important to understand different ways in which a single ‘skin’ can be designed and manufactured to reflect this region. By exploring different facets, including texture, gradient, overlay, depth and speed we will be able to determine a larger set of potential solutions to the Western Gateway Project.


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DEVELOPMENT OF A ‘SKIN’


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07 reflection

organic form finding sketches

week seven_

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As someone who feels much more at ease with a pencil in hand, what I have gained most from this subject thus far is definitely an appreciation for those are pushing the boundaries of architecture in terms of utilizing new programming environments and scripting capabilities. Initially I was bitter towards the idea of abandoning everything I knew, stepping into the realm of parametric design. After extensive research and my own explorations using Grasshopper I feel although I have come along way in understanding the relevance and necessity of what this subject is trying to achieve in terms of proposing new and inspiring digital design tools. This subject has forced me to step out of my comfort zone and although it has been a rollarcoaster ride so far, I definitely do not consider this a bad thing.

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Expression of Interest As the City of Wyndham successfully reinvents itself, improving its image through the significant work to upgrade its condition and aesthetics, we as designers have been called upon to help Wyndham establish a ‘gateway,’ aiming to enrich the municipality whilst informing others of its new found glory. In order to put Wyndham on the map, establishing the city as an integral, ever-growing part of Melbourne we aim to create a large-scale, monumental spectacle which demands attention and cannot be overlooked by travelers on the Princes Freeway. ‘The Western Gateway’ will be an icon which infers Wyndham’s continual evolution towards a greater, more vital sector of Melbourne, provoking a sense of anticipation for the future.

If selected, our proposal will provoke new, inspiring and brave ideas, generating a new discourse which is only achievable through the use of parametric design to represent morphogenesis. Today’s society is witness to the rapid growth of digital design tools which are pushing the boundaries of design. Parametric Softwares, Plug-ins, Add-ons, and Scripts are developing every day. Parametric design represents the architecture of the zeitgeist, there is no better tool is there to depict Wyndham’s rapid growth with than the digital design tools which hold the key to the future of design, inferring Wyndham’s future as bright and anticipated. With this in mind we can boost Wyndham’s desirability as a destination, inspiring a fresh and current outlook of Wyndham, conjuring up imagery of metamorphosis and morphogenesis, elevating the city’s status as a prominent and sophisticated part of Melbourne’s future. The product of our ‘gateway’ design will hold the ability to be experienced by anyone, on an equal basis, without qualification. Through the “Wyndham City Gateway” we aim to produce a domestic statement on the life we share in common, dealing with Wyndham City as an organism which in turn is connected to the larger, urban sprawl of Melbourne. We will evoke a sense of movement and dynamism, promoting the growth of an up and coming city like Wyndham, something which evolves and expands over time like nature. Lastly, we intend for the ‘gateway’ to be an overwhelming experiential structure, something wish demands attention, craving to be viewed from all angles and is utterly monumental and unforgettable. Viewers will retain dynamic imagery of Wyndham in their minds’, long after driving past the ‘gateway.’

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We aim to consider to notion of Wyndham City as an organism, focusing specifically on the metamorphosis and morphogenesis, representing change and transformation of organic forms. The process of parametric design tools will allow us to infer the relationship between the natural morphogenesis of living organisms (in this case Wyndham City) and their related algorithmic morphogenesis as a part of computational design. As Wyndham is known for its rural/environmental character, therefore the stipulation of naturally occurring processes ties in with the sites’ history.


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Figure 1.

Figure 2.


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SITE LOCATION. As a group we began looking at the two design possibilities/directions on offer from the site at hand_ Figure 1. depicts the 400m stretch of land spanning the length of Site A. Having a series of structures along this length would engage viewers over a vast distance, creating a truly experiential gateway. It is important to note that travelling at 100km/h this length of the site would take less than merely 40 seconds to drive past.

Figure 1.

Figure 2.

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Firgure 2. locates itself at the fork in the road at the southern end of Site A. This location is ideal for the placement of one large, monumental structure which craves attention from every direction, front and back. A large scale structure will engage the viewer from a significant distance away, for a evidential length of time; they will be approaching it in a head on direction, rather than having to look to the side like in Figure 1.


MID SEM REVIEW FEEDBACK

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Following the mid semester review I gained a much clearer understanding of what is required for the Gateway Design Project. It was brought to my attention the weakness and confusion surrounding my initial EOI. The concept of morphogenesis and metamorphosis was deemed as not linking to Wyndhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth strongly and immediately enough. Also, the metaphor of linking a city to a growing organism needs to be reevaluated in regards to representing the evolution and change that has undergone in Wyndham. Upon further reflection I began to see the flaws in our concept, it is crucial that I devise an instantaneous, stronger concept in order tighten the connection between the gateway design and the growth of Wyndham. It is also necessary that the chosen design clearly depicts something growing.

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GATEWAY


LECTURE CONTENT The week 8 lecture looked at kinetic structures and motion. Through looking at various projects the lecture interpreted the dynamic properties of architecture. All environments. We learnt the importance of controlling dynamic situations in contemporary architectural design, especially in the context of parametric design. Philip Beesley’s ‘Hylozoic Ground’ is a stimulating, interactive environment made of lightweight digitally-fabricated components fitted sensors. The components generate forms, changing at different speeds in relation to different observers. Beesley’s architecture breathes and shifts and moves like an organism.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v86B9Nz_LVU

In the adjacent video, displayed during the lecture, Beesley described ‘Hylozoic Ground’ as a “response of architecture which makes space and touches the edge of experience.” ‘Hylozoic Ground’ begs the question of “can architecture live?” I aim to keep this notion of ‘living architecture’ in mind as I design the ‘gateway’ project, we want to create a structure which strongly stipulates the evolving growth of a living city, producing something which gives the appearance of movement and aliveness will resonate strongly with our concept.


Site Location

Following the mid semester review my group was encouraged to work on formulating one large, monumental gateway structure, rather than a series of objects. Our gateway would locate itself at the fork in the road at the southern end of Site A. Personally I feel that the creation of one major structure fills the design brief much holistically than through creating a series of objects. The brief calls for an object which represents the entrance to Wyndham and well as the entrance to metropolitan Melbourne so it seems fitting to create an object which can be viewed and experienced equally from all converging roads.


Revised concept/ connection to Wyndham

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2022

2012 2032

SUBURBANIZATIONSecond

1

1:64.70

Last year, Wyndham city had the largest and fastest growth of all Victorian local government areas and this growth is predicted to continue exponentially over the next 30 years. This is due to the opportunity Wyndham provides for families to own their own home. Families who otherwise couldn’t afford it. The recent suburbanisation and prospective growth signifies its increasing importance within the broader context of Melbourne. Wyndham’s suburbanisation depicts the growth of destinations on the fringe of the Melbourne metropolitan area, strengthening the ties between the two locations as people commute back and forth. The growth caused by suburbanisation is definitely a strong link to which I can explore through the ‘gateway’ design. 2

Second

1:64.70

BOOMBURB

Second

267,000

Australian Bureau of Statistics.

335,000

1

267,000

184,191

2012

59

184,191

2022

Second

1:93.74

Expected population growth of Wyndham over the next twenty years. If this is any indication we can clearly see that Wyndham is developing at a very rapid rate. Wyndham City is definitely a ‘Boomburb’ on the cusp of exponential expansion. Through our design we aim to depict Wydham’s position as a ‘Boomburb,’ a rapidly growing city that remains suburban in character.


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L-SYSTEMS

L-systems are used to model growth process and I used the Grasshopper plug-in ‘Rabbit’ to experiment with l-systems. For a while I was pretty set on using an l-system to derive our ‘gateway’ design from. Although the cubes created by the l-system are very representative of suburbanizing and multiplying houses, the system was far too unpredictable and hard to control and manipulate with such little knowledge of ‘Rabbit.’ Inevitably I decided to move on from pursuing an l-system derived design.


REPRESENTING WYNDHAM AS A SUBURBANIZING BOOMBURB. (DESIGN PHASE)

EXTRUDING GEOMETRY USING BEZIER CURVES

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Moving on from l-systems I shifted my focus towards a script which produces extruded geometry to varied degrees. The use of rectangular geometry in this script instantaneously gives the appearance of a growing city, linking directly to our concept of suburbanisation. Due to these strong links and the parametric appearance of this script I decided it would be the ideal aesthetics to begin manipulating into an eye catching ‘Gateway object.’ I would do this by altering the bezier curve which drives the shape of the extrusions, and by using multiple curve attractors to determine the overall shape of the object as well as its highest and lowest points.


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REPRESENTING WYNDHAM AS A SUBURBANIZING BOOMBURB. (DESIGN PHASE)

I soon came to the realization that the script I have decided to work with interestingly enough looks much like an evolving housing or city grid in plan view. This strengthens the ties between connecting the design to the suburbanisation of Wyndham, as each varied grid square size could almost be representative of a new home. Through our design we aim to depict Wydham’s position as a ‘Boomburb’ undergoing suburbanisation. We aim to stipulate the growing connection between Wyndham and Melbourne by deriving our design form the regular square geometry of the Melbourne CBD Hoddle grid. By distorting the rectilinear organization of the Hoddle grid we can infer a sense of movement, promoting the growth of Wyndham as an up and coming city that evolves and expands over time.


CONCEPT MODEL (DESIGN PHASE)

Using a concept model I began exploring ways in which I could apply my knowledge of Grasshopper in a way which would represent the suburbanisation of Wyndham, as well as the idea of Wyndham as a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Boomburb.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Using the chosen script, I developed the idea of tilting the rectilinear extruded geometry on its side, making each rectangle box hollow as to display an expanding suburban housing grid from an approaching view (Figure 1.) and an extruded, randomized and exaggerated city growth form from a passing view (Figure 2&3.). I feel this elevates the chosen script to a much more aesthetically interesting level, yet still maintains the conceptual depiction of growth and expansion.

Figure 1.

Figure 2.

Figure 3.


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REVISED EXPRESSION OF INTEREST As the City of Wyndham reinvents itself through upgrading its condition and aesthetics, we have designed a gateway that enriches the municipality and inform of its newfound glory. In order to put Wyndham of the map, establishing it as an integral, every growing part of Metropolitan Melbourne, we aim to create a monumental spectacle that demands attention. Our Western Gateway is an icon that infers Wyndham’s suburbanization and continual evolution towards a greater, more vital sector of Melbourne. Our proposal generates a new discourse of architecture that is only achievable through the use of parametric design.

Through our design we aim to depict Wydham’s position as a ‘Boomburb,’ a rapidly growing city that remains suburban in character. We have stipulated the growing connection between Wyndham and Melbourne by deriving our design form the regular square geometry of the Melbourne CBD Hoddle grid. By distorting the rectilinear organization of the Hoddle grid we can infer a sense of movement, promoting the growth of Wyndham as an up and coming city that evolves and expands over time. The ‘booming’ growth and extrusion of our design is reflective of rapid development and change, elevating the city’s status as a prominent and sophisticated part of Melbourne’s future. Parametric design is the emerging architectural zeitgeist and therefore there is no better way to illustrate current and future development. Lastly, we intend for the ‘gateway’ to be an overwhelming experiential structure, something wish demands attention, craving to be viewed from all angles and is utterly monumental and unforgettable. With this design we hope to boost Wyndham’s desirability as a destination, inspiring a fresh and current outlook on the morphing suburban area. Viewers will retain dynamic imagery of Wyndham in their minds’, long after driving past the ‘gateway.’

Martin Klimas, ‘Paintings in Motion,’ 2011. Kilmas’s ‘Paintings in Motion’ series perfectly captures the notion of something being in the midst of movement and growth. As I aim to represent Wyndham as a ‘Boomburb,’ I want our design to similarly appear to be exploding or ‘booming’ in a rapid state of flux. Source; http://www.martin-klimas.de/

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We decided to design a standalone sculpture at the fork of the Princes Hwy and Wests Road. This location is ideal for the placement of a monumental structure which craves attention from every direction. Last year, Wyndham city had the largest and fastest growth of all Victorian local government areas and this growth is predicted to continue exponentially over the next 30 years. This is due to the opportunity Wyndham provides for families to own their own home. Families who otherwise couldn’t afford it. The recent suburbanisation and prospective growth signifies its increasing importance within the broader context of Melbourne.


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GATEWAY


LECTURE CONTENT

The week nine lecture was delivered by Drew Williamson of McBride Charles Ryan architects. It was eye opening to witness the fabrication of parametric design being used by a reputable architectural practice. The lecture specifically focused on the upcoming Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre and the Yardmasters building. It was so refreshing to be exposed to such captivating realized works of architecture, instilling my faith in the future of real-life application of parametric design and a wider appreciation for the teaching of this subject. McBride Charles Ryan also have designed the Penleigh and Essendon Grammer School â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Infinity Centre,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; which was completed at the beginning of the year. This is the school which my younger brother attends so I was able to venture though the building, which is completely out of this world and nothing like any other school building I have even been inside before.

Images sourced from week 9 lecture slides.

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Figure 2. Using Grasshopper I manipulated the script I had chosen during week 8 until I was satisfied with the outcome, feeling that it captured the ideas set out on page 62-63 and satisfied the revised EOI on page 64. ‘Figure 1’ depicts the primary elevation of the final design and ‘Figure 2’ represents the Grasshopper script and the chosen bezier curve used to produce the ‘Gateway.’

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Figure 1.


DESIGN PROCESS ITERATION

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My parametric design process shows the warping of the Hoddle grid into the final design, illustrating the organic shift from large rural areas to condensed urban properties. I continued to manipulate the length and widths of the extruded rectilinear tubes until I was satisfied with their appearance. Initially our design very much demonstrated the growth of a city from the ground up, but in order for drivers to recognise the expanding suburban housing grid formation I tilted the rectilinear extruded geometry on its side to show varying extrusions as they drive around it (Figure 1.). I decided upon utilizing one central, large extrusion and having all the others appear to grow up and around it, as if trying to outreach each other inn a state of ‘booming’ growth. The notion of having the main and largest extrusions situated along one side of the structure allow to formation to balance and anchor to the ground without collapsing (Figure 1.).

Melbourne CBD Hoddle Grid. (Conceptual starting point)

Figure 1. Size of an average car in relation to the 20m tall design.

Wyndham as a series of large rural areas.

Wyndham housing grid beginning to suburbanize and ‘boom.’


Wyndham housing grid undergoing rapid expansion and suburbanisation, creating a dense urban grid.

Final grid formation depicting Wyndham as a fully fledged ‘boomburb’. Slight gaps are created between each square of the gird, stipulating the spaces between properties and separation of housing. The movement felt by the large extrusions depicts Wyndham city as having the largest and fastest growth of all Victorian local government areas in 2011. (Australian Bureau of Statistics) This growth is predicted to continue exponentially over the next 30 years which is why the ‘Gateway’ appears in a state of constant flux. The final grid shape is derived loosely from the plan of Wyndham. The sheer size and dynamism of the design unlike any roadside sculpture I have seen before. It is definitely a symbol of parametric design and I am proud that it displays the capabilities of Grasshopper.

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DESIGN PROCESS

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Having one 20m high structure will engage viewers from a distance as they travel along the Hwy towards Melbourne or Wyndham. Its primary elevation targets those travelling towards Melbourne and Wyndham, whilst an alternate view is provided for those existing Melbourne. From a distance the viewer will see only the skeletal framed housing grid (Figure 1.), however as they approach the structure the individual tubes will appear to extrude at differing lengths, representing rapid growth and dynamism (Figure 2.). The flat sided view of the ‘Gateway,’ seen when exiting Melbourne, represents the dense urban grid created by the sprawling, random suburbanisation occurring on the fringe of the Metropolitan Melbourne areas, such as Wyndham, serving as a constant reminder of the bright, promising future’s which these areas hold. The arrangement of tubes is haphazard and disorganised, demonstrating the rampant growth of the residential area as a rapidly developing ‘Boomburb.’

Figure 1.

Figure 2.

}


1:250 SITE PLAN

00 00

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1

0 5,

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1:50 MODEL CONSTRUCTION

Construction of the 1:50 model proved to be far more difficult than initially intended, due to the fact that we used a numbered template to ensure that each of the 726 tubes we positioned in their correct spot, hence the physical model is a direct replica of the digital one. We used double sided tape to stipulate the gaps between each tube. In hindsight tape was probably not the sturdiest of materials, but was the only option available which would adequately depict our design intention of having spaces between each tube. In looking back the only thing I would change in regards to our design would be to extrude each tube slightly further to give slightly more depth and stability to the structure. I am however pleased with the model we created, I believe it does the design justice.


REAL LIFE CONSTRUCTION The structure can be made possible with the use of a steel frame, grounded by deep bored pile footings. The steel frame fits neatly within the intentionally created spaces which separate each extruded tube. Light weight copper will form the extruded rectangles with a line of rubber insulation tape separating the copper and the steel to limit chemical reaction. Stainless steel M12 bolts would be used, again preventing a direct connection between the reactive metals.

Other material choices include using either zinc or titanium panels to clad the steel frame. (Such titanium panels can be seen on the exterior of Frank Gehry’s Guggenhein Museum Bilbao). However, personally I believe it would be aesthetically interesting should our ‘gateway’ remain white in color, it would stand out vividly against the grass and skyline, representing Wyndham’s fresh, bright future. In order to do this we could employ white powder coated steel cladding.

COPPER

STEEL FRAME

RUBBER INSULATION TAPE - 3mm BORDERING COPPER TO LIMIT CHEMICAL REACTION WITH STEEL

M12 STAINLESS STEEL BOLTS SPOTLIGHT

FOOTING

PIER CAP

BORED CONCRETE PIER FOOTING


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week ten_

10

GATEWAY


LECTURE CONTENT

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBec95Mv8G8&feature=related

The week ten lecture was definitely my favorite lecture of the subject so far. It dealt with using stop-motion animation methods and techniques to represent a change in architectural environments. Designing and representing dynamic situations was at the core of the content, theoretical considerations, the precedents shown were captivating and inspiring. I particularly enjoyed Maurice Gee’s ‘Going West’ which demonstrated a representation of a city through intricate paper manipulation. Having never produced a stop motion before, I did however feel that the precedents shown could have been a little bit more basic, also, I would have liked to of been taught a handful of basic production techniques. This week I am to produce, to the best of my ability, a few draft cut stop-motion animations which explore various aspects of the design.


STOP MOTION EXPLORATION

STOP MOTION 1: GRASSHOPPER MODEL EXPLORATION This short stop motion was done via capturing a series of images from the Rhino ‘perspective’ viewpoint. It explores the model’s entirety, travelling around it from the appropriate real-life eye level. By stipulating precisely what it would be like to circle the ‘gateway’ from the position of being in a car, we see just how overwhelmingly large the design is, as well as the effect of the extrusions to the grid formation. Through the use of Rhino, the stop motion also explores the shadows cast on the design over the course of a day, the light creates dramatic changes due to the hollow nature of the extruded tubes.


STOP MOTION 2: 1:20 DESIGN DETAIL PHYSICAL MODEL UNDER EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS. The Western Gateway Project should be seen as a dynamic whole where every facet morphs with time and as such copper would be an ideal material choice. As Wyndham changes and develops, so to will the copper â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;gateway.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Untreated copper oxidizes in the atmosphere and over a period of 7 to 10 years the material will transform, changing from a rich copper colour to a vibrant green patina. Here is an example of the process which we stipulated ourselves using acid to speed up the process. We formulated a short stop motion which depicts the changing aesthetics of copper over a ten year period as it oxidizes in the atmosphere. The adjacent images are captured from our stop-motion.


Figure 4.

Figure 3.

Figure 2. 54 Figure 1.


STOP MOTION 3: REALIZATION OF PHYSICAL MODEL

The 39 second outcome of this stop motion is quite rough and a bit shaky, however considering it was my first time doing such a thing I am pleased with the result nevertheless. It serves as a raw, unpolished insight into the conceptual process of the design, establishing it as an analogy of Wyndham’s booming housing grid.

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This stop motion brings together our concept and the physical model. It begins by depicting the rapid suburbanisation of Wyndham through that use of cardboard cut outs (Figure 1.). It goes on to demonstrate the booming growth of Wyndham in plan form, symbolizing the expansion of the city’s housing/suburban grid (Figure 2.). Finally, a stage was set up (Figure 4.) to photograph a scale car driving past the structure (Figure 3.), providing insight into the physicality of the design, demonstrating its connection and direct reference to Wyndham’s suburban housing grid .


1:50 PHYSICAL MODEL

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Primary elevation which directly faces the oncoming traffic of the Princess Freeway for an extended length as they approach the structure. At this stage viewers would not be aware of the depth to the structure, viewing it as merely a urbanized, dense housing grid formation.

At night the sculpture will be illuminated by spotlights embedded within the ground. This will not only make the design visible from the road but will also create an added sense of dynamism, splaying shadows across the ground and refracting light off the reflective copper.


The extrusions of the tubes become gradually more visible as one drives past the ‘gateway,’ leaving viewers with the perception of growth and movement. 83 Dynamic side view of the ‘gateway’ experienced by drivers as they approach a parallel position with the structure. The tube extrusions are in full view, one can see the sweeping motion of the differently sized tubes, gaining momentum and length as they reach the furthest point. This to me represents a ‘boomburb’s’ rapid growth.


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GATEWAY


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Final presentation boards depicting our ‘gateway’ design from conception to its final realization as a 3D physical model. Through our presentation argued our project’s case for innovation and explained how the project satisfied the requirements of the Gateway Project brief.


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week twelve_ LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES 1.1 PERSONAL BACKGROUND AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES Without any background knowledge of either Grasshopper or Rhino it quickly became apparent to me that the main learning objective which I would strive to achieve would be to gain a basic understanding of both these programs. I definitely found this easier to achieve in terms of learning Rhino as oppose to Grasshopper. By watching a plethora of videos regarding Rhino training I was able to grasp a firm hold on the main aspects and tools of the program. In terms of familiarizing myself with Grasshopper, I found that the tutorial videos and Ex:Lab manual were useful, but often did not demonstrate the full extents of applying the task at hand to a situation whereby it would be used. I did however, find that the fabrication tutorials for Grasshopper were excellent in helping me understand the connections between both programs. I also found that the fabrication tutorials for Grasshopper were excellent in helping me understand the connections between both programs and were excellent tools in preparing a design for fabrication. With a background in using strictly ArchiCAD I was interested to see the capabilities of two other programs which, if not for this studio, I probably would not have been exposed to. Also, aside from using Grasshopper and Rhino, I wanted to familiarize myself with using both InDesign and Illustrator, two programs of which I had not used previously. I have identified both model making and photography as two of my weakest points in regards to the course. Hence, I wanted to learn a thing or two about producing high quality photographs and model making. 1.2 LEARNING PROGRESS The progress of my learning definitely peaked during the last 4 to 6 weeks of the course. For the first 8 weeks or so I spent my time completing tutorial after tutorial, not really feeling as through I was achieving much. However, once the ‘Western Gateway Design Project’ was underway, I was also forced to face my fears and begin applying my acquired knowledge of Grasshopper and Rhino to produce a design. I still maintain only a very slight grasp on the basic components of Grasshopper and I do believe it is just one of those things that take time and patience. I think perhaps what i was lacking at first was the enthusiasm, immediate gratification and sense of real life project applicability linked to a program such as Grasshopper. As the weeks went by, the evocative lectures began to provide me with a sense of clarity, ensuring me that there are many practical real world situations and scenarios whereby Grasshopper could be used to produce things more than a ‘Gateway.’ This inspired me to invest myself in the program and I am happy with the design I achieved with such little time, I do believe it maintains a strong connection to Wyndham, fulfils the brief and it is unlike any roadside sculpture I have seen before. It is definitely a symbol of parametric design and I am proud that it displays the capabilities of Grasshopper.


1.3 LEARNING OUTCOMES In terms of my learning outcomes, I am overall quite pleased with how I have handle such a new, exhilarating and challenging subject. Particularly I am pleased with the knowledge gained in using and understanding the basic functions of Rhino and Grasshopper, as well as InDesign and Illustrator. I am disappointed that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get much of a chance to gain photography and photo editing skills, I feel that this is widely due to the major assignment being a group effort and photography was a task which was delegated to another group member. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to photograph the final model but I did take the photographs seen on page 63 and on page 75 and I am pleased with the results of these. Also, experimenting with stop-motion was definitely a highlight of the course. The stop-motions produced were by no means of a particularly high quality but I feel that they are a decent first foray.

1.4 FUTURE WORK I definitely feel that the knowledge gained in this subject has been valuable. Although I may still not be as proficient using Grasshopper as I had hoped to be, I feel although I have come along way in understanding the relevance and necessity of what this subject is trying to achieve in terms of proposing new and inspiring digital design tools. This subject has forced me to step out of my comfort zone to gain an appreciation for those who are pushing the boundaries of architecture in terms of utilizing new programming environments and scripting capabilities, such as at McBride Charles Ryan. I found the parametric design process very innovative and aesthetically appealing, it is certainly something I would like to continue building my skills upon. In order to make the use of Grasshopper feel more applicable I am interested in learning how to incorporate an object or facade created in Grasshopper or Rhino with a building design achieved through ArchiCAD or Revit. I understand that parametric design is the architectural movement of the zeitgeist and definitely an insight into our future, so I do believe that this studio is helping advance the discourse of architecture. However, I would first and foremost like to perfect my basic modelling skills on ArchiCAD before delving any further into parametric design, as I almost feel that it is necessary for me to get the basic building blocks of architectural digital modelling down packed before advancing any further.

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In terms of learning how to build architectural models, I was pleased to gain a wider understanding of the fabrication process and the manipulation of the digital model in order to be fabricated. In terms of actual model making, I felt that our final design was one which didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow much room for movement and experimentation when it came to producing a physical model. I think we aimed quite high with our design and the fabrication process was probably far more time consuming and involved then I had naively expected, particularly when it came to placing each of the tubes in their correct location. I feel that our model is probably a lot rougher and slightly less neat then I had pictured, this fact probably comes down to the fact that we underestimated the work and patience involved in producing a clean cut, exhibition quality model. Model making is definitely something I believe I need to work on in the future, however I still believe we produced the best work we could in terms of accurately representing our chosen design.


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