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INSIDE THIS ISSUE ¤ PEARL EMBELLISHED JEANS ¤ WOVEN CLUTCH BAG ¤ HAND-BUILT CLAY POTS ¤ KNITTED PIXIE BONNET ¤ BEADED STATEMENT NECKLACE ¤ PAPERCUT WALL ART

P

MAIN IMAGE PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

89


CONTENTS

ON THE COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE & MATILDA SMITH; MODEL: FRANCISKA BODNAR

63

18

FELT SOFTIES

issue number eighty nine

89

Air-dry clay pots

INTRODUCING.. LIVING The latest news from the world of handmade

Fill your life and home with crafted goodness

9 INTRODUCING…

43 LIVING

Handpicked crafty happenings

We find the loveliest hand-crafted, creative buys for your home

14 TRENDS Pantone’s 2018 Colour of the Year

46 HOME TOUR

18 FELT SOFTIES

Artist and interiors gal Lucy Tiffney shows us around her colourful Essex home

Sew adorable besties Kitty and Percy in pretty pastel-coloured felt

52 CROCHET BLANKET Hook up granny squares in spring brights

26 TEA AND A CHAT Meet artisan pen designer Tom Gyr

56 HEXIE PLACEMATS Sew patchwork beauties for your table

32 PEARL JEANS

Talk to us! facebook.com/MollieMakes

pinterest.com/MollieMakes

4 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

@MollieMakes

MollieMakes

youtube.com/user/MollieMakes

Jazz up your tired denim with a scattering of gems and pearls

61 FLORAL PAPERCUT

36 GOOD READ

63 CLAY POTS

How to balance your side hustle

Shortcut your way to artisan-look pottery

39 WOVEN CLUTCH

67 PULL-OUT PAPERS

Chunky texture and yarn tassels in functional clutch bag form

Eight quirky springtime patterns and posters designed by Suzy Ultman

Cut and layer graphic botanicals


39

Woven clutch bag

NEVER MISS AN ISSUE 24 Subscribe UK

Save 50% when you subscribe to Mollie Makes today

80 Subscribe overseas International subscribers save up to 78%

91

Knitted bonnet

FRESH IDEAS

32 Embellished jeans

Spring has officially sprung in the Mollie Makes office, so this issue is all about the new. We’re taking style cues from Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2018, Ultra Violet intended to evoke creative inspiration showing off our crafting in different ways (woven clutch bag, anyone?) and bringing next-level cuteness to your felt-based makes with the adorable BFFs on page 18. There are also original takes on favourite techniques, like Katie Jones’ amazing crochet cushion on page 81, and easy ways to update your home, such as the painterly clay pots on page 63. Use them to display your spring blooms, then show off your newlyacquired skills using #molliemakers.

LOVING Treats and treasures to fall in love with

Yvette Streeter Acting Editor

75 LOVING Beautiful things to adore and make

76 EASY-SEW PLAYMAT A drawstring mat for stashing toys

81 CROCHET CUSHION Go bold with Miami Memphis vibes

86 BEADED NECKLACE

81

Crochet cushion

Chevron patterns for everyday glam

91 BABY BONNET Knit a Scandi-style hat for a little ’un

95 SCREEN PRINTING Decorate cushions with bold motifs

98 TEMPLATES All the shapes for this issue’s makes

106 BACK PAGE PROJECT Yan Schenkel’s crochet inspiration Subscribe at molliemakes.com

86

Beaded necklace

Turn the page for more on your free gift! Then Turn to page 67 for your papers


Contributors

Tom Gyr Pen craftsman Tom used to work as a photographer for food start-ups and would often commute to work by kayaking along the Thames. He’s a big fan of Wes Anderson films – The Life Aquatic is one of his favourites. Read about Tom’s Studio on page 26. www.tomsstudio.co.uk

Manuela Trani As a little girl, Manuela thought clouds were made of whipped cream. She wanted to be a mermaid when she grew up, but instead turned to crafting, naming her business Nuvolina, which means ‘little cloud’ in Italian. Find Manuela’s cute felt softies on page 18. www.nuvolinahandmade.etsy.com

EDITORIAL Editor (on maternity leave) Cath Dean Acting Editor Yvette Streeter Senior Art Editor Helena Steele Deputy Art Editor Matilda Smith Commissioning Editor Lindsey Newns Production Editor Becca Parker Digital Editor (on maternity leave) Nina Dyer Digital Editor Hannah Carr Picture Editor Emma Georgiou molliemakes@immediate.co.uk

ADVERTISING

Call: 0117 300 8206 Senior Advertising Manager Penny Stokes Client Partnership Manager Beckie Pring Brand Sales Executive Lauren Morris

MARKETING & CIRCULATION

Head of Newstrade Marketing Martin Hoskins Newstrade Marketing Manager Janine Smith Subscriptions Director Jacky Perales-Morris Direct Marketing Manager Penny Clapp

PRODUCTION

Production Director Sarah Powell Production Managers Louisa Molter/Rose Griffiths Production Coordinator Lily Owens-Crossman

LICENSING

Director of International Licensing and Syndication Tim Hudson tim.hudson@immediate.co.uk

Lucy Tiffney Lucy grew up in Essex, making things with her friends and going on treasure hunts with her sisters. She’s now based in Colchester, and pours her passions for colour and unusual objects into interiors, design and lecturing. Peek inside Lucy’s colourful home on page 46. www.lucytiffney.com

Sadie Hawker Jewellery designer Sadie has been overaccessorising and making questionable fashion choices for as long as she can remember. She loves vegetarian-friendly restaurants, New York City and a good margarita. Make Sadie’s beaded necklace on page 86. www.shhbysadie.com

BUYING TEAM Paul Torre, Karen Flannigan, Corinne Mellerup

MANAGEMENT

Publishing Director Catherine Potter Group Senior Editor Julie Taylor Chief Executive Officer Tom Bureau Managing Director, Bristol Andy Marshall

SUBSCRIPTIONS

For new orders and back issues sales call 03330 162 148 or visit www. buysubscriptions.com/craft. For enquiries relating to your subscription email molliemakes@buysubscriptions.com or call +44 (0) 1604 973 757.

COPYRIGHT GUIDELINES FOR PROJECTS We have requested permission from designers so you can make and sell selected projects on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. Please credit the designer where appropriate and when requested. Mollie Makes encourages creativity and as well as making for gifts and for yourself, we want to help you make small batches of handmade items to sell. You can individually handmake as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell for yourself, a local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) or go into mass production, so you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine or its kit is prohibited. Please respect one another’s copyright.

Anna Birtwistle Northern girl Anna loves nothing more than snuggling up with a cuppa and some crochet. Designer by day, blogger by night, she’s always looking for ways to be creative, from styling an outfit to cooking a new recipe. Sew Anna’s denim project on page 32. www.madeupstyle.com

Suzy Ultman Suzy grew up in Pennsylvania, collecting stickers, tap dancing, adventuring with her sisters, woodworking with her dad and sewing with her mum. From this playful foundation, Suzy creates to spread happiness. See Suzy’s quirky papers on page 67. www.suzyultman.com

Other contributors Anna Alicia,Valerie Bracegirdle, Franciska Bodnar @ Mustard Models, Dave Caudery, Cath Chamberlain, Lucy Davidson, Hilary Frazier, Nicky Gotobed, Chloe Hardisty,Victoria Haynes, Holly Johnson, Katie Jones, Erin Lacy, Fiona Murray, Lou Orth, Mandy O’Sullivan, Caroline Rees,Yan Schenkel, Philip Sowels, Lottie Storey, Lara Watson, Naomi Wilkinson

6 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

Mollie Makes is published by:

Immediate Media Company Limited, 2nd Floor, Tower House, Fairfax Street, Bristol, BS1 3BN. Tel: 0117 927 9009 We abide by IPSO’s rules and regulations. To give feedback about our magazines, please visit immediate.co.uk, email editorialcomplaints@immediate.co.uk or write to Yvette Streeter or Katherine Conlon, Immediate Media Co., Vineyard House, 44 Brook Green, London W6 7BT. Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited (company number 05715415) is registered in England and Wales. The registered office of Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited is at Vineyard House, 44 Brook Green, London W6 7BT. All information contained in this magazine is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk. Although every care is taken, neither Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited nor its employees agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.


your bonus gift!

Cross stitch banner

THIS GIFT COMES WITH THE PRINT COPY OF THE MAGAZINE ONLY. ALTERNATIVE GIFT ON SOME OVERSEAS COPIES. PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Stitch Chloe Hardisty’s tasselled slogan wall hanging for your craft space

Positive vibes only.. “I love designing kits that are so simple they can be made in an evening – there’s nothing like the satisfaction of a finished project. I also love positive phrases or words all around my house, and ‘be kind’ is a favourite one of mine. I’m often asking my two young boys to be kind, so a little reminder hung up on the wall is no bad thing. Anything pink always gets my vote, but you could stitch the board with your own thread,

or even paint the board a different colour first if you really wanted to personalise it!” Chloe Hardisty is mum to two little boys, and lives in Loughborough where she runs Cotton Clara, designing modern embroidery kits using laser cutting techniques. She loves dreaming up new ideas for innovative craft projects alongside the business. Find her at www.cottonclara.com. Turn to page 98 for instructions on making your banner, then share using #molliemakers.


Gorgeous knitting, crochet & embroidery supplies

WWW.LOOPKNITTING.COM 15 CAMDEN PASSAGE, ISLINGTON, LONDON, ENGLAND


INTRODUCING..

89

THE LATEST IN CREATIVE GOODNESS – HANDPICKED JUST FOR YOU Rainy days just got a whole lot better thanks to Gudrun Sjoden’s monochrome mac. Its statement print fully overthrows any geek chic vibes your standard anorak might have, and as the UK tends to see more showers than sunshine, this fashion-forward jacket will definitely earn its keep. www.gudrunsjoden.com

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89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 9


TOP READ Il-loom-inati

In their new book, Weave This, The London Loom dream team Francesca Keltz and Brooke Dennis showcase weaving as you’ve never seen it before. From giant looms to fluorescent soumaks, we’re in love. www.hardiegrant.com

Gray by Southwood Stores have brought back their apparel line for women. Soft organic cotton in feminine shapes deserves a spot in your wardrobe, so bag yourself a treat while stocks last. www.southwood-stores.myshopify.com

THIS MONTH’S WISHLIST If your socks aren’t making you smile, they aren’t working hard enough.These Lily Rib ankle socks in fuel yellow and candy pink will help put everything right. www.happysocks.com

Fans of pretty and functional craft tools, have we got a treat for you. Straight from the pages of a storybook, these golden Longwood scissors are what every sewing box needs. www.anthropologie.com 10 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

When Lee Foster-Wilson decided to turn her design skills to terrazzo, only good things could come of it, as this backpack proves. Upgrade your current bag, activewear-style, or use it to smarten up your gym game. www.bonbiforest.com


Jessica’s rope baskets come in all shapes and sizes

BRAND FOCUS Ruby Cubes Jessica Geach of Ruby Cubes uses rope to form bowls, placemats, baskets and other handmade accessories, creating affordable, artisanal homewares everyone will love. Working with natural materials, Jessica has an ethos of ‘earth friendly mindfulness’, echoed in the subtle colour palettes and freeform shapes of her makes. Shop her current collection, or request a custom piece through her website www.rubycubes.co.uk

Give your sideboard a fun update and create the table top menagerie we’ve all been dreaming of with cute planters and quirky terrariums. Because you can never have too many llama-themed accessories. www.westelm.co.uk

WEBSITE TO WATCH Rosie Drake Knight

Add a boho vibe to your décor with rope bowl planters

All Jessica’s products are handmade in her studio

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSICA GEACH

Designer Rosie Drake Knight specialises in surface pattern and leatherwork, combining the two to bring luxury to everyday pieces. Her collections can be inspired by organic patterns, textures, or the love of a certain colour palette, and she makes it her business to track the origins of the materials used within them. www.rosiedrake-knight.com 89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 11


TOP READ Petal crush

Did someone say new season wardrobe update? Paint splatters, clashing colours and glints of gold combine to make a multi-textured statement necklace that’ll put a spring in your step, and bring a fresh feel to any outfit. www.oliverbonas.com

If the early signs of spring aren’t quite meeting your floral needs, Hannah Read-Baldrey’s new book Flowerbomb! definitely will. Full of craft projects to bring flowers into your home, your next soirée and your street style, you just need to choose which of the 25 ideas to make first. www.pavilionbooks.com

We’re declaring the Queen Palm Ben Chair from Kitty McCall’s new Brasilia collection to be, well, the queen of all chairs.Treat your home to its very own tropicalprint throne. www.kittymccall.com

Upgrade your party to a fiesta with Talking Tables’ Boho range. Mix and match floral plates, Frida Kahlo cups and pom poms galore. Oh, and don’t forget the llama cocktail sticks. www.talkingtables.co.uk 12 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

Show your mum you’re her biggest fan this Mother’s Day. Better yet, buy a set of these Rifle Paper Co. cards and tell well-deserving mum pals how great they are too. After all, not all heroes wear capes. www.riflepaperco.com


INTRODUCING trends

THIS MONTH WE’RE OBSESSING ABOUT...

ULTRA VIOLET Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2018 looks to the night sky for inspiration

Bring the drama with floor-to-ceiling swathes of this enigmatic shade. www.dulux.co.uk

14 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89


INTRODUCING trends 01

02

01

Get the look with

chunky knits and dark indigo jeans. www. anthropologie.com 02

Phone home from a

swirling galaxy sky. www.society6.com 03

03

Shiny cosmos vibes,

AND it’s in the sale. www.tattydevine.com 04

08

04

Party animal or sofa

and Netflix? You decide. www.ohhdeer.com 05

For planning magical

adventures. www. nikkistrange.co.uk 06

Violet represents

creativity, so channel it with yarn. www. woolandthegang.com 07

Contemplate the

mysteries of Aura Quartz. www. eclecticeccentricity. bigcartel.com 08

A whole world in one

pair of earrings. www.

05

tinygalaxies.com

06

MAKE IT! TURN THE PAGE TO 07

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

DIY THE PANTONE TREND 89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 15


INTRODUCING trends

MAKE IT!

ULTRA VIOLET HOOP

MATERIALS Q Paintbox Yarns Simply Chunky, 100% acrylic, 136m/149yd per 100g, one ball in Pansy Purple (Yarn A) Q Stylecraft Special DK, 100% acrylic, 294m/322yd per 100g, one ball in Violet (Yarn B) Q Small amount of cream DK yarn Q Wooden embroidery hoop, 23cm (91/8") diameter Q Wooden embroidery hoop, 16cm (63/8") diameter Q Copper acrylic paint Q Wooden beads Q Paint brush

16 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

01

02

03

04

05

06

01 Separate the inner and outer parts of both embroidery hoops. Put aside the outer parts of the hoops as they won’t be used. Paint both inner hoop parts with copper paint and leave to dry. 02 Next, cut lengths of yarn for the tassels. Cut 75 80cm (31½") lengths from Yarn A, and cut 120 60cm (235/8") lengths from Yarn B. 03 To make the tassels for the larger hoop, gather five lengths of Yarn A together and fold in half to make a loop. Pass the loop through the embroidery hoop from back to front, and pull the ends of the yarn through the

loop, as shown. Repeat another 14 times with the remaining lengths of Yarn A. 04 To make the tassels for the smaller hoop, gather 20 lengths of Yarn B together and attach using the same method as per Step 3, stopping once you have six tassels in total on the hoop. 05 Add wooden beads to the smaller hoop by taking three strands from the centre of the first tassel and three strands from the next tassel, and threading on a bead. Push the bead to the top, then repeat for the remaining tassels.

06 Join the two hoops together at the top by wrapping a length of cream yarn around both hoops and securing it with a knot. Thread on wooden beads, using the image as a guide, tie a knot and make a hanging loop. Trim the Yarn B tassels diagonally, as shown, to finish.

Victoria Haynes lives on the south coast of the UK with her husband and children. When she’s not dreaming up craft tutorials, she’s out exploring or pottering in the garden. www. theowlandtheaccordion.com


Fruity

Est. 2000 | Devon

Piña Colad a Body Bu

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Ingredients from us, handmade by you. Find all of the ingredients and a full recipe at www.thesoapkitchen.co.uk


Kitty & Percy Sew the cutest pair of feltie pals – Manuela Trani shows you how


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH


02

03

05

06

HOW TO MAKE… FELT SOFTIES MATERIALS Q Wool felt in Natural, Peach, Blossom, Mocha, Fawn, Blush, Pale mint, Moss and Pistachio, 1mm (1/8") thick (we got ours from www. paper-and-string.net) Q Riley Blake Designs Ava Rose Flower cotton fabric in Cream Q Matching sewing threads Q Two black brads, 0.5cm (¼") Q One white plastic pearl bead, 3mm (3/8") 20 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

Q Three white plastic pearl beads, 4mm (¼") Q Four mustard yellow seed beads Q Embroidery thread in black, pink, red and mustard yellow Q Pale pink satin ribbon, 4mm (¼") wide Q Pink powder blush Q Cotton bud Q Soft toy stuffing Q Erasable fabric marker Q Pinking shears

We may have reached peak cuteness with this project – what could be more adorable than cat and mouse BFFs Kitty and Percy sharing a strawberry picnic? And what makes them almost too pure for this world is the off-the-scale level of detail involved – blushing cheeks, bows and tiny pearls. Use three strands of matching embroidery thread for sewing throughout, unless stated otherwise, and turn to page 98 for our embroidery stitch guides. 01 Using the templates on page 98, cut two head pieces and one cape

piece in peach felt, and one face piece, two leg pieces, two foot pieces and four arm pieces in fawn felt. In pale mint felt, cut two boot pieces, two mouse pieces, four ear pieces, two sole pieces and four paw pieces. Cut two cat ear pieces and one mouse tummy piece in natural felt. From blush felt, cut two strawberry pieces and two inside ear pieces. Finally, cut one hair piece in the mocha felt. 02 Place the hole template onto one head piece and trace the outline using erasable pen. Cut out the hole along the markings. Pin the hair piece onto the face piece


04

05

07

07

and sew along the fringe using backstitch and matching thread. 03 Pin the face piece under the head piece so it looks centred through the hole, and sew together around the edge of the hole with backstitch and matching thread. Sew the cat ear pieces in place with whipstitch. Using erasable pen and the image as a guide, draw on the mouth, cheeks and eyes. Sew over the lines using backstitch and red embroidery thread for the mouth, satin stitch and black embroidery thread for the eyes, and satin stitch and pink embroidery thread for the cheeks.

Using matching thread, blanket stitch the head pieces together, starting at the neck opening, and fill with stuffing. From the pistachio and moss felt, cut four small leaves and attach them to the head with a few stitches. Cut out four 1cm (3/8") circles from natural felt and two bigger circles from blush and blossom felt for the flowers, leaving irregular edges to give a more natural look. Attach the flowers to the head with a couple of stitches and add a mustard yellow seed bead on top of each one. 05 Sew two arm pieces together using blanket stitch and matching 04

thread, leaving a small opening for stuffing. Stuff, sew the gap closed, then repeat. Fold one leg as pictured and stitch along the longer edge with blanket stitch, leaving the top open. Sew the foot in place and stuff. Wrap the boot around the foot and sew the ends together with blanket stitch and matching thread. Add the sole, then repeat for the second leg. 06 Trace the outline of the dress template onto the WS of the cotton fabric, then cut it out using pinking shears, leaving a 0.5cm (Âź") seam allowance. Use this piece as a template to cut out a second 89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 21


08

09

10

11

HOW TO MAKE… FELT SOFTIES matching dress piece. Pin RS together, with the legs in between. Sew along the drawn line using backstitch, leaving the neck open. Turn RS out, fill with stuffing, then sew the gap closed using blanket stitch and matching thread. 07 Pin the head to the body and sew using ladder stitch. Attach the arms and cape with a couple of stitches. Fold a 10cm (4") length of pink ribbon as shown and tie the middle with thread. Sew the bow to the neck and add a 4mm (¼") pearl bead on top. Add pearl beads to the boots as well. 08 Sew the inside ears to the ears. Sew two arm pieces and stuff, then 22 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

repeat. Whipstitch the tummy onto one mouse piece. Using the image as a guide, embroider the mouth and nose with backstitch and satin stitch in black and pink embroidery thread. To add black brads for the eyes, mark the position on the felt, then gently push them through. Turn the felt over, open out the metal ends and fold flat. Pin and sew the ears and mouse pieces together using blanket stitch, starting at the bottom. Leave a small gap, stuff, then sew closed. 09 Cut a 2.5 x 1cm (1 x 3/8") piece of blossom felt, then tie it in the middle with thread, as shown, to form a bow. Attach the arms and

sew on the bow with a 3mm (3/8") pearl bead on top. 10 Embroider seeds onto one strawberry piece with the mustard yellow embroidery thread, as shown, then sew the strawberry pieces together with blanket stitch and stuff lightly. Cut out four leaves from pistachio and moss felt and attach them to the top of the strawberry with a few stitches. Sew the strawberry on between the mouse’s paws as shown. 11 Make a tail with a 9cm (3 5/8") length of pink ribbon and finish with a button at the join. Use the cotton bud to dab on a bit of pink powder blush for the cheeks.


Manuela Trani Manuela is a 34-year-old Italian crafter living with her two-yearold boy and loving partner in Slovenia. She loves cats (especially her own furry kitty, ZoÍ), autumn, chocolate and, of course, felt. Find Manuela’s patterns in her Etsy shop, and her finished makes on Insta @nuvolinahandmade. www.nuvolinahandmade.etsy.com


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Describe your style in a few words… Contemporary, uncommon, joyful and innovative – at least that’s what I strive for.

Following your passion with...

TOM GYR

The Bournemouth-based calligraphy tool designer tells us how luck, hard work and Instagram have helped grow his business

Words: HOLLY JOHNSON Photographs: FIONA MURRAY

We all dream of that lightbulb moment when we identify the need for a niche product we can develop into a business. In the case of Tom Gyr, it came when his wife – calligrapher Gemma Milly (www.gemmamilly.com) – inspired him to start making calligraphy pens. Since then, Tom has turned pen design into a career, selling his creations around the world via his online shop as well as in Harrods and Quill London. Growing up, Tom spent summer holidays visiting his father, who worked as a designer at an arts university in 26 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

Switzerland. Watching the students at work gave Tom a glimpse into the world of design and the impetus to pursue a similar career path. After studying in Newcastle, he worked as a graphic designer in London before meeting Gemma and moving to Bournemouth. Tom’s passion for quality is what gives him the edge. Designed to last, Tom’s products are made from recycled materials such as surf board resin and kitchen counters – a backlash against mass-produced alternatives. We visited his busy studio to find out more.

How did you get into making calligraphy tools? I made my first pen after seeing my wife Gemma using a cheap mass-produced pen to create her beautiful work. I couldn’t live with this so I decided to hand-make her one she’d love using every day. I’d previously used my father-in-law’s 1960s engineering lathe to make copper cufflinks for the groomsmen at our wedding and thought it would be the perfect tool for the job. A few days later I’d produced something I was happy with, and Gemma was over the moon too. Where did you learn these skills? I studied at Northumbria University. They have an amazing course called 3D Design, Furniture and Product. I was like a kid in a sweet shop with a huge workshop full of laser cutters, 3D printers and beautiful old machinery. It’s where I learnt how to make, and I was lucky enough to be set some really interesting briefs, like making a cutlery set from scratch, which honed my metal-working skills and eye for detail.


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

“I’m still learning and I feel lucky to be hands-on with every piece I make.”

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Newcastle also has a great design culture, with an annual design fair and some pretty world-class alumni such as Apple’s Jonny Ive and furniture maker Max Lamb. Tell us about your creative process. I like to get ideas out on paper – quick and messy sketches help me to figure out how things could be made to work. Once I’m happy with a concept, I’ll refine it with finer sketches or a scale drawing. Prototyping really allows me to iron out the details and make the smaller visual tweaks Subscribe at molliemakes.com

to create a more refined product. From this stage I repeat, repeat, repeat and keep distilling the process. I’m still learning new techniques and processes and feel lucky to be hands-on with every piece I make as I think it allows me to constantly improve the finished product.

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Tom’s workspace

to be sent off to a

includes a wood

customer in Tom’s

lathe he uses for

bespoke, brass-

creating more

foiled packaging.

free-form designs. 02

This finished

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Wife Gemma

practises lettering

white corian and

with one of Tom’s

copper pen is ready

new Studio Pens.

Take us through a typical working day. I’m definitely a morning person, so after having breakfast with my wife and daughter I like to get to the studio early. I’m quite free-form in my working style and like to 89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 27


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

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make in batches, so generally every day will be different. I might be turning on the lathe, developing new products, emailing suppliers, taking photos or putting the finishing touches to a completed pen. I love the variety of each day and not knowing what emails or orders may come in.

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This eco resin, cast

What was the hardest part of getting your business started? Telling my wife I was going full-time with the business after we’d had a baby. I joke, but it was a bit of a make-or-break decision. Initially, earning a living making calligraphy pens seemed unrealistic, but having supportive customers and a global audience – thanks to Instagram – has made this dream a reality. I have a lot to thank Gemma for too.

with 24ct gold leaf and off-cuts from other pens, will be used for Tom’s zero waste range. 02

A batch of pens are

lined up, ready to be polished and sent out. 03

Blanks are drilled,

then attached to copper or brass ‘tails’.

How did you go about getting stocked in Harrods and Quill London? Harrods had seen my work on Instagram and got in touch. To say the least, it was a very exciting email to receive and gave me a lot of confidence I was going in the right direction. It was a similar moment with Quill – Lucy, the owner, has been a great ambassador for calligraphy nationwide and to have her endorsement was superb. What could you not live without? Family is the obvious answer, but it’s true. I tried and failed at starting my own design

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INTRODUCING tea & a chat

“It’s important for me to follow my curiosity and to experiment.”

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company before, and I think when failure doesn’t have consequences for anyone but yourself, it’s harder to summon up the same kind of motivation. Can you share the most important business lesson you’ve learnt? I think it’s to never base decisions on profit. I’ve worked for companies where the bottom line was the most important thing. For me, it’s about creating products my customers will love and going from there. It’s also important for me to follow Subscribe at molliemakes.com

my curiosity, experimenting with different materials and processes. Quite often this results in a calamity of a product, but I learn from these mistakes and end up with something completely unique.

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Described as the

black chip blanks

heart of the studio,

wait to be turned

Tom uses this 1960s

into pens.

Myford Lathe on all his pen designs. 02

Gold leaf and

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Tom gets stuck

into the messy job of hand-turning.

Why is zero waste important to you? I’m fed-up with products that don’t consider the environment in their conception. I think it’s my responsibility as a designer to create pieces that leave as little impact on the planet as possible. My zero waste pens take beautiful waste 89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 29


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

02

materials, like curls from turning copper on the lathe, and repurpose them into the body of the pen. It’s my intention to make everything to last at least a lifetime, so my products don’t end up in landfill. Describe your dream project. My dad used to make beautiful rocking horses. All of them have unfortunately been sold, but I have a picture of me on one as a three-year-old. When I find the time, I’d love to recreate his amazing designs and make one for my little girl. 01

01

Calligraphy pro

Gemma puts a pen through its paces in her own studio. 02

Gemma’s wedding

stationery business inspired Tom to start making his bespoke writing products.

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Tom’s Studio Tom Gyr creates bespoke calligraphy kit and writing instruments using recycled materials from his Bournemouth-based studio. He works on a 1960s lathe to produce high-end products that are used by some of the world’s top lettering artists. Find him on Instagram @tomsstudio. www.tomsstudio.co.uk

Can you tell us what’s next for you? I’m excited to launch the Studio Pen – it can switch between a fountain, rollerball, fineliner, felt tip or brush pen, which lets people use the same pen for all their pursuits. It’s my hope that a beautifullymade pen which lasts a lifetime can reduce the number of pens thrown away each year – 1.6 billion in the US alone. Finally, what’s the best piece of creative advice you’ve ever been given? “The creative adult is the child who survived.” This Ursula K. Le Guin quote reminds me not to take myself too seriously, and to keep the inquisitive sixyear-old in me in the driving seat when it comes to making creative decisions.


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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH, MODEL: FRANCISKA BODNAR


The pearl update Customise your well-worn denim – Anna Birtwistle shows you how


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HOW TO MAKE… PEARL EMBELLISHED JEANS MATERIALS QSelection of small, medium and large pearl beads QSelection of craft gems QJeans QWhite sewing thread QSewing needle QFine sandpaper QFabric glue

Unleash your inner pearly queen and adorn the heck out of your tired denim. Pearl-studded jeans are a trend we’ve seen all over the high street, just begging to be recreated with DIY couture. Nod to the craze with a demure polka dot sprinkling of tiny pearl beads, or go all-out and fade a cascade of them down the entire length of your jeans. And, who knew a string of pearls was what your knees had been missing this whole time? Wear your pearls, girls, and wear them on your legs. Pocket burst 01 Lay the jeans out on a clean, flat surface, facing up. To create a burst of pearls around the front pocket, start by placing the largest pearls a

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few centimetres below the opening of the pocket, leaving an even spacing between them. 02 Once you’re happy with the layout, make a faint mark on the jeans with a pencil or chalk to indicate the position of each pearl. Take the pearls off the jeans and place them to one side. 03 Using a needle and white thread, sew the largest pearl beads in place first, using the marks as guides. Make sure to only sew through one layer of the pocket as you work, and tie and cut off any excess thread at the back after each pearl is attached. 04 Once all the large pearls are in place, sew on a few medium-sized pearl beads in the same way. These should be placed a little lower

down the pocket, and evenly spaced around the larger pearls. 05 Using the image as a guide, fill in any large gaps with the smallest pearls, then randomly dot them around the bottom of the pocket, leaving a bigger gap between each pearl to finish off. Repeat this pearl burst formation on the other front pocket of the jeans to finish. Knee rip 06 To make the knee rip, measure a point just above the knee, then mark on the jeans where you’d like the rip to sit. Using the marked knee position as a guide, cut a 12 x 4cm (4¾ x 15/8") rectangle, starting and finishing a little way in from the seams on one leg of the jeans. Make sure to only cut through the


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front layer of the jeans when cutting out the knee rip rectangle. 07 Distress the edges of the cut by rubbing a piece of fine sandpaper over the fabric to give a worn and frayed look. Add more cuts above and below the knee rip in the same way for a more distressed look. 08 Using the needle and white thread, attach the thread to one end of the rectangle cutout at the back, then pull the length through to the front. Thread a row of different-sized pearls onto the needle to create a string of pearls the same length as the rectangle. 09 Sew the string of pearls to the other side of the rectangle and cut off any excess thread at the back. Make more strings of pearls in this way to fill the ripped knee, or add

smaller strings of pearls above and below for a more bejewelled look. Turn-up detail 10 To create embellished turn-ups, start by turning up the bottom cuff of the jean legs by approximately 5-6cm (2-23/8"). Press in place. 11 Arrange the craft gems on the turn-up. Once you’re happy with the placement, dab a small amount

of fabric glue onto the back of one of the gems and stick down in place on the turn-up. Glue the other gems evenly around the turn-up front and back, leaving an even space between each. Allow them to dry for a few minutes until they feel firm and secure. 12 Sew on some small pearls in the gaps between the gems to add finishing touches to the turn-ups.

Anna Birtwistle Designer, blogger and maker Anna is based in Lancashire. She loves to blog about her life and makes in her spare time and is always on the look out for things to customise. Anna’s also a bit of a travel enthusiast and enjoys seeking out new destinations to explore. www.madeupstyle.com

89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 35


ILLUSTRATION: NAOMI WILKINSON


INTRODUCING good read

A BIT ON THE SIDE

Earning a wage from your creative passion while still managing your main career is a dream for many, but how do you balance that side hustle? Words: LOTTIE STOREY Illustration: NAOMI WILKINSON

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rom Etsy shops to blogs, one in five of us now have a sideline that fulfils something in us our day job doesn’t. For some, the ultimate dream is to jack in the job in favour of becoming your own boss, but that isn’t necessarily right for everyone. It’s perfectly possible to balance both, but how? First things first, figure out why you want a sideline. Think really carefully about this one. Just because you can do both, doesn’t mean you should. To succeed, you’ll need to set some gentle objectives and limitations, especially around what to do if it grows and demands more of your time. What’s your end goal? Eleanor Willock writes popular parenting blog The Bristol Parent (www.thebristolparent.com). “Having a ‘side hustle’ is absolutely possible, and you can do both with great reward,” she says. But things have changed for Eleanor. “My blog is five years old this year. I’m very proud of [it], however I’ve run out of time to spend on it and want to be online less,” she admits. This is where looking ahead and planning come into play. Eleanor is now working out how to wrap up her blog and move onto the next project. “My advice would be to plan for every stage of your side hustle and think about how you want it to grow and change.”

EDUCATE AND ORGANISE

Onto The Plan. How can you walk the tightrope without burning the candle at both ends? Kim Lawler runs two businesses: a web design company and Finest Imaginary (www.finestimaginary.com), making and selling jewellery, stationery and homeware. Her best advice for managing both? Get organised. “Something that’s always worked well for me has been to list out the long and short-term goals and priorities in my business, so then I know where best to focus my time and be as productive as possible.” And once you’re up and running? “Learning to bend with your business and follow its ebbs and flows is really valuable. In the quieter months, you can prepare for the busier times by making extra stock or ordering supplies,” advises Kim. “I also love to outsource tasks that take up too much of my time or really annoy

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me, like my tax returns. Batching tasks is also a great time-saver too, like blocking off a couple of regular hours each month to sort out social media posts, write newsletters, or to tweak your Etsy listings.” Good advice. But what’s the best way to balance your time? “Balance can be such a difficult thing when you’re working more than one job, especially if you can’t be as flexible as you’d like,” Kim points out. The secret is finding ways of working that fit in more comfortably with your lifestyle. If you’ve been sitting in front of a screen all day at work, you might want to save your sideline admin for the weekend. Equally, vice versa may be better for you – saving your making and more creative tasks for ‘days off’ could feel like you’re doing something enjoyable with your weekend. And if you can afford it, get a cleaner.

FINDING TIME

While the temptation may be there to work on your project while in your day job, don’t do it. “Don’t jeopardise your main job and your main source of income!” urges founder of Women Who (www. womenwho.co), Otegha Uwagba. “If you need to, get up early and fit in a few hours before work. It’s so much more productive doing an hour or two before work and having your evenings free than coming home from work and doing extra hours then.” There’s a lot of life to fit in to 24 little hours a day – as well as work, many of us have families to care for, and our own needs are often the first to fall off the radar. But this way lies burnout. Although your side hustle was born of something you love, running it as a business means you’re working double time. Give yourself permission to recharge. Fix a set shut-off time each evening and remember to take holidays to give your brain and body space to relax. Keep all of this at the front of your mind and you should be okay. Accept that you can’t do it all. And if you need a bit more focus? Head to Etsy and browse for planners or motivational quotes for your home office wall. After all, the person who made them is probably up at 5am working on their sideline, too.

89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 37


WeaveR feveR

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Take your weaving out in the wild with Cath Chamberlain’s boho clutch

89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 39


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HOW TO MAKE… A WOVEN CLUTCH BAG MATERIALS Q Hayfield Bonus Aran Tweed, 20% wool/6% viscose/74% acrylic, 840m/920yd per 400g, one ball in Glencoe (929) (Yarn A) Q Women’s Institute Soft and Chunky, 70% acrylic/30% merino, 110m/120yd per 100g, one ball in Cream (Yarn B) Q WI Soft and Smooth Aran, 100% acrylic, 1000m/1094yd per 400g, one ball in Mustard (Yarn C) Q Tjockt Fat and Sassy Merino, 100% merino, 10m/11yd per 100g, one ball in Cloud (03) (Yarn D)

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Q Katia Concept All Seasons Cotton, 100% cotton, 130m/142yd per 50g, one ball in Off White (03) (Yarn E) Q Katia Peru, 40% wool/40% acrylic/20% alpaca, 106m/116yd per 100g, one ball in Black (02) (Yarn F) Q Loom, 100 x 40cm (393/8 x 15¾") Q Tapestry needle Q 1m (393/8") gold lining fabric Q 40 x 40cm (15¾ x 15¾") mustard velvet fabric Q Sewing thread in mustard and black Q 1cm (3/8") wooden bead Q Grey zip, 30cm (117/8") Q Sewing machine zipper foot

Ever fallen so in love with your weaving that you wanted to cart it about everywhere to show it off? Sure, you can Instagram it, but it’s way better if you can actually see the looks of admiration with your own two eyes. This deliciously tactile project is the craft equivalent of declaring your devotion from the rooftops – now you can lift the curfew and take your woven beloved out and about with you in glorious clutch bag form. It’s a simple make, packed with texture and tassels, and backed with luxe velvet. 01 To create the warp for the weaving, wrap Yarn A around the top and bottom of the loom and tie at the start and end, creating a warp width of 30.5cm (12"). 02 Thread the tapestry needle with Yarn B and start working plain weave stitch, passing the yarn

over and under the warps, then alternating back across, working under the warps you went over, and over the warps you went under. Work 10 rows in this way, then use plain weave to create a sloping triangle on the right-hand side. 03 Create a row of rya knots in Yarn C over the sloping triangle. Thread two 10cm (4") lengths of yarn under one warp strand, bring them back over two warp strands, then come back under the second strand to bring the pieces of yarn through where they originally entered. Pull the ends tight to finish, then trim the row to neaten once complete. Add another row of rya knots above at the centre of the knots below to create a layered effect. 04 Using Yarn D, create a chunky stitch by working the plain weave technique, this time weaving under and over two warp strands instead of one. Pull loosely to add texture.


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Use plain weave to add a block of colour across the width of the loom in Yarns B and E. Using Yarn F and plain weave stitch, add a line of dashed stitching by going under two warps and over two warps, referring to the image above. Continue working plain weave in Yarn E, then work a few rows of plain weave in Yarn F until the woven piece is 18cm (7") high. 06 Tie the yarn ends together at the back. Where the ends are close to the sides, weave them in towards the centre. Cut the warp threads 10cm (4") above the last row of weaving and tie the top ends together. Carefully pull the bottom ends off and tie together. 07 Cut one 30.5 x 20cm (12 x 8") piece from the velvet for the backing, and two 30.5 x 20cm (12 x 8") pieces from the lining fabric. 08 To assemble, place one lining piece and the zip right side (RS) up 05

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and place the woven front piece RS down, aligning all top edges. Pin through all three layers, offsetting the zipper by 2.5cm (1"). Using a 2.5cm (1") seam allowance, sew with a zipper foot. 09 Repeat with the second lining piece and the velvet backing along the second long edge of the zip, pinning the pieces with RS together and sewing as per Step 8. 10 Undo the zip to about halfway and pin the woven front and backing piece RS together, and the lining pieces RS together. Sew the

outer edges leaving a 2.5cm (1") seam allowance, sewing as close to the zip as possible without sewing onto it. Leave a 7.5cm (3") gap at the bottom of the lining for turning. 11 Trim the seam allowance and excess zip at the edges. Turn RS out, pushing out the corners. 12 Using the mustard thread, sew the hole in the lining closed, then tuck the lining inside the clutch bag. Make a tassel with Yarn C, leaving a tail at the top for hanging. Thread the bead onto the tail, then tie it onto the zip to finish.

Cath Chamberlain Cheltenham-based maker Cath is a weaver and embroiderer with a love of colour and texture. Specialising in hand weaving, she creates unique woven cushions, wall hangings and clutch bags with vibrancy and a playful nature. www.cathchamberlain.etsy.com

89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 41


JUST

£9.99* inc. P& P

Learn a new craft for the new year! With 164 pages of step-by-step tutorials and easy-to-follow patterns, Beginner’s Guide To Knitting & Crochet is the quickest way to get creative with yarn. From first stitches to beautiful finished projects, we’ll show you how!

ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY! Call 03330 162 138 and quote ‘Knitting & Crochet Print 1’ Online www.buysubscriptions.com/craftspecial Lines open weekdays 8am to 8pm and Saturday 9am to 1pm. Overseas please call +44 (0) 3330 162 138. *EUR price £11.99, ROW price £12.99. All prices include p&p. Please allow up to 28 days for delivery.


LIVING

89

INSPIRATION ALERT! SPACES, PLACES & NEW DESIGNERS TO WATCH Make any room into your happy place with this fantastical wallpaper based on Josef Frank’s botanical patterns. Its bright colours and bold spring motifs might have been designed in the 40s, but they still feel fresh as a daisy to us. www.svenskttenn.se/en

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89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 43


Go all David Attenborough and brush up on your butterfly identification skills with this old-school chart. Or, opt for Andy Warhol vibes instead with The Printed Peanut’s retro tin selection. www.theboyfrost.bigcartel. com; www.theprintedpeanut.co.uk

GET THE LOOK

Working twice as hard as standard cushions, these novelty pillows are both squish-worthy – knitted in 100% alpaca yarn – and add character to your sofa. www.oeufnyc.com 44 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

ECLECTIC COLLECTOR

If this lamp’s ability to tilt at just the right jaunty angle isn’t enough to win you over, its condimentinspired shade, English Mustard, will. www.amara.com

Shopping vintage style doesn’t have to be expensive. Archivist’s letterpress printed matchboxes are mini works of art, and come with an equally small scale price tag. www. howkapow.com

Yes, we know you’ve already got a cupboard full of cups, but can you ever have too many? Make space for these cheery painterly pieces and you won’t regret it. www.houseofrym.com


Textiles, stationery and home goods are all part of Leah’s range

BRAND FOCUS Leah Duncan Leah started out as a graphic designer before pursuing a career in illustration in 2008. Since then, she’s collaborated with companies such as Urban Outfitters and Cloud 9 Fabrics, and has created a successful brand centred around her textiles. Each piece is hand-drawn, and taps into Leah’s love of nature. www.leahduncan.com Made by wrapping lengths of Mexican clothesline around a hexagonal shape, Oklahoma’s wire baskets and their vibrant colours will have you wistfully dreaming of sunnier shores. www.trouva.com Texan Leah takes inspiration from her surroundings

WEBSITE TO WATCH Sarah K. Benning

If greenery’s your bag, head over to Sarah’s site. Her embroidered hoops are a thing of beauty, drawing influences from mid-century design, antique textiles, and her own extensive potted plant collection. Each piece starts out as an illustration, but her patterns are available to buy in her Etsy shop. www.sarahkbenning.com

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Leah is known for her soft colour palettes

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LIVING home tour

Artist Lucy Tiffney showcases her travels in her colourful family home Words: LARA WATSON Photography: FIONA MURRAY

From the tropics of Borneo to Japan via Western signage, the detached 1910s home Lucy Tiffney shares with husband Tiff, teenage sons Leo and Frank, and Zed the cat, unites her experiences in a riot of joyful styling. Known for her murals and love of salvaged pieces, Lucy’s work merges seamlessly with her home in Colchester, Essex as “an amalgamation of creative life”. Lucy and her family have lived here for four years, moving in and updating, knocking

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LIVING home tour

Lucy’s Lagoon wallpaper shines in the living room, with sofa cushions from Jonathan Adler and Crisp and Dene, among others.

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89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 47


LIVING home tour

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JOSEF FRANK The three mini cushions on the sofa in Lucy’s snug are made with vintage fabric by Josef Frank (1885-1967). He was an Austrian-born architect, artist and designer who gained Swedish citizenship in the latter half of his life, and had an enormous effect on the history of Scandinavian design with his bright, modern prints.

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through, rewiring, replastering and redecorating to create the modern space they needed for a growing brood. The interior has evolved over the years through Lucy “collecting stuff,” such as a ‘42’ plaque that a friend found by a railway and gave to her aged 18, and the kitchen’s oversized ‘Gas/Oil’ sign that caught Lucy’s eye, discarded at the side of a road in France. “I threw it into the back of the car alongside my three friends and we took it on holiday with us!” Two years into living here, Lucy was selected to appear on the BBC’s Great Interior Design Challenge, in which she made the final, and her career took off. “My background is in textile design, but after the show I got commissions to paint murals instead, and I quickly realised I wanted to do more wallpapers and homewares as well as interior designing.” Lucy only launched her wallpaper collection last May, but the success has been overwhelming, winning 48 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

Best Start Up Business at the Mollie Makes Handmade Awards 2017, as well as accolades in the press and gaining several big clients. “I’ve never been great at labelling my style, but my designs do tend to be happy and bright,” says Lucy. “ It’s all about textures, bringing things together – different colours, items from different decades, different places.” She considers herself lucky as her sister lived in America and Japan for a while, and in her 20s she had the opportunity to travel a lot. “It’s informed my work a lot more than I realised until this point. I spent a lot of time in south east Asia – all the colours, all the tropicalness, materials and graphics. That was the luck of how things panned out for me.” You can also tell from Lucy’s home that she has a fascination with lettering and found objects. And, thrifting is something she’s very passionate about. Lucy has an eagle eye for a

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bird toy is from Castor and Pollux in the arches in Brighton. 02

Lucy found this

painted disc years ago, and kept it for its fun graphics. The little toys on the shelf are 25 years old, from China.


Vintage kitchen chairs have been covered in Lucy’s fabric.The fabric in the fireplace is by Lucienne Day, one of Lucy’s design heroes.


LIVING home tour

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special piece of furniture or decor and is never off-duty in her aesthetic hunt. “It’s the sheer joy of always looking out for lovely things,” she explains. Lucy is in heaven in this environment, saving anything from vintage umbrella stands to old toys. “The thrill is not knowing where or when you’re going to find it. It’s great, but it does mean I have two sheds full of stuff!” Lucy loves trawling eBay, and most of her furniture is vintage, such as her Ercol table, painted bright pink, “as it was a bit scuffed,” and her Eames DAR rocking chair, a gift from her parents. Other items are second-hand. “Both our sofas came from my sister, the kitchen chairs were donated… I don’t spend much money, but I will save up for something like a throw or a cushion I really like.” The Prozac cushion in the green room, for instance, is by Jonathan Adler. Lucy enjoys making her space her own, repainting or re-covering things herself to 50 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

prolong their life: “If I go off something, I just paint it a different colour.” It’s easy to see Lucy’s zest and energy when you visit her home. All those moments of chance, seized as a prize; such a keen eye for detail, making the most of each and every beautiful thing. It’s a sentiment that naturally translates into her work, and something she can’t hold in. “I throw everything at it,” says Lucy. “Our house is the stuff of life.”

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The yellow

thermometer was a gift from Japan for Lucy’s husband. 02

In the bedroom,

Lucy’s curtains are vintage Marimekko: “I found them in the cupboard when I was teaching at college.”

Lucy Tiffney Lucy is an artist and designer from Essex with a unique and vibrant style. With a background in textiles and teaching, she now designs wallpapers, prints and homewares and takes on mural work and interior design projects. www.lucytiffney.com


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The team behind Mollie Makes bring you a collection of contemporary crochet patterns for enthusiasts of all levels. Our easy-to-follow projects created by top crochet designers will inspire you to hook clothes, gifts, home accessories and more. Plus there’s a handy beginner’s guide so you can start right away!

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Spring brights Spruce up your home for the new season with Mandy O’Sullivan’s rainbow crochet blanket


HOW TO MAKE… A CROCHET BLANKET MATERIALS QPaintbox Yarns Cotton Aran, 100% cotton, 85m/93yd per 50g, 19 balls in Paper White (246) (Yarn A) and one ball each in Peach Orange (655), Bubblegum Pink (651), Spearmint Green (626), Buttercup Yellow (623), Daffodil Yellow (622), Blush Pink (654) and Tea Rose (643) (all Yarn B) Q4.5mm (UK 7, US 7) crochet hook QTapestry needle QPom pom maker TENSION Each granny square is approx. 16 x16cm (6½ x 6½")

ABBREVIATIONS st(s) stitch(es) sp space (es) ch chain ch-sp chain space ss slip stitch dc double crochet tr treble yrh yarn round hook BLO work stitch through back loop only rep repeat pc popcorn st – work 5tr into the st or sp indicated, pull up the working yarn from last tr made and remove hook. Insert hook into top of first tr made then replace working loop onto hook. Pull this loop back through the first tr and pull together until the 5tr cluster pops up

Reader offer Mollie Makes readers get 20% off all yarns at LoveCrochet, using code LOVEMAKES89. Offer valid from 1st February to 29th February 2018. www.lovecrochet.com

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stpc starting popcorn st – ch3 (counts as 1tr), 4tr in the same st (or sp), pull up the working yarn from the last tr and remove hook. Insert hook into top of 3rd ch that was made and then replace the working loop onto the hook. Pull this loop back through the 3ch to complete first popcorn st BPtr back post treble – yrh, insert hook from the back of work to the front, around the front of indicated st and back through to the back, yrh and draw round the front of the post of indicated st, (yrh and draw through 2 loops) twice FINISHED SIZE Approx. 100 x 120cm (39½ x 47½")

Get a head start on spring with this fresh crochet block blanket, heralding blossom, chirping birds and blue skies with its clean white cotton and bright colour pops. Made using granny squares, it looks simple enough, but is brimming with pom poms and texture to keep things interesting while you hook. Pack away the chunky wool blankets and keep this cheery rainbow beauty on hand for sofa snuggling instead. Textured granny square Make 42 squares, using each of the Yarn B shades as the centre colour six times. Foundation using a Yarn B shade, ch7, ss into the first ch to form a ring Round 1 stpc into the ring, ch2, (pc in ring, ch2) 7 times, ss into rear of stpc to join, fasten off [8pc, 8 2ch-sps] Round 2 join Yarn A in any 2ch-sp, ch6 (counts as 1tr, ch3) 2tr in same sp, 3tr in the next 2ch-sp, *(2tr, ch3, 2tr) in the next 2ch-sp, 3tr in the next 2ch-sp; rep from * twice more,


1tr in the first 2ch-sp, ss into 3ch of starting ch6 [7tr along each side, 3ch at corners] Round 3 ss into 3ch-sp, ch3 (counts as 1tr), (1tr, ch3, 2tr) in the same 3ch-sp, BPtr around each of the next 7 sts, *(2tr, ch3, 2tr) in the next 3ch-sp, BPtr around each of the next 7 sts; rep from * twice more, ss into top of starting ch3 [7 BPtr along each side, (2tr, ch3, 2tr) at corners] Round 4 ss into the first tr and into the 3ch-sp, ch3 (counts as 1tr), (1tr, ch3, 2tr) in the same 3ch-sp, 1tr in the BLO of each of the next 11 sts, *(2tr, ch3, 2tr) in next 3ch-sp, 1tr in the BLO of each of the next 11 sts; rep from * twice more, ss into the top of the starting ch3 [11 BLO tr along each side, (2tr, ch3, 2tr) at corners] Round 5 ss into the first tr and into the 3ch-sp, ch3 (counts as 1tr), (1tr, ch3, 2tr) in the same 3ch-sp, 1tr in the BLO of each of the next 15sts, *(2tr, ch3, 2tr) in next 3ch-sp, 1tr in the BLO of each of the next 15sts; rep from * twice more, ss into the top of the starting ch3 [15 BLO tr Subscribe at molliemakes.com

(RS) together and joining with a dc through the back loops of each square. This will create a ridge in between each block on the back of the blanket. Work horizontally and then join the rows vertically.

along each side, (2tr, ch3, 2tr) at corners] Round 6 ss into the first tr and into the 3ch-sp, ch3 (counts as 1tr), (1tr, ch3, 2tr) in the same 3ch-sp, working in both loops now, 1tr in each of the next 19 sts, *(2tr, ch3, 2tr) in next 3ch-sp, 1tr in each of the next 19 sts; rep from * twice more, ss into the top of the starting ch3, break yarn and fasten off [23tr along each side, 3ch-sps at corners] Weave in all ends.

Border Attach Yarn A at any corner, work dc in each st along the sides and (2dc, ch2, 2dc) in each of the four corner 3ch-sps. Join with ss to first dc, fasten off and weave in ends.

Joining Lay out the 42 squares in a 6 x 7 configuration using the main image as a guide, or in the order of your choice. Join the squares using Yarn A, holding them right sides

Finishing Make 14 pom poms (two of each Yarn B shade) and attach to the points where the squares join at the short ends of the blanket and at the corners. Weave in all ends.

Mandy O’Sullivan Mandy’s an Australian maker, designer and photographer that loves all crafts, but especially crochet. She shares fun ideas for creative living on her blog and posts daily on Instagram as @crochetbyredagape. www.redagape.com.au

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Work your angles

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Update your dining table with Lou Orth’s patchwork placemats and coasters


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HOW TO MAKE… PATCHWORK PLACEMATS AND COASTERS MATERIALS Q One fat quarter of Art Gallery Fabrics Tule by Leah Duncan in Mojave Opaque (Fabric A) Q One fat quarter of Kona Cotton Solids by Robert Kaufman in Breeze (Fabric B) Q One fat quarter of cork fabric (Fabric C) (ours was from www. purple-stitches.com) Q One fat quarter of backing fabric (Fabric D) Q Matching sewing threads Q Wadding, 45.5 x 56cm (18 x 22") Q Rotary cutter Q Cutting mat

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We’re always looking for new ways to play with cork fabric, and love how it looks paired with cotton prints and solids in these geometric table settings. The simple patchwork technique also helps keep things feeling fresh, and is fairly easy to do – great news for newbies and anyone after a quick sewing fix. If you’ve never used cork fabric before, just take care not to iron it directly. Plus, with these neat hexies, every mealtime becomes flatlay heaven – is it just us, or are parallel lines weirdly satisfying? 01 From Fabric A, cut two 15 x 12.5cm (6 x 5") Section Two pieces for the placemats and four 5.5 x 45.5cm (2¼ x 18") pieces for the binding. From Fabric B, cut one 21.5 x 10cm (8.5 x 4") Section One

piece and one 15 x 10cm (6 x 4") Section Three piece for the placemats. From Fabric C, cut one 21.5 x 10cm (8.5 x 4") Section One piece and one 15 x 10cm (6 x 4") Section Three piece for the placemats. Cut two 25.5 x 23cm (10 x 9") pieces from Fabric D for the backing. Cut two 25.5 x 23cm (10 x 9") pieces of wadding. 02 From Fabric A, cut one 14 x 7.5cm (5½ x 3") piece and two 5.5 x 45.5cm (2¼ x 18") binding pieces for the coasters. From Fabric B, cut one (5½ x 2½") piece for the coasters. From Fabric C, cut one (5½ x 3") piece and one (5½ x 2½") piece for the coasters. Cut two 15 x 15cm (6 x 6") pieces from Fabric D for the backing. Cut two 15 x 15cm (6 x 6") pieces of wadding. 03 To make the binding for the placemats, take the two binding

strips and join them to create one long strip. Repeat this process with the other two placemat binding strips. Next, fold each placemat and coaster binding strip in half along the length with wrong sides (WS) together, and press. Set the binding aside until needed. Placemats 04 Sew a Section Two piece to a Section Three piece along the 15cm (6") side with right sides (RS) together and press. Attach a Section One piece along the top of Section Two and Three along the 21.5cm (8½") side in the same way. 05 Lay a placemat backing piece WS up with the placemat wadding square on top, then layer on the front panel with RS up. 06 Lightly quilt the placemat to hold the layers together by sewing


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a line either side of the seam running across the placemat. 07 Lay the placemat template on page 98 on top of the quilted panel and align the section lines with the seams. Use the rotary cutter and cutting mat to neatly cut all the way around the template to create the hexagon shape. 08 Take the placemat binding strips and align the raw edges with the raw edges of the placemat. Pin and sew along one edge using a 0.5cm (Âź") seam allowance, stopping 0.5cm (Âź") before the corner. Backstitch to secure. 09 To turn the corner, fold the binding back out of the way at approximately 45o, using the image as a guide, then line it up with the next side of the hexagon to be sewn. This will create a little pleat in the binding. Start sewing again

from the edge, backstitching it in place when starting. 10 Sew the binding all the way around, repeating Steps 8 and 9 at the corners. Join the binding edges at the end, then fold the binding over to the WS of the placemat and hand stitch in place. 11 To make the second placemat, repeat Steps 4-10, using the remaining Section One, Two and Three pieces, and the remaining length of binding.

Coasters 12 Working as for the placemats, sew Sections One and Two of the coasters together. Create a quilt sandwich with the front panel, wadding and backing piece, then follow Step 6 to quilt. Using the coaster template on page 98, follow Step 7 to create a hexagon shape. Follow Steps 8-10 to add the coaster binding. Repeat for the second coaster using the remaining section pieces and binding.

Lou Orth Lou is a self-confessed fabric addict from Oxfordshire, where she lives with her young family. Sewing is her passion, specifically patchwork and quilts. She blogs about her sewing projects and you can find her posting on Instagram as @imstudiolou. www.imstudiolou.com

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Wallflower

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Cut and layer graphic botanicals to create Caroline Rees’ wall art


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HOW TO MAKE… A FLORAL PAPERCUT MATERIALS Q Craft knife Q Replacement craft knife blades Q Cutting mat Q One sheet of white A4 paper, 120gms Q Colour printer Q Mint, pink and orange paper Q Pale pink A4 paper Q Craft glue

Take the simple pleasure of cutting and sticking, and add Scandi-inspired florals into the mix. That, ladies and gentlemen, is how you rustle up Mother’s Day-worthy wall art that’s sure to impress pattern-loving mamas. We especially like how you can play around with the coloured papers you layer your design with, creating a one-of-a-kind palette. Swap in monochrome, pastels or brights to find your colour pop sweet spot. 01 Print or photocopy the papercut template on page 98 onto the sheet of white A4 paper. 02 Lay the printed or copied template sheet onto the cutting mat. To cut out the design, hold the craft knife like a pen with the blade at a 45o angle. Holding the paper above the knife with your fingers, slowly draw the knife towards you. You may find it helpful to experiment with the amount of pressure you need on a scrap piece of paper before cutting the design.

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03 Begin by cutting out the white areas of the design in the top left hand corner (if you are righthanded). Cut the smallest shapes first, and rotate the paper as you cut. Join up the cut lines so the shape is easily removed and doesn’t leave a rough corner. 04 Continue cutting, working from the top to the bottom. Place a piece of A4 paper between your hand and the template to protect the fragile cut out pieces. 05 Move the tiny cut out scraps away from the cutting mat as you progress so they don’t interfere with the cutting. 06 Finally, cut the outline of the papercut template. Use scissors

for this step if you find them easier to handle than the craft knife. 07 Turn the template over and place the elements of the papercut you want filled with colour on top of the coloured sheets. Draw around them with a pencil. 08 Cut out these shapes with scissors, just inside the pencil line. 09 Apply dots of glue on the reverse of the areas of the cutout which will be backed by the coloured paper. Lay the coloured shapes on top, taking care to line them up, and press firmly. 10 Mount the complete collaged papercut onto a sheet of pale pink A4 paper with dots of glue to hold it in place. Frame as desired.

Caroline Rees Caroline makes striking papercut pictures, prints and products, and is known for her contemporary black and white artwork enhanced by splashes of colour. She often takes inspiration from the coastal landscape where she lives, and scenes from family life. www.carolinerees.co.uk


Made by hand

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH

Shortcut your way to artisan-look pottery – Lucy Davidson shows you how


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HOW TO MAKE… A CLAY VASE AND POT MATERIALS Q Two packs of air-dry clay Q Clay tool Q Rolling pin Q Craft knife Q Masking tape Q Chopping board Q Greaseproof paper Q Glass jar, 7.5cm (3") diameter Q Glass jar, 9cm (35/8") diameter Q Sandpaper Q Plain paper Q Dust mask Q Acrylic craft paint Q Metallic craft paint Q Paint brushes Q Varnish

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Hand-built ceramics are hot property right now, and the good news is you don’t have to be a master potter to get the look. Roll up your sleeves and get stuck in with air-dry clay, then embrace your inner artist and decorate your vessels with splashy, painterly patterns. We’ll be filling ours with pens, knitting needles or dried blooms, arranging them just so to show off our handiwork. Bear in mind air-dry clay isn’t watertight, so pop any live plants into jars before placing them in your fancy new pots. 01 Start by rolling out the air-dry clay on the chopping board. Roll it out to roughly 0.5cm (¼") thick,

then cut a 25 x 10cm (97/8 x 4") rectangle to make the smaller pot. 02 Wrap the small glass jar with greaseproof paper to prevent sticking, then wrap the strip of clay around the jar and seal the short edges together, using your fingers or the clay tool to merge the two pieces. Keep pressing together until there is a clean join. 03 To make a base for the pot, roll another piece of clay out, roughly the same thickness and slightly bigger than the base of the jar. Trim the base into a circle. 04 Secure the base to the sides by pressing them together. Roll out a thin piece of clay from the leftover bits and push it into the join – this will help to strengthen it.


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05 Turn the pot over and make sure all the edges are smoothed down. Take your time with this step and make sure you’re completely happy with the shape. 06 To make a matching vase, repeat Steps 1-5, this time cutting a 25 x 15cm (97/8 x 6") rectangle of clay and shaping it around the taller glass jar. Once finished, remove the glass jars and the greaseproof paper, and leave the pot and vase to dry for at least 24 hours. 07 If there are any rough edges, use a small piece of sandpaper to sand the pieces down for a smooth finish. Wear a dust mask for this, as sanding causes a lot of dust. 08 To keep a clean edge on the lower parts of the pots and vase

while painting, wrap a strip of plain paper around the bottom of each vessel, as shown, and secure it in place with masking tape. 09 Take the first paint colour and water it down slightly. Working around the pots, paint on some loose brush strokes. Repeat this process, watering down another colour. Keep the strokes natural

and not too neat to achieve a painterly look, as shown. 10 Remove the paper and masking tape and add some metallic paint strokes to create a shiny look. Apply a little too much paint so it drips down the pots, adding to the natural design. Once the paint is dry, apply two coats of varnish and leave to dry for 24 hours.

Lucy Davidson Brighton gal Lucy spends her days playing with colour and texture, creating beautiful weaves and decorative wonders. When she’s not crafting, she’s teaching others how to, and can be found passing on her skills in workshops across the UK. www.peasandneedles.co.uk

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EXCLUSIVE PAPERS! Quirky springtime patterns and posters to brighten up your walls, or to cut, stick and collage. Share your makes using #molliemakers Illustrations: SUZY ULTMAN WWW.SUZYULTMAN.COM


LOVING

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OH, YOU PRETTY THINGS! MOODBOARDS & MUSINGS TO INSPIRE US

PHOTOGRAPHY: POLKA DOT CLUB, JEN MURPHY

Modern heirloom toymakers Polka Dot Club have teamed up with a handknit brand to create incredible limited edition plushies. Cutest collab ever? We think so. Naturally the kitty’s our fave, rocking a scaled-down version of Misha and Puff’s Popcorn Sweater. www.mamaowl.net

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; CECIL STACKING BUNNY, T-LAB WOODEN SHEEP AND COW FROM WWW.BOBBYRABBIT.CO.UK; BLOOMINGVILLE WOODEN TRAIN, OOH NOO WOODEN ALPHABET BLOCKS AND PANNY THE PANDA FROM WWW.SCANDIBORN.CO.UK. WARNING – THIS IS NOT A TOY. NEVER LEAVE CHILDREN UNATTENDED WHEN PLAYING

Playtime

Let kids be kids, then tidy up pronto with Anna Alicia’s ingenious drawstring playmat

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HOW TO MAKE… A PLAYMAT MATERIALS Q 1m (393/8") each of two complementary printed cotton fabrics Q 0.5m (19¾") contrasting cotton fabric Q 1m (393/8") lightweight wadding Q 3.5m cord, 0.5cm (¼") thick Q Two sets of press fasteners Q Press fastener tool Q 42 x 42cm (16½ x 16½") piece of paper Q 50cm (19¾") string Q Safety pin Q Tailor’s chalk

Toys strewn as far as the eye can see may be a little one’s idea of heaven, but we’d be happier minimising those stepping-onLego moments. This playmat is an amazing solution and, frankly, we can’t shout loud enough about it. Lay it out flat and it’s a cushiony padded base for kids to play away on, then with a simple snap of a popper and a pull of the drawstring, the day’s playtime debris is squirrelled away as the mat transforms into a bag. Hello portable toy stash. And did we mention it’s reversible, too? Pick out playful prints and sew your own version in fun brights, or go minimal with monochrome. 01 Lay the paper out onto a flat surface. Tie one end of the string to a pen, close to the tip. Measure 42cm (16½") along the string and

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cut. With the end of the string held at one corner of the paper and the string held taut, draw an arc right across the paper to form a quarter circle. Cut the quarter circle out. 02 Use the quarter circle as a template to draw a full circle on the wrong side (WS) of one of the printed fabrics. Mark where the corner of the template lies to help position the template as you move it around. Cut out the marked circle, then mark a seam allowance on it by drawing a line with the tailor’s chalk all the way around, 1.5cm (5/8") in from the edge. 03 Lay the wadding out and place the second printed fabric on top, right side (RS) up. Lay the fabric circle from Step 2 RS down on top of the wadding and fabric. Cut around the circle. 04 To make the edging, fold the contrasting fabric in half along the

length with RS together. Mark and cut three long strips across the fabric, 9cm (35/8") wide. Trim away any selvedge. Take two of the long strips and lay one on top of the other with RS together, then pin at one of the short ends. Sew 1cm (3/8") in from the end. Repeat this with the third strip, so you end up with one long strip, then press the seams flat with an iron. Fold the long strip in half along the length with WS together and press. 05 Tuck the edging strip between the two big circles of fabric, not next to the wadding. Place the strip so the open edge is facing out, aligning all raw edges. Pin in place, through all the layers of fabric and wadding, all the way around, 1.5cm (5/8") in from the edge. When you reach to the starting point, overlap the edging strip ends by 2cm (¾") and cut away any excess.


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06 Open out the two ends of the long folded strip, then fold them to the WS by 1cm (3/8") twice. Press before pinning back in place – this should leave a 2cm (ž") gap between the ends. 07 Cut a 9 x 18cm (35/8 x 71/8") rectangle from the leftover contrasting fabric and press. Fold the rectangle in half along the length with RS together, then pin and sew along the sides, leaving the bottom edge open. Turn RS

Anna Alicia Anna has a passion for eco-ethical and handmade products, and an addiction to having her hands covered in clay. Luckily she gets to put these to good use in her craft practice, creating jewellery and homeware for her label A Alicia. www.aalicia.bigcartel.com

out and press. Tuck this rectangle between the fabric circles at the gap, and between the ends of the edging. Make sure the open edge is facing out and lines up with the edges of the circles. Replace any pins to pin in place. 08 Sew all the way around the fabric circle, 1.5cm (5/8") in from the edge, following the chalk line, and leaving a 5cm (2") opening. Trim the seam allowance to 1cm (3/8"). Turn the circle RS out so the fabric, not the wadding, is showing. 09 Press, then top stitch, all the way around the inner edge of the circle, roughly 1cm (3/8") in. This will help keep the layers together and also close up the gap. 10 To thread in the drawstring, attach a safety pin to one end of the cord and use this to help manoeuvre it through the edging tube. Once the cord is all the way

through, lay the mat out and make sure the edging is not ruched up, otherwise the cord will end up too short. Overlap the ends by 1.5cm (5/8") and cut away any excess. Pin the overlapping ends together and sew back and forth with a wide zigzag stitch to secure. 11 Cut a 4 x 4cm (15/8 x 15/8") square of contrasting fabric. Fold the edges to the WS by 1cm (3/8") and press. Pin this around the cord to cover where the two ends overlap, with WS together. Sew across both sides and the open edge. 12 Add the positive sides of the fasteners close to the corners of the flap. Fold the flap over to cover the opening where the cord comes out, and mark where the negative sides need to be on the other side of the mat. Fix in place, then close the poppers to cover the cord whenever the mat is opened out. 89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 79


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Granny goes retro Channel 80s Miami Memphis vibes with Katie Jones’ crochet cushion

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HOW TO MAKE… A CROCHET CUSHION MATERIALS Q Knitcraft Cotton Blend Plain DK, 50% cotton/50% acrylic, 215m/235yd per 100g, one ball each in Yellow (Yarn A), Red (Yarn B), Light Blue (Yarn C), Green (Yarn D), Light Pink (Yarn E), Black (Yarn F), and White (Yarn G) Q Tapestry needle Q 43 x 43cm (17 x 17") cushion pad TENSION A four round granny square should measure approx. 10 x 10cm (4 x 4")

ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) sp(s) space(s) ch chain ch-sp(s) chain space(s) ss slip stitch dc double crochet htr half treble tr treble dtr double treble beg beginning gap gap between sts or group of sts FINISHED SIZE Approx. 43 x 43cm (17 x 17")

Ready to take your granny squares to the next level and crank up the retro vibes? We’re smitten with this statement crochet cushion cover, inspired by both Miami Art Deco architecture and 1980s Memphis design. Together, they spell a riotous cocktail of brights, pastels and bold patterns – cue the monochrome liquorice stripes and graphic details. The cushion cover is made by joining five different sections edged in double crochet to make a large square. The points are then brought together and sewn up. Use the colour sequence suggested, or freestyle it and mix up the seven yarn shades to your liking. Large granny square For this square, ’gap’ is the gap between 3tr groups. Foundation using Yarn D, ch5 and ss into first ch to make a ring Round 1 ch3 (counts as 1tr throughout), 2tr in ring, ch2, (3tr in

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ring, ch2) 3 times, ss into third of beg 3 ch Round 2 ch3, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into next 2ch-sp 3 times, (3tr, ch2, 2tr) into last 2ch-sp, ss into third of beg 3 ch. Break yarn and fasten off [2 x 3tr groups on each side] Round 3 Join Yarn A into any 2chsp, ch3 (counts as 1tr), (2tr, ch2, 3tr) into same 2ch-sp, *3tr into next gap, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into next 2ch-sp; repeat from * twice more, 3tr into next gap, ss into third of beg 3 ch [3 x 3tr groups on each side] Round 4 ch3, *(3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 2ch-sp, 3tr into each of next 2 gaps: repeat from * twice more, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into next 2ch-sp, 3tr into next gap, 2tr into last gap, ss into third of beg 3 ch. Break yarn and fasten off [4 x 3tr groups on each side] Round 5 join Yarn D into any 2chsp, ch3, (2tr, ch2, 3tr) into same 2ch-sp, *3tr into each gap to next 2ch-sp, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 2ch-sp; repeat from * twice more, 3tr into


each gap to end, ss into third of beg 3 ch [5 x 3tr groups on each side] Round 6 ch3, *(3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 2ch-sp, 3tr into each gap to next 2ch-sp; repeat from * twice more, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 2ch-sp, 3tr into each gap to last gap, 2tr into last gap, ss into third of beg 3 ch. Break yarn and fasten off [6 x 3tr groups each side] Repeat Rounds 5 and 6 five more times changing between Yarn D and Yarn A every 2 rounds, starting with Yarn A. Break yarn and fasten off [16 x 3tr groups on each side] Edge round join Yarn F into any tr, ch1 (does not count as a st), work 1dc in each tr along sides of square, and (1dc, ch1, 1dc) in each 2ch-sp at corner, ss to first dc. Break yarn and fasten off. Spot square For this square, ’gap’ is the gap between groups of 3 sts. Foundation using Yarn E, ch4 and Subscribe at molliemakes.com

ss into first ch to make a ring Round 1 ch3 (counts as 1tr throughout), 11tr into ring, ss into third of beg 3 ch [12 sts] Round 2 ch3, 1tr into same st, 2tr into each st to end, ss into third of beg 3 ch [24 sts] Round 3 ch3, 1tr into same st, 1tr into next st, *2tr into next st, 1tr into next st; repeat from * to end of round, ss into third of beg 3 ch [36 sts] Round 4 ch3, 1tr into same st, 1tr into each of next 2 sts, *2tr into next st, 1tr into each of next 2 sts; repeat from * to end of round, ss into third of beg 3 ch [48 sts]

Round 5 ch3, 1tr into same st, 1tr into each of next 3 sts, *2tr into next st, 1tr into each of next 3 sts; repeat from * to end of round, ss into third of beg 3 ch [60 sts] Round 6 ch3, 1tr into same st, 1tr into each of next 4 sts, *2tr into next st, 1tr into each of next 4 sts; repeat from * to end of round, ss into third of beg 3 ch. Break yarn and fasten off [72 sts] Round 7 join Yarn B into any st, ch4 (counts as 1dtr), (2dtr, ch3, 3dtr) into same st, *miss 2 sts, 3tr into next st, miss 2 sts, (3htr into next st, miss 2 sts) 3 times, 3tr into next st, miss 2 sts **, (3dtr, ch3,

Miami Memphis This project appears in the Miami Memphis capsule collection, created by Katie Jones exclusively for Knitcraft using their Cotton Blend DK yarn. The collection also includes homeware and kidswear, and patterns are available at Hobbycraft and online. www.hobbycraft.co.uk

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HOW TO MAKE… A CROCHET CUSHION 3dtr) into next st; repeat from * 3 times more ending last repeat at **, ss into fourth of beg 4 ch [28sts along each side and 3ch-sps at corners] Round 8 ch3 (counts as 1tr), *(3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 3ch-sp, 3tr into each gap to next 3ch-sp; repeat from * twice more, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 3chsp, 3tr into each gap to last gap, 2tr in last gap, ss into third of beg 3 ch. Break yarn and fasten off Edge round join Yarn F into any tr, ch1 (does not count as a st), work 1dc in each tr along sides of square, and (1dc, ch1, 1dc) in 2chsps, ss to first dc. Break yarn and fasten off. Half and half square For this square, ’gap’ is the gap between 3tr groups Foundation using Yarn D, ch5 and ss into first ch to make a ring Side 1 Row 1 ch4 (counts as 1tr and ch1 throughout), (3tr, ch2, 3tr, ch1, 1tr) into ring, turn Row 2 ch4, 3tr into 1ch-sp, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into next 2ch-sp, 3tr into next 1ch-sp, ch1, 1tr in third of beg 4 ch, turn Row 3 ch4, 3tr into first 1ch-sps and each gap to 2ch-sp, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 2ch-sp, 3tr into each gap to end and last 1ch-sp, ch1, 1tr into third of beg 4 ch, turn Repeat Row 3 five more times. Break yarn and fasten off [8 x 3tr groups on each side] Turn work upside down to work Side 2. Side 2 Row 1 join Yarn C at the top of Side 1 on the end tr of Row 1 end tr, ch1, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into ring, ch1, 1dc into third of beg 3 ch of Side 1/Row 1 Row 2 ch2, dc into top of tr of next row of side 1, turn, 2tr into 1ch-sp, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 2ch-sp, 3tr into next 1ch-sp, 1dc into top of beg 3 84 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

ch of same row of Side 1 Row 3 ch2, 1dc into top of tr of next row of Side 1, turn, 2tr into gap between dc and first tr of previous round, 3tr into next gap, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 2ch-sp, 3tr into next gap, 3tr into gap between last tr and dc of previous round, 1dc into top of beg 3 ch of same row of Side 1 Row 4 ch2, 1dc into top of tr of next row of Side 1, turn, 2tr into gap between dc and first tr of previous round, 3tr into each gap to 2ch-sp, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) into 2ch-sp, 3tr into each gap to end, 3tr into gap between last tr and dc of previous round, 1dc into top of beg 3 ch of same row of Side 1 Repeat Row 4 four more times. Fasten off [8 x 3tr groups each side] Edge round join Yarn F into any tr, ch1 (does not count as a st), work 1dc in each tr along sides of square, and (1dc, ch1, 1dc) in 2chsp, ss to first dc. Break yarn and fasten off. Multi square This square is made in three parts. Part 1 is a granny square, worked in Yarn C, Part 2 is worked in tr rows from one edge of Part 1 in Yarn B, and Part 3 is worked from one long edge of Parts 1 and 2 in tr rows in Yarns F and G. Part 1 Using Yarn C, work as for Large granny square to end of Round 4 but do not change colour at the end of Round 2, instead ss into the 2ch-sp and continue with the instructions for Round 3. Break yarn and fasten off after Round 4 [4 x 3tr groups each side] Part 2 Row 1 join Yarn B into any 2chsp, ch3 (counts as 1tr here and throughout), 1tr into each tr to end, 1tr into 2ch-sp, turn [14 tr] Row 2 ch3, 1tr into each tr to

end, turn Repeat Row 2 five more times. Break yarn and fasten off. Part 3 Row 1 (RS) join Yarn F into top of tr at edge of Part 2 (along long side), ch3 (counts as 1tr here and throughout), 1tr into same row edge, 2tr into each row edge of Part 2, 1tr into the joining corner of Parts 1 and 2, 1tr into the 2ch-sp of Part 1, 1tr into each tr to end, 1tr into 2ch-sp. Do not turn [29 sts] Row 2 (RS) join Yarn G at start of last row, ch3, 1tr in each tr to end, turn Row 3 pick up Yarn F where it sits, ch3, 1tr into each tr to end. Do not turn Row 4 pick up Yarn G where it sits, ch3, 1tr into each tr to end, turn Repeat Rows 3 and 4 once more, then Row 3 once. Break yarn and fasten off Edge round join Yarn F into any tr, ch1 (does not count as a st), work 1dc in each tr along sides of square, 2dc into each row edge and (1dc, ch1, 1dc) in corners, ss to first dc. Break yarn and fasten off. Stripe rectangle This rectangle is made in two parts, with Part 2 working along the side of Part 1 into each row edge. Part 1 Foundation using Yarn F, ch16 Row 1 1tr into 4th st from hook (3ch missed counts as 1tr), 1tr in each st to end, turn [14 sts] Row 2 ch3 (counts as 1tr throughout), 1tr in each st to end, turn Repeat Row 2, two more times. Break yarn and fasten off. Change to Yarn G, and work Row 2 four times. Break yarn and fasten off. Change to Yarn D, and work Row 2 four times. Break yarn and fasten off.


Change to Yarn A, and work Row 2 four times. Break yarn and fasten off. Change to Yarn C, and work Row 2 four times. Break yarn and fasten off. Change to Yarn E, and work Row 2 four times. Break yarn and fasten off. Change to Yarn B, and work Row 2 four times. Break yarn and fasten off. Part 2 Row 1 (RS) join Yarn F into top of tr at corner of Part 1, ch1 (does not count as a st throughout), working down the long side, work 2dc into each row edge to end, 1dc into last st. Do not turn [57 sts] Row 2 (RS) join Yarn G at start Subscribe at molliemakes.com

of last row, ch3 (counts as a tr throughout), 1tr into each dc to end, turn Row 3 pick up Yarn F where it sits, ch1, 1dc into each tr to end. Do not turn. Row 4 pick up Yarn G where it sits, ch3, 1tr into each dc to end, turn. Repeat Rows 3 and 4 three more times, then Row 3 once. Break off Yarn G and continue in Yarn F. Edge row continue last row around corner, (1dc, ch1, 1dc) into each corner and work dc evenly around each edge. Break yarn and fasten off. Joining Sew in all ends and lightly block each piece to size as follows: Large granny square approximately

40 x 40cm (15¾ x 15¾") square. Small square pieces approximately 20 x 20cm (77/8 x 77/8") square. Rectangular piece approximately 20 x 40cm (77/8 x 15¾"). Following the layout shown on page 82, pin the pieces together. Using Yarn F and the tapestry needle, join with a dc seam working from the wrong side (WS) and easing in the edges to fit. Fold each corner point to the centre of the square with right sides (RS) together, and work dc along each edge to join, leaving a long edge open, as shown on page 83. Sew in all ends. Turn RS out and pull open into a square. Insert the cushion pad through the opening and whip stitch the gap closed using Yarn F. 89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 85


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH


Everyday luxe Get your bead on with Sadie Hawker’s geometric chevron necklace

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HOW TO MAKE… A BEADED NECKLACE MATERIALS Q White nylon beading thread Q Size 12 beading needles Q Cement glue (we used G-S Hypo Cement glue from www. beadsdirect.co.uk) Q Bead loom Q 19 strand flexible beading wire in gold Q Size 8 round seed beads in coral, pink, white and gold

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Q Seven white stone beads, 1.5cm (5/8") Q Long-nose pliers Q Gold chain Q Four gold plated brass ribbon ends, 19mm (¾") Q Gold-plated jump rings Q Gold-plated clasp Q Two gold-plated crimps, 1.3mm (5/8")

Playful graphic patterns and shiny gold hardware give this necklace the power to glam up everything from everyday denim and stripes to your LBD. The neat chevron sections (we’re living for that gold and peach colour combo) are woven on a bead loom with tiny seed beads – think of it as pixel art for jewellery. 01 Thread the bead loom with 11 warps of beading thread. Securely knot the thread at the start and end and make sure the warps are tight. Thread the needle with approximately 130cm (51¼") of beading thread. Weave the needle and thread from right to left, under and over the warps, leaving approximately 30cm (117/8") of thread at the end. Bring the needle

and thread back over and under the warps, from left to right. 02 Following the chart, working from the bottom up, thread the first row of beads onto the needle. 03 Thread the seed beads down off the needle and onto the thread until they sit under the warps. Push the beads up so they’re poking up through the warps from underneath. 04 Thread the needle through the holes in the beads again, ensuring every bead is threaded, from right to left. Pull all of the thread through the beads, then pull it tight. 05 Next, bring the needle and thread back underneath the warps, from left to right, as shown. 06 Following the chart, thread the next ten beads onto the needle and repeat Steps 2-5. Continue in


CHART

KEY

20

Pink

19 18

White

17 16

Coral

15 14 13 05

06

Gold

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

11

12

this way until you’ve completed all 20 rows of the chevron pattern. 07 Once you’ve finished beading the first strap, use the remainder of the thread to weave a section of thread onto the loom, as per Step 1, approximately 0.5cm (¼") high. Do this at the opposite end of the beaded section too, under the first row of beads. Seal these sections with cement glue – these are where the ribbon ends will be attached. Repeat Steps 1-7 to make the second strap, securing the ends with a woven section and glue. 08 Cut a 35cm (13¾") length of chain. Cut it in half and attach one half of the clasp to one end of either length with jump rings. 09 Thread the large white beads onto the beading wire. Cut the

beading wire, leaving roughly 1.5cm (5/8") remaining at the end. Next, thread a crimp onto the beading wire and, using pliers, pull the end of the wire back onto itself creating a loop, then thread it back through the crimp. 10 Squash the crimp with pliers, securing the two strands of beading wire together to create a permanent loop. Repeat this

crimping process again at the other end of the white beads. 11 Cut the two straps from the loom. Using pliers, attach a ribbon end to either end of the straps. 12 Attach the white beads to the bottom of the beaded straps using jump rings and pliers. Attach the two lengths of chain to the top of the beaded straps using jump rings and pliers to finish.

Sadie Hawker Sadie is the Welsh jewellery designer behind Shh by Sadie, and loves high heels and flamingos. She recently returned to the UK after eight years in New Zealand, and her colourful, adventurous designs have featured in national and international press. www.shhbysadie.com

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1S

T MON AR SAL CH E 20 18

NEXT MONTH’S ISSUE PLANS!

Two ways with easter baubles

MAKE A POM POM fLOWER BANNER MAKE IT

crochet a trio of BRUNCH POTHOLDERS

¤ SASHIKO WASH BAG ¤ TERRAZZO COASTER SET ¤ PIÑATA DOUGHNUT RECIPE ¤ EASY-SEW KIDS’ PYJAMAS ¤ ARM-KNIT BOLSTER CUSHION ¤ FRINGED MINI SKIRT

PLUS EMBROIDERED BUNNY K & SPRING HOMESTYLE BOOK Make this cute plushie for Easter!

90 COVER GIFT AND CONTENTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: HELENA STEELE AND MATILDA SMITH; LIEWOOD ANDY WOOD RATTLE AND BLOOMINGVILLE WOODEN ANIMALS FROM WWW.SCANDIBORN.CO.UK

All the small things Make Hilary Frazier’s pom pom-topped pixie bonnet for a little one


HOW TO MAKE… A BABY BONNET MATERIALS Q Cascade 220 Superwash, 100% wool, 200m/220yd per 100g; one ball in Lemon (820) Q 4.5mm (UK 7, US 7) circular knitting needle at least 40cm (15¾") long Q 4.5mm (UK 7, US 7) crochet hook Q Stitch markers Q Tapestry needle Q 4.5cm (1¾") pom pom maker Q One 1.5cm (½") diameter button TENSION Approx. 18 sts and 25 rows to 10cm (4") over stocking stitch ABBREVIATIONS st(s) stitch(es) k knit 92 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

k2tog knit two sts together p purl ssk slip one st, slip one st, knit slipped sts together st st stocking st – knit one row, purl one row repeated yo yarn over psso pass slipped st over sl 1 slip one st knitwise RS right side WS wrong side

Butter-soft, sunshine-coloured wool and scrummy mock cable details? Heirloom status confirmed. This Scandi-style pixie bonnet is what knitter’s dreams are made of, and that buttoned chin strap means even the wriggliest of wild things will stay cosy. Top it with a pom pom and you’re away. Baby or no baby, we’re gonna be stitching at least one of these little golden wonders.

FINISHED SIZE The bonnet is made in three sizes: 0-3 months: To fit head circumference approx. 35.5cm (14") 3-6 months: To fit head circumference approx. 40.5cm (16") 6-12 months: To fit head circumference approx. 45.5cm (18")

Instructions The instructions are written for the smallest size, with instructions for the larger sizes shown in brackets, e.g. 0-3 (3-6, 6-12). The baby bonnet is knitted flat on a circular needle for ease of working, but remember to turn at the end of each row. A mock cable pattern is used at the start and end of each row, with stocking stitch worked in between.

Bonnet Cast on 55 (61, 67) sts onto the circular needle using the crochet provisional cast on method Row 1 (RS) k Mock cable pattern Row 2 (WS) k4, p1, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, purl across until last 15 sts, k2, p2, k2, p2, k2, p1, k4 Row 3 k5, p2, k1, yo, k1, p2, k1, yo, k1, p2, knit across until last 15 sts, p2, k1, yo, k1, p2, k1, yo, k1, p2, k5 Row 4 k4, p1, k2, p3, k2, p3, k2, purl across until last 17 sts, k2, p3, k2, p3, k2, p1, k4 Row 5 k5, p2, sl 1, k2, psso both k sts, p2, sl 1, k2, psso both k sts, p2, knit across until last 17 sts, p2, sl 1, k2, psso both k sts, p2, sl 1, k2, psso both k sts, p2, k5 Repeat Rows 2-5 until the piece measures 10 (11.5, 14)cm (4 (4½, 5)") from the cast on edge,


ending with a WS row. Decrease section Continue in the mock cable and st st pattern according to which row you ended on in the previous section and decrease only on the RS rows: Decrease row (RS) continue working in the mock cable and st st pattern from where you left off. Once you have 25 (28, 31) sts on your right hand needle, ssk, place marker, k1, place marker, k2tog, continue knitting in mock cable pattern to end of row Next row continue working in mock cable and stocking stitch pattern with no shaping Repeat last 2 rows 9 times more, ending with a WS row. Cast off until 5 sts remain. Start knitting a chin strap with these remaining 5 sts until the strap Subscribe at molliemakes.com

measures roughly 4cm (1½") long Buttonhole row k2, yo, k2tog, k1 K two more rows and then cast off the 5 sts. Finishing With WS together, divide the sts from the cast on edge in half, and place them on the circular needle to hold the stitches as you remove the holding yarn. Using Kitchener stitch, graft the top of the bonnet together, beginning at the front.

Make a pom pom for the top using a pom pom maker. Make the pom pom really tight and fluffy by wrapping the yarn several times around the pom pom maker. Remove the pom pom from the maker and trim, then sew it to the top of the bonnet. Make sure it sits in front of the point of the bonnet so it doesn’t fall backwards. To finish, sew on the button using the image as a guide, weave in any loose ends, and block.

Hilary Frazier Hilary comes from a line of women who love to create. Her mother and grandmother were high school sewing teachers and her aunt is a knitter. Hilary’s own passion for knitting began when her first son was born seven years ago, and she hasn’t set her knitting needles down since. www.hilaryfrazier.etsy.com

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Small screen

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG & BECKI CLARK

Create your own mini hoop screen and print Erin Lacy’s winged motifs


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HOW TO MAKE… SCREEN PRINTED CUSHIONS MATERIALS Q100% pure silk scarf QWooden embroidery hoop, 12.5cm (5") diameter QClear Mod Podge QFabric printing paint, 100ml in each Wheat and Midnight (ours were from www. pickprettypaints.com) QFoam paint dabbers, 3.5cm (13/8") QFine paint brush QMedium-weight cartridge paper QPlain linen cushion covers

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Always fancied yourself as a printmaker? Us too. And now we’ll be cheating our way to surface pattern glory, armed with our own simple hoop screen. The beauty of this project is there’s no fancy, super-specialist kit required, so you can get cracking right away; printing single statement motifs or all-over pattern repeats. Ready-made cushion covers are a great starting point for your new print obsession, and these bold, entomology-inspired designs will instantly update your bed or sofa for spring. 01 Cut out or print your chosen template from the designs on page 98. Alternatively, create your own screenprinting template by

drawing around the inside of the embroidery hoop onto a piece of paper, then drawing your design inside the circle. Fill in the areas of negative space you don’t want to print using black pen – this will highlight the design details. 02 To create the hoop screen, lay the silk scarf on top of the embroidery hoop and cut out a square panel to fit the hoop. Undo the hoop, sandwich the silk square between it, then tighten it up. Pull the fabric until the surface is smooth and taut. Cut away any excess silk around the hoop leaving a small seam allowance edge. 03 Place the hoop screen flat onto the template, as shown, and use a pen to trace the design directly onto the silk fabric surface, only

drawing around the shapes you wish to be printed. 04 Flip the hoop back over and use a paint brush to apply Mod Podge to the negative space around the design. Start by filling the edge of the design, working from the middle out. Mod Podge acts as a block resistant, meaning the paint now won’t go through these areas – this is called exposing the screen. Hold the screen to the light to make sure all the areas are filled, then leave until dry and clear. 05 To print, lay a plain cushion cover right side (RS) up on a flat surface and place the hoop screen face down in the position you want the motif to appear. Apply a small amount of fabric printing paint at the top of the hoop.


04

07

Using the foam paint dabber, pull the paint down across the surface with a medium pressure. Carefully lift the hoop from bottom to top, revealing the design. This prevents mess and gives you much more control over the screen. 07 To create an even repeat pattern, repeat Steps 5-6, lining up the hoop screen with the position of the last printed shape. If the screen becomes blocked, wipe away the paint from the screen before continuing. 08 Once you’ve finished printing, wash out the hoop screen with water and leave it to dry in an airing cupboard. To fix the printing paint onto the fabric, leave the piece to dry, then carefully steam the area with an iron. 06

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Erin Lacy Erin moved from Milton Keynes to the seaside town of St. Ives to follow her love for print. In her Pick Pretty Paints harbourfront studio, she now produces her own hand-mixed printing paints inspired by her beautiful Cornish surroundings. www.pickprettypaints.com

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TEMPLATES All the shapes for this issue’s makes. Unless otherwise stated, templates are shown at 100%.You can find the full-size templates ready to download from www.molliemakes.com YOUR FREE GIFT

BY CHLOE HARDISTY PAGE 7 01

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Cut a length of pink thread roughly 30cm (117/8") long and tie a knot in the end. Thread the needle, then bring the needle up through the second hole down at the top left of the board, and start stitching the crosses, using the image as a guide. Make sure you 01

consistently stitch the first diagonal arm of the cross in one direction, and the second diagonal arm over the top in the opposite direction, as it will look much neater this way. 02 At the end of a length of thread, knot the end at the back of the board and start

again with another 30cm (117/8") length of pink thread. 03 Once both the words have been cross stitched, cut 18 11cm (43/8") lengths of pink thread to create the tassels. 04 Starting at the bottom point of the board, as shown, take two of the lengths and fold them in

half. Thread all four ends up through the hole on the edge. 05 Feed the four ends back through the loop and pull tight. Repeat for all nine of the holes. 06 Attach the string for hanging to the top of the board by knotting it at the back. Neatly trim the tassels to finish.

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

SCREEN PRINTED CUSHIONS

BY ERIN LACY PAGE 95

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 99


MAKES

PATCHWORK PLACEMATS

BY LOU ORTH PAGE 56

Placemat Cut 1

Section 1 Cut 2

Section 3 Cut 2

Section 2 Cut 2

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

PATCHWORK PLACEMATS

BY LOU ORTH PAGE 56

Coaster Cut 1

Section 1 Cut 2

Section 2 Cut 2

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

89 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 101


MAKES

FLORAL PAPERCUT BY CAROLINE REES PAGE 61 Photocopy at 125%

FIND FULL SIZE TEMPLATES ON molliemakes.com

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

102 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89


MAKES

FELT SOFTIES BY MANUELA TRANI PAGE 18

Head Cut 2

Dress Cut 1

Face Cut 1

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

FELT SOFTIES BY MANUELA TRANI PAGE 18

Hair Cut 1

Cat ear Cut 2

Foot Cut 2 Arm Cut 4

Leg Cut 2

Cape Cut 1

Sole Cut 2

Boot Cut 2

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

FELT SOFTIES BY MANUELA TRANI PAGE 18

Inside ear Cut 2 Ear Cut 4 Mouse Cut 2

Strawberry Cut 2

Paw Cut 4

Mouse tummy Cut 1

STITCH GUIDE

USE OUR HANDY STITCH GUIDE FOR THE EMBROIDERY PROJECTS IN THIS ISSUE

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BACKSTITCH This stitch is ideal for outlines, and it’s the one you’ll find you use the most. Come up from the back at point 1, then go down at point 2. Come up at point 3, then go back to point 1 and bring the needle through to the back.

BLANKET STITCH (SURFACE) This is fun for decorative stitching or appliqué. Try to keep the spacing and stitch height consistent, or change it up to create a pattern. Come up at point 1. Go down at point 2 and come back up at point 3, keeping the needle over the working thread. Pull the thread to create a right angle. Repeat as your work along the fabric.

SATIN STITCH When you want to fill an area with a smooth finish, this stitch is the ideal choice. It’s best worked in small areas, because if the stitches are too long, they may snag. Come up at point 1, then go down at point 2. Come up at point 3, then go down at point 4. Repeat. Always work the stitches across the area you’re filling, coming up on the opposite side where your needle went down.

Mollie Makes (ISSN 20460228) (USPS 20517) March 18 is published 14 times a year (monthly, with a Spring issue in March and a Christmas issue in November) by Immediate Media Company Bristol Ltd., Tower House, Fairfax St. Bristol BS1 3BN, United Kingdom. Distributed in the U.S. by NPS Media Group, 2 Corporate Dr., Suite 945, Shelton, CT 06484. Periodical Postage paid at Shelton, CT and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Mollie Makes, 3330 Pacific Ave., Suite 500, Virginia Beach, VA 23451. Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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How crochet designer Yan Schenkel brought her latest characters to life

Name: Yan Schenkel Occupation: Author and crochet designer

I’ve always enjoyed cartoons and children’s books. Even as an adult, I consume kids’ content every day, with the excuse of having children! In fact, I usually buy children’s books for myself and ‘lend’ them to my kids. When thinking about my latest crochet book, Animal Friends of Pica Pau, I used that inspiration to make lists of animals, noting character details like clothing, shapes, and their way of speaking, then drew them in a thousand different notebooks. I tried to imagine how they’d look in crochet, and when

Iimaginedaworldwherethecharacters could live together and interact Yan’s amigurumi designs are full of personality and charming details

I decided to include accessories, I tried not to add too many elements, keeping only the essential features that identify each character. For their back stories, I imagined a world where the characters could live together and interact. Sometimes the story came after the design, sometimes it helped me create the toy. But, they all have names of people I admire and occu ations I’d have loved to pursue.

Many sketches and stitches later, and Animal Friends of Pica Pau was born

Currents Visit Yan’s website at www.picapauyan.com to see more of her quirky crochet creations and find her new amigurumi book. Check out her Instagram @picapauyan.

Next issue: Rebecca Denton’s passion for preloved fabrics 106 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89

Reading: Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls by Elena Favill with my youngest daughter. Aiming to: Read more grown-up books for myself. Oh, spare time, where can I find you? Planning: My third book, so doing lots of lists and tons of drawings.


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22-24 June 2018 Bowood House, Wiltshire

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Liz Earle Bowood House

Skills Workshop Bowood House

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Sewing Masterclass Ragley Hall

Visit thehandmadefair.com quoting MOLLIE Official partners *Full Experience ticket includes entry into the fair, one Super Theatre session, one Skills Workshop and one Grand Make session. ÂŁ5 discount applies to Full Experience tickets only.


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