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ALL OUR STORIES

A MIGRATION MUSEUM FOR BRITAIN


CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1 INTRODUCTION 2

HIGHLIGHTS 2017/18

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AUDIENCE AND FEEDBACK

APPENDICES 3 6 8

WHAT WE DO 4 EXHIBITIONS

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5 EDUCATION

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6 EVENTS

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7 MIGRATION MUSEUMS NETWORK

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8 DIGITAL

39

1

WHO WE ARE

59

2

DISTINGUISHED FRIENDS

64

3 FUNDERS

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4 MIGRATION MUSEUMS IN OTHER COUNTRIES

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MEASURING OUR IMPACT 9 EVALUATION & IMPACT

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RATIONALES & AIMS 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM 45 11 THE NEXT THREE YEARS

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Cover: Exuberant crowds line the streets, Belgrave Mela, Leicester City Centre, 2011, part of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition © Kajal Nisha Patel Opposite: Humanæ by Angélica Dass, part of the Migration Museum Project’s exhibition No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain © MMP

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OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW | 1 INTRODUCTION

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1 INTRODUCTION We are creating a migration museum for Britain – a moving and inspiring institution that puts Britain’s important migration story at the forefront of our national consciousness. Migration is a pressing contemporary issue that people discuss in one form or another day in, day out. Migration lies at the centre of debates about Britishness and belonging, identity and inclusion. It is at the heart of national debates about Brexit and anxiety about the current global refugee ‘crisis’. But migration is much more than an issue to be addressed or a problem to be solved – it’s a human story that connects us all. There’s a great and complicated underlying story of comings and goings that goes back for thousands of years: if you peel back the layers of anybody’s family history in Britain, you find a migration story – whether immigration, emigration, or both. There is no simple narrative, and certainly there are no simplistic conclusions to be drawn. But if we understood Britain’s migration history better, we would have a better understanding of who we are today – as individuals and as a nation.

The Migration Museum Project is shining a light on the many ways in which the movement of people to and from Britain across the ages has shaped who we are – as individuals and as a nation. We are doing this by: • creating an inspiring national migration museum for Britain • hosting a series of stimulating exhibitions, events and activities • running a wide-ranging education programme (encompassing workshops, teaching resources and partnerships) • creating a network of museums and galleries to share knowledge about and increase coverage of migration themes across the UK

Chinese children learning English in the school holidays, Liverpool, August 1971, part of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition © Science and Society Picture Library

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OVERVIEW | 1 INTRODUCTION

OVERVIEW | 1 INTRODUCTION

This page: Cazenove Road, London, part of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition © Christian Sinibaldi Opposite: Participants in a boat-making community workshop as part of our No Turning Back exhibition © MMP

We have staged exhibitions, events and education workshops exploring migration themes at venues across Britain since 2013. In April 2017, we opened our temporary Migration Museum at The Workshop in Lambeth, London, enabling us to build and engage audiences, grow links with community groups and schools, test ideas and gather feedback about what people would like to see in our permanent museum. Because there will be something in the Migration Museum for everybody, it’s also right that everybody has the opportunity to contribute and be a part of the story. Through our programming and outputs to date, we have collected and shared a wide range of personal stories that help us all to see the world through one another’s eyes. This collaborative, participatory storytelling ethos will continue to underpin everything that we do as we develop and grow. Building on the success of our temporary Migration Museum at The Workshop in 2017/18, we continue to: • seek a permanent central London site for our Migration Museum

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• expand the reach of our education programme to more school, college and university students across the country • grow our national presence and sector-supporting outreach by expanding our Migration Museums Network, a specialist network for arts and heritage-sector institutions across the country aimed at sharing knowledge and best practice about coverage of migration themes

We’ve come a long way in a short space of time.1 Please join with us as we build on our work to date and help us to create a permanent migration museum for Britain.

1

For details of who we are, see Appendix 1 (p.59).

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OVERVIEW | 2 HIGHLIGHTS 2017/18

OVERVIEW | 2 HIGHLIGHTS 2017/18

2 HIGHLIGHTS 2017/18

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May 2017: PSYCHEdelight actors performing Borderline at The Workshop, at an event accompanying our Call Me By My Name exhibition.

March 2018: Emily Miller, MMP's head of learning and partnerships, working with pupils from Grafton Primary School, London.

June 2017: Gary Younge, journalist and author, giving his MMP lecture on 'Your Money or Your Life: Why Global Capital Respects No Borders But People Must'.

October 2017: Michael Rosen – poet, author, performer and MMP distinguished friend – speaking at the launch of our No Turning Back exhibition.

Autumn 2017: a visitor engages with one of the exhibits of No Turning Back – Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain.

October 2017: Roshni Hirani, one of the guides on our second Imprints walk, in front of the mural commemorating the Battle of Cable Street (original design by David Binnington).

April 2017: A visitor walking through Nick Ellwood’s I Can See England banners at the launch of our Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond exhibition at the Migration Museum at The Workshop.

September 2017: No Turning Back – Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain, our second exhibition at The Workshop, attracts great interest from public and media.

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OVERVIEW | 3 AUDIENCE AND FEEDBACK

OVERVIEW | 3 AUDIENCE AND FEEDBACK

3 AUDIENCE AND FEEDBACK

+ 150 000 visitors to our exhibitions since 2013

“A place where Britain’s story is told in all its colour and varieties, a United Kingdom of peoples – that’s what the Migration Museum could represent.” George Alagiah, BBC newsreader and MMP distinguished friend

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7 000+ students have participated in our education workshops

“We just had the students back after school for a de-brief and they were still completely overwhelmed by the exhibition. Many of them talked about how their perceptions had shifted or how struck they were with the stories they had encountered. I am sure that it has been the most valuable school trip thatnumber I have beenof on.” Total

students attended

Sam Norwood, teacher, Robert Clack School

“Both my parents were migrants from India in the late 1950s, and I really felt that you provided a space where their story is valued, and they are valued. I had not realised, until I saw the exhibition, how important it is to feel represented without prejudice.” Museum visitor, 2017

“It has been a long time coming, but Britain is finally getting an institution that reflects the heritage of its entire people.” The Economist, May 2017

73%

of visitors to No Turning Back were under the age of 40 Mailing list subscribers

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pieces of coverage across international, national, regional and local media for our Call Me By My Name and No Turning Back exhibitions

“The Migration Museum is a thought-provoking space, where both global diversity and personal histories can be explored and celebrated. The staff are welcoming, wellinformed and inspirational. Our Year 6 children felt a sense of belonging there and have been stimulated to find out more about themes we looked at. I wouldn’t hesitate in recommending the experience to colleagues, families and children I support. Keep up the fantastic work!” Beatrice Symes, teacher, Grafton Primary School

259

heritage sector professionals and academics participated in our Migration Museums Network in 2016–17

41%

of visitors to No Turning Back who came on an educational visit were from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds

More than

9 000 people have attended our events

“I feel like I’m actually there experiencing what refugees go through by seeing and learning what they do and how they live. I also feel sorry for everyone who goes through these difficult phases.” Pupil, Langdon Park School

15000+ number of social media followers Schools & colleges

visited MMP exhibitions 9


WHAT WE DO

WHAT WE DO | 4 EXHIBITIONS

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4 EXHIBITIONS We tell migration stories through a range of compelling, interactive exhibitions. Our exhibition programming to date has featured original exhibitions developed by our curators; we have also created or staged touring exhibitions in partnership with established institutions. Some focus on the long story of migration to and from Britain; others seek to explore and contextualise pressing contemporary issues. All have personal storytelling at their core, in line with our aspiration to be the national museum of all our migration stories. Above: Visitors to No Turning Back – Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain discussing Angélica Dass's Humanæ exhibit © MMP Opposite: Part of a display of interactive discs at the entrance to the Adopting Britain exhibition, Southbank Centre, London, 2015 © Poppy Williams

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WHAT WE DO | 4 EXHIBITIONS

Right: Nick Ellwood and Kamal Kaan’s And After We'd Sailed a Thousand Skies, part of the No Turning Back exhibition at the Migration Museum at The Workshop © Sue McAlpine

4.1 NO TURNING BACK – SEVEN MIGRATION MOMENTS THAT CHANGED BRITAIN No Turning Back – Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain is a mixed-media exhibition that opened to the public at the Migration Museum at The Workshop in September 2017. The phrase ‘no turning back’ had come to be associated with an unswerving commitment to Brexit in the wake of the EU referendum result. The exhibition used uncertainty about what Brexit might mean for Britain’s relationship with the rest of the world and the movement of people to and from these shores as starting points from which to explore previous moments in British history that had had profound effects on the nation and its people – and which continue to resonate today. These moments included the expulsion of England’s entire Jewish population in 1290, the first East India Company voyage to India in 1607, the Rock Against Racism movement of the late 1970s and the large increase in the number of people defining their ethnic

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origin as ‘mixed’ in the 2011 census. Each moment was explored through a combination of personal stories, commentary, photography and art from established and emerging British and international artists and contributors. These moments encouraged visitors to explore themes and stories about migration and sparked conversations about moments that mattered to them. Supported by grants from Arts Council England and the Aziz Foundation, funding from the Open University and funds raised by participants in our 2016 annual fundraising walk (see p.33), the exhibition displayed works – by The Singh Twins, Angélica Dass, Nick Ellwood and Kamal Kaan, Roman Lokati, Malgosia Stepnik and Hormazd Narielwalla, among others – many of which were commissioned specifically for the exhibition or displayed publicly in the UK for the very first time. Visitor and media reaction was extremely positive, highlighting a strong appetite for the exploration of complex, highly topical migration themes in a cultural setting. The exhibition attracted over 5 500 visitors in its first 16 weeks,

with evaluation showing visitors from a wide range of ages and ethnic backgrounds (59 per cent BAME and ‘White Other’). Over 90 per cent of visitors who completed evaluation forms said that the exhibition was ‘very interesting’; 97 per cent said they had learned something new about British migration history; 93 per cent said they would use knowledge gained from the exhibition in their work/studies/ conversations; and 87 per cent said they now intended to find out more about British migration history. In the first 16 weeks, 1 263 students participated in workshops designed around the exhibition, with evaluation from students and teachers equally positive. No Turning Back attracted positive press coverage from international, national and local media outlets including the BBC, CNN, Newsweek, Time Out, Londonist and Huffington Post. Social media campaigns for the exhibition, based around the #MigrationMoments hashtag, enabled tens of thousands of people to engage and interact with the exhibition’s content and themes beyond the four walls of our museum.

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WHAT WE DO | 4 EXHIBITIONS

WHAT WE DO | 4 EXHIBITIONS

Below: Red Carpet, Calais, 2015 (from Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond) © Paul Evans

4.2 CALL ME BY MY NAME: STORIES FROM CALAIS AND BEYOND Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond was a storytelling experience that examined the human stories and individual creativity behind the headlines about the migration ‘crisis’ and the refugee and migrant camp in Calais, a complex social structure with transient populations characterised by a potent mix of courage, hardship, ambition, loss and suffering. The work encompassed visual art, photography, film, sound and performance, much of it created by refugee and migrant artists, including works created from within the Calais camp itself – a testimony to the vibrancy and creativity of camp residents. It offered an opportunity to reflect on lesser-known aspects of contemporary migration developments and to question our national responsibilities towards refugees living right on our doorstep (Calais is closer to London than Birmingham). Working with a range of artists and organisations, as well as volunteers,

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camp residents and aid workers, this exhibition provided an opportunity for us to address contemporary issues of migration in the context of the long history of migration into our country. We first staged Call Me By My Name at Londonewcastle Project Space in Shoreditch, east London, in June 2016, recurating it at our Migration Museum at The Workshop in Lambeth in April 2017. The exhibition was made possible with the generous assistance of property developers Londonewcastle and with additional funding from Arts Council England, the Economic Social and Research Council (ESRC) and private donors. We tested public support by launching our first crowdfunding campaign to fund part of the exhibition, reaching our target within five days. Our delivery partnership with Oxford University’s COMPAS and the Open University enabled us to mount a series of events to accompany the exhibition’s initial staging in 2016. These events featured poetry, music, film screenings and discussions about people smuggling, resettlement of refugees, the ethics of representation, academic research in the field and more.

Call Me By My Name attracted almost 10 000 visitors over its two runs in 2016 and 2017. Visitor evaluation was positive – 89 per cent said they wanted to find out more about the themes covered in the exhibition as a result of their visit, while 87 per cent said they had a better understanding of the migration crisis after viewing the exhibition. The exhibition was featured by a wide range of international, national and regional media outlets including Mail Online, Reuters, Metro, Time Out and Londonist, and was selected by the Royal Academy of Art as its ‘Pick of the Week’. The reaction to Call Me By My Name suggests that there is a strong public appetite for intelligent, balanced explorations of ‘difficult’ topics – a firm validation of one of our core rationales (see p.49).

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WHAT WE DO | 4 EXHIBITIONS

WHAT WE DO | 4 EXHIBITIONS

4.3 100 IMAGES OF MIGRATION 100 Images of Migration is the exhibition with which we launched the Migration Museum Project in 2013. The exhibition was the product of a competition run with the Guardian newspaper in which people were asked to submit images that were, for them, resonant of migration. We received hundreds of images from both amateur and professional photographers, from which a panel of judges selected 100 images to display at our first exhibition. Sue McAlpine, then curator of Hackney Museum and now one of our two curators, created an exhibition of these 100 images, which was displayed at Hackney Museum in June 2013. This exhibition is an illustration of the way in which we work – in partnership with other organisations and soliciting input and stories from a wide range of communities. Following its debut at Hackney – which both the Guardian and The Economist featured – the exhibition toured venues across the capital and the country, including Senate House, the Heritage Gallery Greenwich, City Hall and Europe House in London;

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Top: Oromo family, Brighton, 2007 © Howard Davies Left: A young boy from Leicester © Kajal Nisha Patel Opposite top: Display of photographs from 100 Images of Migration at Leicester railway station, 2014–15 © Kajal Nisha Patel Opposite bottom: Polish church choir, Balham, London, 2009 © Tim Smith All images on these pages have been displayed as part of various stagings of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition.

Langley Academy in Slough; Wardown Park Museum in Luton; the Exchange gallery in Penzance; the Central Library, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; the Huguenot Museum, Rochester; and the Museum of Oxford, where it formed part of an exhibition called Journeys to Oxford in 2017. The exhibition was re-curated as 100 Stories of Migration and given a digital makeover by students and staff at the University of Leicester’s School of Museum Studies, where it had a six-month stay from summer 2014. The team in Leicester incorporated augmented-reality technology, created a film installation (a fictional dialogue between Enoch Powell and immigrants from different countries) and took the exhibition beyond traditional confines by creating installations in Leicester train station and across the university campus. We exhibited a selection of our 100 Images of Migration at our Migration Museum at The Workshop in 2017/18. More than 100 000 people have now seen 100 Images of Migration, and we have also developed an online gallery of images on our website.

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WHAT WE DO | 4 EXHIBITIONS

WHAT WE DO | 4 EXHIBITIONS

Top: ESOL learners participating in a Keepsakes workshop at Idea Store Whitechapel © Shkelzen Kernaja Bottom: Muna Hayle, with the diary she brought with her from Syria, containing messages, photos and phone numbers of friends and teachers she left behind. Photographed as part of the Keepsakes project exhibited at Southwark Council’s headquarters © MMP

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4.4 KEEPSAKES

4.5 GERMANS IN BRITAIN

There is an exciting idea underlying Keepsakes: that some of the most intriguing objects, with the most compelling stories attached, are not necessarily housed within museum collections, but might be tucked away in people’s homes. We have shown displays of Keepsakes at venues including London’s Southbank Centre (2015), Southwark Council’s headquarters, and the Idea Store in Whitechapel (2016), and at our Migration Museum at The Workshop (2017). Each display featured a different selection of objects and stories, gathered through workshops facilitated by our curators in partnership with local organisations, with contributions from a wide range of people from across different communities, encompassing Latin Americans and Turkish Cypriots in Southwark, Caribbean elders in Notting Hill, Bengalis in Whitechapel, European ESOL students at the Victoria and Albert Museum, and adult learners at Morley College in Lambeth. We have discovered that memories of migration and identity emerge

Germans in Britain is unusual and provocative: by focusing on an ‘invisible’ minority and the long history of German migration to the UK – from the AngloSaxons to the Royal Family – it provides an interesting vehicle for examining questions of belonging and national identity. The exhibition, curated by Dr Cathy Ross, honorary research fellow at the Museum of London and MMP distinguished friend, took the form of pop-up banners; it was accompanied by a lively video featuring reflections on being a German in Britain from Lord Moser, comedian Henning Wehn and Museum of London curator Beatrice Behlen. With the support of the GoetheInstitut and private and corporate sponsors, we first staged Germans in Britain at the German Historical Institute in September 2014. It was launched at a special private view by Neil MacGregor, then director of the British Museum, and Joanna Lumley. The exhibition has subsequently toured widely, visiting numerous sites in London, Manchester, Cambridge, Edinburgh and beyond.

through our Keepsakes workshops and exhibitions, and that people are keen to share the small and valued things that, often, have passed down through generations, reminding them of their families and their culture. Focusing discussion on an object can be liberating for participants and may be less intrusive than sharing an entire personal history. We aim to develop the concept of Keepsakes with new partners and to experiment with different methods of deep community engagement.

Above Internment camp souvenir, 1915, presented to Baron Bruno Schröder. The image shows the tents at Cunningham Camp, a former holiday camp ©The Schroder Collection / Graham Mille Top: Frederick Accum, shown here lecturing at the Surrey Institution, 1809 © Museum of London Bottom: Struwwelhitler: A Nazi Story Book, 1940 © Private collection

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WHAT WE DO | 4 EXHIBITIONS

4.6 ADOPTING BRITAIN AT SOUTHBANK CENTRE We were a major contributor to Adopting Britain: 70 Years of Migration, an exhibition put on by the Southbank Centre in 2015, in partnership with Counterpoints Arts. This was part of the Changing Britain festival, exploring the ways in which immigration has changed the country since the end of the Second World War. Adopting Britain attracted 42 000 visitors between April and September 2015. The exhibition not only gave us an opportunity to be part of a much larger enterprise, and a glimpse of how a migration museum might look one day, but it also introduced us to many other organisations and artists with whom we have subsequently worked, or plan to work in the future. We were also delighted to be able to promote the inclusion of colleagues we had worked with before – such as BBC Radio Leicester and the University of Leicester’s School of Museum Studies – and whose contributions added an important regional reach to the exhibition.

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WHAT WE DO | 4.0 EXHIBITIONS

4.7 RE•THINK: MIGRATION AT THE NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM We collaborated with the National Maritime Museum (NMM) in Greenwich over six months in 2015 to explore the theme of migration, one of the NMM’s seven themes. Visitors, schools and community groups were offered the space to explore, discover and reflect on the museum’s themes and to create responses within the gallery.

Opposite: A pupil sharing an aspect of her migration story on the world map at RE·THINK: Migration at the National Maritime Museum © Andrew Steeds Below: Visitors looking at the London Transport section of the Adopting Britain: 70 Years of Migration exhibition, Southbank Centre, London, 2015 © Kajal Nisha Patel

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WHAT WE DO | 5 EDUCATION

5 EDUCATION We devise and deliver school and university workshops based around the themes explored in our exhibitions and support curriculum teaching about the topic of migration across the UK.

Above: Pupils discuss two of our 100 Images of Migration, part of the Adopting Britain exhibition, Southbank Centre, London, 2015 © Poppy Williams Opposite: A pupil writes her response to migrants and refugees in unsafe boats at RE·THINK: Migration at the National Maritime Museum © Emily Miller

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Public education about Britain’s migration heritage has been at the heart of the Migration Museum Project from the outset. Through our expanding and varied education programme, we have been working with young people across the UK on migration and related issues – such as citizenship, identity and belonging – since 2013. We devise and deliver workshops for primary, secondary and university students based around the content and themes explored in our exhibitions, and the evaluation of these workshops has been extremely positive. Through partnerships and the creation and curation of downloadable teaching resources, we support curriculum teaching about the topic of migration, which formally entered the revised history programme from 2016 in the form of optional migration modules at GCSE delivered by examination boards AQA and OCR. Our programme is guided by our education committee, chaired by Bushra Nasir CBE (see p.63 for committee members).

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WHAT WE DO | 5 EDUCATION

WHAT WE DO | 5 EDUCATION

Below: Emily Miller, head of learning and partnerships, talks to pupils from Langdon Park School, London, about Nikolaj Bendix Skyum Larsen’s Wanderers, part of Call Me By My Name at Londonewcastle Project Space, London, 2016 © MMP

5.1 WORKING WITH SCHOOLS, TEACHERS AND TEACHER EDUCATORS We have worked directly with more than 6 000 primary and secondary school pupils and university students, delivering workshops in our exhibition spaces and in schools across the UK. Our residency at The Workshop allowed us to significantly increase the scope of our education programme and we continue to develop relationships with schools and universities. More than 2 500 young people from schools and universities across the UK participated in our exhibition-themed workshops at the Migration Museum at The Workshop in 2017. There is also a strong appetite for our work among international student audiences keen to learn about UK migration and our aims. We have hosted groups from a wide range of countries, including France, Germany and the Netherlands, as well as South Korea and China. We also have ongoing commitments with groups of undergraduate American university students. These consistently popular

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sessions generate valuable income. To engage teachers in migration education, and to meet their needs, we have mapped where migration-related themes fit into the revised curriculum and conducted an audit of migration teaching resources, making the best of these available through our website, along with the resources we produce ourselves. We delivered training to

Below: Liberty Melly, MMP education and events officer, gives an education workshop to pupils from Queen’s Park Primary School in the Migration Museum at The Workshop, 2017 © MMP

more than 1 200 adults responsible for migration education – including teachers and teacher trainees in many universities. More widely, we have spread the word about our education programme at national and international conferences.

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WHAT WE DO | 5 EDUCATION

WHAT WE DO | 5 EDUCATION

5.2 WORKING WITH PARTNERS

Above: The winning team from Aylesbury High School in our ‘Moving Stories’ competition, which we ran with OCR in 2017/18 © Hugo de la Rosa Paulet

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We have built a strong relationship with the OCR examinations board. Our education committee member Martin Spafford co-wrote the textbooks2 for OCR’s new migration modules focusing on the history of migration to Britain. In 2017/18, we ran ‘Moving Stories’, a competition with OCR that invited teams of pupils to enter plans for migration-themed exhibitions based on their course, with submissions being assessed by a panel of high-profile judges. We received entries from across the UK, from which the judges drew up a shortlist of four schools. The prize involved the winning team – Aylesbury High School – heading to New York City to visit Ellis Island and our friends at the Tenement Museum to see other migration-themed museums in action. Between 2015 and 2016 we ran ‘Migration Stories’, a theatre-ineducation initiative in partnership with Tamasha Theatre Company, in five schools in London and the Midlands. This innovative project brought groups of pupils together with professional directors and playwrights to create

an original ensemble script that explored migration themes. The plays produced through this project were enthusiastically received by the pupils taking part and the audiences gathered to watch them. This positive reception was reflected in the independent evaluation we commissioned from a team, led by the International Migration Institute, University of Oxford, which found that the project ‘had a strong impact on pupils’ knowledge about migration, as well as being empowering and contributing to attitudinal change’. We co-delivered all schools workshops connected with Call Me By My Name (see p.15) with refugees who had arrived in the UK as unaccompanied asylum-seeking children. Feedback described the considerable impact of their first-hand testimony on pupils’ consideration of the difficult topics of forced migration, the migration ‘crisis’ and the experience of staying in the Calais ‘Jungle’. The 2017 summer term culminated in several school workshops codelivered with academics from the Open University whose research complemented our work.

We have been generously supported by volunteers throughout the development of our education programme, and have had excellent input from trained teachers through TeachFirst’s Summer Project programme for three successive years.

5.3 OUR FUTURE PLANS Our ambition is to extend our reach into schools and academy chains and to broaden our influence in curriculum development, in order to further enhance the profile of migration education nationally and internationally. We continue to develop the education area of our website as a vibrant hub for migration teaching resources, ideas and support for teachers. We hope that the pilot of the competition with OCR will set a precedent for future collaboration with the exam board, and we will use the process and output of this competition to gauge an approach for consulting with young people about their input for the future of the Migration Museum.

Above: Pupils from Robert Clack School work on an exercise during an education workshop based around our Call Me By My Name exhibition at Londonewcastle Project Space, London, 2016 © MMP Spafford, M and Lyndon, D (2016) Migrants to Britain c.1250 to Present. London: Hodder Education; and Spafford, M and Lyndon, D (2016) Migration, Empire and the Historic Environment. London: Hodder Education.

2

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WHAT WE DO | 6 EVENTS

6 EVENTS We run a lively programme of events to complement our exhibitions and provide a forum for debates around migration.

Above: Lord Moser (centre) in conversation at the Goethe-Institut with Susie Harries (right) and Carl Miller (left), as part of our Great Minds series of events © Rosalind Duguid Opposite: Street Orchestra Live performing at The Workshop, April 2018 © MMP

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We have been running events since the earliest days of the Migration Museum Project, encompassing, among other things, lectures and panel discussions on topics ranging from intellectual thought to fashion, film screenings, art workshops and guided walks – so far just over 9 000 people have attended these events. We also contribute to events organised by third parties by enlisting team members, trustees or distinguished friends to appear as panellists in discussions and by providing our space as a venue for performances, book launches, away days and more. 29


WHAT WE DO | 6 EVENTS

WHAT WE DO | 6 EVENTS

Below: (from left to right) Jackie Kay, Ruth Padel, Michael Rosen and Sophie Herxheimer at ‘Poetry of Migration’, one of the many events put on in the three weeks that Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond was on display in Shoreditch, London, 2016 © MMP

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6.1 EXHIBITION-RELATED EVENTS

6.2 ANNUAL LECTURES

We organise and stage a wide range of events related to our exhibitions. These have included panel discussions, film screenings, art workshops, theatre performances, a poetry evening and ‘Pop-up Prof’ sessions (during which leading academics are on hand to talk to visitors about their responses to our exhibitions) accompanying our stagings of Call Me By My Name; and art workshops and discussions on themes explored in our No Turning Back exhibition. In addition to events we have arranged ourselves, there have been some intriguing accompaniments to our exhibitions: Emilie Oléron Evans, for example, gave fresh insights into Nikolaus Pevsner in a talk at Queen Mary University of London, and Florian Kaplick gave a performance of Kurt Schwitter’s sound poem ‘Ursonate’ at Edinburgh’s National Records of Scotland – both events coinciding with stagings of our Germans in Britain exhibition.

We run an annual lecture series with the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), in which highprofile speakers explore issues of topical relevance and concern. Lady Desai delivered a lecture – ‘Partition, 70 Years On: What Have We Learnt From the Division of India?’ – about the challenges of creating the

Partition Museum in Amritsar, India, the issues involved in securing people’s oral testimonies and the positive reception the museum has received – among both those who lived through this period of history and also their children and grandchildren, many of whom had not heard about it from their family members. Journalist and author Gary Younge gave a lecture on the political and

Below: Professor Robert Tombs (left) in discussion with MMP trustee Robert Winder after delivering the MMP lecture on ‘Migration: An English History’ at the London School of Economics and Political Science, 2015 © MMP

economic dimensions of the debate around immigration. In this lecture, ‘Your Money or Your Life’, influenced by his travels in the US and by his recent experience of covering the 2017 general election in the UK, he looked at how immigration is understood in the neoliberal age and what the consequences are in terms of migration, social anxiety and democracy. Professor Robert Tombs, author of The English and their History, delivered a lecture entitled ‘Migration: An English History’. In a wide-ranging talk that paid attention as much to the outward as to the inward flow of peoples, he showed how central migration has been to the development of British and English history and to our national identity. In our inaugural annual lecture in 2014, former children’s laureate Michael Rosen spoke entertainingly and provocatively to an audience of 350 on ‘The Languages of Migration’, about the ways in which we speak about migration. Distinguished historian, producer and presenter David Olusoga is scheduled to deliver our annual lecture in 2018. All of these lectures are available

to listen to or to watch on our website: migrationmuseum.org/outputs.

6.3 SEMINARS AND DISCUSSION SERIES We run Great Minds, a series of seminars on the ways in which migrants have shaped British life. This series, which we run with the Council for At-Risk Academics (Cara), has covered a wide

range of topics and has proved popular – topics explored to date include intellectual thought, DNA, medicine, philosophy, architecture and fashion. We are developing an ‘in-conversation’ series called Migrants Mean Business in partnership with a range of corporate sponsors, in which prominent business leaders with migrant backgrounds reflect on what their own history of migration has brought to their experience of business and leadership.

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WHAT WE DO | 6 EVENTS

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WHAT WE DO | 6 EVENTS

6.4 ACADEMIC EVENTS

6.5 WALKS

We host seminars developed in partnership with a range of academic and third-sector partners. In 2017, we hosted a series of public seminars organised by the Open University at our Migration Museum at The Workshop, bringing together academics and practitioners to engage with how the arts, politics and law represent the experiences of refugees and migrants. Details and videos of these events can be found on our website. In 2016, we jointly hosted ‘The Ethics and Politics of the Refugee Crisis,’ an integrated programme of seminars and activities held throughout the year, aimed at strengthening collaboration between academic research, civil society, education and the culture sectors via avenues of creative expression. The programme was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and culminated in a civil society forum held at Rich Mix in Bethnal Green, London, in December 2016, attended by over 150 people.

We run a series of guided walks exploring the migration history of London. Hundreds of walkers have participated in our annual Imprints fundraising walks, all-day guided walks across London exploring the city’s rich migration history and raising funds for our exhibitions, events and activities. Participants in our two Imprints walks to date have raised £40 000. In partnership with a team from AOL (now OATH), we researched and designed a Lambeth migration walk, which we ran in September 2017. This was a public event designed to draw attention to the many migration stories surrounding our temporary premises at The Workshop. Around 30 walkers, mostly drawn from the immediate locality, joined us on the five-mile route from our Migration Museum at The Workshop to Brixton; the walk included an account of the Portuguese presence in Lambeth by Ana Có and Catarina Demony from the Little Portugal Project. In 2017 and 2018, we partnered with Dr Nadia Valman of Queen Mary University of London to stage two

Above: Sophie Henderson, MMP director, introduces ‘Statelessness as Displacement in Situ’, an event run in partnership with the Open University at the Migration Museum at The Workshop, 2017 © MMP Right: The route map for our second Imprints walk, held in 2017, which started in Canary Wharf and ended in a party at the Migration Museum at The Workshop © MMP Opposite: Roshni Hirani, one of the guides on our second Imprints walk in 2017, gives the history of the mural commemorating the Battle of Cable Street, which was originally designed by David Binnington and completed by Desmond Rochfort, Paul Butler and Ray Walker © MMP

series of four migration-themed walks developed around a range of literary texts, ranging from a walk focusing on 19th-century Irish migration to the experiences of a Chinese novelist and a Trinidadian man of letters in Bloomsbury. This series has proved extremely popular, with just under

200 people in total attending the walks. We plan to develop and grow our guided public walks offering, and, ideally, to replicate them in towns and cities across the country. We also offer private guided walks for corporates and charities on a bespoke basis.

33


WHAT WE DO | 6 EVENTS

WHAT WE DO | 6 EVENTS

6.6 FILMS, MUSIC AND PERFORMING ARTS Our residency at The Workshop has enabled us to stage a varied arts programme – encompassing film screenings, concerts, plays, dance performances and more. We launched our Migration Museum Film Club in 2017/18 – a series of film screenings that shed light on different aspects of migration, accompanied wherever possible by Q&As with directors, filmmakers or experts in fields relating to the film being shown. We partnered with the GoetheInstitut London on a number of these screenings. Other notable arts performances include a performance by Street Orchestra Live, a 50-strong ensemble of musicians (photo, p.28); and a dance double-bill by choreographer Sivan Rubinstein, staged in partnership with King’s College London.

34

6.7 THIRD-PARTY EVENTS

Above: The cast of Borderline, a play performed by PSYCHEdelight as part of ‘Spicy Eggs and Jungle Chai’, an all-day event held to cast light on the events and experiences featured in our exhibition Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond at the Migration Museum at The Workshop, 2017 © PSYCHEdelight

Our Migration Museum at The Workshop has been the venue for a wide range of third-party events in 2017/18, encompassing partnerships and private hires, enabling us to establish ourselves as the go-to venue for migration-related events, cultivate relationships with key stakeholders, deepen our links with community and other third-party organisations, reach new audiences, and generate revenue. Events staged to date have included book launches, panel discussions, away days, community events and private parties. Our staff members and trustees also regularly participate as panellists, speakers, judges or interviewers at events across the country hosted by other organisations.

Opposite: Embroidery workshop by Mi Casa Migration, exploring Latin Americans’ ideas of ‘home’ in London at the Migration Museum at The Workshop © Cruz Maria Vallespir

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WHAT WE DO | 7 MIGRATION MUSEUMS NETWORK

7 MIGRATION MUSEUMS NETWORK Our Migration Museums Network brings together museums across the country to share knowledge and best practice, with the aim of increasing and improving outputs related to migration across the UK heritage sector. In 2016–17, we coordinated a pilot Migration Museums Network, funded by Arts Council England and Paul Hamlyn Foundation, bringing together museums and heritage sector professionals from across Britain to share knowledge and best practice, with the aim of increasing and improving outputs related to migration across the UK heritage sector. An online survey gauged current current activities around, and the appetite for, exploration of migration themes across the arts and heritage sectors. This survey was completed by 119 museum professionals and academics covering the sector across the country. We also commissioned Dr Cathy Ross, Honorary Research Fellow at the Museum of London, and Emma Shapiro, a post-graduate student from Queen Mary University of London, to write a report examining the representation

36

of migration in English museums since 2009, and to explore whether a national migration museum and a Migration Museums Network would make a useful contribution to the museum sector. The report and results of the survey were disseminated at two network events held in October 2017, the first at the British Museum in London and the second in the Discovery Museum in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. These events brought over 120 museum-sector professionals and academics together to learn, share best practice and gain in confidence on working with migration and related themes. Feedback on these events was extremely positive, demonstrating strong demand for exploration of migration themes across the country and sector, and a clear and demonstrable need for a network to support and

facilitate migration-related outputs and programming across the UK museums and heritage sector. We aim to secure funding to continue and grow this network in coming years as we deepen our positioning as facilitators and advisors on migration-related themes and outputs for the UK museums and heritage sector as a whole.

Above: Participants in Autograph ABP’s Canvas/s project, involving young refugees re-designing the National Gallery’s audio-visual guide – one of the case studies at our Migration Museums Network event at the British Museum © Autograph ABP Opposite: The culmination of the ‘This is my Cornwall’ project was a concert at the Royal Cornwall Museum on 9 February 2017 – this was another case study presented at our Migration Museums Network event at the British Museum © Royal Cornwall Museum

37


WHAT WE DO | 8 DIGITAL

8 DIGITAL We harness digital platforms and technology across all our workstreams and outputs to increase engagement, drive audiences, collect content and enhance the visitor experience, both within and beyond the four walls of our exhibitions and events.

Above: Blippar technology used on a mobile phone at the University of Leicester, School of Museum Studies’ 100 Stories of Migration, 2014–15 © University of Leicester, School of Museum Studies Opposite: Part of the online gallery page for our 100 Images of Migration exhibition on the MMP website © MMP

38

We have a well-established and lively online presence. Our website attracts more than 53 000 visitors annually and reflects our growing activity. In addition to exhibition, education and events pages, our online galleries of past and current exhibitions enable a global audience to view a selection of our works. We have a wide selection of publications and audio and video material to view and download, including recordings of past lectures and events, and reports and publications that we have commissioned or produced. Our blog regularly tells various strands of the migration story – often presented by guest bloggers – focusing on people and organisations that have been our inspiration. We have an active and growing social media presence across Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, enabling us to reach

and engage with tens of thousands of followers across these platforms. Social media has been a powerful way for us to raise awareness of and attract audiences to our exhibitions, events and activities. It also allows us to communicate and build relationships directly with a range of people within and outside our sector, and to engage in topical conversations around migration and the heritage sector. In addition, we harness digital technologies wherever possible to enhance our exhibition and event offerings. Examples include the use of Flickr and other platforms to enable contributors to submit images to our ever-evolving 100 Images of Migration exhibition, the use of augmented reality technology to provide visitors with additional content and engagement for our staging of our 100 Images of Migration in Leicester in 2014, the creation of a Spotify playlist to accompany our No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain exhibition, and the gathering of real-time visitor evaluation feedback using Google Forms.

39


MEASURING OUR IMPACT

MEASURING OUR IMPACT | 9 EVALUATION & IMPACT

40

9 EVALUATION & IMPACT We reach tens of thousands of people each year through our various outputs. Our evaluation reveals an audience that is young and diverse and that feels overwhelmingly positive about what we do and about our plans. 9.1 REACH More than 160 000 visitors have attended our exhibitions and events across the country since 2013. This includes 42 000 visitors to Adopting Britain at London’s Southbank Centre in 2015; 40 000 visitors to our various stagings of 100 Images of Migration; 20 000 visitors to our collaboration with the National Maritime Museum; 11 000 visitors to Call Me By My Name and over 10 000 visitors to our various showings of Germans in Britain. Many of the exhibitions with which we have been associated are interactive; at Adopting Britain over 6 000 visitors filled out cards in which they described their own migration story, and more than 2 000 people contributed information or a drawing about their keepsake. At the National

Maritime Museum more than 9 000 visitors responded to a question about whether they considered Britain’s migration story to be their story too, and in Leicester visitors engaged with images through an interactive app called Blippar. Thousands of visitors have filled out interactive cards associated with our exhibitions at the Migration Museum at The Workshop. Just over 9 000 people have attended our events, and we have reached audiences of thousands more through speaking at conferences and workshops. We reach 53 000 website visitors annually and we have an active social media presence, with more than 15 000 followers across Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and healthy engagement rates across all platforms. We have attracted significant international, national and local media

coverage across online, print and broadcast platforms since 2013, including the BBC, CNN, Reuters, AP, Al-Jazeera, the New York Times, The Economist, the Guardian, The Times, Metro, the Irish Times, Evening Standard, Buzzfeed, Vice and Huffington Post.

Above: A visitor reads contributions to the Conversations wall in our No Turning Back exhibition, 2017 © MMP Opposite: A visitor to our No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain fills out a card to give an account of her own migration story. These personal stories are frequently cited as visitors’ highlights © MMP

41


MEASURING OUR IMPACT | 9 EVALUATION & IMPACT

MEASURING OUR IMPACT | 9 EVALUATION & IMPACT

Below: Ollie Bayley discusses pictures of his AngloIndian family, loaned to us for our No Turning Back exhibition, with Assunta Nicolini, MMP volunteer, 2018 © MMP

9.2 IMPACT We evaluate all our outputs. We invite audience and participant feedback in relation to our events and exhibitions through questionnaires that measure satisfaction, learning and visitor profiles. We assess responses to our qualitative surveys and have a process of debriefing and reflection (involving staff, trustees

42

and advisers) that enables us to consider whether we have met our objectives, and which informs future activities. Evaluation of our exhibitions and events to date has shown both the overwhelmingly positive reaction to our outputs and the diverse, youthful nature of our audiences. Some 96 per cent of visitors to Adopting Britain who completed an

evaluation form rated the exhibition content as ‘excellent’ or ‘good’, 98 per cent said that the exhibition had contributed to their knowledge of migration in the UK, and 90 per cent felt there should be more exhibitions about immigration. Of visitors evaluated, 50 per cent were from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds, while 54 per cent were under the age of 30. The evaluation results from our Call Me By My Name exhibition showed similar trends: 96 per cent found the exhibition ‘very interesting’, 93 per cent ‘very much liked’ the idea of a permanent migration museum and 83 per cent said they were ‘very likely’ to visit such a museum. Just under twothirds of visitors surveyed (60 per cent) identified their ethnicity as deriving from groups other than ‘white British’, while 44 per cent were under the age of 30, with a further 29 per cent in their 30s. As of late January 2018, our realtime evaluation of visitors to No Turning Back also demonstrated a very positive response to the exhibition from a diverse, youthful audience (47 per cent under the age of 30, 59 per cent BAME

and ‘White Other’), with 91 per cent rating the exhibition ‘very interesting’, 97 per cent saying they had learned something new about British migration history, and 87 per cent saying they now intended to find out more about British migration history. Pupils and teachers who have participated in our education programme to date are similarly positive – results reveal that 92 per cent of pupils and teachers are satisfied with our workshops, and that 80 per cent of pupils would like to visit a migration museum. Our schools’ programme often reaches different demographic groups from our adult visitors, including low socio-economic and non-arts-engaged groups. Interestingly, independent valuation of our Theatre in Education project revealed a greater potential impact on pupils’ attitudes towards migration in areas of the country which tend to have more mixed or negative attitudes (e.g. Derby) than in areas with more positive attitudes (e.g. London). We have captured considerable data so far, but will consolidate and improve our evaluation with assistance from

British Future, an independent, nonpartisan thinktank that has been working with the Home Affairs Committee to measure public attitudes towards immigration. We will refine our theory of change and devise an evaluative framework across all our outputs designed to test our impact and audience reach. As well as involving visitors and participants with wide geographical reach, we aim in particular to engage: ◆ non-traditional museum visitors

from low socio-economic groups and BAME or refugee communities ◆ visitors/participants who recognise

the benefits of migration but feel that there are drawbacks too

With regards to this last point, British Future has identified a significant portion of the British population who constitute an ‘anxious middle’, holding subtle and complex views about migration that may be internally contradictory, but who are nevertheless ‘balancers’, keen to evaluate competing arguments and up for an honest conversation about migration The chart below indicates our provisional framework for measuring knowledge, skills and values; we believe that – by improving the knowledge and empathetic values of the ‘anxious middle’, as well as our other target audiences – we can make a real contribution to a more reasoned public conversation about migration.

Knowledge

Skills

Values

• Britain’s migration story

• Critical thinking

• Tolerance

• Contemporary debates around migration

• Effective argument and communication

• Empathy

• Investigation of own place in story

• Respect for views of others • Sense of belonging and shared history (inclusion)

43


RATIONALES & AIMS

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

44

10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM We are creating a dedicated, permanent, national migration museum for Britain. Our museum will dignify the important subject of migration and will stand as a powerful cultural symbol in its own right, playing a major role in the on-going national conversation about identity, history and all aspects of Britishness. Opposite: A visitor to No Turning Back reads Nivi Manchanda’s description of her weekly commute: ‘A cup of coffee at the airport was my constant companion’ © MMP

There is a renewed enthusiasm for museums: there has been a 10-per cent increase in the number of adults visiting museums over the last 10 years, and museums are now seen as community resources and centres of popular debate that are expected to deliver a social impact.3 Britain already has thousands of museums dedicated to a variety of themes – aerospace, golf, toys, silk, wool, rowing and stained glass. But we are unusual in the world in not having a museum of national history, and behind the times, increasingly, in not having a national migration museum (see p.66). Britain needs something similar to the US’s Ellis Island – an authoritative, inspiring and moving institution that illuminates the role that migration has always played in our national story.

Migration is a hot political topic with far-reaching implications for our national identity. The time is right to tell this story in all its antiquity and complexity. We will emphasise our shared history and establish a migration museum with the authority and confidence to tackle difficult issues about identity and belonging, prejudice and protest. And it is a gripping story, too, full of stirring individual tales. A serious, A-list migration museum – an intriguing genealogical project, an inquiry into where we all come from and where we are going – will position this story where it belongs: in the mainstream, at the forefront of our national consciousness, as a central part of our collective memory.

3

The Economist (2013) Temples of Delight – Economist Special Report on Museums, December 2013 and Mendoza, N (2017) The Mendoza Review: An Independent Review of Museums in England. London: Department for Digital, Media, Culture & Sport.

45


RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

70

80%

46

NHS

EU/Brexit

Immigration

Economy

Housing

Unemployment

Source: Ipsos MORI Issues Index, October 2017.

(nor, come to think of it, his predecessor, Boris Johnson). We would not have pizzas and pasta, curries and spring rolls, kebabs and oxtail soup. We would have no Mo Farah, Jessica Ennis-Hill or Dele Alli to cheer on in sport. Even characters who seem typically British – Winston Churchill, Audrey Hepburn and Stephen Fry – often turn out to have foreign parentage. Some of our cherished national symbols are not as ‘British’ as we might imagine: St George was a Turkish knight, the royal family is German, medieval Italian financiers gave us lire, soldi and denari – £sd: pounds, shillings and pence – and John O’Groats was a Flemish merchant, Jan de Groot. Our institutions

have been shaped by foreigners: Christianity came from the Middle East, via Greece, Rome and Germany; the English language is Latin, Germanic and French; non-nationals comprised a third of the British armed forces in the First World War; and intellectual life has been immeasurably influenced by our Nobel laureates, of whom nearly one-fifth arrived in the country as refugees. Emigration is an equally important part of Britain’s migration story. It includes late-16th-century journeys to the Americas, the movement of indentured servants, transportation of convicts in the 18th and 19th centuries, the massive emigration of millions of Britons between 1830 and 1930 in

% mentions of asylum/migration/ refugees (MPs’ postbags)

The total number of British people living abroad rose 23 per cent from 4.1 million in 1990 to 4.9 million in 2017: http://tinyurl.com/UNtrends.

5

h  ttps://www.slideshare.net/IpsosMORI/ipsos-moriissues-index-october-2017; https://www.ipsos.com/ ipsos-mori/en-uk/issues-index-2007-onwards

6

B  linder, S (2014) UK Public Opinion Toward Immigration: Overall Attitudes and Levels of Concern. The Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford.

Jan 13

Jul 11

Apr 12

Jan 10

Oct 10

Jul 08

Apr 09

Oct 07

Jul 05

Jan 07

Apr 06

Jan 04

Apr 03

Oct 04

Jan 01

Jul 02

Oct 01

Jul 99

Oct 98

Apr 00

Jul 96

Jan 98

Net migration

Source: Duffy, B and Frere-Smith, T (2014) Perceptions and Reality: Public Attitudes to Immigration. London: Ipsos MORI.

10.2 OUR RATIONALES We believe that the British public wants to talk about migration and that we can make a real contribution to promoting a more informed debate on the subject.

4

Apr 97

Oct 2017

Jan 95

Oct 2016

Oct 95

Oct 2015

Jul 93

Oct 2014

Oct 92

Oct 2013

Apr 94

Oct 2012

Apr 91

Oct 2011

Jul 90

Oct 2010

Jan 92

Oct 2009

Oct 89

Oct 2008

Jul 87

Oct 2007

Jan 89

0

0 -50 Apr 88

10

50

0%

Jan 86

20

100

20%

Oct 86

30

150

40%

Jul 84

Britain’s migration story is not new: at first there was no one, and then people came. But it is a story waiting to be told. We all have some sort of migration story – it just depends how far back we go. And that is something that unites us all. The tale of immigration to the UK is as rich as that of emigration to the former British Empire and the New World. It encompasses medieval Jews, 17th-century European Protestants, African slaves escaping the transports, Irish and Italian labourers in the 19th century, the long, 20th-century stream of arrivals from Britain’s dwindling overseas Empire – and, since the 1990s, a broader range of migrants from the European Union and beyond. Without migration we would not have Ritz, Schweppes, Brunel and Selfridge. We could lay no claim to T S Eliot, Joseph Conrad or V S Naipaul. There would be no Marks & Spencer, easyJet, Cobra, WPP, Triumph, Warburg, Rothschild or Dr Martens; no Idris Elba, Sophie Okonedo, Rita Ora or Stormzy – and no Sadiq Khan, current Mayor of London

200

Apr 85

40

250

60%

Jan 83

50

response to rapid industrialisation and events such as the Irish potato famine and the Australian Gold Rush. It takes in the stories of Welsh nationalist settlers in Patagonia, Cornish miners in Mexico, and the forced migration of tens of thousands of poor and orphaned children to the open spaces of the New World. These voyagers inevitably shaped the communities they joined. Outside the UK, well over 60 million people across the world now claim to have British ancestry, while the number of British citizens living abroad has soared in the last decade to almost 5 million.4

Oct 83

60

% MENTIONS

10.1 A RICH STORY, WAITING TO BE TOLD

Figure 2: Immigration as an important issue, by mentions of asylum/immigration/ refugees in MPs’ postbags, compared with net migration, 1983–2013

NET MIGRATION – THOUSANDS

Figure 1: Issues facing Britain: 10 year trends What do you see as the most/other important issues facing Britain today?

Migration is a central public concern. Recent Ipsos MORI surveys reveal that immigration has steadily ranked among the top public issues across the last 10 years, being the number one issue in most months between 2014 and 2016 (see Figure 1). In June 2016, the month of the EU referendum, for example, immigration was ranked top, identified as a priority issue by 48 per cent of

respondents, ahead of the NHS on 37 per cent, the EU on 32 per cent and the economy on 27 per cent.5 Although worries about immigration appear to have subsided somewhat since 2016, the proportion of the population expressing concern about immigration has nevertheless grown markedly over the past two decades: in December 1999, fewer than 5 per cent of Ipsos MORI’s monthly respondents cited race relations or immigration as a pressing concern. Worries about migration – as measured by mentions in MPs’ post-bags – closely reflect the real phenomenon of increased net migration to the UK (see Figure 2).6

47


RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

48

In your opinion, what do you think is the most common reason for immigrants (from other countries) to come to (your country)? 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% UK

USA

EU 10*

France

Germany

Greece

Italy

To be united with family members

To work

None of the above

To seek asylum

To study

Refuse to answer

To seek social benefits

Sweden

*The EU 10 countries are Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia.

Source: Transatlantic Trends Topline Data 2014, German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Compagnia di San Paolo (Italy).

between different places. The latest British Social Attitudes research suggests that attitudes in Britain are, overall, becoming gradually more positive over time – partly because of the more positive views of younger generations – but that they are also becoming more socially polarised. The gaps in perceptions of migration by class, age and educational attainment in the UK are now wider than in most other countries, in comparative European studies (see Figure 4).9

about the subject.10 This finding has been reinforced by the National Conversation on Immigration, conducted in 60 towns and cities across the UK by British Future and Hope Not Hate as a contribution to the Home Affairs Committee. In local citizens’ panels, the researchers find that most people are ‘balancers’, with mixed views about the pressures and gains of migration, and that there is a strong public appetite for an open public debate about how we can manage migration and integration successfully.11

Figure 4: Percentage point difference in European countries on positive opinion about economic impact of immigration between graduates aged ≤45 and school-leavers aged ≥65

Figure 3: Public perceptions of why immigrants come to different countries

% of respondents

This concern has prompted calls for lower levels of immigration to the UK, with a majority of the population now favouring a reduction in immigration.7 There are public debates about immigration in the US and across Europe with many common features. In comparative studies, such as the Transatlantic Trends surveys, the UK has had comparatively high concern about the levels and pace of immigration, particularly low trust in how governments handle immigration, and a distinctly higher concern than other European countries that migrants come to ‘take benefits’ (see Figure 3). In other areas of the immigration debate, however, including valuing skilled migrants, and seeing national identity as open to migrants from different ethnic and faith backgrounds, the UK has somewhat warmer attitudes than other European countries.8 Public attitudes to migration are therefore more nuanced and complex than the headline figures and newspaper headlines can sometimes suggest. There are very significant differences in attitudes to migration across the generations, across social classes and

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

7

h  ttps://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/attitudesimmigration-have-softened-referendum-most-stillwant-see-it-reduced

8

E  uropean Social Survey Topline Results from Round 7 http://www.europeansocialsurvey.org/docs/ findings/ESS7_toplines_issue_7_immigration.pdf

UK Sweden Slovenia France Denmark Austria Finland Spain Norway Germany Switzerland Netherlands Ireland Poland Belgium Portugal Czech Rep Hungary 0

5

19

13

4 10

15

20

21

26

22

25

28 28

30

31 30

32

41

36 35 34

35

40

43 42

45

46

50

Source: Clery E, Curtice, J, and Harding R (2016) British Social Attitudes: the 34th Report. London: NatCen Social Research.

London, which has seen the highest absolute levels of migration in recent decades, has more positive attitudes about migration, in contrast to areas of comparatively lower migration, and areas that have experienced rapid change for the first time (see Figure 5, p.50). But views in London are also mixed, with a majority in its outer boroughs favouring some reductions in immigration, while nevertheless being more positive about the economic and cultural balance sheet.

Many studies of migration show that there are strongly held and vocally expressed views about migration on both flanks of the debate, but that the largest group hold mixed views about the pressures and gains of migration. Research by British Future suggests that roughly half the population constitutes an ‘anxious middle’, which, although harbouring some concerns about immigration, has subtle and complicated views and is up for an honest, well-informed conversation

9

Clery E, Curtice, J, and Harding R (2016) British Social Attitudes: The 34th Report. London: NatCen Social Research: http://bsa.natcen. ac.uk/latest-report/british-social-attitudes-34/ immigration.aspx

10

K  atwala, S, Ballinger, S and Rhodes, M (2014) How To Talk About Immigration. London: British Future.

11

K  atwala, S, Rutter, J and Ballinger, S (2017) Time to Get It Right: Finding Consensus on Britain’s Future Immigration Policy. London: British Future.

49


RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

50

Figure 5: Proportion of poll respondents wanting to reduce migration

100%

80%

80%

20 77 60%

22

75

25

73

60%

40%

Duffy, B and Frere-Smith, T (2014) Perceptions and Reality: Public Attitudes to Immigration. Ipsos MORI/Social Research Institute.

16

Figure 6: Approval rating for government’s handling of immigration in 14 countries

100%

23

71

27

67

33

64

33

64

40%

36

60

40

57

46

51

44

60 50

67

48 38

20%

26

Source: Sumption, M. (2017) Location, Location, Location: Should Different Parts of the UK Have Different Immigration Policies? Oxford: The Migration Observatory. (Chart is taken from page 10; data combines findings from 2011 and 2013 British Social Attitudes Survey.)

thus promoting more positive attitudes towards ‘others’.15 Immigration in the abstract is a greater fear than it is as a day-to-day reality; although 77 per cent of the population see immigration as a national problem, only 30 per cent see it as a problem in their local area.16 High public concern is associated with the significant rise in migration levels in recent decades (see Figure 2, p.47), combined with anxieties about how this is handled by the government (see Figure 6)17 and, for some, a sense of a lack of public voice in discussing

Heath, A and Tilley, J (2005) ‘British National Identity and Attitudes Towards Immigration’, International Journal on Multicultural Studies 7: 119–32.

12

Saggar, S, Somerville, W, Ford, R and Sobolewska, M (2012) The Impacts of Migration on Social Cohesion and Integration, final report to the Migration Advisory Committee.

13

Duffy, B, Kaur-Ballagan, K, Gottfried, G and Palmqvist Aslaksen, A (2017) Shifting Ground: 8 Key Findings From a Longitudinal Study on Attitudes Towards Immigration and Brexit. London: Unbound Philanthropy.

14

Hewstone, M and Schmid K (2014) ‘Making it Happen 1: Contact’ in Goodhart, D (ed) Mapping Integration: Closing the Gap Between the Seminar Room and Wider Public Debate on Integration. London: Demos.

15

Approve

Ru ss ia

Po la nd

Po rt ug al Sw ed en

Ita ly

Fr an ce

U S

Tu rk ey

U K

G re ec e

Disapprove

EU N et he rl an ds G er m an y

Reduce a little

0% Sp ain

W al es Ea st M id la nd s W es tM id la nd s So ut h W es t

Ea st Yo th rks e H hir um e a be nd Ea r st of En gl an d

N or th

W es t

Ea st

N or th

So ut h

Sc ot la nd

0%

Reduce a lot

Source: Transatlantic Trends (2014) Mobility, Migration and Integration: Key Findings from 2014 and Selected Highlights from Transatlantic Trends and Transatlantic Trends: Immigration 2008–2013. Michigan, USA: Transatlantic Trends/German Marshall Fund of the United States.

the issue. At the same time, the public tends to significantly overestimate levels of immigration18 in the same way that it tends to overestimate the size of the Muslim population of Britain.19 Some studies show that providing accurate information can mitigate levels of concern: for example, 54 per cent of Britons who had not seen official figures said there were too many immigrants in the country, while the proportion saying this was 31 per cent among those who had viewed the numbers (Figure 7, p.52). But other studies show that worry itself

Transatlantic Trends (2014) Mobility, Migration and Integration. Key Findings from 2014 and Selected Highlights from Transatlantic Trends and Transatlantic Trends: Immigration 2008–2013. Michigan, USA: Transatlantic Trends/German Marshall Fund of the United States.

17

Bob Duffy and Tom Frere-Smith’s report for Ipsos MORI/Social Research Institute (2014) reveals that the British public perceive the proportion of foreign-born citizens to be 31 per cent, whereas it is in fact 13 per cent.

18

36

20% In ne rL on do n O ut er Lo nd on

Opposition to immigration tends to be rooted in worries about the economic or, more frequently, the cultural impact of new arrivals to the country. There is strong evidence, however, of a significant long-term shift from a belief that Britishness is ancestral (rooted in whether one’s family is British)12 to an understanding that it is civic – based on citizenship, shared understanding and the rule of law.13 It is also clear that attitudes to migration are not fixed and can change. An Ipsos MORI study tracked the same respondents over seven ‘waves’ from 2015 to 2017: the study found that around 40 per cent of participants shifted their views, sometimes significantly, during this period. Those with the most positive views had the most stable attitudes, but there were considerable shifts in all directions, and there was an aggregate positive shift. This is important evidence that engaging with the public could have a significant impact on attitudes. 14 Furthermore, evidence shows that contact between groups enables bridges to be built between people of different backgrounds, values to be shared and differences to be negotiated,

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

is capable of causing exaggeration or ‘emotional innumeracy’.20 This suggests that mere ‘myth-busting’ by the presentation of accurate information is unlikely to have a sustained effect on the drivers of anxieties unless this is also delivered with an empathetic response, which stresses common humanity and personal experience and so begins to break down a sense of ‘them and us’ between migrants and the communities they join.

Ipsos MORI’s Perils of Perception 2016 (Pew Research/De Standaard (Belgium)/Statistics Canada), as reported in the Guardian December 2016, revealed that the British public perceive the Muslim population as constituting 15 per cent of the UK population rather than the reality of 5 per cent.

19

Duffy, B and Frere-Smith, T (2014) Perceptions and Reality: Public Attitudes to Immigration. Ipsos MORI/Social Research Institute.

20

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RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

52

10.3 OUR AIMS

Figure 7: Too many immigrants in our country? Proportion of respondents answering ‘too many’ when asked about number of people living in their country who were born in another country. Half of respondents were given official immigration estimates; the other half were not. 60% 50% 40% 30% 20%

Given official immigration estimates

Po la nd

Sw ed en

G er m an y

Fr an ce

Ru ss ia

EU N et he rla nd s

Sp ain

U S

Po rt ug al

Ita ly

0%

U K

10% G re ec e

% of respondents stating there are too many immigrants in their country

Museums can play a key role in helping people explore their attitudes to migration.21 They are highly trusted as authoritative sources of information,22 and also highly visited, with over half of UK adults going to a museum every year – 52 per cent went in 2016/17, representing a 10-percentage-point increase over the preceding decade (42 per cent went to a museum in 2005/06).23 We believe that a national migration museum for Britain can contribute to a more reasoned debate by providing a calm and authoritative cultural space – away from newspapers and away from politicians – in which people can think about this politically charged and polarising topic. We can humanise migrants and bring different groups of people together by sharing stories and transforming ‘others’ into more-familiar neighbours. We can play a valuable role in drawing attention to some common misperceptions about migration. And we can address concerns about cultural threats to national identity by focusing on Britain’s shared heritage as a migrant nation.

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

Not given official immigration estimates

Source: Transatlantic Trends Topline Data 2014, German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Compagnia di San Paolo (Italy).

For all these reasons, we believe that a migration museum that is a rich and stimulating cultural institution, with an empathetic focus on storytelling that encourages audiences to see the world through other people’s eyes, is a highly appropriate vehicle for encouraging the public to engage thoughtfully and actively with the important topic of migration.

Lemos, G (2005) The Search for Tolerance: Challenging Racist Attitudes and Behaviour Amongst Young People. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

21

Britain Thinks (2013) ‘Public Perceptions of – and Attitudes to – the Purposes of Museums in Society’ – a Report for the Museums Association 2013: www.museumsassocation.org/museums2020.

22

Mendoza, N (2017) The Mendoza Review: An Independent Review of Museums in England. London: Department for Digital, Media, Culture & Sport.

23

A permanent site in London We believe that the Migration Museum should have a permanent home – a compelling visitor attraction and a symbol of what is culturally valued by the nation. In our view London is the natural home for a viable migration museum for the following reasons: ◆ Visitor numbers for both paid and free museums, galleries, historic properties and heritage centres in all size categories are far higher in London (especially Inner London) than they are in other major centres of population in the UK (Birmingham, Leeds and Manchester).24 ◆ London is much more visited by domestic overnight visitors, tourism day visitors and foreign visitors than other cities in the UK, and visitors to London spend far more than those to other cities and regions. More foreign visitors visit London than all other regions of the UK combined.25 26

◆ On every measure from the last census, London is the most diverse place in England and Wales by far.27 Only 45 per cent of Londoners reported themselves as white British; the capital has the largest proportion of all main minority ethnic groups; 37 per cent of Londoners were born abroad; the top ten areas for the proportion of the population born abroad are all London boroughs (the next three are Slough, Leicester and Luton); there is more religious diversity in London than anywhere else. A national network While we are seeking a permanent London location for our Migration Museum, we are fully committed to reflecting the national scope of Britain’s migration story through partnerships with museums and galleries across the country. We aspire to be at the centre of a network of museums that can share expertise, programming and stakeholder engagement with the overriding purpose of helping the heritage sector to increase and improve outputs related to migration across the UK.

Britain has arguably the richest museum ecology of any nation: worldclass national museums and galleries complemented by an extraordinary tapestry of more than 2 000 regional museums. The collections held in these museums are uniquely broad, in part a consequence of empire and of early industrial wealth. Objects as varied as Pacific feather cloaks and Byzantine ivories sit in regional museums among collections of local and regional importance. These museums are extraordinary resources for making the connections between local and global stories, and movements of people, that are more relevant today than ever before.

Data from Visit England’s annual surveys of visits to visitor attractions www.visitengland.org/insightstatistics/major-tourism-surveys/attractions/ Annual_Survey/

24

https://www.visitbritain.org/sites/default/files/ vb-corporate/Documents-Library/documents/ foresight_157_regional_spread.pdf

25

https://www.visitbritain.org/great-britain-tourismsurvey-latest-monthly-overnight-data

26

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/census/2011-census/keystatistics-for-local-authorities-in-england-andwales/index.html

27

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RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

Below: Young West Indian immigrant, Victoria Station, 24 June 1962, part of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition © Science and Society Picture Library

Many national, regional and other museums tell these stories in their galleries, temporary exhibitions and other programming, particularly those with a ‘deep’ historical focus. But opportunities may be missed for relating these stories to today’s population movements. And our scoping research suggests that many museums lack the resources to develop their collections and acquire new material to ensure that they are relevant to the UK’s changing population, or the confidence to tackle what are sometimes regarded as sensitive or divisive themes in their programming. The Migration Museum will tell a national story of migration to and from the UK, from the distant past to the present day. Some of its narrative will be panoramic, while some will be focused on particular communities, places and individuals. We recognise that, often, local museums are the best tellers of stories that resonate with their local communities. We believe that by developing touring exhibitions in partnership with regional museums we can draw out migration stories across the nation, reach new audiences,

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and simultaneously strengthen the rationale and build the content and the relationships that we will require to deliver a permanent migration museum for Britain. Expanding our audience Our evaluation of our own exhibition visitors28 shows that our core adult audience is young (71 per cent aged under 40), highly educated (74 per cent with a degree or higher qualification) and ethnically diverse. While we are keen to continue to engage and challenge this audience – and recognise that building a core audience is essential for the success of the Migration Museum – we nevertheless aspire to reach well beyond it. Taking Part surveys from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport29 show that black, Asian and minority ethnic audiences are consistently under-represented in the arts, and we aim to continue to reach those audiences, as well as those from low socio-economic groups, those who do not feel particularly positive towards migration, and those for whom museums are regarded as being ‘not for us’.

Our own evaluation further revealed that, while 53 per cent of our adult visitors to No Turning Back are highly engaged with the arts, visiting a museum, gallery or heritage site at least once a month, just under 10 per cent of school children who take part in our workshops are similarly engaged, thus demonstrating our reach to significantly different, and otherwise hard to reach, audiences through our education programme. A national opinion poll conducted by Survation on behalf of British Future in early 2018 found that 43 per cent of respondents nationwide said they would be likely to visit a permanent national migration museum (14 per cent said they would be very likely to visit, and 29 per cent quite likely). We have also considered Mosaic and Arts Council England market segmentation data regarding propensity to visit museums and exhibitions, and we estimate that the population segments most likely to visit a migration museum represent approximately 35 per cent of the UK population and will form a solid base of likely visitors. Within this group there is a wide range of diversity

in terms of socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds. The Migration Museum will also attract those who have a special interest in migration, either personally (people interested in ancestral family or group history – importantly, including visitors from abroad) or professionally: researchers, academics or policy makers in migration studies and related fields. There is therefore a large potential market for a migration museum, positioning itself as a mainstream attraction with broad popular appeal, among people who are currently engaged with the arts and far beyond. Working in partnership We do not aim for the time being to acquire a collection of our own but rather to operate a policy of curation that is integrated with our community engagement – sourcing and borrowing material from the variegated communities that constitute our country. At the same time, we aim to breathe new life into what is already available, by tapping into the 90 per cent of the collections of museums that are in storage or in countless ‘resting’

exhibitions. By working in partnership with existing museums, we hope to build the stories and the collections that will contribute to the Migration Museum.

Evaluation of Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond available on MMP website.

28

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/taking-part-survey and Equality, Diversity and the Creative Case 2016–2017 published by Arts Council England.

29

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RATIONALES & AIMS | 11 THE NEXT THREE YEARS

RATIONALES & AIMS | 11 THE NEXT THREE YEARS

11 THE NEXT THREE YEARS Our broad targets for the next three years include the following: ◆ Securing a permanent home for the Migration Museum in London while continuing to occupy temporary spaces. We will establish ourselves as a valuable community resource and place-maker, connecting people with place and with each other, and contributing to local and national heritage ◆ Growing the Migration Museums Network as a sector-supporting organisation to facilitate and enable migration stories to be told in institutions across the country, reflecting the truly national scope of Britain’s migration story, and at the same time developing strong nationwide delivery partnerships for the Migration Museum

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◆ Delivering a vibrant, participatory, partnership-orientated cultural programme that encompasses exhibitions and events in our own venues and beyond, continuing to test lively new approaches and defining our policy on collections, loans and digital strategy ◆ Developing our education programme, taking our schools workshops to more than 2 000 children each year, building our partnerships, and testing innovative approaches to learning, and our capacity for income generation ◆ Developing our audiences beyond our ‘core’ by further extending our reach into – among others – BAME and migrant/refugee audiences, those with less positive attitudes to migration and those from low socioeconomic backgrounds and with low levels of arts engagement

◆ Refining our theory of change, and improving our evaluation, aiming for meticulous measurement of all our outputs in order to measure our social impact and demonstrate the need for a migration museum ◆ Strengthening our organisation through a genuine commitment to inclusion and diversity, an emphasis on efficiency and resilience, in particular developing leadership and business skills, rigorous analysis of staff and trustee activities and skills, and a culture of internal and external evaluation, training and mentoring ◆ Building the business case for a sustainable migration museum by working with specialist partners to test opportunities for income generation from admissions, events, merchandise, education provision and more; building partnerships with local business improvement districts and enterprise partnerships; growing our capacity for fundraising from private donors with a rigorous approach to due diligence

◆ Embedding digital platforms and technology across all of our work streams to increase engagement, drive audiences, collect content and enhance the visitor experience, both within and outside the four walls of our exhibitions and events ◆ Further developing our profile across all communications and media platforms to grow and engage audiences; raising awareness of our cultural and education programmes and our sector-supporting network activities as well as our plans to create a permanent national migration museum; contributing context and insight to ongoing debates about migration and identity; and emphasising our role as a community hub, a place where people can connect their individual stories with collective narrative

Right: A visitor engages with Déirdre Kelly’s Arrival, Departure, Arrival, Departure at the launch of No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain in the Migration Museum at The Workshop, October 2017 © MMP

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APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

APPENDICES

RATIONALES & AIMS | 11.0 THE NEXT THREE YEARS

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APPENDIX 1 WHO WE ARE GOVERNANCE The Migration Museum Project is a private charitable company limited by guarantee. Our trustees meet regularly, together with our staff and advisers. We are supported by a specialist education committee and development subcommittee.

Trustees Barbara Roche, Chair Barbara was a Labour Government Minister and MP. She was a minister of state in the Home Office, Cabinet Office and the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. She was also the Financial Secretary to the Treasury, a minister at the Department of Trade and Industry, Minister for Women and Equalities, and the Immigration Minister when at the Home Office. Barbara has chaired one of the largest housing associations in the country and currently chairs a number of other organisations, including the Migration Matters Trust, an all-party group which works with business, trade unions and former senior diplomats to argue the positive case for migration.

Dr Jill Rutter, Vice-chair Jill is Director of Strategy and Relationships at British Future. Previously she was a senior research fellow in migration at the Institute for Public Policy Research, where she managed the original scoping study for the Migration Museum Project. She has also worked at the Refugee Council and has written extensively on migration. Mohan Mansigani, Treasurer Mohan, a finance director with extensive private equity experience, has played a key leadership role in establishing Casual Dining Group (CDG, previously known as Tragus) as a major UK restaurant business. He led the business through two private equity transactions, including the £267 million sale to Blackstone in 2007. Before working for CDG, Mohan was Chief Financial Officer of Costa Coffee and also of TGI Fridays. Mohan now serves as a non-executive director with Bob & Berts (a Business Growth Fund-backed chain of coffee shops), and as a trustee with St John Ambulance.

Zelda Baveystock Zelda is Senior Grants/Development Officer with the Heritage Lottery Fund. She has extensive experience in the capital development of history museums from her previous role as acting deputy director at the Museum of Liverpool – and, as Senior Keeper of History at Tyne and Wear Museums, she was part of the team that led the £13 million redevelopment of Discovery Museum in Newcastle. Silaja Berks Silaja is Global Philanthropy Manager for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), currently based in New York. Before this, she worked for the Tate Gallery and Shakespeare Schools Festival, developing strategic collaborations with international museums and funding partners. In a voluntary capacity, Silaja is a former trustee of Book Works, and participated in Diaspora Dialogues, a Sri Lanka programme run by International Alert.

Opposite: Notting Hill couple, 1967, part of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition © Charlie Phillips

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APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

Sarah Caplin Sarah is a qualified solicitor and former TV executive for both the BBC and ITV in senior production and management roles. She launched the children’s charity ChildLine, for which she served as a trustee for many years. In 2012 she was part of the small team creating the Silver Line Helpline charity for older people, and she is a trustee of The Alfred Caplin Family Charitable Trust. Charles Gurassa Charles was appointed chair of Channel 4 in January 2016. He is deputy chairman at easyJet plc, senior independent director of Merlin Entertainments plc and a trustee of English Heritage. He is a former chairman of several companies, including Virgin Mobile plc, LOVEFiLM, and former deputy chairman of the National Trust. He is the former CEO of Thomson Travel Group plc.

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APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

Robert Winder Robert is the former literary editor of the Independent and deputy editor of Granta. He is the best-selling author of Bloody Foreigners: The Story of Immigration to Britain (the second edition of which was published in 2013) and, most recently, The Last Wolf: The Hidden Springs of Englishness. He has also been a regular contributor to the Independent, the Observer and the New Statesman.

Team Aditi Anand, Head of Creative Content Aditi is a creative producer and curator with experience of working within the arts and non-profit sectors. Previously, she produced and managed a multimedia education project in India that is currently being implemented in over a thousand schools and was communications lead for India’s largest media for social change initiative. She has also worked in New York with the Museum of the Moving Image and interactive design firm, Local Projects.

Bill Bingham – Events Adviser and Performer Bill’s association with the Migration Museum Project began in earnest with visits to the Calais ‘Jungle’ for Call Me By My Name in 2016. His background in news broadcasting (BBC, LBC, Sky News) helped him collect a great many stories during the camp’s dramatic final months. His parallel acting career means he provides dramatic presentation of many other migration stories, including Shakespeare's Strangers for the 500th anniversary of the 1517 May Day anti-immigration riots near St Paul’s Cathedral. Sophie Henderson, Director Sophie has overseen the transition of the Migration Museum Project from voluntary to funded organisation. Before that she was a barrister at Tooks Court, chambers of Michael Mansfield QC, where she specialised in immigration, asylum and human rights law. She was also a judge of the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal and chaired appeals for the Social Security and Child Support Tribunal.

Georgina Lewis, Head of Development Georgina joined the Migration Museum Project after five years developing and managing grants for an international development NGO. Georgina has been a mentor and volunteer co-ordinator for the Terrence Higgins Trust Refugee Mentoring Project and a volunteer advisor at Praxis, providing support for vulnerable migrants in London. Georgina has a BA in Hispanic Studies and Politics from the University of Sheffield and an MSc in Global Politics from LSE. Sue McAlpine, Curator Sue has long experience as a curator, working especially in community engagement. For many years she was curator for Hackney Museum, producing exhibitions (including the first outing for 100 Images of Migration in 2013), managing collections and working closely with Hackney’s communities. Since then Sue has curated three further exhibitions for the Migration Museum Project: Keepsakes and Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond, and No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain.

Liberty Melly, Education and Events Officer Liberty joined the Migration Museum Project from a background in the heritage sector. Following her undergraduate studies in history at the University of Nottingham, she has worked for the Museum of London and Museum of London Docklands and volunteered for the National Trust and Hackney Museum. Liberty’s career to date has focused on learning and community engagement. She has also recently completed an MA in Museums, Galleries and Contemporary Cultures from the University of Westminster, during which her dissertation explored the representation of migration in the UK cultural heritage sector. Emily Miller, Head of Learning and Partnerships Emily has grown the education programme from scratch since joining the Migration Museum Project in 2013. Following an anthropology degree, Emily trained as a citizenship teacher with TeachFirst and then moved on to co-ordinate an international education

programme encouraging secondary school pupils into philanthropy. She has also worked at Seeds of Peace summer camps – which bring teenagers from the Middle East and South Asia together in America – and took an MA in Conflict Resolution in the Peace Studies division at Bradford University. Matthew Plowright, Head of Communications Matthew has worked as an editor, journalist and researcher for a number of media and research organisations, including the Financial Times, Euromoney, Pacific Epoch and MSN, with a particular focus on China. A born-andbred Londoner, with roots in multiple continents, he is a strong believer in the need for a dedicated national museum of migration.

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APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

Andrew Steeds, Projects Manager Andrew has a background in writing and editorial consultancy. In addition to his work for the Migration Museum Project, he runs Simply Put Ltd, a company that works with organisations to make public written communication clearer and more accountable.

Education committee

Volunteers

Bushra Nasir CBE

Chair; former headteacher, Plashet School

Jenny Blay

Head of museum learning, the Langley Academy

Sophie Henderson

Director, Migration Museum Project

Our highly dedicated, highly skilled volunteers generously give up their time to enable us to stage exhibitions, events and workshops. We can’t list all of them here, but below is a list of some of our regular recent volunteers:

Roland Williams, Design Adviser Roland has worked with the Migration Museum Project since its inception, advising on brand, exhibition and communications design. He has a senior position at Garden, a leading London branding consultancy.

Sally McCartney

History consultant, United Learning

Liberty Melly

Education and events officer, Migration Museum Project

Emily Miller

Head of learning and partnerships, Migration Museum Project

Dr Cathy Ross

Honorary research fellow, Museum of London

Una Sookun

Head of humanities, Globe Academy, Southwark

Professor Justin Dillon Professor of science and environmental education, Exeter University

Martin Spafford Former head of history, George Mitchell School, author of OCR history GCSE text books, fellow of Schools History Project Rebecca Sullivan

CEO, Historical Association

Martin Thornton

Council for At-Risk Academics

Emma Winch

Hackney Museum

Koto Akiyoshi Tanya Costa Tabitha Deadman Beatrice Duguid Cox Anya Edmond Henry Freeman Lucy Gardner Alizeh Hameed Eureka Henrich Roshni Hirani Mona Jamil Sonia Kneepkens Aleksandra Kubica Holly Langham Alice Lepage

Iris Lim Naomi Munro-Lott Jana Manuelpillai Ray Murphy Assunta Nicolini Sam Norwood Anna Phillips Alice Riegler Simon Sleight Kirsty Sullivan Adam Sutcliffe Beth Taylor Tracey Taylor Nadia Valman Emine Yeter

Right: Girl with balloon, Chinatown, London, 1987, part of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition Š Colin O'Brien

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APPENDIX 2 | DISTINGUISHED FRIENDS

APPENDIX 3 | FUNDERS

APPENDIX 2 DISTINGUISHED FRIENDS A large number of high-profile people, from across the political spectrum and all areas of public life, have expressed their support and enthusiasm for our project, many of them making significant contributions to our activities. These are our distinguished friends. Sukhpal Ahluwalia Riz Ahmed Sughra Ahmed Sir Keith Ajegbo George Alagiah OBE Professor Sir Michael Atiyah Professor Peter Atkins Julian Baggini Dr Rob Berkeley Richard Beswick Professor Dinesh Bhugra CBE Sir Geoffrey Bindman Sir Nicholas Blake Ian Blatchford Rt Hon Lord Blunkett Dr Alan Borg CBE FSA Mihir Bose Alain de Botton John Bowers QC Rt Hon Lord Browne of Ladyton The Duke of Buccleuch Rickie Burman Sarah Caplin Saimo Chahal Baroness Chakrabarti Dr Jung Chang Stephen Claypole

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Professor Robin Cohen Professor Linda Colley CBE Professor David Crystal Prakash Daswani Laura Devine Rt Hon Lord Dholakia OBE DL Lloyd Dorfman CBE Lord Alf Dubs Rt Hon Lord Dyson Graham Farmelo Baroness Flather Daniel Franklin Professor Suzanne Franks Dr Edie Friedman Manjit S Gill QC Teresa Graham CBE Susie Harries Naomie Harris Professor James Hathaway David Hencke Sophie Herxheimer Afua Hirsch Rt Hon Lord Howard of Lympne CH QC Tessa Jackson OBE Clive Jacobs Sir Adrian Johns KCB CBE DL Shobu Kapoor

Jackie Kay Ayub Khan-Din Shappi Khorsandi Dr Turi King Professor Francesca Klug Sir Hans Kornberg FRS Professor Tony Kushner Kwasi Kwarteng Kwame Kwei-Armah David Kynaston Dr Brian Lambkin Lord Lester of Herne Hill QC Mark Lewisohn Joanna Lumley OBE Michael Mansfield QC Heather Mayfield Sue McAlpine Lord McConnell Neil Mendoza David Miles Abigail Morris Rt Hon Baroness Morris of Yardley Hugh Muir Tessa Murdoch Sir Vidia Naipaul Sandy Nairne CBE FSA Bushra Nasir CBE Dr Susheila Nasta MBE FRAS Eithne Nightingale John O’Farrell David Olusoga Julia Onslow-Cole John Orna-Ornstein Lord Herman Ouseley Ruth Padel Professor Panikos Panayi

APPENDIX 3 FUNDERS Lord Bhikhu Parekh David Pearl Caryl Phillips Dr Mike Phillips OBE FRSL Trevor Phillips OBE Sunand Prasad Aubrey Rose CBE Michael Rosen Dr Cathy Ross Sir Salman Rushdie Professor Philippe Sands QC Rt Hon Sir Konrad Schiemann Rt Hon Sir Stephen Sedley Dr Maggie Semple OBE FCGI Saira Shah Arun Singh Jon Snow Robert Soning David Spence Danny Sriskandarajah Stelio Stefanou OBE DL Lord Taverne QC Andy Thornton Professor Robert Tombs Lord Verjee CBE Patrick Vernon OBE Edmund de Waal OBE Iqbal Wahhab OBE Yasmin Waljee OBE Jake Wallis Simons Sir David Warren KCMG Iain Watson Henning Wehn Baroness Whitaker Gary Younge Benjamin Zephaniah

The Migration Museum Project has received funding from a number of organisations over the last five years. We would like to acknowledge this generous contribution here and to express our thanks to our funders, who include: The Alan and Babette Sainsbury Charitable Fund Alfred Caplin Charity Settlement Artistic Endeavours Trust Arts Council England Aziz Foundation The Baring Foundation City Bridge Trust City Funding Network Cockayne – Grants for the Arts Doris Pacey Charitable Foundation and the Doctor Michael and Anna Brynberg Charitable Foundation Economic and Social Research Council Esmée Fairbairn Foundation Hogan Lovells Kohn Foundation Londonewcastle Migration Foundation

Nadir Dinshaw Charitable Trust Northwick Trust Oath Paul Hamlyn Foundation Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP Rayne Foundation Rothschild Foundation The Schroder Foundation Sigrid Rausing Trust UBS Unbound Philanthropy

We would also like to acknowledge the generous support of u + i, who provided us with a temporary home at The Workshop in 2017 and 2018 – and all our individual donors, whose contributions make our work possible.

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APPENDIX 4 | MIGRATION MUSEUMS IN OTHER COUNTRIES

APPENDIX 4 | MIGRATION MUSEUMS IN OTHER COUNTRIES

APPENDIX 4 MIGRATION MUSEUMS IN OTHER COUNTRIES Britain is increasingly behind the rest of the world in not having a dedicated museum of migration. Below we have listed a selection of migration museums in other countries. Ballinstadt Emigration Museum, Hamburg, Germany: www.ballinstadt.net/BallinStadt_ emigration_museum_Hamburg/ Welcome.html Canadian Museum of Immigration, Halifax, Nova Scotia: www.pier21.ca/home Centre de Documentation sur les Migrations Humaines, Dudelange, Luxembourg: www.cdmh.lu Cité National de l’Histoire de l’Immigration, Paris, France: www.histoire-immigration.fr

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Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration, New York City, USA: www.libertyellisfoundation.org/visitingellis-island

MhiC – Museu d'Història de la Immigració de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain: www.mhic.net

Other museums that incorporate migration substantially throughout the museum, within a dedicated gallery or through temporary exhibitions.

Maritime museums

Grassroots initiatives

Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney: www.anmm.gov.au

EPIC – The Irish Emigration Museum, Dublin, Republic of Ireland: http://epicchq.com

Migration Museum, Adelaide, Australia: migration.history.sa.gov.au

National museum

Galata Maritime Museum, Genoa, Italy: www.galatamuseodelmare.it/jsp/index.jsp

Porto M (M for Mediterranean, Migration, Memory or Militarisation) Askavusa Collettivo (Barefoot Collective), Lampedusa, Italy: www.askavusa.com

Museu de Imigração, São Paulo, Brazil: museudaimigracao.org.br

Te Papa, Wellington, New Zealand: www.tepapa.govt.nz

German Emigration Centre, Bremerhaven: dah-bremerhaven.de/english/english. html Immigrant Museet, Farum, Denmark http://immigrantmuseet.dk/ Immigration Museum, Melbourne, Australia: museumvictoria.com.au/ immigrationmuseum/ La Nave della Silla, Calabria, Italy: en.lanavedellasila.it

Site-specific museums Museo de la Inmigración, Buenos Aires, Argentina: untref.edu.ar/muntref/museo-de-lainmigracion/ Museo Paolo Cresci, Lucca, Italy: www.fondazionepaolocresci.it Museo Nazionale Emigrazione Italiana, Rome, Italy: www.museonazionaleemigrazione.it Red Star Line Museum, Antwerp, Belgium: www.redstarline.be/en

City or neighbourhood museums FHXB Museum, East Kreusberg, Berlin, Germany: www.fhxb-museum.de MAS, Antwerp, Belgium: www.mas.be/en Museum of Copenhagen, Denmark: (Closed until 2019) cphmuseum.kk.dk/en/indhold/home

Hyde Park Barracks Museum, Sydney, Australia: sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/hydeparkbarracks-museum Tenement Museum, New York City, USA www.tenement.org Baltimore Immigration Museum, Baltimore, USA http://www.immigrationbaltimore.org/

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In your opinion, what do you think is the most common reason for immigrants (from other countries) to come to (your country)? 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% UK

USA

EU 10*

France

Germany

Greece

Italy

To be united with family members

To work

None of the above

To seek asylum

To study

Refuse to answer

To seek social benefits

Sweden

*The EU 10 countries are Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia.

Source: Transatlantic Trends Topline Data 2014, German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Compagnia di San Paolo (Italy).

between different places. The latest British Social Attitudes research suggests that attitudes in Britain are, overall, becoming gradually more positive over time – partly because of the more positive views of younger generations – but that they are also becoming more socially polarised. The gaps in perceptions of migration by class, age and educational attainment in the UK are now wider than in most other countries, in comparative European studies (see Figure 4).9

about the subject.10 This finding has been reinforced by the National Conversation on Immigration, conducted in 60 towns and cities across the UK by British Future and Hope Not Hate as a contribution to the Home Affairs Committee. In local citizens’ panels, the researchers find that most people are ‘balancers’, with mixed views about the pressures and gains of migration, and that there is a strong public appetite for an open public debate about how we can manage migration and integration successfully.11

Figure 4: Percentage point difference in European countries on positive opinion about economic impact of immigration between graduates aged ≤45 and school-leavers aged ≥65

Figure 3: Public perceptions of why immigrants come to different countries

% of respondents

This concern has prompted calls for lower levels of immigration to the UK, with a majority of the population now favouring a reduction in immigration.7 There are public debates about immigration in the US and across Europe with many common features. In comparative studies, such as the Transatlantic Trends surveys, the UK has had comparatively high concern about the levels and pace of immigration, particularly low trust in how governments handle immigration, and a distinctly higher concern than other European countries that migrants come to ‘take benefits’ (see Figure 3). In other areas of the immigration debate, however, including valuing skilled migrants, and seeing national identity as open to migrants from different ethnic and faith backgrounds, the UK has somewhat warmer attitudes than other European countries.8 Public attitudes to migration are therefore more nuanced and complex than the headline figures and newspaper headlines can sometimes suggest. There are very significant differences in attitudes to migration across the generations, across social classes and

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

7

h  ttps://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/attitudesimmigration-have-softened-referendum-most-stillwant-see-it-reduced

8

E  uropean Social Survey Topline Results from Round 7 http://www.europeansocialsurvey.org/docs/ findings/ESS7_toplines_issue_7_immigration.pdf

UK Sweden Slovenia France Denmark Austria Finland Spain Norway Germany Switzerland Netherlands Ireland Poland Belgium Portugal Czech Rep Hungary 0

5

19

13

4 10

15

20

21

26

22

25

28 28

30

31 30

32

41

36 35 34

35

40

43 42

45

46

50

Source: Clery E, Curtice, J, and Harding R (2016) British Social Attitudes: the 34th Report. London: NatCen Social Research.

London, which has seen the highest absolute levels of migration in recent decades, has more positive attitudes about migration, in contrast to areas of comparatively lower migration, and areas that have experienced rapid change for the first time (see Figure 5, p.50). But views in London are also mixed, with a majority in its outer boroughs favouring some reductions in immigration, while nevertheless being more positive about the economic and cultural balance sheet.

Many studies of migration show that there are strongly held and vocally expressed views about migration on both flanks of the debate, but that the largest group hold mixed views about the pressures and gains of migration. Research by British Future suggests that roughly half the population constitutes an ‘anxious middle’, which, although harbouring some concerns about immigration, has subtle and complicated views and is up for an honest, well-informed conversation

9

Clery E, Curtice, J, and Harding R (2016) British Social Attitudes: The 34th Report. London: NatCen Social Research: http://bsa.natcen. ac.uk/latest-report/british-social-attitudes-34/ immigration.aspx

10

K  atwala, S, Ballinger, S and Rhodes, M (2014) How To Talk About Immigration. London: British Future.

11

K  atwala, S, Rutter, J and Ballinger, S (2017) Time to Get It Right: Finding Consensus on Britain’s Future Immigration Policy. London: British Future.

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RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

50

Figure 5: Proportion of poll respondents wanting to reduce migration

100%

80%

80%

20 77 60%

22

75

25

73

60%

40%

Duffy, B and Frere-Smith, T (2014) Perceptions and Reality: Public Attitudes to Immigration. Ipsos MORI/Social Research Institute.

16

Figure 6: Approval rating for government’s handling of immigration in 14 countries

100%

23

71

27

67

33

64

33

64

40%

36

60

40

57

46

51

44

60 50

67

48 38

20%

26

Source: Sumption, M. (2017) Location, Location, Location: Should Different Parts of the UK Have Different Immigration Policies? Oxford: The Migration Observatory. (Chart is taken from page 10; data combines findings from 2011 and 2013 British Social Attitudes Survey.)

thus promoting more positive attitudes towards ‘others’.15 Immigration in the abstract is a greater fear than it is as a day-to-day reality; although 77 per cent of the population see immigration as a national problem, only 30 per cent see it as a problem in their local area.16 High public concern is associated with the significant rise in migration levels in recent decades (see Figure 2, p.47), combined with anxieties about how this is handled by the government (see Figure 6)17 and, for some, a sense of a lack of public voice in discussing

Heath, A and Tilley, J (2005) ‘British National Identity and Attitudes Towards Immigration’, International Journal on Multicultural Studies 7: 119–32.

12

Saggar, S, Somerville, W, Ford, R and Sobolewska, M (2012) The Impacts of Migration on Social Cohesion and Integration, final report to the Migration Advisory Committee.

13

Duffy, B, Kaur-Ballagan, K, Gottfried, G and Palmqvist Aslaksen, A (2017) Shifting Ground: 8 Key Findings From a Longitudinal Study on Attitudes Towards Immigration and Brexit. London: Unbound Philanthropy.

14

Hewstone, M and Schmid K (2014) ‘Making it Happen 1: Contact’ in Goodhart, D (ed) Mapping Integration: Closing the Gap Between the Seminar Room and Wider Public Debate on Integration. London: Demos.

15

Approve

Ru ss ia

Po la nd

Po rt ug al Sw ed en

Ita ly

Fr an ce

U S

Tu rk ey

U K

G re ec e

Disapprove

EU N et he rl an ds G er m an y

Reduce a little

0% Sp ain

W al es Ea st M id la nd s W es tM id la nd s So ut h W es t

Ea st Yo th rks e H hir um e a be nd Ea r st of En gl an d

N or th

W es t

Ea st

N or th

So ut h

Sc ot la nd

0%

Reduce a lot

Source: Transatlantic Trends (2014) Mobility, Migration and Integration: Key Findings from 2014 and Selected Highlights from Transatlantic Trends and Transatlantic Trends: Immigration 2008–2013. Michigan, USA: Transatlantic Trends/German Marshall Fund of the United States.

the issue. At the same time, the public tends to significantly overestimate levels of immigration18 in the same way that it tends to overestimate the size of the Muslim population of Britain.19 Some studies show that providing accurate information can mitigate levels of concern: for example, 54 per cent of Britons who had not seen official figures said there were too many immigrants in the country, while the proportion saying this was 31 per cent among those who had viewed the numbers (Figure 7, p.52). But other studies show that worry itself

Transatlantic Trends (2014) Mobility, Migration and Integration. Key Findings from 2014 and Selected Highlights from Transatlantic Trends and Transatlantic Trends: Immigration 2008–2013. Michigan, USA: Transatlantic Trends/German Marshall Fund of the United States.

17

Bob Duffy and Tom Frere-Smith’s report for Ipsos MORI/Social Research Institute (2014) reveals that the British public perceive the proportion of foreign-born citizens to be 31 per cent, whereas it is in fact 13 per cent.

18

36

20% In ne rL on do n O ut er Lo nd on

Opposition to immigration tends to be rooted in worries about the economic or, more frequently, the cultural impact of new arrivals to the country. There is strong evidence, however, of a significant long-term shift from a belief that Britishness is ancestral (rooted in whether one’s family is British)12 to an understanding that it is civic – based on citizenship, shared understanding and the rule of law.13 It is also clear that attitudes to migration are not fixed and can change. An Ipsos MORI study tracked the same respondents over seven ‘waves’ from 2015 to 2017: the study found that around 40 per cent of participants shifted their views, sometimes significantly, during this period. Those with the most positive views had the most stable attitudes, but there were considerable shifts in all directions, and there was an aggregate positive shift. This is important evidence that engaging with the public could have a significant impact on attitudes. 14 Furthermore, evidence shows that contact between groups enables bridges to be built between people of different backgrounds, values to be shared and differences to be negotiated,

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

is capable of causing exaggeration or ‘emotional innumeracy’.20 This suggests that mere ‘myth-busting’ by the presentation of accurate information is unlikely to have a sustained effect on the drivers of anxieties unless this is also delivered with an empathetic response, which stresses common humanity and personal experience and so begins to break down a sense of ‘them and us’ between migrants and the communities they join.

Ipsos MORI’s Perils of Perception 2016 (Pew Research/De Standaard (Belgium)/Statistics Canada), as reported in the Guardian December 2016, revealed that the British public perceive the Muslim population as constituting 15 per cent of the UK population rather than the reality of 5 per cent.

19

Duffy, B and Frere-Smith, T (2014) Perceptions and Reality: Public Attitudes to Immigration. Ipsos MORI/Social Research Institute.

20

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RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

52

10.3 OUR AIMS

Figure 7: Too many immigrants in our country? Proportion of respondents answering ‘too many’ when asked about number of people living in their country who were born in another country. Half of respondents were given official immigration estimates; the other half were not. 60% 50% 40% 30% 20%

Given official immigration estimates

Po la nd

Sw ed en

G er m an y

Fr an ce

Ru ss ia

EU N et he rla nd s

Sp ain

U S

Po rt ug al

Ita ly

0%

U K

10% G re ec e

% of respondents stating there are too many immigrants in their country

Museums can play a key role in helping people explore their attitudes to migration.21 They are highly trusted as authoritative sources of information,22 and also highly visited, with over half of UK adults going to a museum every year – 52 per cent went in 2016/17, representing a 10-percentage-point increase over the preceding decade (42 per cent went to a museum in 2005/06).23 We believe that a national migration museum for Britain can contribute to a more reasoned debate by providing a calm and authoritative cultural space – away from newspapers and away from politicians – in which people can think about this politically charged and polarising topic. We can humanise migrants and bring different groups of people together by sharing stories and transforming ‘others’ into more-familiar neighbours. We can play a valuable role in drawing attention to some common misperceptions about migration. And we can address concerns about cultural threats to national identity by focusing on Britain’s shared heritage as a migrant nation.

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

Not given official immigration estimates

Source: Transatlantic Trends Topline Data 2014, German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Compagnia di San Paolo (Italy).

For all these reasons, we believe that a migration museum that is a rich and stimulating cultural institution, with an empathetic focus on storytelling that encourages audiences to see the world through other people’s eyes, is a highly appropriate vehicle for encouraging the public to engage thoughtfully and actively with the important topic of migration.

Lemos, G (2005) The Search for Tolerance: Challenging Racist Attitudes and Behaviour Amongst Young People. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

21

Britain Thinks (2013) ‘Public Perceptions of – and Attitudes to – the Purposes of Museums in Society’ – a Report for the Museums Association 2013: www.museumsassocation.org/museums2020.

22

Mendoza, N (2017) The Mendoza Review: An Independent Review of Museums in England. London: Department for Digital, Media, Culture & Sport.

23

A permanent site in London We believe that the Migration Museum should have a permanent home – a compelling visitor attraction and a symbol of what is culturally valued by the nation. In our view London is the natural home for a viable migration museum for the following reasons: ◆ Visitor numbers for both paid and free museums, galleries, historic properties and heritage centres in all size categories are far higher in London (especially Inner London) than they are in other major centres of population in the UK (Birmingham, Leeds and Manchester).24 ◆ London is much more visited by domestic overnight visitors, tourism day visitors and foreign visitors than other cities in the UK, and visitors to London spend far more than those to other cities and regions. More foreign visitors visit London than all other regions of the UK combined.25 26

◆ On every measure from the last census, London is the most diverse place in England and Wales by far.27 Only 45 per cent of Londoners reported themselves as white British; the capital has the largest proportion of all main minority ethnic groups; 37 per cent of Londoners were born abroad; the top ten areas for the proportion of the population born abroad are all London boroughs (the next three are Slough, Leicester and Luton); there is more religious diversity in London than anywhere else. A national network While we are seeking a permanent London location for our Migration Museum, we are fully committed to reflecting the national scope of Britain’s migration story through partnerships with museums and galleries across the country. We aspire to be at the centre of a network of museums that can share expertise, programming and stakeholder engagement with the overriding purpose of helping the heritage sector to increase and improve outputs related to migration across the UK.

Britain has arguably the richest museum ecology of any nation: worldclass national museums and galleries complemented by an extraordinary tapestry of more than 2 000 regional museums. The collections held in these museums are uniquely broad, in part a consequence of empire and of early industrial wealth. Objects as varied as Pacific feather cloaks and Byzantine ivories sit in regional museums among collections of local and regional importance. These museums are extraordinary resources for making the connections between local and global stories, and movements of people, that are more relevant today than ever before.

Data from Visit England’s annual surveys of visits to visitor attractions www.visitengland.org/insightstatistics/major-tourism-surveys/attractions/ Annual_Survey/

24

https://www.visitbritain.org/sites/default/files/ vb-corporate/Documents-Library/documents/ foresight_157_regional_spread.pdf

25

https://www.visitbritain.org/great-britain-tourismsurvey-latest-monthly-overnight-data

26

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/census/2011-census/keystatistics-for-local-authorities-in-england-andwales/index.html

27

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RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

RATIONALES & AIMS | 10 THE CASE FOR A MIGRATION MUSEUM

Below: Young West Indian immigrant, Victoria Station, 24 June 1962, part of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition © Science and Society Picture Library

Many national, regional and other museums tell these stories in their galleries, temporary exhibitions and other programming, particularly those with a ‘deep’ historical focus. But opportunities may be missed for relating these stories to today’s population movements. And our scoping research suggests that many museums lack the resources to develop their collections and acquire new material to ensure that they are relevant to the UK’s changing population, or the confidence to tackle what are sometimes regarded as sensitive or divisive themes in their programming. The Migration Museum will tell a national story of migration to and from the UK, from the distant past to the present day. Some of its narrative will be panoramic, while some will be focused on particular communities, places and individuals. We recognise that, often, local museums are the best tellers of stories that resonate with their local communities. We believe that by developing touring exhibitions in partnership with regional museums we can draw out migration stories across the nation, reach new audiences,

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and simultaneously strengthen the rationale and build the content and the relationships that we will require to deliver a permanent migration museum for Britain. Expanding our audience Our evaluation of our own exhibition visitors28 shows that our core adult audience is young (71 per cent aged under 40), highly educated (74 per cent with a degree or higher qualification) and ethnically diverse. While we are keen to continue to engage and challenge this audience – and recognise that building a core audience is essential for the success of the Migration Museum – we nevertheless aspire to reach well beyond it. Taking Part surveys from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport29 show that black, Asian and minority ethnic audiences are consistently under-represented in the arts, and we aim to continue to reach those audiences, as well as those from low socio-economic groups, those who do not feel particularly positive towards migration, and those for whom museums are regarded as being ‘not for us’.

Our own evaluation further revealed that, while 53 per cent of our adult visitors to No Turning Back are highly engaged with the arts, visiting a museum, gallery or heritage site at least once a month, just under 10 per cent of school children who take part in our workshops are similarly engaged, thus demonstrating our reach to significantly different, and otherwise hard to reach, audiences through our education programme. A national opinion poll conducted by Survation on behalf of British Future in early 2018 found that 43 per cent of respondents nationwide said they would be likely to visit a permanent national migration museum (14 per cent said they would be very likely to visit, and 29 per cent quite likely). We have also considered Mosaic and Arts Council England market segmentation data regarding propensity to visit museums and exhibitions, and we estimate that the population segments most likely to visit a migration museum represent approximately 35 per cent of the UK population and will form a solid base of likely visitors. Within this group there is a wide range of diversity

in terms of socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds. The Migration Museum will also attract those who have a special interest in migration, either personally (people interested in ancestral family or group history – importantly, including visitors from abroad) or professionally: researchers, academics or policy makers in migration studies and related fields. There is therefore a large potential market for a migration museum, positioning itself as a mainstream attraction with broad popular appeal, among people who are currently engaged with the arts and far beyond. Working in partnership We do not aim for the time being to acquire a collection of our own but rather to operate a policy of curation that is integrated with our community engagement – sourcing and borrowing material from the variegated communities that constitute our country. At the same time, we aim to breathe new life into what is already available, by tapping into the 90 per cent of the collections of museums that are in storage or in countless ‘resting’

exhibitions. By working in partnership with existing museums, we hope to build the stories and the collections that will contribute to the Migration Museum.

Evaluation of Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond available on MMP website.

28

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/taking-part-survey and Equality, Diversity and the Creative Case 2016–2017 published by Arts Council England.

29

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RATIONALES & AIMS | 11 THE NEXT THREE YEARS

RATIONALES & AIMS | 11 THE NEXT THREE YEARS

11 THE NEXT THREE YEARS Our broad targets for the next three years include the following: ◆ Securing a permanent home for the Migration Museum in London while continuing to occupy temporary spaces. We will establish ourselves as a valuable community resource and place-maker, connecting people with place and with each other, and contributing to local and national heritage ◆ Growing the Migration Museums Network as a sector-supporting organisation to facilitate and enable migration stories to be told in institutions across the country, reflecting the truly national scope of Britain’s migration story, and at the same time developing strong nationwide delivery partnerships for the Migration Museum

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◆ Delivering a vibrant, participatory, partnership-orientated cultural programme that encompasses exhibitions and events in our own venues and beyond, continuing to test lively new approaches and defining our policy on collections, loans and digital strategy ◆ Developing our education programme, taking our schools workshops to more than 2 000 children each year, building our partnerships, and testing innovative approaches to learning, and our capacity for income generation ◆ Developing our audiences beyond our ‘core’ by further extending our reach into – among others – BAME and migrant/refugee audiences, those with less positive attitudes to migration and those from low socioeconomic backgrounds and with low levels of arts engagement

◆ Refining our theory of change, and improving our evaluation, aiming for meticulous measurement of all our outputs in order to measure our social impact and demonstrate the need for a migration museum ◆ Strengthening our organisation through a genuine commitment to inclusion and diversity, an emphasis on efficiency and resilience, in particular developing leadership and business skills, rigorous analysis of staff and trustee activities and skills, and a culture of internal and external evaluation, training and mentoring ◆ Building the business case for a sustainable migration museum by working with specialist partners to test opportunities for income generation from admissions, events, merchandise, education provision and more; building partnerships with local business improvement districts and enterprise partnerships; growing our capacity for fundraising from private donors with a rigorous approach to due diligence

◆ Embedding digital platforms and technology across all of our work streams to increase engagement, drive audiences, collect content and enhance the visitor experience, both within and outside the four walls of our exhibitions and events ◆ Further developing our profile across all communications and media platforms to grow and engage audiences; raising awareness of our cultural and education programmes and our sector-supporting network activities as well as our plans to create a permanent national migration museum; contributing context and insight to ongoing debates about migration and identity; and emphasising our role as a community hub, a place where people can connect their individual stories with collective narrative

Right: A visitor engages with Déirdre Kelly’s Arrival, Departure, Arrival, Departure at the launch of No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain in the Migration Museum at The Workshop, October 2017 © MMP

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APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

APPENDICES

RATIONALES & AIMS | 11.0 THE NEXT THREE YEARS

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APPENDIX 1 WHO WE ARE GOVERNANCE The Migration Museum Project is a private charitable company limited by guarantee. Our trustees meet regularly, together with our staff and advisers. We are supported by a specialist education committee and development subcommittee.

Trustees Barbara Roche, Chair Barbara was a Labour Government Minister and MP. She was a minister of state in the Home Office, Cabinet Office and the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. She was also the Financial Secretary to the Treasury, a minister at the Department of Trade and Industry, Minister for Women and Equalities, and the Immigration Minister when at the Home Office. Barbara has chaired one of the largest housing associations in the country and currently chairs a number of other organisations, including the Migration Matters Trust, an all-party group which works with business, trade unions and former senior diplomats to argue the positive case for migration.

Dr Jill Rutter, Vice-chair Jill is Director of Strategy and Relationships at British Future. Previously she was a senior research fellow in migration at the Institute for Public Policy Research, where she managed the original scoping study for the Migration Museum Project. She has also worked at the Refugee Council and has written extensively on migration. Mohan Mansigani, Treasurer Mohan, a finance director with extensive private equity experience, has played a key leadership role in establishing Casual Dining Group (CDG, previously known as Tragus) as a major UK restaurant business. He led the business through two private equity transactions, including the £267 million sale to Blackstone in 2007. Before working for CDG, Mohan was Chief Financial Officer of Costa Coffee and also of TGI Fridays. Mohan now serves as a non-executive director with Bob & Berts (a Business Growth Fund-backed chain of coffee shops), and as a trustee with St John Ambulance.

Zelda Baveystock Zelda is Senior Grants/Development Officer with the Heritage Lottery Fund. She has extensive experience in the capital development of history museums from her previous role as acting deputy director at the Museum of Liverpool – and, as Senior Keeper of History at Tyne and Wear Museums, she was part of the team that led the £13 million redevelopment of Discovery Museum in Newcastle. Silaja Berks Silaja is Global Philanthropy Manager for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), currently based in New York. Before this, she worked for the Tate Gallery and Shakespeare Schools Festival, developing strategic collaborations with international museums and funding partners. In a voluntary capacity, Silaja is a former trustee of Book Works, and participated in Diaspora Dialogues, a Sri Lanka programme run by International Alert.

Opposite: Notting Hill couple, 1967, part of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition © Charlie Phillips

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APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

Sarah Caplin Sarah is a qualified solicitor and former TV executive for both the BBC and ITV in senior production and management roles. She launched the children’s charity ChildLine, for which she served as a trustee for many years. In 2012 she was part of the small team creating the Silver Line Helpline charity for older people, and she is a trustee of The Alfred Caplin Family Charitable Trust. Charles Gurassa Charles was appointed chair of Channel 4 in January 2016. He is deputy chairman at easyJet plc, senior independent director of Merlin Entertainments plc and a trustee of English Heritage. He is a former chairman of several companies, including Virgin Mobile plc, LOVEFiLM, and former deputy chairman of the National Trust. He is the former CEO of Thomson Travel Group plc.

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APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

Robert Winder Robert is the former literary editor of the Independent and deputy editor of Granta. He is the best-selling author of Bloody Foreigners: The Story of Immigration to Britain (the second edition of which was published in 2013) and, most recently, The Last Wolf: The Hidden Springs of Englishness. He has also been a regular contributor to the Independent, the Observer and the New Statesman.

Team Aditi Anand, Head of Creative Content Aditi is a creative producer and curator with experience of working within the arts and non-profit sectors. Previously, she produced and managed a multimedia education project in India that is currently being implemented in over a thousand schools and was communications lead for India’s largest media for social change initiative. She has also worked in New York with the Museum of the Moving Image and interactive design firm, Local Projects.

Bill Bingham – Events Adviser and Performer Bill’s association with the Migration Museum Project began in earnest with visits to the Calais ‘Jungle’ for Call Me By My Name in 2016. His background in news broadcasting (BBC, LBC, Sky News) helped him collect a great many stories during the camp’s dramatic final months. His parallel acting career means he provides dramatic presentation of many other migration stories, including Shakespeare's Strangers for the 500th anniversary of the 1517 May Day anti-immigration riots near St Paul’s Cathedral. Sophie Henderson, Director Sophie has overseen the transition of the Migration Museum Project from voluntary to funded organisation. Before that she was a barrister at Tooks Court, chambers of Michael Mansfield QC, where she specialised in immigration, asylum and human rights law. She was also a judge of the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal and chaired appeals for the Social Security and Child Support Tribunal.

Georgina Lewis, Head of Development Georgina joined the Migration Museum Project after five years developing and managing grants for an international development NGO. Georgina has been a mentor and volunteer co-ordinator for the Terrence Higgins Trust Refugee Mentoring Project and a volunteer advisor at Praxis, providing support for vulnerable migrants in London. Georgina has a BA in Hispanic Studies and Politics from the University of Sheffield and an MSc in Global Politics from LSE. Sue McAlpine, Curator Sue has long experience as a curator, working especially in community engagement. For many years she was curator for Hackney Museum, producing exhibitions (including the first outing for 100 Images of Migration in 2013), managing collections and working closely with Hackney’s communities. Since then Sue has curated three further exhibitions for the Migration Museum Project: Keepsakes and Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond, and No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain.

Liberty Melly, Education and Events Officer Liberty joined the Migration Museum Project from a background in the heritage sector. Following her undergraduate studies in history at the University of Nottingham, she has worked for the Museum of London and Museum of London Docklands and volunteered for the National Trust and Hackney Museum. Liberty’s career to date has focused on learning and community engagement. She has also recently completed an MA in Museums, Galleries and Contemporary Cultures from the University of Westminster, during which her dissertation explored the representation of migration in the UK cultural heritage sector. Emily Miller, Head of Learning and Partnerships Emily has grown the education programme from scratch since joining the Migration Museum Project in 2013. Following an anthropology degree, Emily trained as a citizenship teacher with TeachFirst and then moved on to co-ordinate an international education

programme encouraging secondary school pupils into philanthropy. She has also worked at Seeds of Peace summer camps – which bring teenagers from the Middle East and South Asia together in America – and took an MA in Conflict Resolution in the Peace Studies division at Bradford University. Matthew Plowright, Head of Communications Matthew has worked as an editor, journalist and researcher for a number of media and research organisations, including the Financial Times, Euromoney, Pacific Epoch and MSN, with a particular focus on China. A born-andbred Londoner, with roots in multiple continents, he is a strong believer in the need for a dedicated national museum of migration.

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APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

APPENDIX 1 | WHO WE ARE

Andrew Steeds, Projects Manager Andrew has a background in writing and editorial consultancy. In addition to his work for the Migration Museum Project, he runs Simply Put Ltd, a company that works with organisations to make public written communication clearer and more accountable.

Education committee

Volunteers

Bushra Nasir CBE

Chair; former headteacher, Plashet School

Jenny Blay

Head of museum learning, the Langley Academy

Sophie Henderson

Director, Migration Museum Project

Our highly dedicated, highly skilled volunteers generously give up their time to enable us to stage exhibitions, events and workshops. We can’t list all of them here, but below is a list of some of our regular recent volunteers:

Roland Williams, Design Adviser Roland has worked with the Migration Museum Project since its inception, advising on brand, exhibition and communications design. He has a senior position at Garden, a leading London branding consultancy.

Sally McCartney

History consultant, United Learning

Liberty Melly

Education and events officer, Migration Museum Project

Emily Miller

Head of learning and partnerships, Migration Museum Project

Dr Cathy Ross

Honorary research fellow, Museum of London

Una Sookun

Head of humanities, Globe Academy, Southwark

Professor Justin Dillon Professor of science and environmental education, Exeter University

Martin Spafford Former head of history, George Mitchell School, author of OCR history GCSE text books, fellow of Schools History Project Rebecca Sullivan

CEO, Historical Association

Martin Thornton

Council for At-Risk Academics

Emma Winch

Hackney Museum

Koto Akiyoshi Tanya Costa Tabitha Deadman Beatrice Duguid Cox Anya Edmond Henry Freeman Lucy Gardner Alizeh Hameed Eureka Henrich Roshni Hirani Mona Jamil Sonia Kneepkens Aleksandra Kubica Holly Langham Alice Lepage

Iris Lim Naomi Munro-Lott Jana Manuelpillai Ray Murphy Assunta Nicolini Sam Norwood Anna Phillips Alice Riegler Simon Sleight Kirsty Sullivan Adam Sutcliffe Beth Taylor Tracey Taylor Nadia Valman Emine Yeter

Right: Girl with balloon, Chinatown, London, 1987, part of our 100 Images of Migration exhibition Š Colin O'Brien

62

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APPENDIX 2 | DISTINGUISHED FRIENDS

APPENDIX 3 | FUNDERS

APPENDIX 2 DISTINGUISHED FRIENDS A large number of high-profile people, from across the political spectrum and all areas of public life, have expressed their support and enthusiasm for our project, many of them making significant contributions to our activities. These are our distinguished friends. Sukhpal Ahluwalia Riz Ahmed Sughra Ahmed Sir Keith Ajegbo George Alagiah OBE Professor Sir Michael Atiyah Professor Peter Atkins Julian Baggini Dr Rob Berkeley Richard Beswick Professor Dinesh Bhugra CBE Sir Geoffrey Bindman Sir Nicholas Blake Ian Blatchford Rt Hon Lord Blunkett Dr Alan Borg CBE FSA Mihir Bose Alain de Botton John Bowers QC Rt Hon Lord Browne of Ladyton The Duke of Buccleuch Rickie Burman Sarah Caplin Saimo Chahal Baroness Chakrabarti Dr Jung Chang Stephen Claypole

64

Professor Robin Cohen Professor Linda Colley CBE Professor David Crystal Prakash Daswani Laura Devine Rt Hon Lord Dholakia OBE DL Lloyd Dorfman CBE Lord Alf Dubs Rt Hon Lord Dyson Graham Farmelo Baroness Flather Daniel Franklin Professor Suzanne Franks Dr Edie Friedman Manjit S Gill QC Teresa Graham CBE Susie Harries Naomie Harris Professor James Hathaway David Hencke Sophie Herxheimer Afua Hirsch Rt Hon Lord Howard of Lympne CH QC Tessa Jackson OBE Clive Jacobs Sir Adrian Johns KCB CBE DL Shobu Kapoor

Jackie Kay Ayub Khan-Din Shappi Khorsandi Dr Turi King Professor Francesca Klug Sir Hans Kornberg FRS Professor Tony Kushner Kwasi Kwarteng Kwame Kwei-Armah David Kynaston Dr Brian Lambkin Lord Lester of Herne Hill QC Mark Lewisohn Joanna Lumley OBE Michael Mansfield QC Heather Mayfield Sue McAlpine Lord McConnell Neil Mendoza David Miles Abigail Morris Rt Hon Baroness Morris of Yardley Hugh Muir Tessa Murdoch Sir Vidia Naipaul Sandy Nairne CBE FSA Bushra Nasir CBE Dr Susheila Nasta MBE FRAS Eithne Nightingale John O’Farrell David Olusoga Julia Onslow-Cole John Orna-Ornstein Lord Herman Ouseley Ruth Padel Professor Panikos Panayi

APPENDIX 3 FUNDERS Lord Bhikhu Parekh David Pearl Caryl Phillips Dr Mike Phillips OBE FRSL Trevor Phillips OBE Sunand Prasad Aubrey Rose CBE Michael Rosen Dr Cathy Ross Sir Salman Rushdie Professor Philippe Sands QC Rt Hon Sir Konrad Schiemann Rt Hon Sir Stephen Sedley Dr Maggie Semple OBE FCGI Saira Shah Arun Singh Jon Snow Robert Soning David Spence Danny Sriskandarajah Stelio Stefanou OBE DL Lord Taverne QC Andy Thornton Professor Robert Tombs Lord Verjee CBE Patrick Vernon OBE Edmund de Waal OBE Iqbal Wahhab OBE Yasmin Waljee OBE Jake Wallis Simons Sir David Warren KCMG Iain Watson Henning Wehn Baroness Whitaker Gary Younge Benjamin Zephaniah

The Migration Museum Project has received funding from a number of organisations over the last five years. We would like to acknowledge this generous contribution here and to express our thanks to our funders, who include: The Alan and Babette Sainsbury Charitable Fund Alfred Caplin Charity Settlement Artistic Endeavours Trust Arts Council England Aziz Foundation The Baring Foundation City Bridge Trust City Funding Network Cockayne – Grants for the Arts Doris Pacey Charitable Foundation and the Doctor Michael and Anna Brynberg Charitable Foundation Economic and Social Research Council Esmée Fairbairn Foundation Hogan Lovells Kohn Foundation Londonewcastle Migration Foundation

Nadir Dinshaw Charitable Trust Northwick Trust Oath Paul Hamlyn Foundation Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP Rayne Foundation Rothschild Foundation The Schroder Foundation Sigrid Rausing Trust UBS Unbound Philanthropy

We would also like to acknowledge the generous support of u + i, who provided us with a temporary home at The Workshop in 2017 and 2018 – and all our individual donors, whose contributions make our work possible.

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APPENDIX 4 | MIGRATION MUSEUMS IN OTHER COUNTRIES

APPENDIX 4 | MIGRATION MUSEUMS IN OTHER COUNTRIES

APPENDIX 4 MIGRATION MUSEUMS IN OTHER COUNTRIES Britain is increasingly behind the rest of the world in not having a dedicated museum of migration. Below we have listed a selection of migration museums in other countries. Ballinstadt Emigration Museum, Hamburg, Germany: www.ballinstadt.net/BallinStadt_ emigration_museum_Hamburg/ Welcome.html Canadian Museum of Immigration, Halifax, Nova Scotia: www.pier21.ca/home Centre de Documentation sur les Migrations Humaines, Dudelange, Luxembourg: www.cdmh.lu Cité National de l’Histoire de l’Immigration, Paris, France: www.histoire-immigration.fr

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Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration, New York City, USA: www.libertyellisfoundation.org/visitingellis-island

MhiC – Museu d'Història de la Immigració de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain: www.mhic.net

Other museums that incorporate migration substantially throughout the museum, within a dedicated gallery or through temporary exhibitions.

Maritime museums

Grassroots initiatives

Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney: www.anmm.gov.au

EPIC – The Irish Emigration Museum, Dublin, Republic of Ireland: http://epicchq.com

Migration Museum, Adelaide, Australia: migration.history.sa.gov.au

National museum

Galata Maritime Museum, Genoa, Italy: www.galatamuseodelmare.it/jsp/index.jsp

Porto M (M for Mediterranean, Migration, Memory or Militarisation) Askavusa Collettivo (Barefoot Collective), Lampedusa, Italy: www.askavusa.com

Museu de Imigração, São Paulo, Brazil: museudaimigracao.org.br

Te Papa, Wellington, New Zealand: www.tepapa.govt.nz

German Emigration Centre, Bremerhaven: dah-bremerhaven.de/english/english. html Immigrant Museet, Farum, Denmark http://immigrantmuseet.dk/ Immigration Museum, Melbourne, Australia: museumvictoria.com.au/ immigrationmuseum/ La Nave della Silla, Calabria, Italy: en.lanavedellasila.it

Site-specific museums Museo de la Inmigración, Buenos Aires, Argentina: untref.edu.ar/muntref/museo-de-lainmigracion/ Museo Paolo Cresci, Lucca, Italy: www.fondazionepaolocresci.it Museo Nazionale Emigrazione Italiana, Rome, Italy: www.museonazionaleemigrazione.it Red Star Line Museum, Antwerp, Belgium: www.redstarline.be/en

City or neighbourhood museums FHXB Museum, East Kreusberg, Berlin, Germany: www.fhxb-museum.de MAS, Antwerp, Belgium: www.mas.be/en Museum of Copenhagen, Denmark: (Closed until 2019) cphmuseum.kk.dk/en/indhold/home

Hyde Park Barracks Museum, Sydney, Australia: sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/hydeparkbarracks-museum Tenement Museum, New York City, USA www.tenement.org Baltimore Immigration Museum, Baltimore, USA http://www.immigrationbaltimore.org/

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Visitor with migration discs interactive exhibit Š MMP

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www.migrationmuseum.org @MigrationUK MigrationMuseumProject MigrationMuseumProject The Migration Museum Project is a charitable company registered in England and Wales No. 8544993 and a registered charity No. 1153774

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Migration Museum Project brochure 2017-18  

A brochure detailing the Migration Museum Project's plans to create a national migration museum for Britain and our achievements to date.

Migration Museum Project brochure 2017-18  

A brochure detailing the Migration Museum Project's plans to create a national migration museum for Britain and our achievements to date.

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