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SPORTS | FITNESS | OUTDOORS

MIDWEST EVENTS NOV/DEC 2016

Baby it’s Cold Outside

How to Survive Cold Weather Running

Triathlon Related Nordic Ski Injuries Scene in Motion Nutrition for Healing

Race & Event Calendar

Holiday Gift Guide www.midwestevents.com

Jump Start Your CX Training


NOV. 24

You can always nap later. Warm up your Thanksgiving appetite by burning some calories to kick off the holiday. This family-oriented fitness celebration brings family and friends together to start the day in a healthy way. The Turkey Day 5k Run is a distance for all ages and fitness levels, followed by a carnival with a variety of games for kids and adults. Gather your whole flock and come dressed for the part. Join thousands of runners, joggers and walkers for some lighthearted fun and make the Turkey Day Run part of your family’s holiday tradition.

Back in 2016: SET YOUR PERSONAL BEST WITH THE TIMED 5K OPTION!

REGISTER TODAY AT TURKEYDAY-5K.COM #PERKYTURKEY ©2015 LIFE TIME FITNESS, INC. All rights reserved. EVMG51049


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content

04 Race and Event Calendar

10 Scene in Motion

06 Triathlon Related Nordic Ski Injuries

14 2016 Holiday Gift Guide

08 How to Survive Cold Weather Running


MIDWEST EVENTS www.midwestevents.com

PUBLISHERS | OWNERS Terry and Brigid Thompson terry@midwestevents.com brigid@midwestevents.com EDITOR Jenn Barnett jenn@midwestevents.com Advertising terry@midwestevents.com Editorial and Photography Submissions jenn@midwestevents.com Subscriptions and Customer Service info@midwestevents.com Contributing Writers Gaby Bunten Dr. Marie-Christine Leisz Val Schonberg Kris Swarthout Andy Tetmeyer

Midwest Events magazine is published 6 times a year by Midwest Events, LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part without written approval is prohibited. Submission of manuscripts, including drawings, sketches, photography or other artwork to Midwest Events magazine is the author’s warranty that the material is in no way an infringement on the rights of others and that the material may be published without additional approval. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the publishers, sponsors, advertisers, or anyone else. The publisher is not responsible for mistakes in listings, howsoever caused (including due to printing errors on our part), and readers are advised to contact the sponsors identified in listings to ensure the information is correct. Sports can be strenuous and readers are advised to seek the guidance of a qualified medical professional before beginning any sporting activity.

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18 Jump Start Your CX Training 20 Nutrition for Healing On the Cover: Green Acres Cycolcross. Photo by Midwest Events This Page: Green Acres Cyclocross. Photo by Jenn Barnett

Congratulations to Shannon Kratzke, winner of the Unleash the She race entry! Check out www.midwestevents.com for our monthly race entry contests.


RACE CALENDAR sponsored by ***Dates subject to change. Please consult race websites for updates.

RUN Date

Events

Location

Type

Date

Events

Location

Type

11/1

Trick or Trot 5K

Fargo, ND

Run

11/24

Festival Foods Turkey Trot

Eau Claire, WI

Run

11/5

Sandy’s Donuts Donut Run

West Fargo, ND

Run

11/24

Magic City Turkey Trot

Minot, ND

Run

11/5

Chick-uamegon Women’s 5K 10K

Ashland, WI

Run

11/26

Jingle Bell Run/Walk

Sioux Falls, SD

Run

11/5

Shrapnel Happens 5K

Richfield, MN

Run

11/26

Moustache Run 1/2 Marathon, 10K, 5K

Minneapolis, MN

Run

11/5

Food Run 5K

Coralville, IA

Run

11/26

Des Moines Hungry Turkey Run 13.1M/5K

Des Moines, IA

Run

11/5

KSNA Turkey Trot

Cedar Rapids, IA

Run

12/3

Jingle Bear Run

White Bear Lake, MN

Run

11/5

Run for Relief

Iowa City, IA

Run

12/3

Jingle Bell Run/Walk

Duluth, MN

Run

11/5

Sullivan Brothers 5K/10K

Waterloo, IA

Run

12/3

Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis

Fargo, ND

Run

11/5

Girls on the Run 5K

Eau Claire, WI

Run

12/3

Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis

Quad Cities

Run Run

11/6

Kowalski’s Strive 10 Miler & 5K

White Bear Lake, MN

Run

12/3

Boldly We Beat Cancer Mistletoe Mile

Shakopee, MN

11/6

Halloween Hot Chocolate Race

Des Moines, IA

Run

12/3

Ugly Sweater Dash

St. Louis Park, MN

Run

11/7

Tiger Trail 5K

Minneapolis, MN

Run

12/3

Snowflake Shuffle 5K

St. Joseph, MN

Run

11/8

Election Day 5K

St. Paul, MN

Run

12/5

The Ugly Sweater 5K

Dubuque, IA

Run

12/10

Scheels Santas on the Run

Rochester, MN

Run Run

11/12

623 Foundation 5K Walk/Run/Kids Run

Roseville, MN

Run

11/12

Jingle Bell Run/Walk

St. Paul, MN

Run

12/10

Reindeer Run

Minneapolis, MN

11/12

Girls on the Run 5K

St. Paul, MN

Run

12/10

Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis

Des Moines, IA

Run

11/12

Veteran’s Day 5K

St. Paul, MN

Run

12/10

Bismarck Santa Run

Bismarck, ND

Run Run

11/12

Chaska Turkey Trot 5K, Kids Run

Chaska, MN

Run

12/25

Joyful 5K

St. Paul, MN

11/12

Turkey Trot 10K/5K/1Mile

Fergus Falls, MN

Run

12/31

Resolution Run

Apple Valley

Run

11/12

Coca Cola Classic 10K/5K/1K

Sioux City, IA

Run

12/31

Resolution Run

Maple Grove

Run

11/12

Harvest Hustle 5K

Des Moines, IA

Run

12/31

Resolution Run

Rochester

Run

11/12

Decide Commit Succeed Turkey Trot

New Richmond, WI

Run

1/1

Lifetime Commitment Day Run

Life Time Fitness’

Run

11/13

Girls on the Run 5K

Iowa City, IA

Run

1/1

Hopeful 5K

St. Paul, MN

Run

11/13

Turkey Trot

Cedar Falls, IA

Run

1/21

Freeze Yer Gizzard

International Falls, MN

Run

11/13

Christmas Tree Skirt Dash 3M.2M,1M

Sioux Falls, SD

Run

11/13

Madison Full and Half Marathon

Madison, WI

Run

11/19

Stride Fall 5K Challenge

Mankato, MN

Run

11/19

Dakota Fitness Turkey Trot 5K

Prior Lake, MN

Run

11/24

Thanksgiving Day Turkey Trot

Dubuque, IA

Run

11/24

Turkey Trot

Des Moines, IA

Run

11/24

Fast Before the Feast 10K/5K, & Fun Run

White Bear Lake, MN

Run

11/24

Beast 2 Feast 5K

Minneapolis, MN

Run

11/24

Dash & Dine 5K, 5 Mile and Kids Fun Run

Chisago City, MN

Run

11/24

Drumstick Dash

Minneapolis, MN

Run

11/24

Lifetime Turkey Day 5K

Minneapolis, MN

Run

11/24

Gobble Gallop

Duluth, MN

Run

11/24

IRIS Turkey Trot 5 & 10K

Faribault, MN

Run

TRAIL RUN Date

Events

Location

Type

11/5

Fall Back Blast 50K, 25K, 12.5K

Eau Claire, WI

Trail Run

11/6

NWTC Fall Trail Series Hawk Ridge 6K

Duluth, MN

Trail Run

11/6

Rocky’s Run-Cross Country

St. Paul, MN

Trail Run

11/12

R U Chicken Trail Run & Relay

Arcadia, WI

Trail Run

11/13

5k Trail Rivet Run/Walk

Superior, Wi

Trail Run

11/13

Rivet Run 5K Trail Run/Walk

Superior, Wi

Trail Run

11/19

Night Crawler Trail Run 5K/10K

Rochester, MN

Trail Run Trail Run

11/19

Living History Farms Off Road races 7M

Des Moines, IA

11/24

Turkey Day Trail Trot

Battle Creek, St. Paul, MN Trail Run

12/10

Hateya Trail Run

Kenosha, WI

Trail Run

ULTRA RUN

11/24

Burn the Bird 5K/10K

Fargo, ND

Run

11/24

Gobble Gait

Hastings, MN

Run

Date

Events

Location

Type

11/24

Giving Thanks 5K

St. Paul, MN

Run

11/4

tBunk Endurance Challenge 200M, 150M

La Grange, WI

Ultra

11/24

Beast 2 Feast 5K

Minneapolis, MN

Run

11/6

tBunk Endurance Challenge 100M,50M, 50K

La Grange, WI

Ultra

11/24

Turkey Trot St. Paul 10K, 6K

St. Paul, MN

Run

12/10

Hitchcock Experience 50M/100M

Honey Creek, IA

Ultra

11/24

Wild Turkey Wattle

Otsego, MN

Run

1/16

Tuscobia Winter Ultra

Park Falls, WI

Ultra

11/24

Tonka Turkey Trot

Minnetonka, MN

Run

1/30

Arrowhead 135 Mile Winter Ultra Run

International Falls, MN

Ultra

Type

11/24

Turkey Leg 5K

Willmar, MN

Run

11/24

Gobble Wobble Family Races

Rochester, MN

Run

11/24 11/24

Chanhassen Turkey Troit Cyctic Fibrosis Assn. Turkey Trot

Chanhassen, MN Bismarck, ND

Run Run

11/24

FM Burn the Bird 5K, 10K

Fargo, ND

Run

11/24

Chequamegon Bay Turkey Trot

Washburn, WI

Run

04

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ENDURANCE Date

Events

Location

1/15

YWCA of Minneapolis Indoor Tri

Minneapolis, MN

Triathlon

1/29

King Boreas Winter Triathlon

St. Paul, MN

Winter Tri

11/5

Des Moines Dirty Duathlon

Des Moines, IA

Duathlon


CYCLING

ADVENTURE RACE

Date

Events

Location

Type

Date

Events

Location

Type

11/5

The Iceman Cometh

Kalakska, MI

Mtn Bike

1/16

Triple D Endurance Race

Dubuque, IA

AdvRace

1/28

ICEMAN 5K Obstacle Course Race

Sauk Rapids, MN

Adv Race

11/12

AW SH*T Ride

Ankeny, IA

Cycle

11/19

Fat Turkey Ride

Brainerd, MN

Fat Tire

11/24

Turkey Day Fatbike Ride

Minneapolis, MN

Fat Tire

11/26

The Pie Burner

Hibbing, MN

Fat Tire

12/3

Global Fat Bike Day

12/9 to 10

GO CR Fat Sac & Fox Enduro Ride

Fat Tire Cedar Rapids, IA

Fat Tire

12/10

Frozen Frolic

Champlin, MN

Fat Tire

12/17

Solstice Chase

St Croix Falls, WI

Fat Tire Fat Tire

12/21

Frozen Frolic

Savage, MN

1/1

Frozen Nose & Tos Fat Bike Ride

Royalton, MN

Fat Tire

1/7

Norpine Fat Bike Classic

Lutsen, MN

Fat Tire

1/11

Frozen Frolic

Rockford, MN

Fat Tire

1/28

Powder Key Snowshoe & Fat Bike Races

Eau Claire, WI

Fat Tire

3/11

Fat Tire Birkie

Seeley, WI

Fat Tire

CYCLOCROSS Date

Events

Location

Type

11/5

Morgan Cross

Palo, IA

Cyclocross

11/5 to 6

Fulton Star Cross

St. Louis Park, MN

Cyclocross

11/12 to 13

Theo Wirth Cycloross Classic

Minneapolis, MN

Cyclocross

11/19 to 20

MN State Cyclocross Championships

Crystal, MN

Cyclocross

11/12

Frosty Cross

Le Mars, IA

Cyclocross

FightForAirClimb.org EventsMN@Lung.org

FEBRUARY 25, 2017 U.S. BANK PLAZA

MINNEAPOLIS, MN 31 FLOORS | 680 STEPS

EVENT Date

Events

Location

11/18 to 20

Midwest Mountaineering Fall Outdoor Adv Expo Minneapolis, MN

Event

12/16 to 18

Sandstone Ice Festival

Event

Sandstone, MN

Type

Sign up before January 11th and receive 40% your registration fee!

off

www.midwestevents.com

05


Triathlon-Related Nordic Ski Injury by Marie-Christine Leisz, DO

Reduce your risk and fix your shoulder pain

Hopefully, we only have 6 weeks before the snow flies and we are back on skis! If you have a nagging shoulder injury that failed to improve over the summer or want to reduce the risk of getting one, you have plenty of time to get those shoulder muscles in shape. The topic in this edition is why do you get and how do you fix, Nordic skirelated shoulder pain. First the anatomy: The shoulder joint is made up of the scapula (shoulder blade), clavicle (collar bone) and the humerus, the upper bone of the arm. It is a ball and socket joint. The socket is very shallow, making the shoulder one of the most mobile and potentially unstable joints in the body. To stay together, the joint relies on a series of ligaments called a capsule and the tendons of the 4 small muscles of the rotator cuff. Together these tissues stabilize, or firmly seat the ball in the socket. The little rotator cuff muscles also initiate the movement of the shoulder. There are 9 bigger strength muscles, including the 3 parts of the trapezius, the rhomboids and deltoids, attaching to the bones of the shoulder. Their job is to anchor the joint to the anterior and posterior chest wall and do most of the work of arm movement. Nordic ski-related shoulder injuries fall into 2 categories; trauma and overuse. Fractures, shoulder separation and dislocation, or strain to the soft tissues, can occur from a fall. But by far, the most common cause of shoulder pain is from an overuse injury called impingement. Impingement is caused by repeated pinching of the tendon of supraspinatus, one of the rotator cuff muscles, by the ball of the shoulder joint and part of the scapula. The flexed, head-shoulder forward posture of skiing contributes to the likelihood of this injury. Ideally, when the arm is raised to pole, the mid and lower portion of the trapezius and the rhomboid should pull the scapula down and back, opening the space for the supraspinatus tendon. This stabilizes the scapula, allowing the humerus to move on a firm foundation. If there 06

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is poor technique or weakness in this part of the trap, the upper trap takes over “hunching” the shoulders, narrowing the space. You probably have impingement if you feel an ache over the top of your shoulder while poling. The rotator cuff muscles can also be damaged by pulling yourself with the arms and not correctly utilizing the entire upper body, to propel forward. Tightness in the pectorals or chest muscles contributes to the problem too. So, in addition to training the ever-important pelvic core muscles, the muscles that stabilize the shoulder and upper core of the body, need equal attention too. To get the mid and lower traps to working, stand up straight with your back against a wall. Bring your head back touching the wall and gently pull your chin back. Relax your neck in this position. Now, bring your arms up against the wall and bend your elbows so there are 90 degree angles at your shoulders and elbows (the “stick-up” position). Roll your shoulder blades down and back and bring your shoulder blades together. You have just stabilized your scapulae and this is the position your scapulae should be in when you pole to avoid impingement! Hold the position for 1 minute and then relax for 30 seconds. Do 10 repetitions. Step away from the wall and do the same thing. Practice this exercise standing and seated all day long to retrain appropriate posture and put your shoulders into good functional position. Now, stretch your pectoralis or upper chest muscles with the wall-corner push up to further improve posture. Stand, about an arm’s length away, facing an open corner. Put your hands on and wall at shoulder level. Lean in until your forearms rest on the wall. Feel the stretch? Hold it for a minute, rest 30 seconds and do 10 repetitions. What about more ski-specific exercises? Who better to ask than the incomparable Caitlin

Compton Gregg, a medalist in the 2015 Nordic World Championships and only athlete, female or male to win 4 Birkie’s? She suggests the prone “I’s”, “T’s” and “Y’s”. These exercises are done lying on your stomach. You can place a small pillow under your forehead for support. With neck relaxed and arms at your sides, thumbs down, extend your spine. Roll your shoulder blades down and back, stabilizing the scapulae and raise your arms up and down off floor. This is the “I” position. Do 20-30 repetitions. Relax. Then, bring arms up to shoulder height forming the letter “T”. Thumbs are up. Stabilize the scapulae and raise the arms up and down with 20-30 repetitions. Next, arms are repositioned with palms down, to form the letter “Y”. Repeat the same scapular stabilization maneuver and number of repetitions. When these get too easy, add a 1 lb. weight in each hand. Caitlin also suggests a variation of the exercise where you hold the spine in extension with scapular stabilization and pass a one lb. weight from one hand to the other in the “I”, “T” and “Y” position. As you get stronger, do the exercises on a stability ball! These are the most basic scapular stabilization exercises but there are many more. You can find them on the internet or during a few visits with a Physical Therapist. As mentioned above, poor technique is causing of shoulder injury. If you are a beginner or experienced but want to move to the next level, take a Nordic ski class. You will learn correct technique to help keep you injury-free for many seasons to come! Dr. Marie-Christine Leisz is a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine Physician at Courage Kenny Running and Endurance Sports Injury Clinic.. Learn more at: www.allinahealth.org/ahs/ski.nsf/page/running_endurance


How to Survive Cold Weather Running by Gaby Bunten

Now that it has officially been fall for a month, many Minnesotans are thinking one thing, “How much longer do we have until winter?” We all have thought about when we may see the first snowfall or wake up to the first freeze. At least, I know I have! However, with that thought, many runners panic or assume they need to be stuck inside all of the time. Here are three big tips to help you survive training through the winter months. Dress for Success Have you ever heard someone say, “There is no such thing as bad weather, just a bad choice of clothing?” Well, that person was onto something! If you dress for the weather you will be able to enjoy running outside. I try to stick to one rule; dress as if it’s 20 degrees warmer than it actually is. For example, if it is 32 degrees outside, think about what would you wear casually outside if it were 52 degrees outside. You should start cool as you begin to run, you will warm up not long after. Think of layers of dry wicking material, to wick sweat, equipped with zippers and/or vents at the neck and underarm to ventilate air as your body temperature rises. 25-30 degrees: 2 tops, 1 bottom. Long-sleeve base layer and a vest to keep your core body temp up. Running Tights for your legs. Headband and light gloves for your head and hands. 15 to 20 degrees: 2 tops, 2 bottoms. A thin jacket over your base layer. On the bottom, wind pants over the running tights. Headband and light gloves once again for your hands and head. Smart Wool socks also become helpful at this temperature range. 0 to 10 degrees: 3 tops, 2 bottoms. Two tops (both dry wicking materials, one fleece or smart wool if you run on the cold side) and a thin windblocking jacket. On the bottom, stick to the wind pants, ideally with a fleece inside layer for extra warmth, over the running tights. Hat, mittens and smart wool socks will be a necessity at this temperature range. Minus 10 to 0 degrees: 3 tops, 2 bottoms, hat, extra pair of mittens, 1 gator or face mask to cover nose and mouth from exposure to the cold.

Warm-Up before you head out the door If you decide to run outside, warming up before you head out the door is critical. Warming up 08

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raises your heart rate, core body temperature, and gets blood flow to your muscles and tissues. The goal of warming up is to lessen the stress your body endures when you ask it to work hard in a difficult environment. Before you head out the door, warm-up inside just enough to get the blood flowing and gradually raise the heart rate. The goal is to do this without breaking a sweat, to avoid getting chilled when you begin your run. This will help your workout feel easier much sooner into the workout. A dynamic warm-up is best to prep your body immediately before a workout. 10 minute dynamic Warm-Up: 15 Glute Bridges 10 Clam Shells (10 reps on both sides) 10 Bird Dogs (10 reps on both sides) 10 Forward Lunges each side 10 Side Lunges each side

When in Doubt, Take it Indoors! Many runners dread taking their run indoors. I have heard the treadmill called, all too often, “The Dread-Mill.” If you feel the treadmill is boring, you are not alone. However, indoor training doesn’t have to be something you dread. In fact, running indoors can boost your fitness over the winter months! The key to running indoors is to keep your workout focused. Your workout should have structure in order to keep you on your toes and focused in on what you are doing. First, be sure that you have a proper warm-up. If you are doing any form of interval work or intensity, a proper warmup is critical to set you up for success and prevent injury. Second, a pre-set is needed to set you up for the main set. A pre-set can consist of striders, drills or short sprints to prep your body and fine tune form before the main-set. Third, a main set, this will bring focus and purpose to your workout. A main-set should always have a specific theme. For example, a main set could be short sprints for speed work or long zone 2 intervals, pace just above a comfortable talking

pace, to build your base. Finally, everyone’s favorite part of a workout, the cool-down! It’s crucial to bring the heart rate down slowly in order to recover properly. Indoor Speed Workout in 60 Minutes or Less Warm-Up: 10 minutes ~ Gradually increasing pace here! Pre-Set: 5 x’s 20 second striders with 40 seconds easy in between each (Focus on GOOD form for these strides). Main-Set: 3 x’s 30 seconds at your 5K PR pace (-5 seconds) with 1:00 easy in-between, 2 x’s 1 minute at your best 5 K pace with 1:00 easy inbetween and 1 x 2 minute at your best 5 K pace with 2 minutes easy. Option to repeat this main set a second time! Cool-down: 5-10 minutes Gradually cooling down and decreasing pace. It’s inevitable; we all know that cold weather is upon us. So, don’t let the cold weather bring you down this winter. Remember to dress in layers in order to stay warm and dry during your run. In order to start your run warm, try warming up before you head out the door. You’ll thank yourself for the preparation as soon as the cool air hits your face. Finally, when in doubt, take it indoors! If you go to the treadmill with a purpose, you will stay focused during your run and time will pass in a flash.

Gaby holds a Bachelors of Science in Exercise Science from Iowa State University. She has competed for over 9 years in competitive swimming. She is an USAT All-American Triathlete; 70.3 World Championship qualifier; two time Age Group World Championship qualifier and is an endurance coach and personal cheerleader for Final K Sporting Services. Gaby’s mantra is to help ANY level of athlete TRI something they never thought imaginable through trials, smiles and miles. Contact Gaby at gabunten@gmail


scene in motion Women Run the Cities; Wayne Kryduba Photography

Green Acres Cyclocross; Jenn Barnett Photos

Minnesota Mile; Grandma’s Marathon

Minnesota Mile; Grandma’s Marathon

Chocoholic Frolic; Fred Sobottka

Run Crazy Horse; Historic Black Hills Studios

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Birkie Trail Run & Trek; American Birkebeiner Ski Foundation ©Randolph


Women Run the Cities; Wayne Kryduba Photography

Women Run the Cities; Wayne Kryduba Photography

Tri Rock Lake Geneva; Midwest Events

Green Acres Cyclocross; Jenn Barnett Photos

Ironman Wisconsin; Brianna Lynn Photography

Birkie Trail Run & Trek; American Birkebeiner Ski Foundation ©Randolph

Green Acres Cyclocross; Jenn Barnett Photos

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11


Autumn Trail Series; Mountain Goat Running/Sam Rush

Autumn Trail Series; Mountain Goat Running/Sam Rush TCO Vikings 5K: Kyle Zedaker/ Minnesota Vikings

12

Green Acres Cyclocross; Jenn Barnett Photos

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Birkie Trail Run & Trek; American Birkebeiner Ski Foundation ŠRandolph

Run Crazy Horse; Historic Black Hills Studios

Tour de Hugo; Kerri Kolstad

Ironman Wisconsin; Brianna Lynn Photography


TCO Vikings 5K: Kyle Zedaker/ Minnesota Vikings

Green Acres Cyclocross; Jenn Barnett Photos

Mendota Bottoms Trail Run; Mountain Goat Running/Sam Rush

Birkie Trail Run & Trek; American Birkebeiner Ski Foundation ŠRandolph

Chocoholic Frolic; Fred Sobottka

Minnesota Mile; Grandma’s Marathon

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LUMO RUN SENSOR & CLIP $99.99 THE POD $24.95

Improve your running form with Lumo Run, the first smart tracker to analyze your running form and offer personalized coaching to help you exceed your goals.

i l o H G 6

MilestonePod is an accurate, lightweight shoe-worn wearable that gives runners easy access to detailed performance and run form data. MilestonePod tracks everything from the basic metrics like distance, pace and calories, to foot-based metrics like cadence, foot strike and rate of impact. The Pod syncs to the free MilestonePod app via Bluetooth where runners can view their run and walk data, and gain insights on their personal running style and how to improve it. The MilestonePod even tells runners when it’s time to replace their running shoes, a key factor in preventing injury. http://www.milestonepod.com

1 0 2

Includes: Lumo Run Sensor; Attachable Clip; Charging Unit; Battery life: 20 hrs in-run, 7 days stand-by ; Waterproof and machine washable Compatible with iPhone 5S or newer. https://store.lumobodytech.com

FABRIC CAGELESS WATER BOTTLE $15.99 This revolutionary cageless 750 ml water bottle completely does away with the need for a cage by mounting directly to your frame. The ultralight-weight 1.5g studs are secure, remove unnecessary parts and improve the clean lines of your bike. Features high quality BPS free bottle and 2 sets of mounts for use on multiple bikes. http://usa.fabric.cc/shop/

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e d i

y u a d G i ft i G

for the athlete in your life

MILLION MILE LIGHT $19.99 Million Mile Light is an ultra-bright, battery-free safety light for runners that’s powered by motion. The Million Mile Light creates a bright pulse of LED light with every stride, keeping you visible and safe while running in low-light situations. How’s it different from other night running safety lights? Simple – no batteries required. It is motion activated so you never have to worry about changing batteries, carrying extras or losing power in the dark. https://flipbelt.com/million-mile-light www.midwestevents.com

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THE HED ONESIE $60.00 Give your winter fat biker the Hed Fleece Onesie, the most aerodynamic, light weight, comfortable racing attire in the world. It also excels at lounging, sleepovers and post-race naps. Hed tests confirm that this onesie saves 10 seconds on your next midnight walk to the refrigerator compared to the next-fastest onesie on the market today. Available in black. https://www.hedcycling.com/accessories/accessories/onesie

STRENX BY GYMWATCH – SENSOR (COAL BLACK) $149.00 Workout everywhere and anytime. In the park, in front of the TV or at the beach. Use fitness machines at your gym or workout freestyle. Analyze your workout on a scientific basis. Highly precise sensors create your individual long-term fitness profile. During your workout it will provide you with immediate audio-visual feedback. This way you won’t hurt yourself. Workout according to your individual level – provides you with a lot of exercises and workouts. Combined with a free app, this way your workout is flexible to a maximum. https://store.gymwatch.com/ 16

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MARQUETTE CARBON BIKE FRAME $1539.95 Lightweight cross country 27.5+ The frame is set up with a rear brake post mount, threaded bottom bracket shell, and two water bottle cage mounts. This timeless design is sure to have you hammering trails with the component group of your choice with a smooth and solid ride. On and off road performance for the begginer to intermediate riders who want to take their skills to the next level. http://www.the-house.com/framed-marquettecarbon-build.html?fork=reba

HOTSHOT $35.00 Give the endurance athlete on your list the gift of a cramp-free training season in 2017. Created by Rod Mackinnon, MD, a Nobel Prize-winning neuroscientist and endurance athlete, HOTSHOT is a 1.7 fl. oz. organic sports beverage comprised of a proprietary formula of ingredients with a kick. It has been scientifically proven to prevent and treat muscle cramps by stopping them where they start: at the nerve. Consumed before, during or after exercise, HOTSHOT’s formula of strong TRP activators has shown a statistically significant reduction in muscle cramp frequency and intensity. http://www.teamhotshot.com/

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Jump Start your CX Training and have fun getting dirty

by Kris Swarthout

Last year for the cyclocross issue I wrote about the importance and relevance of cyclocross racing for triathletes. The majority of the feedback I received was “great, now tell me how to train for it”. So for this issue I thought I would take it to the next level, or as the kids say “take it 2.0”. The basics of training for cyclocross is rooted in biking and running, but remember, each needs to be specific to the elements of the sport. For biking, the two main elements you will want to train are your handling skills and your climbing ability. Handling skills can be honed either on a mountain bike while riding off road trails or if you are not living in an area where that is an available option, try creating tight obstacle courses in a parking lot or better yet on grass in an area like a park or field. If you have a training buddy, play a little game of follow the leader. As the leader you can choose as many or as few turns and obstacles as possible in an effort to shake off your trailer. For hills, simply find as many steep hills as you can and learn to ride in a high cadence while seated. I say while seated because in cyclocross surface conditions often are less than optimal and traction becomes a major issue. Climbing out of your saddle changes your center of gravity and thus puts less weight on the rear tire resulting in a loss of traction.

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For running, lose the paved trails and move to the dirt. Running in cyclocross is normally short, but is almost always uphill, while carrying a bike and done at or above aerobic threshold. Therefore, lose the long runs and focus on high intensity short efforts. If you have the chance to do hill repeats with your cycling shoes, this will add a new level of specificity to your training. Many cyclocross shoes have small spikes in the toes to assist with traction, make sure these are clean and tight so that you don’t lose one or two during your race. This would result in uneven traction and could be harmful to you and your race.

By integrating these two workouts or variations of them into your program twice a week plus one or two short easy recovery spins per week, you will have a jump start on training for your next cyclocross event. Enjoy yourself and have fun getting dirty. Coach Kris

Now, for your two workouts. These can last anywhere from 60 to 90 minutes and should be done on grass or dirt. Cyclocross starts 7x60 seconds all out effort from a standing start with 3 minutes easy between each repetition. During this workout, practice clipping in fast, proper hand position on your bars and shifting into the best gear ratio for optimal acceleration. CycleCross starts plus threshold 6x45 seconds all out effort from a standing start with 3 minutes easy between with 20 minutes at threshold pace immediately after last effort.

Kris has been a competitive presence in triathlons since 2001, first as an athlete, now as a coach. Kris is owner and founder of Final K Sporting Services and currently the Midwest Regional Chairperson for USA Triathlon and is the head coach of the Minnesota Junior Elite Team. Since 2010 he has served as the Official Age Group Coach for Team USA by USA Triathlon and has accompanied Team USA to the ITU World Championships around the globe. Kris has coached athletes ranging from professional to first time amateurs. He strives to help people achieve the ultimate balance of family and sport in their lives. www.finalk.com


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Nutrition for Healing by Val Schonberg and Leah Kleinschrodt

for a happy and healthy start to 2017! As we slide towards cooler weather, the holiday season, and the end of 2016, hopefully you have some successful events and fitness memories to reflect upon from this past season. Maybe you achieved a personal best race time, completed your first ever 5K or Ironman Triathlon, finally went on that day-long cycling trip with your best friends, joined a new sports club, or pushed yourself to new limits with your favorite activity. You set goals for yourself, created a plan, trained hard (in good and bad weather), ate well, and improved your sleep. In doing these small, everyday feats, you set the stage for a successful season. Now, if you were able to accomplish your fitness-related ambitions pain-free, by all means feel free to skip this article and continue straight to 2017! The reality, however, is that the majority of athletes and fitness-enthusiasts endure some level of aches and pains along the road. Unfortunately, full-blown injuries, whether from a specific incident or from chronic overuse, can knock you down and keep you side-lined from your sport for weeks, or even months. There are few things more frustrating to an athlete, physically or psychologically, than to be laid up on the couch or chair unable to move or enjoy your usual activities. The good news is that a solid and consistent nutrition plan can help support the healing process. Check out the following tips and strategies to get you back out on the road and moving again! 1) Keep eating. A common concern for the injured and immobilized athlete is weight or body fat gain. This may result in an impulse to drastically cut calorie intake to “make up” for the reduction in physical activity. Injured tissues still need adequate energy and nutrients to heal. In fact, energy expenditure during the early healing process can increase by up to 20%, depending on the injury location and severity (Tipton, 2010). Additionally, for an individual who requires crutches or is participating in physical therapy, getting around during the day also re20

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quires additional fueling. While your total energy expenditure may be reduced during recovery, in all reality it is probably not as blunted as you think. Injured athletes who skip meals, resort to a salad-only diet, or try to ignore their hunger cues may miss out on nutrients that are crucial for healing. Remember that your body still needs quality fuel in order to repair the damaged tissue.

fatty acids are found in cold-water fish, such as salmon and sardines, as well as plant foods like walnuts and flaxseed. For athletes who require a great bone healing regimen, consuming adequate Vitamin D, calcium, magnesium, and Vitamin K are key. Dairy, leafy greens, grass-fed meats, and nuts/seeds provide many of these essential nutrients. Leucine is a branched chain amino acid that has also received much research attention for its role in stimulating muscle building. Leucine is easily obtained by including animal protein, such as beef, pork, chicken, eggs, and turkey in your daily intake. Here’s to wishing you a speedy recovery and happy, healthy start to 2017!

2) Eat protein several times per day. During immobilization and disuse, muscle loss can occur at a rate of approximately 0.5% of total muscle mass per day, accompanied by a functional strength decline of 0.3% - 4.2% per day (Wall and Loon, 2013). Maintaining or slightly increasing overall protein intake during this time period can slow this rate of decline and preserve muscle mass over the long run. A protein intake of around 1.6 to 2.5 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight was demonstrated to aid in this process (Wall, et al, 2014). Additionally, research suggests that injured athletes benefit from more consistent protein intake over the course of the day. This can be achieved by consuming four to six smaller meals/snacks throughout the day, each consisting of 15-30 grams of protein from quality sources such as chicken, beef, pork, eggs, and dairy products. 3) Consume key nutrients. Depending on the type of injury, including key nutrients in your meal planning may aid in the healing process. For example, omega-3 fatty acids are known for their anti-inflammatory properties and may also improve muscle protein synthesis. Omega-3

Special thanks to contributing author, Leah Kleinschrodt for this month’s nutrition article. Leah is a dietetic intern from the University of Minnesota and has a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science and a Master’s degree in Nutrition Science.

Val is a Registered, Licensed Dietitian who is Board Certified as a Specialist in Sports Dietetics and the only dietitian in Minnesota certified as a North American Menopause Society (NAMS) practitioner. She is the founder of EnlightenU Nutrition Consulting and enjoys enlightening recreational and competitive athletes about food, eating and overall wellness. For questions or additional information, you can check out her website at www.enlightenUnutrition.com or contact Val directly at 612-865-6813.


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