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GENERATIONS

OCTOBER ~ NOVEMBER ~ DECEMBER 2011

INDEX Family Caregiver Support Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Old Mill Center needs help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Education, determination key to managing diabetes . . . . .3 Dining Deals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Albany Senior Center offers holiday trips and tours . . . . . .4 Virtual travel for the holidays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Family caregivers celebration and resource fair . . . . . . . . 5 Service of Remembrance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Community spirit creates Storybook Land for 35 years . . .6 Vacation tips to keep your home safer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Hundreds gather to help hospice house . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 See the world through new eyes with Friendship Force . . . .8 Puzzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Samaritan launches new fitness center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Holiday events at Corvallis Parks & Recreation . . . . . . . .10 Help wanted - Linn and Benton counties . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Holiday season travel opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Chintimini Senior Center launches culinary events . . . . .13 Fall and holiday happenings in east Linn County . . . .14, 15 Powerful Tools for Caregivers class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 New programs help seniors stay healthy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

GENERATIONS

A quarterly publication of Cascades West Senior Services, local Senior Centers, and Retired & Senior Volunteer Programs

The Editorial Board Marilyn Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Albany City Hall 541-917-7507 Beth Fox . . . . . . . . . . .Linn-Benton County RSVP 541-812-0849 Kathleen Nickerson . . .Linn-Benton County RSVP 541-812-0849 Scott Bond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Senior Services 541-812-6008 Sharon Bogdanovic . . . . . .Corvallis Senior Center 541-754-1709 Evonne Walls . . . . . . . .Samaritan Health Services 541-768-4241

For more information Cyndi Sprinkel-Hart . . . . . .541-812-6073 or email cyndi.sprinkel-hart@lee.net

1400 Queen Ave. S.E., Suite 206 Albany, OR 97322

Family Caregiver Support Program is a vital community resource BY SCOTT BOND The Family Caregiver Support Program was established in 2000 as a national program to assist families and informal caregivers in caring for their loved ones at home for as long as possible. Families are the backbone of the long-term care system in Oregon and across the nation. We know that 80 percent of all support is provided by family members who spend an average of 20 hours per week caring for one or more family members. Almost half of all caregivers are over the age of 50 and one-third of them describe their health as fair to poor. Caring for a spouse, parent or other member of your family is hard work. As a caregiver, self care is an essential part of staying healthy. The Family Caregiver Support Program was designed to help caregivers stay healthy and receive the support they need to stay involved while balancing a job as well as their own family responsibilities. Respite care is an essential ingredient to staying healthy as a caregiver. Respite care allows the primary caregiver to have a

few hours each week to take care of personal business or enjoy friends or a favorite hobby. The Family Caregiver Support Program uses respite care to help family members know that their loved one is well cared for while they are out of the house. In addition to respite care and support from a case manager who can assist in arranging for additional community resources as needed, there are programs such as the Powerful Tools for Caregivers class that can further assist a caregiver in learning new ways to cope in a healthy way with the stress of being a caregiver. Attending a class can reduce the isolation that some caregivers feel and encourage participation in a local support group. There are many ways to stay healthy while providing care for a loved one at home. Respite services and help through the Family Caregiver Support Program are just a start. If you are interested in the program or know someone who could benefit from the program, please call 541-924-8478 to talk about your options.

Old Mill Center needs help with small children Old Mill Center for Children and Families is seeking volunteers interested in working with young children in its relief nursery. The mission of Old Mill Center for Children and Families is to help children and families thrive and be safe, supported, and successful by partnering with the community. Needed are those volunteers

who want to make a difference in the life of a child, help make early childhood magical and are willing to work in a variety of classrooms with children, ages 6-weeks to 6 years. Opportunities can accommodate morning or afternoon schedules, Monday - Friday. For more information, call or e-mail Cindy Bond at 541-7578068 or cindy_bond@oldmillcenter.org.


GENERATIONS

OCTOBER ~ NOVEMBER ~ DECEMBER 2011

Education, determination key to managing diabetes for 54 years BY IAN ROLLINS At age 16, Novella Clack of Lebanon spent Thanksgiving with an illness that her doctor hadn't been able to diagnose. "I'd been ill for quite some time," Clack recalled. "We went to visit my uncle and his family in California for Thanksgiving. I was still sick and thirsty all the time, and I woke up in the hospital.” Her illness turned out to be type 1 diabetes. "My first reaction was, I'll never be able to eat cake or cookies again," Clack said. That was 1956. Today, at age 71, Clack has celebrated 54 Thanksgivings since her diagnosis as a teenager. “Things have changed so much over the years,” she said. “We used to have to boil our syringes and test our urine for blood sugar count.” Following high school, Clack attended and graduated from business college in Salem, and then worked as a bookkeeper and office manager for businesses in the mid-valley and Colorado. She married, had two sons and adopted a daughter, and later divorced. One of her sons has type 2 pre-diabetes, but her other son is healthy. Diabetes was not a widely known condition in 1956. After her diagnosis, Clack said her doctor told her not to participate in sports until she adjusted to her condition. She had to go to a clinic in Portland to learn how to eat, and how much to eat, to manage her diabetes. Since then, Clack has read scores of articles and books about diabetes. Today, she also has regular appointments with the diabetes education staff at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, and she wears an insulin pump.

Novella Clack walks three miles a day to stay healthy. It hasn't always been a completely smooth road for Clack with her diabetes - she has lowblood-sugar episodes a few times a month, and she had open heart surgery in 2009 - but she feels great today. And she walks three miles a day, six days a week. A recent checkup revealed that her cholesterol and triglyceride levels are excellent, and her doctor gives her a very low chance of having a heart attack. “I like to take credit for a lot of it, but I also have good genes,” she said. With good-natured humor, she added, “my mother and grandmother lived to 80. My goal is to get to 81 at least.” Clack is proof that chronic conditions like diabetes are more manageable today with determination, as well as the treatments developed over the past five decades. She would also encourage newly diagnosed diabetics to seek help and arm themselves with as much information as possible. “It gets better over time; you learn to cope,” she said. “Knowledge is worth a lot.”

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Dining Deals Fall harvest is a time people focus on moving indoors, getting cozy and eating comfort food. The following restaurants are suggestions for getting out and trying some place you may have not tried before and find some comfort food deals.

is located at 109 NW 15th St. in Corvallis near the intersection of 15th and Monroe.

The Brew Station Coffee House Café & Pub has a menu full of reasonably priced options. Everything on the appetizer menu is under $5, and Nearly Normal's is a longtime they offer half Caesar, chef and spinach salads for only $3.95 favorite of locals with great comfort food that is all vegetar- and whole salads for $4.95. The sandwich and burger menu has ian. Normal's offers several no item more expensive than weekly specials. "Margarita Munchie Mondays" offers $3.25 $5.25. From 4 to 7 p.m. every day there are happy hour appeLime Margaritas and $4.25 Ortizer specials. The Brew Station ganic Watermelon Margaritas, is located at 2305 NW Monroe served with free chips & salsa from 4 to 6 p.m. every Monday. Ave. in Corvallis. "Nasty Tuesdays" features halfKnown for the best jerky and price Nearly Nasty Burritos. high-quality meat, Emmons This burrito comes Meat Market also offers a with beans, lunch counter. Get a sincheese, green gle beef burger for only peppers, toma$3.95, a double for toes, scallions $4.95 or try a buffalo and salsa or elk burger for wrapped in a $4.95 for a single, flour tortilla $5.95 for a double. Add and topped Tillamook cheese for $.50 with homeor some of Emmons own made enchilada bacon for $1. The lunch counter sauce, sour cream and lettuce. "Wacky Wednesday" gets you a is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Find half-price falafel. This house Emmons located just across the specialty is a Middle Eastern delight with garbanzo bean pat- bridge from downtown Corvallis at 29545 Highway 34. ties, tomatoes and cucumbers with lemon tahini dressing, all Please send me your ideas for stuffed in pocket bread and dining out deals or let me know served with a side of tzatziki if you try one of these at sauce. And, "Top of the mornsharon.bogdanovic@ci.corvaling Thursdays" offers a halflis.or.us , or at the Corvallis price breakfast entrée of two Chintimini Senior Center, free range eggs, organic home fries and toast. Nearly Normal's attention Sharon.


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GENERATIONS

OCTOBER ~ NOVEMBER ~ DECEMBER 2011

Albany Senior Center offers holiday trips and tours Shopping, music, food and scenery are available on a variety of holiday-themed trips and tours offered this fall through the Albany Senior Center. Registration is open now. Roloff Farms Pumpkins: Just outside of Portland, Roloff Farms is a combination working farm and tourist destination that includes a pirate ship, three-story tree fort, and a Western town complete with underground tunnels. Roloff Farms is open to the public only in October with pumpkins, a food corner and gift barn. Fee includes transportation and wagon ride. Meals are extra. $29 for Albany residents, $39 for those outside the City limits. Friday, Oct. 14, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Verboort Sausage & Kraut Fest: Community volunteers and generations of families have been making sausage, sauerkraut and applesauce at Verboort for 77 years. More than 17 tons of sausage is served to nearly 10,000 diners in a single day. The event includes bingo, crafts, beer garden and a country store. Fee is $33 for residents, $44 for non-residents and includes transportation

and meal. Saturday, Nov. 5, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fall foliage tour and The Point Restaurant, Foster: Lunch at The Point, followed by a drive around Green Peter Reservoir. Fee is $17 for residents, $23 for non-residents and covers transportation only. Wednesday, Nov. 9, 10:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. Holiday Food & Gift Festival, Eugene: Lights, trees, and music highlight the 16th annual Holiday Food & Gift Festival. More than 120 booths offer one-of-a-kind gifts, handcrafted arts and gourmet foods. Fee is $17 for residents, $23 for non-residents and includes transportation and admission. Meals are extra. Saturday, Nov. 12, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Holiday open house at the Barn Owl Nursery, Wilsonville/ Sherwood holiday farm tour: The Barn Owl Nursery specializes in locally-grown herbs, lavender, and gifts. On the holiday farm tour, visit farms, exhibits, and vendors selling Christmas trees, fresh greenery, holly, ornaments, original artwork, hand-woven and hand-knit clothing, hand-

crafted jewelry, decor, yarn and accessories. The fee is $17 for residents, $23 for non-residents and includes transportation only. Sunday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Holiday shopping at Washington Square, Beaverton: Washington Square has stores ranging from Nordstrom, Pottery Barn, and Macy's to Chico's, J. Crew, and Sephora. Play holiday games on the bus for gifts and prizes. The fee is $18 for residents, $24 for non-residents and includes transportation and games. Tuesday, Nov. 29, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Singing Christmas Tree, Portland: The Singing Christmas Tree at Keller Auditorium has a new story each year, told in song by more than 300 adult and youth singers, full orchestra, local actors, and regionally recognized musical professionals. The fee is $63 for residents, $83 for non-residents and covers transportation and ticket to performance only. Tickets go quickly; check for availability. Sunday, Dec. 4, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Grotto's Christmas Festival of Lights, Portland: The Grotto's Christmas Festival of Lights began as a gift to the community in 1988. With lights, hourly concerts, caroling, and other family entertainment, the festival treats visitors to the traditional sights and sounds of the holiday season. Tour will stop for dinner before the festival. The fee is $26 for residents, $35 for nonresidents and covers admission

and transportation only. Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2 to10 p.m. Zoo Lights, P. F. Chang's, Portland: See the Oregon Zoo transformed and aglow with a million lights. Dinner at P.F. Chang's China Bistro prior to the zoo visit. The fee of $29 for residents, $39 for non-residents covers admission to Zoo Lights and transportation. Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2:30 to 10p.m. "A Christmas Carol" cabaret and dinner, Eugene: The classic Broadway musical version of Charles Dickens' tale of Ebenezer Scrooge, Bob Crachit and Tiny Tim. This family show will be a highlight of the holiday season. Twenty tickets available; registration deadline is Nov. 21. The fee is $58 for residents, $77 for non-residents and includes transportation, dinner and show. Saturday, Dec. 17, 5 to 11:30 p.m. Trips are open to anyone age 18 or older. Call or stop by the Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW, 541-917-7760 or Albany Parks & Recreation, 333 Broadalbin St. SW, 541-917-7777 to register. Payment is due at time of registration. Most trips depart from the Senior Center or Carino's Restaurant, 1825 14th Ave. SE, on the Geary Street side. For information about registration deadlines, cancellations, schedules and other trips not listed here, visit www.cityofalbany.net/parks

Family caregiver celebration and resource fair set for Nov. November is National Family Caregiver Month. Family caregivers are invited to attend a free Family Caregiver Celebration and Resource Fair, Thursday, Nov. 3 from 1 to 3:30 p.m., at 1400 Queen Ave. SE, Albany.

There will be speakers, door prizes, resource information, refreshments, support and chair massages. The first 25 attendees will receive a free plant. For more information, call 541-924-8478.


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GENERATIONS

OCTOBER ~ NOVEMBER ~ DECEMBER 2011

Albany Senior Center offers holiday trips and tours Shopping, music, food and scenery are available on a variety of holiday-themed trips and tours offered this fall through the Albany Senior Center. Registration is open now. Roloff Farms Pumpkins: Just outside of Portland, Roloff Farms is a combination working farm and tourist destination that includes a pirate ship, three-story tree fort, and a Western town complete with underground tunnels. Roloff Farms is open to the public only in October with pumpkins, a food corner and gift barn. Fee includes transportation and wagon ride. Meals are extra. $29 for Albany residents, $39 for those outside the City limits. Friday, Oct. 14, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Verboort Sausage & Kraut Fest: Community volunteers and generations of families have been making sausage, sauerkraut and applesauce at Verboort for 77 years. More than 17 tons of sausage is served to nearly 10,000 diners in a single day. The event includes bingo, crafts, beer garden and a country store. Fee is $33 for residents, $44 for non-residents and includes transportation

and meal. Saturday, Nov. 5, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fall foliage tour and The Point Restaurant, Foster: Lunch at The Point, followed by a drive around Green Peter Reservoir. Fee is $17 for residents, $23 for non-residents and covers transportation only. Wednesday, Nov. 9, 10:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. Holiday Food & Gift Festival, Eugene: Lights, trees, and music highlight the 16th annual Holiday Food & Gift Festival. More than 120 booths offer one-of-a-kind gifts, handcrafted arts and gourmet foods. Fee is $17 for residents, $23 for non-residents and includes transportation and admission. Meals are extra. Saturday, Nov. 12, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Holiday open house at the Barn Owl Nursery, Wilsonville/ Sherwood holiday farm tour: The Barn Owl Nursery specializes in locally-grown herbs, lavender, and gifts. On the holiday farm tour, visit farms, exhibits, and vendors selling Christmas trees, fresh greenery, holly, ornaments, original artwork, hand-woven and hand-knit clothing, hand-

crafted jewelry, decor, yarn and accessories. The fee is $17 for residents, $23 for non-residents and includes transportation only. Sunday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Holiday shopping at Washington Square, Beaverton: Washington Square has stores ranging from Nordstrom, Pottery Barn, and Macy's to Chico's, J. Crew, and Sephora. Play holiday games on the bus for gifts and prizes. The fee is $18 for residents, $24 for non-residents and includes transportation and games. Tuesday, Nov. 29, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Singing Christmas Tree, Portland: The Singing Christmas Tree at Keller Auditorium has a new story each year, told in song by more than 300 adult and youth singers, full orchestra, local actors, and regionally recognized musical professionals. The fee is $63 for residents, $83 for non-residents and covers transportation and ticket to performance only. Tickets go quickly; check for availability. Sunday, Dec. 4, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Grotto's Christmas Festival of Lights, Portland: The Grotto's Christmas Festival of Lights began as a gift to the community in 1988. With lights, hourly concerts, caroling, and other family entertainment, the festival treats visitors to the traditional sights and sounds of the holiday season. Tour will stop for dinner before the festival. The fee is $26 for residents, $35 for nonresidents and covers admission

and transportation only. Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2 to10 p.m. Zoo Lights, P. F. Chang's, Portland: See the Oregon Zoo transformed and aglow with a million lights. Dinner at P.F. Chang's China Bistro prior to the zoo visit. The fee of $29 for residents, $39 for non-residents covers admission to Zoo Lights and transportation. Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2:30 to 10p.m. "A Christmas Carol" cabaret and dinner, Eugene: The classic Broadway musical version of Charles Dickens' tale of Ebenezer Scrooge, Bob Crachit and Tiny Tim. This family show will be a highlight of the holiday season. Twenty tickets available; registration deadline is Nov. 21. The fee is $58 for residents, $77 for non-residents and includes transportation, dinner and show. Saturday, Dec. 17, 5 to 11:30 p.m. Trips are open to anyone age 18 or older. Call or stop by the Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW, 541-917-7760 or Albany Parks & Recreation, 333 Broadalbin St. SW, 541-917-7777 to register. Payment is due at time of registration. Most trips depart from the Senior Center or Carino's Restaurant, 1825 14th Ave. SE, on the Geary Street side. For information about registration deadlines, cancellations, schedules and other trips not listed here, visit www.cityofalbany.net/parks

Family caregiver celebration and resource fair set for Nov. 3 November is National Family Caregiver Month. Family caregivers are invited to attend a free Family Caregiver Celebration and Resource Fair, Thursday, Nov. 3 from 1 to 3:30 p.m., at 1400 Queen Ave. SE, Albany.

There will be speakers, door prizes, resource information, refreshments, support and chair massages. The first 25 attendees will receive a free plant. For more information, call 541-924-8478.


GENERATIONS

OCTOBER ~ NOVEMBER ~ DECEMBER 2011

Virtual travel for the holidays For many people, the holidays bring the desire to travel to visit friends and family. This can be challenging for those living with a life-limiting illness for whom traveling is not as easy as it once was. Recent technological advances offer new options for staying in touch with faraway people and places. Benton Hospice Service uses technology to help individuals live as fully as possible for as long as possible. Not long ago, a hospice patient was disappointed because he truly wanted to visit his far away hometown one last time. His doctors and caregivers knew he might not survive a cross-country trip. His hospice support team came up with an idea that saved the day. A social worker from the hospice team took this patient on a virtual trip home by using Google Street View which allowed him to "tour" his old neighborhoods by viewing 360-degree streetlevel imagery from 2,000 miles away. He was able to "drive around" and tour the streets in the town he grew up in. He even saw the old family homestead, as well as his old high school. He saw how the town had changed, new street lights and all. This virtual tour fulfilled his dreams of returning to his hometown, bringing him new peace. Sometimes a person is unable to travel but wants to meet with a friend or loved one to have a chat, mend fences, heal an old wound or simply say "I love you." There are technological

solutions for this too. One is voice and video calling using free software, such as Skype, to make a face-to-face meeting possible when travel is not. Both parties simply need to have a computer with video and audio capabilities and access to the Internet. Once the call is connected, both parties can see and hear each other for a virtual in-person visit. Other family members can be in the room and can join into the conversation as well. Think Christmas morning visit with grandma and grandpa! Pictures are a low-tech way of traveling to another time or place. Organizing personal photographs or looking through photo albums is a way to take a trip down Memory Lane and to share stories. Travel books or the Internet can be used to look at pictures of the faraway places one has always wanted to visit. Whether high-tech or lowtech, there are a number of options available for those who are unable to physically travel to the people and places they would like to visit. One of the goals at Benton Hospice Service is to make life as fulfilling as possible. Benton Hospice Service provides professional, compassionate end-of-life care to residents of Linn and Benton counties. For more information contact Laurie Russell, Community Outreach Manager, at 541-7579616 or Laurie.Russell@bentonhospice.org, or visit www.bentonhospice.org

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Service of Remembrance Benton Hospice Service invites the community to its annual Service of Remembrance, Tuesday, December 6, at 6 p.m. in Dennis Hall at First Presbyterian Church, 114 SW 8th Street, Corvallis. The Service of Remembrance is a celebration of the lives of those who have died during the past year, as well as others still missed. It is a chance to remem-

ber and honor those people during the holiday season. Honorees need not have been in Benton Hospice Service care. The service will include a reading of the names. The community is invited to attend. To add a loved one's name to the list, or for more information, contact Benton Hospice Service at 541-757-9616.


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GENERATIONS

OCTOBER ~ NOVEMBER ~ DECEMBER 2011

Community spirit creates Storybook Land for 35 years to welcome and assist visitors during open hours: weeknights from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. and weekends from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., Dec. 2 to 16.

BY JOYCE MOREIRA Albany's Christmas Storybook Land returns for its 35th annual presentation thanks, to the year-long commitment of 350 regional volunteers and 60 private and business sponsors. Their donation of time, talents and resources makes this twoweek holiday display come alive. From Dec. 2 to 16, Storybook Land will capture and delight people of all ages. The magical world that began in 1976 with only 10 displays now includes over 85 displays of characters and scenes from nursery rhymes, children's stories, movies, and popular cultural and historical periods, as well as two model train displays, a quarter-scale Main Street, and a Victorian village. The ongoing mission of Storybook Land is to provide free entertainment for the family to enjoy during the Christmas season. Visitors are asked to bring a non-perishable food donation which is given to Fish for local distribution to low-income families. In 2010, 23,000 non-perishable food items were collected. Faye Creecy, an active RSVP member, is the tireless scene development leader with endless ideas. Her cadre of creative volunteers meets weekly throughout the year, designing, constructing, painting and adding magic to new scenes and repairing and improving traditional scenes. Creecy takes to heart remarks written by children and adults in the comment book at the venue and is a real stickler for scene authenticity and detail. One comment from an observant boy reported, "Just to let you know there are only 89 Dalmatians in the 101 Dalmatians scene!" On Nov. 19, the whirlwind of activity will begin with an ablebodied crew of volunteers who

In addition to the general public hours, there are two groups who receive special showings: school children and senior citizens. Schools both public and private from the surrounding communities are invited to bring classes to a private showing.

Elfie (Bernice Laverdure), Santa (Jim Sinson) and Mrs. Claus (Donna Thomas) welcome all to 35th annual Christmas Storybook Land.

Joy to the World: Christmas Storybook Land opens December 2 arise early and head to the woods to load hundreds of precut trees provided by Weyerhaeuser to create the indoor simulated forest. They smell so good. Venue setup always appears to be an impossible task: unloading seven semi-trailers jam- packed with scenery and setting up displays that fill the

Cascade Pavilion at the Linn County Fair & Expo all in one day. On Nov. 26, the Saturday after Thanksgiving while folks are contemplating turkey hash recipes, some 200 volunteers of all ages will appear as if by magic to breathe life into Christmas Storybook Land. Next, over 200 official "greeters" need to be scheduled

Senior Day invitations are sent to some 170 assisted living facilities but all seniors and others who need extra care are welcome. On Dec. 9, a dedicated crew of over 35 wheelchair pushers and armholders will guide visitors through the pathways. Volunteers enjoy getting to know the seniors by name and sharing stories. Volunteers lead seniors in singing Christmas songs and reciting complete nursery rhymes. Santa is waiting at the end of the trail with a jolly ho ho, hugs and even a lap to sit on. Then, with help from local sponsors, each senior receives a small gift and candy bag. All volunteers are richly rewarded with cries of glee and glowing smiles of children and the repeated "Thank you for doing this!" voiced by thousands of people who attend. Last year 25,000 people viewed Christmas Storybook Land. Anyone wanting to join the fun and experience the genuine joy of the Christmas season may visit christmasstorybookland.org or call 541928-4656. Joyce Moreira is a member of CSBL Board of Directors (since 2004), serving as the CSBL Board Secretary and the Chair of the Senior Citizens Tour Committee.


GENERATIONS

OCTOBER ~ NOVEMBER ~ DECEMBER 2011

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Vacation tips to keep your home safer BY DIANA SIMPSON BENTON COUNTY SHERIFF

Imagine returning home from a wonderful vacation and finding your front door slightly ajar and as the door swings open it reveals that your house is in shambles. You've been the victim of a burglary. This scenario plays out in Benton County too many times during the vacation seasons each year. The experience of property loss and damage represents only a portion of the injury. The invasion of your private space leaves you with doubts about the true safety and security of your family and property. Insurance can help replace stolen goods and restore damage, yet it doesn't help with the lingering feelings of vulnerability that occur when your home has been burglarized. Whether you leave for the weekend or for several months, here are steps you can take to

Benton County Sheriff Diana Simpson minimize the chances of becoming a victim of burglary and theft: 1. Ask a trusted neighbor to keep an eye on your residence

Hundreds gather to help hospice house project take flight

More than 200 people, including Samaritan staff, board members and community members, gathered on Wednesday, Aug. 31 to break ground on the future home of Samaritan Evergreen Hospice House. The hospice house will be one of six allowed in Oregon, and will serve residents in the mid-Willamette valley. The project is slated to be complete in June 2012.

while you are away. Leave them a key in order to check your house regularly. Give them your trip itinerary so they can reach you in an emergency. Ask if they may be willing to park one of their cars in your driveway and change curtain positions as if you were home (versus leaving them closed). 2. Stop mail and paper deliveries unless you have made other arrangements with neighbors. Any accumulation is a sure sign that the resident is away. 3. Use an answering machine for missed calls. Never leave the message that you are out of town and the date you are returning. 4. Be sure the garage doors are locked and electric door openers are unplugged. Vehicles in your garage should also be locked and the keys stored in a safe location. 5. Consider connecting your indoor and outdoor lights to an automatic timer in order to give

the appearance that someone is home. 6. If you mow and rake on a steady time schedule, have someone continue this while you're away. Have that trusted neighbor take your trash can out or put one of their own in front of your house. The trick is to secure and leave your home looking as though you have never left. If you have questions regarding home security or are interested in obtaining a free home security survey conducted by the Benton County Auxiliary Volunteer Unit, contact the Benton County Sheriff's Office at 541-766-6858. Diana Simpson was elected to her first term as Benton County Sheriff on Nov. 7, 2006. She has the distinction of being the first elected female sheriff in the history of the State of Oregon. Prior to her election, Simpson was the Undersheriff for nearly five years and a sergeant the previous 10 years.


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GENERATIONS

OCTOBER ~ NOVEMBER ~ DECEMBER 2011

See the world through new eyes with Friendship Force learn a little about their destination before they go. "That doesn't mean we need to learn the language," said Joan Rodgers, a member from Corvallis. "We do try to learn a few words, the niceties. When you get there and hear them speak fluent English, though, it's tempting to just let them do it."

BY MARILYN SMITH Travelers set out to see the world in different ways. Some head straight for the traditional sights, tourist destinations, monuments to and remnants of history and culture. They visit world capitols, renowned museums, battlefields, and coastlines, and return with photos and trinkets and stories of desperate searches for food like they eat at home. Members of the Friendship Force define travel differently. When they visit another country, or sometimes another part of their own, they find out how locals live, what they like to do, what sights and activities they enjoy, and they dine on local cuisine. They come home with photos and stories and souvenirs, too; they also come home with new friends. Friendship Force International, founded by Wayne Smith, was introduced by President Jimmy Carter in 1977. It has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for its people-to-people diplomacy and has earned the respect of governments around the world for its home hospitality program as a means of promoting international understanding, according to an organization handout. On the local level, clubs choose destinations they would like to visit, and the international organization sets up an exchange. An exchange visit typically lasts one week, but is often combined with a visit to a second or third club or independent travel. Visitors stay in the homes of their international hosts, then reciprocate as hosts later. A mid-Willamette Valley chapter formed in the early 1990s and now has about 80 members from the Salem area to Eugene. About three-quarters of the members live in Albany, Corvallis and Salem, according to Dallas-area member Rita Powell. MidWillamette members have visited

Barb Callner and Kay Macpherson in Cuba Novgorod, Russia several times. Some members were in Iceland and East Berlin this summer, some will visit Taiwan in October and others are meeting friends from Japan in Hawaii in January. Several will visit New Caledonia and the Sunshine Coast of Australia in 2012. The Friendship Force International's first trips involved sending 250 people to Russia and hosting 250 here at a time when the U.S. was reaching out after the fall of the Soviet Union, member Marilyn Peterson of Albany said. One of the first hosting of the Mid-Willamette Valley's club involved 72 members of a German choir. Other MidWillamette exchanges have been with New Zealand, Republic of Georgia, Vietnam, England, Moldova, Australia, Japan and Cuba. Some exchanges have involved as few as five people but the international organization recommends at least 10 on each trip. Club members pay for their own travel. Annual club dues are $27 for single members and $50 for a couple. Some tours involve humanitarian efforts. Others have themes such as bicycling in England or touring the wine regions of Ore-

Rita Powell with Asia Pacific Festival ambassador from Japan gon. Whatever the format, the purpose is the same: exchanging the way you see the world for a new perspective. "I strongly believe the way to international understanding is by talking to people on a one-to-one basis," Peterson said. "It's so much more meaningful to visit when you're staying in people's homes than looking at the natives through bus windows," said Evedene Bennett of Albany. Travelers attend workshops to

The pre-departure workshops emphasize flexibility, Peterson said. Visitors to Japan, for example, anticipate and may balk at eating raw fish. Peterson's Japanese host, recognizing differences between hers and the American palate, presented Peterson with a procession of dishes, prefaced by "Can you eat this?" At once polite, game, and diplomatic, Peterson tried sushi, salted plums, and a concoction of sea urchin and herring. "I lived to tell the tale," she said with a smile, learning from her hostess that her husband liked one particular dish, but she wouldn't eat it. Friendship Force travel is ideal for individuals who want to see the world but are reluctant try it alone, Kathy Butler of Albany said. She had been to France some years earlier and she and her husband had planned more travel in retirement. "My husband died shortly after I retired," she said. "Rita suggested I might still travel with a group." Butler has since been on five exchanges. "You get to know people and let them see you're not the Ugly American," Powell said. "We're not like TV and the movies. It's important for us to feel proud of ourselves as Americans. This way gives a better impression than what they see on the news. You're not just making an impression. You're making friends." For more information about Friendship Force in Oregon or the Mid-Willamette Valley chapter, visit www.fforegon.org, email fforegon@comcast.net or send a note to P.O. Box 1703, Albany, OR 97321.


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CREATORS SYNDICATE

puzzles puzzle solutions on page 15

GENERATIONS is published in part by

Senior & Disability Services A program of Cascades West Council of Governments.

QUOTE CRYPTOGRAM Y P K X PY I E X V S D W S B ' X E D A A M M W , W M E X I SV K N N M HY W M B A M X F K X E D L L M E X E V S D X IY M W For more information on: • Adult Foster Care • Outreach Services • Meals on Wheels • Information and Referral • Medicaid Longteam Care

• In-Home Care • OPI • Adult Portective Services • Community Resources

Call 541-967-8630 or 1-800-638-0510 TDD/VOICE in Benton and Linn Counties

541-336-2289 or 1-800-282-6194 TDD/VOICE in Lincoln County


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OCTOBER ~ NOVEMBER ~ DECEMBER 2011

Samaritan launches new fitness center with 5K run to support future VA home Lebanon residents will have a new choice for their fitness needs and the future Lebanon veterans home will get a funding boost as Samaritan Health Services launches its first fitness center in Lebanon. SamFit, a state-of-the-art health and fitness center, will be the anchor service in Samaritan's new 12,000-square-foot building at 35 Mullins Drive on the Samaritan Health Sciences Campus across from Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. The building will also house a retail pharmacy. The center will be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with top-of-the-line exercise equipment and private showers. Staff will focus on all aspects of wellness through health assessments, exercise, nutritional advice and education. A grand opening on Sunday, Nov. 6 will include the inaugural SamFit Heroes Run, a 5-kilometer run/walk, and a health fair. Participants can tour SamFit and sign up for memberships and get a check of their core metrics, including weight, blood pressure, body fat and waist-to-hip ratio. The event begins at noon with a ribbon cutting and remarks from keynote speakers and Larry Mullins, CEO of Samaritan Health Services. The 5K begins at 1:30 p.m. and takes runners around the perimeter of the medical school campus. Proceeds will benefit the Veterans Administration retirement center which will be built next year north of Pioneer School. To register for the Heroes Run, go to www.samfit.org/hero or email info@samfit.org. For more information, call Ian Rollins at 541-451-7161.

GENERATIONS

Holiday events at the Corvallis Parks & Recreation Chintimini Senior Center Boo Ball Masquerade & Monte Carlo Casino Night Treat yourself to an entertaining evening full of dancing, casino games and a masquerade and costume contest at this fundraiser in support of Senior Center programs. The party is complete with live music, costume prizes and food. The fee includes one packet of tickets for casino games. Additional tickets will be available for purchase. Saturday, Oct. 29 6 to 9 p.m. Cost: Corvallis resident, $20; non-resident, $25

"Frosty Delight" Holiday Dinner The weather outside is frightful and your friends inside are delightful. So celebrate the season at the annual holiday dinner for seniors at the Chintimini Senior Center. The Center will open at 2 p.m. and a complete holiday dinner will be served at 3 p.m. Reservations must be made at the Senior Center by Dec. 15. This event is made possible through a generous donation from Samaritan Advantage. Sunday, Dec. 25 2 to 5 p.m. Cost: Corvallis resident, $10; non-resident, $12 Register for the events by calling 541-766-6959, going online to www.ci.corvallis.or.us/sc or visiting the center at 2601 NW Tyler Ave., Corvallis.


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Help wanted - Linn and Benton counties Linn and Benton County Senior Peer Counseling (SPC) is a free, confidential program for older adults who are in the midst of making a decision, overcoming difficulties, or facing one of life's many changes. For information on how to become a counselor or to make a referral, contact RSVP at 541812-0849 or msurry@communityservices.us. RSVP Service Learning Academy is recruiting volunteers to mentor high school students or lead a group of students to create a project that positively impacts our community. Contact 541-812-0849 or handson@communityservices.us. Linn-Benton Food Share needs volunteers to help with their annual holiday mailing. The date and time is to be determined, but is usually the week before Christmas. Contact Susan James at 541-752-1010 or sjames@communityservices.us. American Red Cross is looking for volunteers interested in becoming a part of a mission to save lives. Make a difference by greeting, educating, escorting and serving light refreshments to blood donors at local blood drives in Corvallis and Albany. Contact Marisa Wyckoff for more information at 541-9900083 or wyckoffm@usa.redcross.org. SMART (Start Making A Reader Today) program is recruiting volunteer readers and volunteer program coordinators at several locations. If you have one hour, once a week, and enjoy spending time with young children, please apply to be a SMART volunteer at www.getsmartoregon.org, call Laurie in the SMART area office at 541-726-3302, or leave a message for Christi at 541-753-0822. Benton Hospice Service's Transitions program is an endof-life care program that provides services to people with life limiting illnesses before they are ready or eligible for hospice care. Volunteers are

needed for companionship, practical support, and respite breaks for clients. Contact Jamey Suderman, volunteer coordinator, at 541-757-9616 or jamey.suderman@bentonhospice.org. TaxAide needs counselors and client facilitators. Volunteers will attend two weeks of training in January and are asked to volunteer a total of 40 hours during the tax season. Some tax experience is helpful and computer usage is required. For more information or to volunteer, contact Diana Pearcy at dianapearcy@hotmail.com or 541223-3766. The Office of the Long Term Care Ombudsman has openings for five volunteers in Linn and Benton counties. Certified Ombudsman Volunteers spend 16 to20 hours a month advocating for residents in long-term care facilities. Training for new volunteers is in December. For information, call May Dasch 541-929-3315 or Gretchen Jordan at 1-800-522-2602, or email gretchen.jordan@state.or.us. Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) is looking for volunteers who want to lift up a child's voice or a child's life. Help an abused or neglected child by learning more about becoming a CASA. Orientations are held on the second and fourth Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the CASA office, 440 First Ave. E., Albany, or call 541-926-2651.

get to appointments or just simply to provide companionship. To participate in the Senior Companion Program, volunteers must be over the age of 55 and able to serve between 15 to 40 hours a week. For more information, call 541-812-4185 for Linn and Benton counties or 541-574-4714 for Lincoln County.

to 4 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 541-967-7122.

The Foster Grandparent Program is a great way for seniors to stay involved in their communities and make a difference in a child's life. Volunteers are trained seniors who are placed in schools to provide children with one-on-one support. Foster Grandparents must be age 55 or older and able to commit a minimum of 15 hours per week. For more information call 541-8124992 for Lane, Linn and Benton counties or 541-574-4714 for Lincoln County.

Safe and Secure Seniors Independent (SASSI) provides home security and fire safety inspections for persons 55+ while also identifying and improving potential safety risks in older adults' homes. Volunteers are needed in Albany to inspect homes and to install hardware such as deadbolts and smoke alarms. Training is provided. Call Kathleen Nickerson at 541-812-0849 or email knickerson@communityservices.us.

Samaritan Evergreen Hospice will offer a free, seven-course training that prepares volunteers to compassionately care for terminally ill patients and assist their family members, beginning March 30. Classes will run Wednesdays, March 30 through May 11, from 2 to 4:30 p.m. in conference rooms on the fourth floor of Samaritan Albany General Hospital. For information or to register, call Karen McLain at 541-812-4677.

Meals on Wheels in Lebanon seeks drivers to deliver meals. This service is essential to the good health of the frail and elderly people in the community! The commitment is about two hours, one to five days per week. Contact Tori Hartman at 541-451-1139.

Linn County

The Albany Regional Museum is looking for special people to cover the front desk on SCORE, counselors for the life Mondays, and volunteers for of your business, is seeking vol- photo identification and school unteer counselors to help clients tours. The Museum is open Monday through Friday, noon get started in a small business, to assist business owners resolve business problems, and to teach business subjects at workshops. Training for counselors is provided. The work is fun! For information, contact Bob Bernhard, 541-745-5816. Senior Companions touch the lives of seniors who need extra assistance to live independently in their own homes and communities by helping them shop,

East Linn Museum in Sweet Home needs volunteer hosts for one or more days per month. Duties include greeting people and guiding tours through the museum. No museum experience required. Contact Gail Gregory, 541-367-4580.

Family Tree Relief Nursery Classroom Assistant - work with teachers to promote healthy social and emotional development in children aged one to five years from families at risk of abuse or neglect. Training provided. Background check required; food handler's card recommended. Morning shifts available in Sweet Home, Albany and Lebanon. Non~ Continued on page 15


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Holiday season travel opportunities sense of humor. Dinner will be included at Kells Irish Restaurant & Pub. Tuesday, Dec. 6 3 to 11 p.m. $97/$121.25 A Christmas Carol at Actors Cabaret Theater

Enjoy Portland’s Singing Christmas Tree

The Corvallis Parks & Recreation Chintimini Senior Center offers a year round travel and outdoor program that is designed for people age 50+, but anyone over 18 is welcome. Two prices are listed for each trip for residents and non-residents. Activities receive funding from the City of Corvallis so those living inside city limits pay the discounted price since they pay city taxes. For details on all the tours offered, go to www.ci.corvallis.or.us/sc or go to the senior center at Chintimini Park, 2601 NW Tyler Avenue, to pick up a quarterly travel newsletter. You can also call 541-766-6959. Check out these wonderful trips planned to celebrate the holiday season. Hot Apple Cider Kayak Tour Before the hectic holidays begin, take a relaxing kayak tour. Stay warm and snug in your kayak while sipping from your thermos of hot apple cider, provided for you. No experience necessary! Learn about the Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge and how it was established to return this salt marsh to its natural state. It is one of six such wildlife refuges on the Oregon Coast, and is home to stoic salt-starched skeleton trees which you might admire from

your kayak. Kayak Tillamook will provide an introduction to basic equipment and how to kayak, as well as provide equipment and guides. Lunch will be at the Divine Burger Bistro, on your own. Wednesday, Nov. 16 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. $134/ $167.50

Charles Dickens' classic with Ebenezer Scrooge, Bob Cratchit, Tiny Tim and the Ghosts of Past, Present and Future get the full Broadway treatment in Alan Menken's-Lynn Ahrens'-Mike Okrent's adaptation of “A Christmas Carol.” Their song, “A Place Called Home,” has become a holiday standard. There are many adaptations of “A Christmas Carol” out there, but only one Broadway version! This is a matinee show with brunch included. Sunday, Dec. 11

in a wooded scene complete with an interpretive tour history on the area and hot chocolate! They will cater the day's activity to the groups' interest and abilities. Fee includes guide, snowshoes, poles and transportation. Friday, Dec. 16 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. $99/$144 Oregon Whale Watching People come from all over the United States to learn about the gray whales that migrate along our coast each year. Oregon Parks and Recreation Department rangers are ready at the Whale Watching Center in Depoe Bay to answer your questions and help you find whales to watch. Located along the seawall in scenic Depoe Bay, the center is a perfect spot to locate and watch whales as

Singing Christmas Tree This amazing performance is a wonderful way to kick off your holiday experience! Portland's Singing Christmas Tree is a performance like no other, combining Broadway musical quality special effects and actors with a 300 member choir that takes the stage of the Keller Auditorium to comprise the largest choir in Oregon. Dinner will be included at Portland's oldest restaurant, Huber's Café. Thursday, Dec. 1 3 to 11:30 p.m. $93/$116.25

Visit Depoe Bay to watch whales Dec. 29.

Straight No Chaser Originally formed over a dozen years ago while students together at Indiana University, the group has reassembled and reemerged as a phenomenon. The captivating sound of ten unadulterated human voices coming together to make extraordinary music that is moving people in a fundamental sense… and with a

11:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. $64/$80 Snowshoe on Mt. Hood What would be a better way to get in the holiday spirit than to play in the snow? If you can hike, you can snowshoe. Mt. Hood Adventure Recreation Outfitters will guide us on a snowshoe tour

they blow, dive, spyhop and breach. Lunch will be included at Georgie's Beachside Grill featuring fresh Northwest coast cuisine with a spectacular view. You will have some time to explore Depoe Bay as well before heading home. Thursday, Dec. 29 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. $44/$55


GENERATIONS

Help save a life! Volunteer to educate women in your community about breast and cervical health The Oregon and Southwest Washington affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure has introduced a new regional breast and cervical education program that will promote early detection of cancer through education and outreach. You can help educate women in your community about the importance of breast and cervical screenings! SCREEN, a new regional breast and cervical education program, is a partnership with Komen, Oregon Health & Science University, Knight Cancer Institute, the OHSU Center for Women's Health and Samaritan Health Services. Samaritan will offer educational presentations and participate in health fairs and community events within Linn, Benton, Lincoln and Lane counties. SCREEN is recruiting volunteers to carry out grassroots educational activities in their own communities around breast and cervical health education. Volunteers will staff tables at a variety of community events, give presentations to women in their community about the importance of early detection and much more! The goal is to provide resources for services and to deliver the message that early detection saves lives to more than 28,000 women in the first year. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Emily McNulty at 541-451-6929 or emcnulty@samhealth.org.

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Chintimini Senior Center launches culinary events The Corvallis Parks and Recreation Chintimini Senior Center now offers cooking classes, demostrations and culinary events as part of its Wellness Program. Join one or all of the following three events. Harvest Dinner: Join Chef Bre Huffman as she prepares a seasonal fall feast. The menu will include a seasonal appetizer, ginger pumpkin soup, roasted pork loin with butternut squash risotto and roasted local root vegetables, and vanilla bean baked apples. The class will be on Monday, Oct. 10 from 6 to 9:30 p.m. The cost is $25 for Corvallis residents, $31.25 for non-residents. Seasonal Culinary Delights cooking class: Learn how to make delicious and healthy meals using ingredients that are in season, some even grown right here in the Willamette Valley! You will prepare stuffed delicata squash, coq au vin, potato soup, and winter vegetable hash. Pre-registration is required. This class will have three sessions on Mondays, Oct. 24, 31 and Nov. 7, from 1:30 to 3 p.m. The cost is $9 per class.

Chef Bre Huffman will teach two cooking courses this fall.

Thanksgiving cooking demonstrations: Join Chef Bre and learn some new twists on old holiday favorites. You will prepare apricot pecan stuffing, herb roasted vegetables and butternut squash gratin. You will get to sample all of these culinary delights. This class will be held on Monday, Nov. 14 at 2 p.m. The cost is $5. Register for these classes by calling 541-766-6959, going online to www.ci.corvallis.or.us/sc or visiting the senior center at 2601 NW Tyler Avenue, Corvallis.

Guests enjoy the summer seasonal dinner at Chintimini Senior Center.


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Fall and holiday happenings in east Linn County Part of celebrating the fall and holiday seasons is all the wonderful events happening around us! Lebanon and Sweet Home have several things of interest for seniors from craft bazaars to musical shows to fundraisers for a cause and invigorating fall hikes in the beautiful Cascades. Put these events on your calendar to ensure that you'll have a good time no matter what you're in the mood for. Every Friday, 1 p.m., Lebanon Senior Center, 80 Tangent St., Lebanon. Come in for popcorn and classic and contemporary movies on a 22-foot movie screen. The last Friday of the month is the Armchair Travelers Club film, a virtual visit to many places around the world, with sampling of native foods. Check with the Lebanon Senior Center for a list of movies and the destination of the armchair travelers. Special movies will be shown during the holidays and it's free. Friday, Oct. 7, 8 a.m., Sweet Home Ranger District Fall Colors & Seasonal Changes hike - Enjoy panoramic views of the Cascades and impressive fall colors on the Pyramids Trail, with adaptations displayed by native plant and animal species as winter approaches. Hike leader is Lindsay Anderson, landerson02@fs.fed.us. Saturday, Oct. 8, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Santiam Place, Lebanon Ladies’ Night Out - Enjoy an afternoon off with vendors, food and entertainment. This is a fundraiser for two non-profit organizations. The theme for this year's event is Think Pink, Save the Boobies! Some of the monies will go towards breast cancer research. For information, call 541-259-4255. Friday, Oct. 14, 9 a.m., Sweet Home Ranger District Mushroom Hike - The first half of this hike involves learning basic mushroom identification techniques with a focus on distinguishing between edible and non-edible species. Enjoy

mushroom collection during the second half. A bucket or basket and a small cutting knife are recommended. The hike will involve climbing over logs and hiking on rocky trails. Bring waterproof boots. Begins at 9 a.m. For location and fee information, contact hike leader Tiffany at tayoung@fs.fed.us. Sat, Oct. 15, noon to 4 p.m., Lebanon Senior Center Chili Cook-Off - Enter your chili in this contest for bragging rights to the tastiest pot of palatable, peppery, heat producing preparation. Open to the public and judged by impartial tasters. If you love chili, you won't want to miss out. Pick up submission forms at the Lebanon Senior Center if you're cooking, or come to support your favorite chili maker. Tastings are free. Prizes to be won and of course the best gets bragging rights! Until next year, that is. For information, call 541-258-4224 or 541-2584919. Thursday, Oct. 20, noon, Lebanon Senior Center Halloween Potluck - Don't be frightened, come down to Boo Boulevard for chills and thrills and a spooktacular time at the Lebanon Senior Center for a positively defrightful potluck. There will be prizes to be won for costumes and lots of fun to be had! Bring a dish to share. For information, call 541-258-4224 or 541-258-4919. Friday, Oct. 21 and 28, 9 a.m., Sweet Home Ranger District Edible Mushroom Hike Learn about the uses of wild mushrooms, how to distinguish between edible and nonedible species, and which forest conditions produce these sought-after members of the fungus family. Bring waterproof boots. For fee and location information, contact Lance Gatchell, lagatchell@fs.fed.us. Friday, Oct. 28, 2 p.m., Willamette Manor, 176 West C St., Lebanon Halloween Harvest Party There will be a costume con-

test, games and entertainment. Bring the grandkids! Call 541258-8178. October - at The Oaks of Lebanon Partnership in Community Living Free Prize Bingo. Check with The Oaks, 541-2587777. Sat, Nov. 5, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Santiam Place, Lebanon Crafters Market & Homebased Business Expo - Homebased businesses and crafters alike will be at this indoor event. Come and shop in comfort and find that special gift that you have been looking for either for yourself or a loved one! Vendors call 541-259-4255. Thursday, Nov. 10, 10 a.m., Lebanon Senior Center, 80 Tangent St. Honoring Our Veterans Take a few moments to thank the men and women who have served in the military to defend our country. There will be a reception and ceremony with refreshments. For more information, call 541-258-4224. Thursday, Nov. 17, noon, Lebanon Senior Center Thanksgiving Dinner - Seniors and baby boomers 50plus are invited to have a Thanksgiving dinner free of charge, served up by the Lebanon High School choir. The dinner is sponsored by the Lebanon Senior Center, The Oaks of Lebanon, Century Fields, Willamette Manor and Cambridge Terrace. The choir will also entertain with holiday songs. Mandatory registration will open Oct. 25 at the Lebanon Senior Center or by calling 541-258-4224 or 541-2584919. Friday, Dec. 2, 10:30 a.m., Lebanon Senior Center Trim the Tree - You're invited along with some elementary children to make ornaments and trim the holiday tree. This intergenerational event is fun and there are always treats and a visit from Santa! Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m. to 4

p.m., Lebanon Senior Center Holiday Bazaar - Lots of great vendors will be selling their wares; wonderful gifts to be found at this annual event. Crafters and retailers will be available for your holiday shopping. Friday to Sunday, Dec. 2 to 4, Sweet Home High School Auditorium The Sweet Home Singing Christmas Tree is a community choir open to singers of all abilities that presents a yearly program free of charge to audiences from throughout the midWillamette Valley. The program is an inspirational combination of choral music and rhythmic movement of lights. During the program weekend, individual choir members raffle items they have made and donated to the organization. Winners are announced during the Sunday performance. The choir holds rehearsals from the beginning of September until the program the first full weekend in December. Free admission; donations accepted. Performances are 7:30 p.m. Dec. 2, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 3 and 3 p.m. Dec. 4. Friday, Dec. 8, 1 p.m., Lebanon Senior Center Annual Winter Dessert Celebrate the holidays with decadent and delicious desserts and the wonderful entertainment of the Harvest Moon Quartet. Friday, Dec. 16, 7 p.m., Lebanon Senior Center Christmas Show - Celebrating the holidays through the movies - The second annual Christmas Show will be full of wonderful music, laughter and holiday cheer! The musical numbers will be from movies that we all know and love. Admission will be by food donation. Last year, the USO Christmas Show was standing room only and brought in a ton of food donations for Christmas baskets and the goal is the same this year. So come and enjoy the music and help someone have a better Christmas.


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Help wanted ~ Continued on page 11 classroom opportunities such as sorting donations and fundraisers also available. Contact Nicole at 541-967-6580 or nshumaker@familytreern.org. Albany Historic Carousel & Museum is looking for museum volunteers. One day a month, from noon to 4 p.m., volunteers will answer questions and show visitors around. No museum or carousel experience necessary. Come and be a part of this wonderful project! Contact Tyson Brown at 541-791-3340 for more details. Lebanon High School needs mentors from all occupations to work with high school seniors as they research future career choices or lifelong passions. Your help is essential - make the difference between a student reading a book about flying and the ability to see and experience flight itself. Contact Tina Rimov at tina.rimov@lebanon.k12.or.us. Meals-On-Wheels of Albany delivers hot, nutritious meals to the residents of Linn and Benton counties who are over 60 years of age. We need kitchen workers from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Volunteers usually participate once a week. Call Maureen Bromley at 541-967-7647 for

more information. Albany Call-A-Ride needs volunteer dispatchers and drivers. Dispatchers must be detailoriented, able to multi-task, and have good computer and telephone skills. Drivers must have a valid Oregon driver's license and a clean driving record. Drivers use City cars and insurance. Volunteers work one fourhour shift per week - Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Contact Ted Frazier, 541917-7638, or ted.frazier@cityofalbany.net. Christmas Storybook Land needs volunteers! Visit www.christmasstorybookland.o rg for a complete list of activities. Greatest needs are for setup on Nov. 26 and take down on Dec. 17. Greeters are also needed throughout the season.

Department at 541-768-5083 or GSRMCVolunteerServices@sam health.org. Dial-A-Bus needs volunteers to deliver clients to medical appointments, meal and social programs, adult daycare, religious services, and community events. Dial-A-Bus provides the vehicles and insurance. Volunteers contribute one four-hour shift per week. CPR and first aid training, drug and alcohol screening and a good driving are required. For more information, contact Linda Elder at 541-753-5746 or linda.elder@co.benton.or.us. Corvallis Parks & Recreation Chintimini Senior Center needs the following: • Computer lab assistants: Have a good understanding of computers and a gift for help-

ing other people understand them? Enjoy troubleshooting computer issues? Call Natalie at 541-766-6785 to apply now. • Front desk receptionists: Do you have great customer service skills, enjoy meeting new people, and work well with computers? Consider becoming one of our volunteer staff at the Front Desk. Call Sharon at 541-754-1709. • Low vision support group facilitator: Are you knowledgeable about the issues that people with low vision or macular degeneration face? Come lead this support group! Call Bre at 541-754-1724 to apply now. • Newsletter mailing coordinator: Are you detail-oriented and good at organizing tasks? Lead the team that mails the Senior Center's monthly newsletters. Call Natalie at 541-766-6785 to apply now.

Benton County Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center needs volunteers in: coffee cart, family assistance/information desk, flower delivery, Good Sam's Gift Shop clerk, Mario Pastega Guest House, No One Dies Alone/Compassionate Companion, Reach Out and Read program, Sam's Espresso Cabana baristas and tour guides. Contact the Volunteer Service

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

Coping with Grief over the Holidays workshop offered The holidays can be a challenging time for people when they are adjusting to the death of someone they cared about. Benton Hospice Service is pleased to offer a workshop on how to cope with grief during the holidays on Wednesday, Nov. 16 at the Benton Hospice Service office, 2350 NW Professional Drive, Corvallis. Two sessions are offered, one

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from 3:30 to 5 p.m. and a second from 5:30 to 7 p.m. This free workshop will be lead by Joelle Osterhaus, Bereavement Coordinator, at Benton Hospice Service. Pre-registration is required. For more information, or to register, contact Joelle Osterhaus, bereavement coordinator, Benton Hospice Service, 541757-9616.

CRYPTOGRAM: If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that suggests you tried


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Powerful Tools for Caregivers Class Benton Hospice Service, in partnership with Grace Center for Adult Day Services, is offering Powerful Tools for Caregivers, an educational series designed to provide caregivers the tools they need to take care of themselves while caring for an older relative or friend. This program helps family caregivers reduce stress, improve self-confidence, communicate feelings better, balance their lives, increase their ability to make tough decisions and locate helpful resources. Classes consist of six sessions held once a week. Participants will receive a book, The Caregiver Helpbook, developed specifically for the class.There is a $25 fee for the class to cover the cost of the book. Financial assistance is available for those who qualify. Classes will be held at Grace

Center for Adult Day Services, 980 NW Spruce Street, Corvallis from 1:30 to 4:00 pm. Sessions are held every Wednesday and begin on Oct. 12 and run through Nov. 16. For more information or to register, contact Angela Fendley or Bob Daley at Benton Hospice Service, 541-757-9616. Class size is limited and pre-registration is required. Early registration is encouraged. Benton Hospice Service provides professional, compassionate end-of-life care to residents of Linn and Benton counties. For more information, please call 541757-9616 or visit www.bentonhospice.org. Grace Center for Adult Day Services is a nonprofit organization providing comprehensive services to seniors and adults with disabilities. To learn more about its programs, please visit www.GraceCenterCorvallis.org or call 541-7548417.

New programs help seniors stay healthy The Corvallis Parks and Recreation Chintimini Senior Center has a Health Promotions program in October offering many ways to help seniors stay healthy with topics such as oral care, glutenfree eating and heart health.

Grzeskowiak, a gluten free registered nurse, will teach what gluten intolerance and celiac disease are and how to lead a gluten-free lifestyle. This class will be held on Monday, Oct. 17 from 1:30 to 3 p.m.; cost is $2 .

Oral Care Service: Healthy teeth are very important for overall health and wellbeing. Without proper tooth care, plaque, a sticky, colorless film of bacteria, can form on teeth. To keep plaque away, proper teeth brushing is essential. Receive a professional tooth brushing, flossing, plaque removal and oral disease screening provided by a registered dental hygienist. Appointments required for the Tuesday, Oct. 11, event from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The cost is $23 for Corvallis residents and $28.75 for nonresidents.

Keeping Your Heart Healthy: Your heart is your lifeline, and one of the most important muscles in your body. Doctors and a registered dietician with Samaritan Heart and Vascular Institute, Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center and the hospital's cardiac rehabilitation department will discuss heart health and how to improve overall cardiovascular well-being. This threepart series is scheduled at 1:30 p.m. Thursdays, Oct. 6 and 13 and Friday, Oct. 21. Cost is $5 for all three or $2 each.

Gluten-free Eating: More and more people are discovering they are sensitive to wheat and gluten. Knowing how to navigate a gluten-free diet can seem complicated. In this class, Nadine

OREGON CASCADES WEST COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS Senior Services Division is pleased to help publish

GENERATIONS Call 541-967-8630 or 1-800-638-0510 TDD/VOICE in Benton and Linn Counties

541-336-2289 or 1-800-282-6194 TDD/VOICE in Lincoln County

To register for these programs, call 541-766-6959, go online to www.ci.corvallis. or.us/sc, or visit the center at 2601 NW Tyler Avenue, Corvallis.


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