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SERVING THE COMMUNITIES OF CHESTERFIELD COUNTY

09.15.11

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY || ONLINE EVERY DAY

Historical Society Annual Antique Evaluation tags treasures and trash BY ERIC MILLIRONS special Correspondent

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ost people know that an heirloom that has been in a family’s possession has a sentimental value, but are unable to determine if that same connection to the past has any true monetary value. For this reason, the Fourth Annual Antique Evaluation, sponsored by the Chesterfield Historical Society and the Chester Lions brought the professionals to Thomas Dale High School on Saturday, Sept. 10.

For the price of $10 for one item or $25 for three, one could have an estimate placed on the monetary value of an item. All “proceeds are split straight down the middle” with the Lions Club, according to Liess van der LindenBrusse, past president and current chair of the CHS Events Committee. Exactly what was brought for evaluation boggles the mind. There were stringed instruments, old double barreled shotguns, toys, Civil War memorabilia, furniture, watches and clocks, maps, paintings, and of course, jewelry, to name but a few. According to Virginia Levy, who only recently retired after being in the jewelry business for 40 years, there were “some disappointed customers and some that were ecstatic.” That displays the range of emotions that can result from a fully qualified expert telling it like it is. Informing someone that grandma’s diamond and gold broach is not gold nor does it have a real diamond does not endear the specialist to that person. It was easily discernible that Levy did not desire to give anyone bad news, but her reputation must be preserved. As new customers arrived and placed jewelry on her table, she lowered the Optivisor, a device that enhances the subject item, and proceeded with another evaluation. Another table that had considerable activity was that of Bill McDonald, a specialist in vintage toys. He has been one of the volunteer experts at each of the previous venues and said “I will be back again.” When queried as to any special toys that he had seen on this day, he responded that there had been a “Rita Hayworth doll from ANTIQUES page 4

David Ellena takes the helm at Tomahawk Creek Middle School

PHOTO BY EMILY DARRELL

Members of Chesterfield's Public Safety Honor Guard Presentation of Colors at the opening of Friday's 9/11 Memorial Service on the Historic 1917 Chesterfield Courthouse lawn.

Chesterfield commemorates 10th anniversary of 9/11 frequently ask him whether he was scared to be a rescue worker. Senter, n the lawn of Chesterfield’s on the contrary, said, “I could not Historic Courthouse Friday think of a time when I was more morning, citizens, soldiers, proud to be a firefighter.” and veterans gathered for Speaker Art Warren, Chairman a memorial service to commemorate of Chesterfield’s Board of Supervithe 10th anniversary of the September sors said that , in a way, 9/11 united 11th terrorist attacks. Speakers included America, because it gave us all the Russ Lescault, Captain of the Chestercommon goal of “killing terrorism at field Police Department, and Clarence its roots.” Singleton, a retired New York City “America is stronger than it was firefighter who was at Ground Zero on before,” Warren said. “Not weaker.” that tragic day, pulling people from the The ceremony included the unveildebris. ing of a steel beam from one of the Edward “Loy” Senter, Jr., ChesWorld Trade Center towers. The steel terfield County’s fire chief, spoke of – gnarled and rusted from the flames how, shortly after 9/11 people would – will be permanently displayed on

BY EMILY DARRELL Media General News Service

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the Courthouse grounds as a testament to the victims of the 9/11 attacks and to the police, fire, and EMS workers who selflessly put their own lives on the line in order to save the lives of others. At the ceremony’s closing benediction Chesterfield Police Department Chaplain Neil Wheeler urged everyone to remember not only those who became famous for their heroics that day, but also those “countless numbers of unknown heroes.” Emily Darrell is a staff writer for Powhatan Today

Stony Point shines as second Virginia Tiffany & Co. store opens PHOTO BY ELIZABETH FARINA

Principal David Ellena knows there is 'never a dull moment' as administrative head of a middle school.

career. “I’ve always enjoyed ith 27 years working with students,” he of experience said. in the public He acquired his bacheducation elor’s degree at James system, David Ellena is ready Madison University and to generate positive attitudes received his master’s degree and good grades from a in Administration and new group of middle school Supervision at Virginia students. State University. Ellena is Ellena, who is the newly currently taking classes for appointed principal of his doctoral degree at VSU. Tomahawk Creek Middle He started his pubSchool, was appointed to lic education career as a the position when his pre- physical education teacher decessor Jeff Ellick left to in Prince George in 1985. become principal at James After spending four years in River High School. the Prince George educa“I enjoy the middle tion system, Ellena came to school age group,” he said. Chesterfield and hasn’t left “There’s never a dull mosince. ment.” He taught physical “I still think that you education at L.C. Bird High have a chance to reSchool, Midlothian Middle ally make an impact when School and Falling Creek they’re at that age, and I’ve Middle School. He was always enjoyed working the Assistant Principal at with that age group of kids Midlothian Middle School for that very reason,” Ellena for five and half years, three said. years at Swift Creek Middle Working with chilSchool and the last three dren from a young age of years at Providence Middle 13-years-old, Ellena said School. he helped coach sumEllena said he thinks evmer league competitive ery school is unique to the swimming lessons for 5 community that it serves. and 6-year-olds. He said He added that each school this helped inspire him to ELLENA page 5 want to work with kids as a BY KAYLA WAMSLEY Special Correspondent

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PHOTO BY BRIDGET HAZEL

Amy Setzer and Bill Garvey of Midlothian inquire about re-sizing an engagement and wedding ring set at Tiffany & Co.'s new location at Stony Point.

Amy Setzer and Bill Garvey of Midlothian, who have been dating for n elbow-to-elbow crowd more than six years, were among Tifinside Tiffany & Company’s fany’s first customers after the 10 a.m. new 2,500-square-foot store ribbon-cutting. They distinguished at Stony Point Fashion Center themselves from others at the opening last Friday, Sept. 9, spoke volumes about by arriving with their already-purthe luxury jewelry company’s strong chased engagement-and-weddingfinancial performance in 2010 -- and ring set in its Tiffany ring box. its 20 percent profit for the first quarter “I purchased it at the Tysons Corof 2011, as reported by The New York ner store,” Garvey explained, “and it Times. While some in the crowd were turned out to be one size too small so curiosity-seekers, luxury goods are sellit was obviously much easier to come ing well, even if expensive rings, bracehere than to drive back to Tysons to lets and necklaces are splurges for very special occasions for many consumers. correct the size.” MARTHA STEGER special correspondent

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Tiffany and Stony Point management are counting on that sentiment to increase business for the company as well as for the fashion center. “You don’t even feel like you’re in a mall here,” a customer said as she strolled inside the imposing, brushed stainless-steel doors and noted the other two points of this high-end-shopping triangle -- Saks and Brooks Brothers across the brick walkway. Stony Point’s general manager, Joe Frye, thinks Tiffany will generate increased traffic for the other

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TIFFANY page 4


EXPLAIN

2 || SEPTEMBER 15, 2011

NEWS || FEATURES

Employees accept the charity challenge for 50th kick-off

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MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM

Vietnam War items sought for upcoming exhibit

In conjunction with its annual sponsorship of the Chesterfield County Veterans Day Ceremony in November, the Chesterfield Historical Society of Virginia is planning a new exhibit, entitled, “The Vietnam War, A Retrospective.” This exhibit will highlight the contribution of our citizens to the Vietnam War. The CHSV Collections Committee is asking the public to loan documents, photos, artifacts, uniforms and any other Vietnam War related objects and stories for possible inclusion in the new exhibit which will open at the County Museum on Veterans Day, November 11th. The exhibit is expected to run through the end of January 2012. To share Vietnam War memorabilia, please contact

George Cranford, chairman of CHSV Collections Committee, at (804)276-7243 or email pastwalker@comcast. net The Chesterfield Historical Society of Virginia serves as the center for county history. Established in 1981 as a private, non-profit 501(c)3 organization, its mission is to collect, preserve, interpret and promote Chesterfield county’s unique past for the education and enjoyment of present and future generations. To volunteer or for more information, please call (804)796-7121, visit www.chesterfieldhistory.com or follow CHSV on Facebook at www.facebook. com/ChesterfieldHistory

to me like the Alzheimer’s Association, Horse Rescue and Heart Association,” said Kimberly Byrd, DLA Aviation protocol officer. “I have given my entire federal career of 35 PHOTO BY JACKIE years. I started out GIRARD giving $1 a month Patricia Pearce, DLA DLA Aviation Deputy as a GS-2 [General Aviation executive Commander Kathy Cutler Schedule 2] and assistant to the chief welcomed employees to of staff, hugs a rescue now I am Eagle the event, which included Level giver,[pledges dog that represented one of the CFC participation from dozens of $1,000 or above organizations during of charitable local, state, annually], ” Byrd the kick-off. national and international said. organizations. “I always give,” “This year’s campaign said Patricia Pearce, theme is “Accept the Chal- DLA Aviation lenge – Make 50 Great,” executive assistant Cutler said. “Here at DLA, to the chief of staff. CHSV we are supporting that One of the organitheme with a challenge to zations Pearce said she gives have 50 percent employee to is the American Society participation and 100 per- for the Prevention of Crucent employee contact.” elty to Animals. “Since the installation “My dog was a second held its first campaign in chance angel because of 1967, we have exceeded our the ASPCA,” Pearce said. goal each year and you are “We rescued her from her the reason we have been so abuser. She was a 4-monthsuccessful. Your generosity old German Sheppard that allowed us to exceed last weighed only 11 pounds. year’s goal and we raised She never got bigger than more than $357,000. That 40 pounds. We had her for amount of giving is truly nine years,” she said before incredible … I thank you the dog died. for your contributions… During the ceremony, This year our goal is to raise guest speakers: Rear Adm. $341,000 and I hope we Garry Hall, Retired U.S. exceed that,” Cutler said. Navy, representing Mission Cutler said that for the Readiness and Spc. Dean last 50 years, DLA here Schwartz, retired U.S. Army, in Richmond, as well as representing Disabled the center’s tenant orgaSports USA, shared their nizations and American experiences with CFC with Federation of Government employees. Employees Local 1992 After the CFC personal have received Golden Eagle testimonials from the guest Awards because of more speakers, the Bellwood than $300,000 in contribu- choir sang, “We Are the tions to national, state, and World,” and the DLA Avialocal charities. tion employees made their “Let’s keep the momen- way to the dozens of charitum up ensuring these table organizations that organizations continue had informational booths PHOTO BY BRIDGET HAZEL their worthwhile, necessary set up. Assistant Principal Karen Brown, left, and Principal Catherine Hines at Clover Hill Elementary answer third-grade work,” Cutler said. Trinance Johnson, DLA students' questions about the events of 9/11. Aviation “I give because there are charities that are important

efense Supply Center Richmond employees in Richmond packed the Frank B. Lotts Conference Center Sept. 7 for the annual jump start of the Combined Federal Campaign.

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October 22nd 2011 7:30 pm to 12:30 am at the Richmond Marriott Downtown

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Clover Hill Elementary commemorates 9/11

2011 Charity Bachelor Auction and Shop for the Cure

GED fee waived in September In September, GED® tests are free. The usual cost is $58, but first-time test takers who register in September will pay nothing to take the test. Chesterfield County Public Schools is able to offer free tests for a limited time thanks to a grant from the Virginia Department of Education. GED stands for General

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Educational Development, and a GED certificate is equivalent to a high school diploma. The GED test covers reading, writing, social studies, science and mathematics. In 2010, about 1,000 adults took a GED test in Chesterfield County. Why is earning a GED important? By 2012, according to the Virginia Department

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Thursday, September 22 2 p.m. Elmcroft Assisted Living 1000 Twinridge Lane Richmond Event is FREE but reservations are required by calling 804-320-DOCS (3627).

Smart Nutrition 101 Elmcroft Assisted Living is pleased to partner with Chippenham Hospital to bring our residents and friends a fun, educational and interactive presentation about smart nutrition. Pam Davis, R.D., will discuss how to read labels, what to look for when following a low sodium diet, how to monitor sugar intake, heart healthy eating and the USDA’s new recommendations.

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of Education, 70 percent of job opportunities will require a technical skills certificate. Entry into certificate programs requires a high school diploma or a GED. Here’s how to register for a GED test: • Preregister at www. ged123.org and print out the verification form. • Bring that verification form and a driver’s license or other government-issued ID to the Adult Continuing Education Office at the Chesterfield Technical Center, 10101 Courthouse Road, during registration hours: 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays. • Tests are offered each week through December, and GED seekers will select a test date during the registration process. To pursue a GED, adults must be at least 18 and officially withdrawn from school. There is no prerequisite to taking the GED test, but classes and a learning lab are available for GED seekers who need preparation. Registration for the learning lab costs $30, and prep classes cost $70. Adults who complete 60 hours of preparation will also receive a free GED test. For more information about GED tests or instruction, call 768-6140 or go online to chesterfield. k12.va.us to see the Adult Continuing Education program guide. Chesterfield County Public Schools


MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM

Senior Hall of Fame nominations due tomorrow

The Chesterfield Senior Volunteer Hall of Fame, a program established in 1983 to recognize seniors who make a difference in their communities, is seeking nominations through Sept. 16. To qualify, nominees must be at least 65 years old, reside in Chesterfield County, and must have served after turning 65. Service may have been rendered outside the county. Judging will focus on the nominee’s contributions to improve the community or the lives of others. An independent panel will select the top three nominees for induction. An awards ceremony will be held Oct. 27 at the Eanes-Pittman Public Safety Training Center, 6610 Public Safety Way. If you know an outstanding senior volunteer, please nominate them. Nomination forms can be downloaded from Chesterfield.gov. Click on the Family Resources link, scroll to Seniors, and click Senior Volunteer Hall of Fame. Nominations must be received no later than 5 p.m. on Sept. 16. For more information, contact the Senior Advocate’s office at 768-7878 or Leidheiserd@chesterfield.gov

Chesterfield County

EXPLAIN

Fire and emergency services honor 9/11 victims

As a tribute to the emergency responders and citizens who lost their lives during the 9/11 terrorists attacks of 2001, Defense Logistics Agency Installation Support Fire and Emergency Services here honored them in a ceremony Sept. 9. A decade ago the United States of America was attacked by one of the worst acts of terrorism it had ever seen. On Sept. 11, 2001 2,997 people lost their lives in New York City, Arlington, Va., and Shanksville, Penn. Of those who lost their lives, 343 were New York City firefighters. The New York PHOTO BY JACKIE GIRARD Port Authority Police lost 60 Firefighter Bryston Pabst, (center) gives honors to fallen firefighters during the memorial ceremony. The pictured table is set for the fire department members who are no longer here. The white tablecloth personnel and eight private Emergency Medical Techni- symbolizes the purity of their intentions to respond to the call. Everything on the table tells a piece of the missing firefighter's story. cians and paramedics were lost. “We are here this morning included a missing firefighter soldiers, sailors, Marines and Marchand. “Many of these commemorating the 10th anni- tribute with the carrying of a Airmen who are protecting the people were the ones who dediversary of the terrorists’ attacks helmet and lighting of a candle, American people’s freedoms cated their lives to protecting and remembering the ultimate reflective readings by a fireboth at home and abroad. and serving the people of this sacrifice that the fighter fighters, fighter and police officer, last “Many police, fire and EMS country. Let us not forget those police officers, EMTs and citialarm ringing, the playing of were running into the buildwho serve and have sacrificed so zens made during that dreadful bagpipes and a reading of the ings of the World Trade Center much to protect and defend this day,” said C.J. Hipshire, Installa- 9/11 timeline. and the Pentagon while others country,” Marchand said. tion fire chief. Hipshire said he also wanted were trying to get out,” said Trinance Johnson, DLA Aviation The memorial ceremony everyone to remember the Installation Police Chief Eugene

CRIME REPORT All data are based on the publicly available Chesterfield County Police Department daily arrest and crime releases and are reported according to Federal Incident Based Reporting rules.

23112

No signs of forced entry were noted.

4700 block of Brad McNeer Parkway Victim discovered victim’s silver 2007 Honda’s left rear window was shattered. At this time, nothing has been reported stolen.

23832

Sept. 8

Sept. 7

4000 block of Frederick Farms Drive Unlocked silver 2006 Saturn Ion was entered and property was reported stolen.

Sept. 6

12500 block of Cameron Bay Drive Suspect(s) broke out the rear window with a brick in order to gain entry. The interior was ransacked and items were stolen.

Sept. 11

6200 block of Belmont Road Victim stated that victim heard a noise at the front window, pulled back the curtains and saw an unknown suspect with his hands on the window. Suspect immediately fled the area. Unknown suspect(s) removed a screen from the victim’s rear window in an attempt to gain entry to the victim’s residence. Victim reported a bike was stolen from victim’s back porch.

Sept. 7

10200 block of Beechgrove Drive Victim reported property was stolen from victim’s residence. 10300 block of Memory Lane Victim stated that victim was

approached by an unknown suspect, armed with a weapon demanding victim’s wallet and money. Victim dropped the property on the ground, suspect picked the items up and fled the area.

Sept. 4

6900 block of Belmont Road Unknown suspect(s) used an unknown tool to pop open the lock to a front bathroom window. Nothing was taken.

Sept. 2

3300 block of Turner Road Suspect(s) forced open the locked door at the location and removed property from inside. 8600 block of Belmont Road Suspect(s) removed a storm window and damaged the door frame in an attempt to gain entry to the victim’s residence. At this time, nothing has been reported stolen.

Fraud prevention, fire safety meetings set for October Seniors are invited to participate in TRIAD Training for Older Adults: Senior Fraud Prevention, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 10 a.m., Midlothian YMCA, 737 Coalfield Rd., Midlothian. This free training will teach participants how to identify and avoid common scams targeting seniors. Topics will include an overview of the Better Business Bureau, its Senior Fraud Program, and other services it offers to the public. Learn to identity theft and scams targeting older adults, including home-improvement, charitable-solicitations and home-repair

Sept. 5

Sept. 8

14200 block of Midlothian Turnpike Complainant reported property was stolen from construction site.

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rom children living in poverty to the suddenly unemployed to frail elderly living on small fixed incomes, thousands in our community are in great need of nutritious food.

1100 block of Mount Pisgah Drive HVAC unit stolen from outside of the church.

1000 block of Otterdale Road Stolen vehicle discovered on fire.

share fire safety tips, such as the importance of installing and maintaining smoke detectors, creating a home escape plan, and heating one’s home in a safe manner. Chesterfield TRIAD strives to educate seniors and caregivers about the programs, services, techniques and systems that aid in crime prevention and improve the quality of life for senior citizens. The partnership offers many free safety programs and services. The meetings are open to the public. For more information, call (804)768-7878.

Someofourmostvulnerable neighborsaregoinghungry.

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Sept. 12

scams. The program will be presented by Better Business Bureau’s Senior Fraud Program manager, Jack Saunders and Education and Special Projects manager, Jen Durham. The Chesterfield TRIAD will be sponsoring the event. The organization will also meet Thursday, Oct. 20, at 9-10:30 a.m., at Police Support Services, 2730 Hicks Rd. The meeting will open with a presentation by Lt. Jason Elmore, public information officer, Chesterfield County Fire and Emergency Medical Services, who will

SeptemberisHungerActionMonth

4000 block of Poplar Grove Road Property was taken from victim’s unsecured vehicle. 4800 block of Glen Tara Drive Unknown suspect(s) gained entry into the residence and stole multiple items. NO signs of forced entry were found.

23114

SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 || 3

NEWS || FEATURES

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Sept. 9

700 block of Coalfield Road Victim reported unknown suspect(s) stole victim’s keys from a locker at the location and entered victim’s vehicle and removed property.

23120 Sept. 6

20600 block of Skinquarter Road Entry was gained by pulling on the screen door then breaking the bottom glass pane out of the door. The interior was rummaged through and items were taken.

23235 Sept. 9

9400 block of Beckham Drive Victim reported unknown suspect(s) removed an A/C unit from a rear window and gained entry to the residence. Property was removed.

Sept. 6

8700 block of Trent Road Entry gained to the residence through an unsecured rear door and items taken from the kitchen.

23236 Sept. 8

100 block of Wadsworth Drive Silver 2005 Chevrolet was entered and property stolen.

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EXPLORE

4 || SEPTEMBER 15, 2011

YOUR WORLD || TRAVEL

MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Education opens the doors to possibilities are long gone. Many of us were in college and mostly talked about what our future plans were for the fall when his month, Chesterfield County Public Schools is we returned to campus. Some of us were gypsies that offering free GED tests for first-time test takers wandered seasonally to various resorts and never quite who register for General Educational Developmade it back to the lake. And, of course, two or three of ment exam. The school system is able to waive the the staff worked year round at the restaurant. One of $58 testing fee through a state grant. For those who may those dear souls became like a second mom to me. be hesitant, know that it’s never too late to obtain a high Patrons would always ask if Debbie was my mom or school equivalent diploma. Besides the Virginia Departif I was her daughter. Since she was nearly 20 years older ment of Education statistic that 70 percent of jobs in 2012 than me and had two daughters that were about my age will need a technical certificate that requires a high school the idea was plausible. During after hours, we’d soak our diploma or GED for entry into such a program, I have aching feet in the cool waters while sitting on the dock witnessed the life-altering impact that it had for one close as we watched our fellow colleagues take cannonball friend who obtained the certificate. leaps into the moonlit water. She always encouraged me One year, several of us were sitting on the dock after to pursue my dreams and focus on my college educaa long day of slinging food and beverages to so many tion. It was during one of her usual pep talks that I tourists that we all had lost count of how many people learned Debbie had dropped out of high school before we actually served that day. The working crew, a dozen graduation to become a wife and mother. Two beautiful or so, didn’t really consider the job being at work. It was children and one ugly divorce later, she began waiting more like being hosts at an endless summer celebratables to be the sole support for her family. tion and the paycheck was just added gravy for being It was within a week of that conversation that I had there. One of the many rewarding benefits of working a pulled together all the necessary forms and purchased a seasonal job at a lakeside restaurant was the moonlight book for her to study for her GED. At first she balked at swims in the cove after hours. the idea of studying for high school in her late forties. We became like family. Most of us continue to remain However, I kept pushing for her to pursue the diploma in contact with each other even though the summer days and even offered to help her study math. Our dockside BY ELIZABETH FARINA editor@midlothianexchange.com

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Campaign season begins

TIFFANY from page 1

40-plus merchants at Stony Point Fashion Park. “We’ve had a lot of interest in the Tiffany opening from outside the Richmond area as we draw customers from MEDIA GENERAL NEWS SERVICE all over central Virginia and Williamsburg and Fredericksburg.” Diane Brown, a Tiffany & Co. vice president who lives in McLean, echoed the widespread Virginia interest in the new location. “Richmond is a growing client base for us. Our company executives who made research trips here found the demographics overlapped nicely with those of our traditional clients elsewhere. For years our central Virginia customers have been asking when we were going to open a store, but we were waiting for an upscale shopping area here. Then all of a sudden Richmond opens two upscale centers,” she said -- an oblique reference to Short Pump Town Center as the other new shopping area. “The luxury co-tenancy at Stony Point was the deciding factor,” she said, “plus, we know the Taubman Company [Stony Point’s developer and management company] is committed to this center.” Richmond and Tiffany have a lot in common – beyond the numerous pieces the Tiffany Archives lent to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts for its Louis PHOTO BY ERIC MILLRIONS Comfort Tiffany: Master of Glass exhibit in 2010. The crowd at the Fourth Annual Antiques Evaluation waits their turn with the local expert. Brown recognized the ANTIQUE from page 1 At an event such as this, there are no important role of tradition the 1940’s that had a value of between written appraisals, only verbal ones, and to in the lives of Richmonders. $300 and $400.” There had also been an receive a written appraisal, one would have “The people here appreciate early baseball from the late 1860’s to early to seek out an expert and pay an approthe fine craftsmanship Tif1870’s that was worth somewhere around priate fee. The antique evaluation allows fany offers,” she said, point$700 - $800. an individual the opportunity to have an ing to what has often been Fred Schneider was handling the reexpert in the field give an honest opinion called “the Jackie bracelet,” views at the table that piqued my interest, as to value at a minimal cost which then comprising individually the one dealing with Civil War memoraallows the customer sufficient informamade links that appear to bilia. My two items for evaluation were a tion to determine the need for a written be one continuous piece, .69 caliber musket ball in a piece of a limb appraisal, whether it be for insurance pur- with each link given eight from the battle around Petersburg and a poses or if selling it is being considered. coats of hand-applied $100 Confederate note. I was informed The antiques evaluation will not be enamel. that the musket ball by itself was worth coming around again until next year; so in Two of the other traprobably about $2, but by virtue of it being the meantime, search your attic for those ditional jewelry items by embedded in the wood raised its value to hidden treasures or inspect your jewelry Tiffany designers include about $50 - $75. The Confederate note or toys. Be aware though that even with a sterling silver locks and keys was an entirely different matter. When he certified appraisal, one must have a willing for charm bracelets and gave me a “thumbs up”, it was obvious that buyer. Also be prepared to be disappointed it had value. Given its condition, rarity, in the value of grandma’s broach. and interest paid notation stamped on the For additional information on upcomback, it was worth considerably more than ing events sponsored by the Chesterfield the $1 U. S. currency that purchased it Historical Society, go to: www.chesterfieldback in 1968. history.com

chats turned into late-night cramming sessions as she prepared to take the exam. And then, she failed to pass. She was ready to give up and toss the goal out when she received the bad news. I think it was the first time I ever mentioned Thomas Edison’s fail rate for the light bulb, the perseverance of George Washington and the wise words of Coach John Wooden in the same rambling sentence. I believe she said she’d try again only to make me stop pleading my case. We hit the books again with renewed vigor. Debbie passed and received her GED on the second attempt only two years before her 50th birthday. That achievement led her to get her certification at a community college. Her renewed confidence led her to job in Maryland and to cross paths with the love of her life. This past weekend, my daughter and I had the honor and privilege to be guests at the older couple’s beautiful wedding. Maybe it was a serendipitous moment that summer. She didn’t use the tired excuse that it was too late in life for her to pursue her GED. She didn’t give up when there were hiccups and obstacles on the way to her goal. She worked hard, took the test twice, and then opened life’s door to new possibilities.

necklaces. The locks collection, introduced this year, was based on the designs of founder Charles Lewis Tiffany’s small reproductions of antique locks.

for one of Peretti’s distinctive initials or hearts to wear on it. Paloma Picasso and Jean Schlumberger are the other two Tiffany designers whose work is featured among the company’s jewelry. The new store’s director, Renee Pylinski from Mechanicsville, has made a seemingly easy transition herself – from her VCU engineering degree 11 years ago to working at Tiffany’s Dallas and Baltimore stores before returning to the Richmond area. Brown For consumers to said, “No one could have have more been more delighted than jewelry options Renee when she learned we creates a really were opening a store here. good buzz for It’s homecoming for her – on top of her own fortheveryone in this coming wedding.” business. Pylinski is Tiffany’s ambassador in the Richmond area, with her first Sarah Ashby, role being that of liaison for Carreras Jewelry the company’s promotional sponsorship of CenterStage’s 10th Anniversary Birthday Gala last Saturday night. Besides representing the company and managing the store’s staff, Brown said, Cheryl Gonzales Yancey Pylinski has to be servicewith the Richmond Symminded and an authority phony Foundation has had on all of the company’s personal experience with products -- including items the Tiffany tradition. “My such as its seven sterling father used to get out the flatware patterns, which are annual Tiffany Catalog and among the many diverse set it on the dining-room products not on display at table for our wish-list. My Stony Point. mother is 94 now, and we “We only hire people have enough pieces carewho have a heart for serfully stored away so that, vice,” she said. “We want hopefully, each child and to be the local jeweler who grandchild can have some- knows the wife’s name thing.” when her husband comes in Have women’s jewelryto purchase a gift.” wearing habits changed Sarah Ashby, marketing much over the eight genera- director for Carreras Jeweltions of Tiffany & Compa- ers, said Carreras has been ny? Brown responded, that local Richmond jeweler “Women enjoy their jewelry for one-of-a-kind items for more now. A lot of enter47 years -- and doesn’t feel taining is less formal, and threatened at all by the new most of our pieces go very Tiffany presence. “In adeasily from day to evening dition to our retail jewelry events.” business, we have a full An example of such a buying office here, and a transitional piece is the lot of people bring us their $21 tailored, 16-inch black unwanted, fine jewelry. “For cord by Tiffany designer consumers to have more Elsa Peretti -- for which a jewelry options creates a recustomer might choose to ally good buzz for everyone spend hundreds of dollars in this business.”

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SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 || 5

St. Edward-Epiphany Catholic School celebrates 50th year The first day of each school year is always special for new and returning students, faculty and staff. For those entering the bright, red, front doors of St. Edward-Epiphany Catholic School on the morning of August 30, 2011, it was even more extraordinary. The 2011-2012 school year marks the School’s 50th Anniversary and begins a series of celebratory events for alumni and current students. St. Edward-Epiphany Catholic School starts this year with 443 students in grades Pre-K through 8th grade. Fully accredited, St. Edward-Epiphany features a unique educational and faith-based curriculum that includes a one-of-a-kind “transitional first grade” program, in-house learning disability resource and speech therapy programs, and advanced study oppor-

tunities in mathematics and Spanish. Though St. Edward-Epiphany is affiliated with the Catholic diocese, five percent of students are non-Catholic. Anniversary events for the upcoming year begin with a 50th Anniversary Golf Tournament at Independence Golf Course on September 13, 2011, to be followed by special alumni challenges during the Fifth Annual 5K Eagle Challenge on October 15, 2011. Students will also celebrate the 50th Anniversary with special activities, including an essay contest, 50 Days of Reading, 50 Days of Prayer, and more, to celebrate past, present and future generations of St. Edward-Epiphany classes. St. Edward-Epiphany Catholic School Makes History Founded in September of 1961 as “Saint Edward

School,” classes were initially offered for first and second grades only. After the dedication of Saint Edward the Confessor Catholic Church, additional

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E-mail your event to editor@midlothianexchange.com. Subject line: EVENT

FRIDAY, SEPT. 16 Bon Secours Hospice will provide volunteer training from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 16, in the Orvieto Room of St. Francis Medical Center at 13710 St. Francis Blvd. in Midlothian. For more information and to register, contact Barbara Palmer at 627-5323 or barbara_palmer@bshsi.org.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21 The Salisbury Garden Club meets the third Wednesday of each month at the Church of the Redeemer at 9:30a. m. This month, Sheila Weisensale will present "Grow and Design with Your Own Cut Flowers". For more information or any ques-

tions regarding the Salisbury Garden Club, please contact the president Doris Morris at doriskmorris@comcast.net.

Walk to Stop Diabetes walks down Monument Avenue. It’s more fun to Step Out together! Grab your friends, family and co-workers, lace up your walking shoes and join Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital for a fun-filled and meaningful morning! Enjoy our kid Zone, Wellness Village, Tshirt contest and other entertainment! Every step you take and every dollar you raise helps the American Diabetes Association provide funding for education, advocacy and research. When you walk, you help us stop diabetes. To register to walk or for more information, visit diabetes. org/stepoutrichmond. Check in at 9am. Walk start is 10am.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24 Journey 4 A Cure 5k/1k/Family Funfest will be held from 8:30am-noon at Summer Lake Neighborhood, 17040 Lake Summer Dr. in Moseley, (23120) Come out for this great event and raise money for pediatric cancer! Run/ walk, volunteer, donate. Even if you are not a runner, come out and have fun with all the family friendly activities that will be going on at the Funfest! Visit www.journeyrun. org for more information.

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grades were added to the School each year, from 1962 until 1965. Although the first eighth grade graduation was held in June 1966, it was not until June 1969 that the school graduated students who had attended classes since the first grade. In September 1979, the school changed its name to St. Edward-Epiphany Catholic School when it transcended regionally to serve both Saint Edward Church and Church of the Epiphany. The school now serves the parishes of Saint

PHOTOS BY AIMEE MCNAMEE

Edward, Epiphany, Saint John Neumann, Sacred Heart, Saint Augustine and Saint Gabriel—all part

ELLENA from page 1 has positives and negatives. “I think one of the main things is regardless of what the situation is or what the school is I’ve learned an awful lot being at the difference places I’ve been,” he said. Ellena has two children, Billy and Rachel. Billy is a sophomore majoring in accounting at Virginia Tech, and Rachel is in her senior year at Thomas Dale High School. When he is not in classes to receive his Doctorate or fulfilling his duties as middle school principal, Ellena said he enjoys spending time with his wife Nancy, at their

of this thriving, regional school.

courtesy of Stacy Warner Price

home. He said he also enjoys reading and working out on a regular basis. “I don’t really have that much free time,” he said. As far as the future of Tomahawk Creek is concerned, Ellena said their goal as a school is to continue to build on the tradition of excellence that TCMS has emanated. “When I was coaching that was one of the things that I believed in,” he said. “I think that you need to work every day to get better at what you do. It’s already a great place and we’re going to work to get better every day.”


6 || SEPTEMBER 15, 2011

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Easy ways to winterize your home in the fall insulated attic. * Put up the storm windows. It's nice to open the windows in the spring and summer and let the warm air waft in through the screens. But when summer is over, it's time to put up the storm windows once again. Storm windows add an extra layer of protection from the elements and are especially valuable in homes with single-pane glass windows. Homeowners who don't have storm windows should consider upgrading their existing windows. Such a project isn't cheap, but newer windows will almost certainly lead to lower heating costs, meaning the project will essentially pay for itself over time. Homeowners who can't afford to replace all of their windows don't have to replace them all at once. Instead, replace them a few at a time and make the rooms where you spend the most time each winter the first on the list to receive new windows. * Be diligent with the gutters. Leaves falling from trees is an idyllic image associated primarily with autumn. Unfortunately, when leaves fall they often

fall into the gutters. Routinely clean the gutters once the leaves start to fall. Clean gutters will allow snow and rain to effectively drain through the gutters. If the gutters are clogged, snow might have nowhere to go when it begins to melt, and roof damage might result. Such damage is costly but preventable in most instances. One of the easier preventive measures to take is to routinely clean the gutters of leaves and other debris that accumulate during the fall. When cleaning the gutters, make sure they are properly aligned. Poorly aligned gutters can lead to a host of problems. One such problem is flooding. If downspouts are not properly aligned with the rest of the gutters, then water might not be directed away from the home as it's intended. Instead, water might be directed toward the home, resulting in flooding or additional water damage. * Have the furnace cleaned. Experts recommend annual furnace cleanings. Before cold weather arrives, turn the

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SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 || 

One for the ages

Cheatham's 56th season of Tomahawk Baptist softball ends with Bon Air Church League title By FREd JETER special correspondent

I

PHOTO BY JIM MCCONNELL

Earl Cheatham proudly displays the championship trophy won by the Tomahawk Baptist Church softball team.

n writing of Earl Cheatham’s role with Tomahawk Baptist Church softball, there’s an urge to start off with “in the beginning.” It’s no exaggeration. Growing up on what was then rural Bailey Bridge Road, Cheatham was a 16-year-old whippersnapper when he talked church elders into starting a team. That was 1956. Time marched on, with Cheatham marching right with it, in step. This past season was Cheatham’s remarkable 56th, without interruption, and perhaps his most cherished. Rallying from a dreadful 1-27 in 2010, Tomahawk (located at entrance to Brandermill, off Route 360) posted a

16-12 regular-season record. The “Tommies” were just warming up. For a grand finale, Tomahawk won the Bon Air Church League playoffs, knocking off St. Edward-Epiphany in the Warbro Complex finals. The dramatic “from worst to first” climb won’t be soon forgotten, even by a man who’s seen it all so many times before. “We’ve won a lot of trophies, but this one was probably the best, because we’d done so badly the year before,” he said. The grandfatherly Cheatham, who pronounces Tomahawk as “Tommyhawk,” served as full-time manager and part-time pitcher for the championship squad. “I don’t pitch that much anymore

… I can’t get out of the way (of comebackers) like I used to,” he said, with a friendly chuckle. “And when I get hit, it hurts a lot more.” Tomahawk’s cast included Earl’s son, Mark (team veteran of 25 seasons) and several others who’ve grown up in the church, and on the Tomahawk diamond. “Some of these boys I coached in Little League,” said Cheatham. Other younger veterans, who began playing for Tomahawk as teenagers, are Kevin Grimsley, Norman Jarrell, Tommy Skinner, Sean Orr, Mike Gordon and certainly Kevin Thornton. If any name is more synonymous softBALL p9

Hamlin reflective after trip to capital By CHaRlIE lEFFlER Media General News Service

L

ast Wednesday NASCAR driver Denny Hamlin found himself battling mixed emotions as he stood at the left hand of President Barack Obama. On one hand, a special invitation to the White House left Hamlin exited to return to Washington, D.C. for the second time and take a closer look at the historic city. But at the public ceremony honoring the group of NASCAR drivers, it was hard to miss the fact that Jimmie Johnson stood at the right hand of the President. As much of an honor it was for the drivers to be invited to the White House, this was clearly Johnson’s day. In an East Room ceremony, Hamlin, Jeff Burton, Kyle Busch, Jeff Gordon, Matt Kenseth, Kurt Busch and Clint Bowyer watched as Obama honored Johnson for his accomplishments in NASCAR and his five straight Sprint Cup titles, the latest in which he edged out Hamlin on the final race of the 2010 season. “With so much extraordinary talent going on bumper to bumper in every race, just making the Chase is hard enough let along winning the whole thing” Obama said. “That’s why Jimmie is not only one of the best drivers of all time, he’s up there with some of the best sports dynasties. If you think about it, only the Boston Celtics, the Yankees and the Canadians have won more than four titles in a row.” It was far from the first time Hamlin stood by as witness to how close he had come to claiming his first NASCAR title. After nearly a year he still felt the painful thorn in his side from reminders of the near miss. Watching Johnson honored once again made those feelings reemerge. “Of course all that stuff rekindles and obviously makes you think of those different things,” he said. “It bothers you at times but you know you’ve got to relive it because you’ve got a full year of different tributes to our champion. Respectfully to Jimmie he earned it and deserved it and I’m not going to take anything away from him.” Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle Busch said in many ways Hamlin is not alone in his feelings. “It gets to all of us, trust us,” he said. “We all sit there and watch Jimmie, Jimmie, Jimmie and we’re all, ‘Come on man, how much more does this guy need?’ HAMLin p9

PHOTO BY JIM MCCONNELL

Clover Hill's Joel Caleb stays on his feet after eluding a Prince George defender during last Friday's season opener. The Cavaliers won 14-0.

clover hill standout won't let attention go to his head As colleges vie for his services, Caleb remains grounded By JIm mCCOnnEll jmcconnell@midlothianexchange.com

F

or a guy who does everything at warp speed on the football field, Joel Caleb certainly was in no hurry to leave. More than 30 minutes after Clover Hill’s 14-0 season-opening victory over Prince George last Friday, the Cavaliers’ quarterback still hadn’t made his way back to his team’s locker room. Walking slowly along the track, his cleats barely making a sound on the rubberized surface, Caleb accepted congratulations from dozens of fans. He hugged his mother and other family members who had come out to watch him play. He stopped several times to talk briefly with friends or anyone else who just wanted to say hello. By the time Caleb made it to the locker room, shed his shoulder pads and slipped out of his green No. 6 jersey, you never would’ve guessed the polite, unassuming teenager in the gray T-shirt and shorts was the most highly sought-after high school football prospect in Virginia. And that’s just the way he likes it. “He’s a very humble young man,” said Caleb’s mother, Annette Bailey. “I’m very proud of the way he’s conducting himself and handling this situation.” By “this situation,” Bailey was referring to the overwhelming

attention and hype that accomBuckeyes were removed from panied her son’s explosion onto Caleb’s list after off-field improthe national recruiting scene after prieties became public and cost a junior season in which he proTressel his job. duced more than 2,100 yards of All the fawning over his total offense and 29 touchdowns. unique blend of size, speed and A simple Google search of his athletic ability could be enough name returns hundreds of results to make even the most grounded related to his choice of adult lose perspective, a future college desbut Caleb approaches tination by the many the entire recruiting websites that have process with a levelsprung up to quench headed calm that belies fans’ thirst for recruithis 17 years on the ing news. planet. Considered a four“When I really think star recruit and one about it, I do shake my He's made of the nation’s top head sometimes and this process “athletes,” a designawonder, ‘Am I really in as easy as tion reserved for this position?” Caleb it can be. players who project acknowledged. “I just He doesn't at more than one try to take it all in and position in college, the hype it up. He enjoy it.” doesn't let it 6-4, 220-pound Caleb Both Bailey and get to him. has received so many Clover Hill coach Sean He never gets scholarship offers that O’Hare are determined even he’s not sure of overwhelmed. to help Caleb do just the exact number. that. They’ve put Last month, he together a “prevent detrimmed that list of fense” to keep the more roughly 30 suitors outrageous aspects of and announced 10 finalists, the the recruiting process from turnranks of which included some of ing his senior year into a circus. college football’s perennial power Unlike the vast majority of his programs: Georgia, Florida, LSU, classmates, Caleb doesn’t have a Tennessee, West Virginia, Virginia Facebook page or a Twitter acTech, Clemson, Florida State, count. His only access to e-mail is Penn State and North Carolina. through the main family account, He’s been visited by some of which Bailey dutifully screens college football’s best-known and passes along. He goes out coaches, including former Ohio of his way not to read what fans State coach Jim Tressel, whose are saying about him on message

overHeArd

boards and prefers video games to recruiting rankings. “He’s made this process as easy as it can be,” O’Hare said. “He doesn’t hype it up. He doesn’t let it get to him. He never gets overwhelmed by it.” And yet, the fans want to know: Where’s he going to college? It’s the million dollar question. But if Caleb has any favorites among his finalists, he’s not saying. Neither are his mother or his football coach. Caleb prefers to reflect on advice from older brother Brandon, who played football at the University of Oklahoma: Keep your head, listen to what all the coaches have to say, then go wherever you feel most comfortable. “The sad part [about picking a school] is we like them all,” Bailey said. “It’s going to be a very hard decision. I’m waiting for the time when he makes a visit and says, ‘This is the one.’” While Caleb suggested he could opt to bypass a verbal commitment altogether and wait to pick a school on National Signing Day, Bailey said his current plan is to announce his choice at the U.S. Army All-American Bowl on Jan. 7, 2011, in San Antonio. That’s nearly four months from now. Caleb has more immediate concerns, such as leading CALeB p9


 || SEPTEMBER 15, 2011

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PHOTO BY jim mccOnnell

Lee Carroll, ChFC®, CLU®

Patricia S. Brock

15516 Westchester Commons Way

Midlothian, VA 23113

11307 B Polo Place Midlothian, VA 23113

804-897-1127

804-378-7741

www.edwardjones.com

Clover Hill's Dimitri Evans breaks away from a Prince George defender and sprints down the left sideline for a big gain. The Cavaliers won 14-0. Member SIPC

Train For a Career In Health Care! � Medical Assisting � Practical Nursing � Medical Billing & Coding 7914 Midlothian Turnpike, Richmond PHOTO BY KennY mOORe

Austin Cundiff of James River tries to step out of the grasp of Douglas Freeman's Henry Ivy (left) and Thomas Vu.

800-494-5809

Day and Evening Classes l Job Placement Assistance | Financial Aid if Qualified Accredited School, ACCSC | Additional Certification May Be Required.

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Before and after school martial arts

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Premier Martial Arts has helped to develop focus and concentration, increased confidence, self discipline and respect while teaching children to defend themselves for over 20 years! Our safe, fun, and exciting classes focus a child’s attention, thus improving his or her ability to learn. Learning builds a sense of accomplishment. With each new accomplishment as student’s self-confidence grows and confidence is the first step in the empowerment of an individual’s physical and mental abilities. Children will develop perseverance, which is a nonquitting spirit to overcome life’s

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At Premier Martial Arts we help kids be the best they can be. • Transportation to and from school provided. • For all school age children. • Homework and snack time provided. • Also, evening classes for children and adults. • Space is limited, so register early. Near Chesterfield Towne Center and Johnston-Willis Hospital.


EXERCISE

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softBALL from p7

Fuller Hoepner, the former Cosby High quarterback with Tomahawk than who is now a walk-on football player at Virginia Tech. Cheatham, it’s Thornton. “Fuller hadn’t played Kevin’s father, The Rev. baseball since he was 7 … Clay Thornton, who never missed a softball game, died and he’d never played softball,” said Cheatham. “But in June, 2009, of a heart attack while vacationing on the he hit some of the longest balls I’ve ever seen hit.” Outer Banks. Another talented player is Perhaps shaken by the tragic loss, some of the more Scott Hartman, former Clotalented players drifted away ver Hill High and William & Mary football defensive from the team in 2010. This season they returned, back. Along with serving as with guns blazing. softball manager-player, Tomahawk’s “rookie of the year” was 6-2, 227-pound Cheatham – a retired

electrician – is Chairman of the church’s Buildings and Grounds Committee, a Trustee and Deacon. “It’s the only church I’ve ever attended,” he said. Cheatham’s trademarks, as a player, are a sweatband holding his dark locks in place, and high-arching deliveries – always challenging the 12-foot slow pitch limit. “I try and bring rain,” he said. Never over-swinging at the plate, he’s always been a consistent punch hitter. “I think I only hit one

SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 || 

sports || fitness

legit homer in my life,” he said. Afraid of misleading, he revealed these details regarding that once-in-a-lifetime four-bagger: “Well, it was an in-theparker … when two outfielders ran into each other.” Tomahawk began as a fast-pitch team at old Manchester High (now Elkhardt Middle). It was still fast-pitch at Winterpock in the 1960s. The church converted to slow pitch in 1971, when Cheatham began hurling.

“Nobody else wanted to, so I did it,” he said. Tomahawk played in slow-pitch leagues at Robious Middle School, Thompson Middle School, Rockwood Park and Manchester Middle before moving to Warbro. Cheatham is known as a fierce competitor, but also as someone who enjoys every minute of it. He’s eager to engage in lively, good-natured banter with oppo-

nents. So, after 56 years in the same uniform, what’s next? “I guess it would be a good time to retire,” Cheatham said. But … don’t expect a “the end” to this story anytime soon. “I know I’ll get the itch and be back,” he added with a good ol’ boy’s laugh – the kind of genuine laugh that makes you want to smile with him.

HAMLin from p7

season to prepare himself Caleb as an amazing athlete for the next level, O’Hare’s capable of helping their quarterback made it clear his favorite team win a national his Clover Hill squad to the loyalties lie with his coaches championship, he has so far Dominion District champimanaged to navigate the ofonship and a third consecu- and teammates. “People are going to talk,” ten-unpredictable recruiting tive Central Region playoff he said, “but I don’t pay atprocess while remaining true berth. tention to it good or bad.” to himself. “It may seem like it O’Hare insisted that the He's still a big, fast, because of all the attention I friendly teenager who’s as get, but it’s not all about me,” way his players treat each other, “you’d never know we quick with a smile as he is he said. “If I was to just go have a big-time recruit in to leave opposing defenders out there as an individual, I grasping at air. wouldn’t have the results I’ve our locker room.” That’s because, while “He hasn’t changed at all,” been able to have.” thousands of college football Bailey said. “He just wants to In Caleb’s case, “taking fans across the nation see play football.” one for the team” means agreeing to play out of position. Each of his 10 college Keeping families and finalists are recruiting him as a wide receiver – Alabama businesses comfortable wanted him to play safety and didn’t make the cut – but O’Hare long ago decided it was in Clover Hill’s best interest to put the ball in Caleb’s hands as often as HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING possible. RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL So Caleb plays quarter• Maintenance Agreements $ back in the Cavaliers’ spread • Servicing All Makes & Models offense. He operates almost • Sales, Service & Installations Coupon For exclusively out of the shotAny Service Call. $ 00 gun and can either call his Up to * Must present coupon at own number or get the ball on new time of service to explosive playmakers like * Not valid with any other Carrier Systems offers. Dimitri Evans, Darreus MofRebates paid only on qualifying * Expires 9/30/11 products and systems. fett and Tim Thaniel. * Not valid with any other rebate or special “I’m just doing what’s * Must present coupon at time of service best for the team,” Caleb * System must include indoor & outdoor units plus thermostat explained. * Offer valid until 9/30/11 As for those who have * Restrictions apply criticized O’Hare for not Lic. # 2701012546A not playing Caleb at wide www.wgspeeks.com Class A Contractor receiver and giving him a full

CALeB from p7

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PHOTO BY JIM MCCONNELL

Joel Caleb breaks through the Prince George defense during Friday's season opener.

“But it’s good,” Busch added. “When you win the championship that’s the recognition you want. The only problem is it’s too much of Jimmie is because he’s won it five times in a row. So he deserves it.” For Hamlin, the past year has been a matter of channeling those feelings into something positive. “It is motivation, that’s all you can use it for because last year is last year.” And this year has been far different from 2010. When Hamlin left Richmond last September he was the top driver heading into the Chase. This year he needed one of the two wildcard berths into the Chase and didn't secure that until Richmond. Fighting back from the constant reminders of Johnson’s accomplishments was evident in Hamlin’s synopsis of this season. “We’ve had our struggles this year,” he said. “When you look at all the DNFs and all the different mechanical failures and driver errors that we’ve had this year, for anybody else we’d be 22nd in points right now but we’re in for a shot to win a championship.” That's all any driver can ask for.

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09/15/2011