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BEST-SELLING AUTHOR AND PULITZER PRIZE-WINNING JOURNALIST ANNA QUINDLEN ’74

UNAFRAID

I MAJORED IN

NE W YORK


BARNARD GRADUATES ENTER THE WORLD BOLDLY.

COVER Words from award-winning novelist and columnist ANNA QUINDLEN ’74, who

And why not? They have honed their intellects in a place of ideas, where new knowledge is created every day. They have come to know intimately one of the greatest cities in the world. And they have prospered in a culture where women, as a matter of course, achieve extraordinary things.

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Making the most of an exceptional LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION and the resources of a world-renowned university, students and faculty members learn and grow in a thriving intellectual community.

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served as chair of Barnard’s board of trustees from 2003 to 2010.

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There is no college town more dynamic than NEW YORK CITY. With thousands of museums, galleries, restaurants, and sites for internships and fieldwork, it offers incomparable opportunities.

Surrounded by remarkable and talented role models, students at this COLLEGE FOR WOMEN gain the confidence to pursue lives that matter—to themselves and to the world.

LOOKING FOR A SPECIFIC TOPIC? SEE THE INDEX ON PAGE 66.


ON THE UPPER WEST SIDE OF MANHATTAN

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BARNARD

Barnard’s campus is a picturesque retreat in the midst of the city. Inside the wrought-iron gates, students and faculty members move among a mix of traditional and modern buildings and, when the weather is warm, gather on the lawns beneath the trees. Across the street, Barnard students have full access to Columbia University’s classes, libraries, and campus events, join NCAA Division I teams, and lead student organizations. And just a short walk, cab ride, or subway ride away, the excitement and energy of New York City await.


8:1 BARNARD’S STUDENT-FACULTY RATIO: (10:1 FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT) BARNARD 4

FUELED BY A SHARED PASSION FOR LEARNING, STUDENTS AND TEACHER-SCHOLARS EXPLORE SOME OF LIFE’S MOST IMPORTANT QUESTIONS. THROUGH OUR RIGOROUS LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION, STUDENTS FIND NEW WAYS OF SEEING THE WORLD AND THEIR ROLE IN CHANGING IT.

Investigation and inquiry are hallmarks of the Barnard experience. More than 30 percent of our more than 2,500 students major in the sciences or mathematics, and students in all majors have opportunities to conduct original research with practitioners and scholars on and off campus.


WHY THE LIBERAL ARTS? “I’M A POSTER CHILD FOR THE LIBERAL ARTS. DURING MY FIRST YEAR, I TOOK AN INTRODUCTORY ANTHROPOLOGY COURSE AND FELL IN LOVE! I MIGHT NEVER HAVE DISCOVERED MY CURRENT MAJOR AND PASSION HAD I NOT ATTENDED A SCHOOL THAT ENCOURAGES ACADEMIC EXPLORATION.” GILLI MESSER, JUNIOR, ANTHROPOLOGY MAJOR AND FRENCH MINOR

FIND YOUR OWN PERSONAL MENTOR.

JOIN SOME FASCINATING CONVERSATIONS.

ERASE THE BOUNDARIES OF YOUR INTELLECTUAL COMFORT ZONE.

GIVE YOUR CURIOSITY A WORKOUT.

From introductory biology classes to senior capstone projects, you’ll have the opportunity to explore new intellectual territory and create new knowledge. Here, independent thinking is encouraged. Research is welcomed. Many students work closely with a scholar or researcher at Barnard or Columbia or in one of New York City’s many medical, scientific, or cultural institutions. Since 1984, Barnard has named about a dozen rising sophomores Centennial Scholars. Each scholar receives funding toward intensive research or creative work. The projects have taken them near and far—from learning the inner workings of New York theatre to studying the distinctive wildlife of the Galápagos Islands. Other students engage in research through the Hughes Science Pipeline Project, the National Institute for Mental Health, the Mellon Foundation, The Third Millennium Foundation for Storytelling, and a variety of projects directed through various academic departments.

As leading scholars, researchers, and innovators in their fields, Barnard faculty members make headlines and have bylines in the national media and in prominent journals. But foremost, they are teachers. Faculty members—not graduate students— teach all the classes here. And mentoring students is one of the most gratifying parts of their work. Barnard’s low student-faculty ratio (8:1) gives faculty the time to challenge you to think about concepts, the world, and yourself in new ways. They’ll ask about your interests and dreams. They’ll point out unrealized strengths and suggest unexpected possibilities for the future. Along the way, they’re likely to invite you to join them in their research, offer you a lead on an internship, or just sit down with you over coffee to chat about the latest off-Broadway play.

Discussions are lively, engaging, and challenging in Barnard classes, nearly three-quarters of which enroll 19 or fewer students. Surrounded by students who are as eager as you are to learn, along with a professor who’s passionate about the material, you’ll immerse yourself in conversations that are likely to continue beyond the classroom. Whether in lectures or seminar-style courses, students question, debate, and draw on ideas and connections from life experiences and other course work.

Studying the liberal arts at Barnard allows you to learn broadly. You’ll take classes in subjects you never considered, perhaps never even imagined. Such learning not only helps you expand your knowledge and make connections, but also can lead you to discover a new interest, add a minor, or head down a different path. Liberal arts learning helps you speak knowledgeably on a range of topics and allows you to ask insightful questions that reflect a fuller understanding of the world.

Students and professors here always want to know more. Peel away one layer of thought, and they’re wondering what’s hidden under the next layer. This insatiable curiosity makes Barnard students incisive critical thinkers, effective problem solvers, and creative individuals. You might not discover the answers to all of life’s mysteries, but the liberal arts will train you to follow your curiosity, question ambiguity, and broaden your thinking.

LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION

ASK THE QUESTION NO ONE HAS ASKED BEFORE. THEN PURSUE THE ANSWER.

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FIRST YEAR

SARABETH BERMAN ’06 HOMETOWN:

Newton, Massachusetts MAJOR: Urban Studies EMPLOYER: Vice President, Public Affairs at Teach for All

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Reacting to the Past, Theatre and Society, Gandhi’s India, Voice and Speech WHERE I LIVED: 3rd floor Sulzberger (I am still best friends with many women from that floor!)

SOPHOMORE YEAR

The single most important part of my Barnard experience was the invaluable relationships I had with faculty. I took Theatre and Society in my first year with DENNY PARTRIDGE. I was taken with her approach to theatre and social issues, and the way she used theatre to engage in society. I knew that she would make me a better participant in art, and also make me a better and stronger person.

My first roommate was MILA GOROKHOVICH. She was also interested in dance, and we decorated our room with our favorite dance posters. She now lives in London.

JUNIOR YEAR

SENIOR YEAR

WHERE I LIVED: Plimpton

In my junior and senior year summers, I worked at Seeds of Peace, a conflict resolution camp in Maine for Palestinian and Israeli high school students.

BARNARD

The summer after my sophomore year, I danced in an off-Broadway hip-hop show called Project Playground, and I worked for the Brooklyn Arts Exchange.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Latin American and Caribbean Dance, Perception, American Civilization Since the Civil War

I loved going for runs in Riverside Park.

Paul Scolieri, assistant professor of dance, teaches and researches Latin American and Caribbean dance, dance politics and policy in the United States, and movement theory and analysis. He recently spent a semester as a visiting scholar of Latin American studies at Harvard University.

For my senior thesis, I developed and directed a play with formerly incarcerated women entitled She Disappeared: Mothers and Daughters in Prison. To develop the play, I worked with two Barnard students and two women who were recently released from prison. The performance was the opening event for that year’s Barnard Center for Research on Women’s conference on justice.

BARNARD TAUGHT ME HOW TO BE COMFORTABLE NOT KNOWING. IT TAUGHT ME HOW TO ASK QUESTIONS, HOW TO PUSH MYSELF INTO THE UNKNOWN, AND HOW TO SURVIVE THERE. I KNEW THAT I HAD THE TOOLS TO COPE—AND TO SUCCEED.

At graduation, I had the honor of addressing my class as the academic speaker. It was a thrill to stand before the women who had shaped my Barnard experience and the professors and faculty who had inspired me.

TODAY As vice president of development and communications, I work to secure funding to drive Teach For China. My team does this through marshaling resources, cultivating private sector champions, and creating opportunities for revenue growth in China, Hong Kong, and the United States.

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SOPHOMORE YEAR WAS WHEN I REALLY FOUND MY GROOVE AND MY PLACE IN MORNINGSIDE HEIGHTS. I FELT ENERGIZED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE. I LIVED IN A WONDERFUL SUITE WITH FOUR LADIES. WE FORGED REALLY SPECIAL RELATIONSHIPS.

LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION

Paul Scolieri of the dance department taught fabulous classes that I still refer to in my everyday work: Dance in New York City and Performing the Political.

I loved to go up to Max Soha for dinner with friends and to Columbia Bagels for delicious egg and cheese sandwiches.

WHERE I LIVED: 616 West 116th Street

NEW YORK CITY IS THE WORLD CONDENSED ON A TINY ISLAND. WHEN I TOOK A CLASS ON ANCIENT GREEK LITERATURE, I COULD GO SIT AMONG ANCIENT GREEK ART AT THE MET. WHEN I TOOK A CLASS ON DANCE IN THE CARIBBEAN, I COULD GO TO A DOWNTOWN CLUB AND WATCH THE MOST AUTHENTIC SALSA NORTH OF CUBA. NEW YORK WAS AS MUCH A PART OF MY EDUCATIONAL PROCESS AS THE CLASSROOM.

I choreographed the Columbia Varsity Show in my sophomore and junior years and produced it in junior year. We spent hours testing out story lines, rehearsing sketches, and steeping ourselves in the nuances, quirks, and pleasures of life in Morningside Heights.

I realized if I majored in urban studies, I would be able to take all the classes I was interested in and dive further into the place I was living. My fascination with New York City and my interest in a wide variety of classes made urban studies a great match for me.

I started with Orchesis my first semester and performed with them all eight semesters. I was the master class coordinator and choreographed several shows during various semesters.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Dance Composition, The Radical Tradition in America, Junior Colloquium in Urban Studies

WHERE I LIVED: 601 West 110th Street

The brains behind Reacting to the Past, MARK CARNES, created my First-Year Seminar. Professor Carnes showed me that there are many ways to learn and many ways to expand yourself. The summer after my sophomore year, some students, Professor Carnes, and I traveled to Italy to try to develop a game on Galileo. It was fascinating to be a part of building a curriculum.

MY MOTHER GRADUATED WITH THE CLASS OF 1962. BARNARD STORIES WERE A PART OF MY UPBRINGING. MY LOVE OF NEW YORK CITY, MY INTEREST IN THE ARTS, AND MY DEEP RESPECT AND ADMIRATION FOR MY MOTHER MADE BARNARD A NATURAL CHOICE.

The summer after my first year, I worked at the Ailey Camp in Boston, a camp for underprivileged inner-city middle school students.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Dance in New York City, Immigrant Experiences, Race and Ethnicity in American Politics, Introduction to Psychology


BARNARD SHOWS ITS STRENGTH Barnard is known for the exceptional strength of its programs in architecture, dance, education, theatre, and urban studies, directing these programs for both Barnard and Columbia. Also known for producing some of the world’s most influential writers, Barnard has a writing program whose strength is evident across the curriculum—from First-Year Writing to the Writing Fellows Program to writingintensive courses in every department—and the program serves as an incubator for developing writers. Faculty members and alumnae influence all of these fields on national and international levels.

“BARNARD HAS HELPED AN EXCEPTIONALLY LARGE GROUP OF WOMEN BECOME DISTINGUISHED CONTEMPORARY WRITERS . . . ONE CAN THINK OF BARNARD AS SOMETHING OF A LITERARY HATCHERY . . . WHERE A CERTAIN CONFLUENCE OF TALENT, AMBITION AND WHAT MODERNS WOULD CALL NETWORKING GENERATES AN ASTONISHING LITERARY CROP.” THE NEW YORK TIMES

“TO ME, THAT’S THE BEAUTY OF THE BARNARD DANCE DEPARTMENT’S FOCUS ON BOTH ACADEMICS AND TECHNIQUE— IT ALLOWS STUDENTS TO BE THINKING DANCERS AND THINKING MOVERS. IT DOESN’T VIEW PEOPLE AS A DICHOTOMY, AS ‘YOUR BODY’ AND ‘YOUR HEAD.’ WHAT’S FUELING YOUR MIND IS EQUALLY IMPORTANT TO HOW YOU’RE TRAINING YOUR BODY.” HOLLY WILLIAMS ’79, PROFESSOR OF THEATER AND DANCE, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN; BOARD MEMBER, COUNCIL OF DANCE ADMINISTRATORS; AND PRESIDENT, THE AMERICAN COLLEGE DANCE FESTIVAL ASSOCIATION

WRITING Counting more than 1,300 published authors among its alumnae, Barnard has a long tradition of producing journalists, best-selling novelists, playwrights, Pulitzer Prize winners, and critically acclaimed writers and poets (see pages 62 and 63). Faculty members—including Mary Gordon, a Barnard alumna and Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning writer— serve as powerful mentors.

“BARNARD THEATRE STUDENTS DRAW ON FACULTY MEMBERS WHOSE CLASSROOM WORK IS ENRICHED BY THEIR PROFESSIONAL WORK IN THE NEW YORK THEATRE, AND ON TEACHER-SCHOLARS UNPARALLELED IN THEIR STUDY OF THEATRE AS A CRUCIAL ELEMENT OF THE HISTORY OF CULTURE.” “BARNARD’S URBAN STUDIES PROGRAM IS ONE OF THE OLDEST PROGRAMS IN EXISTENCE. WE HAVE ACCESS TO UNPARALLELED INTERNSHIPS IN EVERY ASPECT OF CITY LIFE. AND BECAUSE IT’S AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM, STUDENTS CAN EXPLORE THE CITY THROUGH THE LENS THAT’S MOST EXCITING TO THEM.” FLORA DAVIDSON, PROFESSOR EMERITA OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AND URBAN STUDIES, CO-DIRECTOR OF THE URBAN STUDIES PROGRAM

“[BARNARD’S ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM] PREPARES YOU TO BE A LEADER IN GRADUATE SCHOOL AND IN THE FIELD. IT’S JUST AN IDEAL SITUATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES. HERE, WE’RE LOOKING AT BARNARD AS A MODEL FOR THE TYPES OF UNDERGRADUATE COURSES WE WANT TO TEACH.” BETSY WILLIAMSON ’92, WHO EARNED HER MASTER’S FROM HARVARD AND TEACHES IN THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO’S ARCHITECTURE DEPARTMENT, IS PRINCIPAL OF HER FIRM, WHICH WAS GRANTED THE YOUNG ARCHITECTS AWARD FROM THE ARCHITECTURAL LEAGUE OF NEW YORK.

ARCHITECTURE

DANCE

EDUCATION

THEATRE

URBAN STUDIES

Whether they’re designing buildings or studying the impact of structures on our society, the faculty members and alumnae of Barnard’s architecture program are helping steer the field into the future. Most of the professors have practices in New York City; others are pursuing research, making films, or writing books—activities that enrich their classes and studios. Graduates have founded award-winning architectural firms and academic journals; they teach in schools the world over. Students in the program gain substantial studio experience and have the opportunity to take graduate-level courses. This four-year liberal arts program results in a bachelor of arts degree.

With coverage in the New York Times, the Village Voice, and the Wall Street Journal, Barnard’s dance program gets noticed. Faculty members have taught and choreographed around the world, written books, served as dance critics for national magazines, and performed with top dance companies (including that of Twyla Tharp, herself a Barnard graduate). Though the major is grounded in the liberal arts, its dual focus includes advanced performance courses in ballet and modern dance, in addition to African, Indian, tap, jazz, flamenco, and more. In collaboration with some of New York City’s most interesting dance venues and choreographers, Barnard stays closely connected to a city that is a powerful force in the dance world.

Shaping tomorrow’s leaders, Barnard’s education program makes an impact on the lives of countless young learners. Through field placements in classrooms throughout New York City, our students experience urban teaching up close with the support and mentorship of experienced educators. When they complete the program, they are eligible for initial teaching certification in New York for elementary, middle, and high school. Throughout the program, from engaging seminars to opportunities to collaborate on faculty research that’s advancing the field, the emphasis is on developing teachers as intellectuals rather than merely technicians.

Located at the intersection of the arts and humanities in the world’s theatrical capital, the theatre program is committed to the interaction of creative and critical work vital in shaping performance. Graduates have gone into a range of theatre and performance work—from experimental companies to Broadway, television, and film—as actors, directors, producers, and designers. The richly critical education here also prepares students for advanced work at leading graduate and professional schools.

With one of the oldest urban studies programs in the nation—and a prime location in New York City—Barnard has long been a pioneer in exploring the multifaceted issues facing cities. Since the interdisciplinary program began more than 35 years ago, alumnae have fanned out across the world, making an impact as appointed and elected officials, teachers and scholars, activists, and leaders in public service. Also shaping the field are faculty members whose expertise and scholarship have been relied on by the U.S. Congress, the United Nations, and governments of other countries.

W. B. WORTHEN, CHAIR, THEATRE DEPARTMENT; ALICE BRADY PELS PROFESSOR IN THE ARTS; PROFESSOR, THEATRE DIVISION, SCHOOL OF THE ARTS, COLUMBIA

“IN THE EDUCATION PROGRAM, WE WANT STUDENTS TO SEE THEMSELVES AS INTELLECTUALS ACTING AS CREATIVE AGENTS. IF YOU WANT CARING, EFFECTIVE, AND INSPIRING TEACHERS, THEY MUST BE CRITICAL THINKERS WHO CAN PROACTIVELY ENGAGE WITH THE PROBLEMS WE FACE IN OUR EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM.” LEE ANNE BELL, PROFESSOR AND BARBARA SILVER HOROWITZ DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION


ONLY AT BARNARD

NOTABLE FACULTY MEMBERS

JAMES BASKER,

Barnard’s Richard Gilder Professor of Literary History and president of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, compiled an anthology of antislavery writings spanning two centuries. The 950-page American Antislavery Writings: Colonial Beginnings to Emancipation captures the abolitionist movement in the words of more than 150 Americans.

Africana Studies and English Professor YVETTE CHRISTIANSË

received a Rockefeller Foundation/Bellagio Residency for work on her opera Cities of Salt with co-librettist Rosalind Morris and composer Zaid Jabri. An authority on Central Asia, associate professor of international relations and foreign policy ALEXANDER COOLEY

has written academic articles and op-eds for the International Herald Tribune, the Wall Street JournalEurope, and the New York Times, among others. His latest book is Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great

Power Contest in Central Asia. KAREN FAIRBANKS,

Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Professional Practice in Architecture and a partner in the firm Marble Fairbanks, took senior architecture majors to Rio de Janiero to study urban development. Students designed a public installation and got feedback from local architects and community members. Dance Teacher magazine named KATIE GLASNER

Dance Teacher of the Year in Higher Education. Senior associate and

assistant chair in Barnard’s department of dance, Glasner danced nationally and internationally with the Twyla Tharp Dance Company for 10 years. Her performance credits also include film work, television, and Broadway. The official state author of New York, Millicent C. McIntosh Professor of Writing MARY GORDON ’71

has published 16 works, including four bestselling novels and the critically acclaimed memoir Circling My Mother.

With the publication of Brain Storm: The Flaws in the Science of Sex Differences, women’s studies professor and sociomedical scientist REBECCA JORDANYOUNG challenges the

notion that gender differences are hardwired into our biology. Her findings have potentially revolutionary implications for how society thinks about gender and sexuality. STEPHANIE PFIRMAN,

the Alena Wels Hirschorn ’58 and Martin Hirschorn Professor of Environmental and Applied Sciences, leads the PoLAR

Climate Change Education Partnership, which the National Science Foundation awarded $5.6 million for climate change education. Before Barnard, she was a senior scientist at the Environmental Defense Fund. The Atlantic calls DEBORAH VALENZE’S

book Milk: A Local and Global History one of “Five Essential Reads on Food Politics.” The professor of history recently won a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship and an American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship.

KIMBERLEY JOHNSON, DIRECTOR, URBAN STUDIES PROGRAM; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AND URBAN STUDIES

SEVERIN FOWLES, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY

RUSSELL ROMEO, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY

JANNA LEVIN ’88, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

As a Columbia student who took courses at Barnard, Kimberley Johnson always appreciated the small classes. Today, as a professor at Barnard, she still values the way students are able to connect with the material, with her, and with each other. She recalls a recent class on policy-making, in which one student had interned with the attorney general’s office and another at a criminal justice institution: “They brought this incredible level of energy and insight on criminal justice policy to the conversation,” she says. “That wouldn’t have happened if we weren’t in New York City.” Students play an important role in her scholarship, in which she’s exploring the political environment between 1920 and the landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education case. “Students help me think through issues in my own research,” she says. “They have a fresh perspective. Sometimes you can get caught up in your own field, and it’s good to have someone challenge you.”

Most of the year, you’ll find Severin Fowles in a typical four-walled classroom. In the summer, though, his teaching moves to a classroom walled by rock. Instead of studying figures on a chalkboard, students who join his field expeditions to the Rio Grande Gorge in northern New Mexico decode ancient Native American petroglyphs. Professor Fowles also guides them through the exploration of shrines, hunting camps, and trails. He’s even been known to lead an impromptu course on cooking a mean buffalo stew. Some students have incorporated their work with Professor Fowles into senior theses and shared their results at national archaeology meetings. Recently, Barnard students helped Professor Fowles and others launch an international archaeology conference at Columbia, which, in its first year, drew more than 100 of the world’s top archeologists as speakers. “One would be hard-pressed to find this sort of high-level scholarly engagement anywhere else in the country,” he says.

Being part of students’ bursts of discovery and understanding—otherwise known as “eureka moments”— is what Russell Romeo finds most rewarding as a neuroscientist at Barnard. Students have the potential for a lot of eureka moments these days in his Laboratory of Developmental Psychobiology, where he’s investigating how stress impacts the brains of adolescents. “Every experiment we are presently conducting has the potential to shed light on enormously important questions and problems in the neurosciences,” says Professor Romeo, who received the Young Investigator Award from the Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology. Students are involved in all levels of his research, from the design and execution of experiments to sharing results at national conferences and in scientific journals. Students experience discovery of a different sort in his course, Science and Scientists, in which researchers come to the classroom to share their own professional and personal experiences as scientists.

It’s no wonder people call Janna Levin a Renaissance woman. An accomplished physicist, her research focuses on theories of the early universe, chaos, and black holes. She’s also a writer, and in her awardwinning debut novel, A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines, she re-imagines the lives of mathematicians Kurt Gödel and Alan Turing. Plus, she’s an artist and was the first scientist-in-residence at the Ruskin School of Art in England. She’s fascinated by the relationship between science, art, literature, and our worldview. She’s enlivened Barnard classes with this multifaceted perspective since she returned to campus in 2004, and she was surprised to discover that one of the most gratifying courses she teaches is introductory physics. “When you walk in and see nearly 40 women tackling physics, you feel you’re defying every prejudice and every hampering stereotype out there,” says Professor Levin, herself a Barnard graduate who majored in physics and astronomy and minored in philosophy.

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Political science professor SEVERINE AUTESSERRE won the University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order for her book The Trouble with the Congo, for which she drew on 18 months of field research and more than 300 interviews. Her latest book is Peaceland: Conflict Resolution and the Everyday Politics of International Intervention.

LEE ANNE BELL, the Barbara Silver Horowitz Director of Education, received the 2013 Multicultural Media Award from the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME) for her film 40 Years Later: Now Can We Talk? The documentary, the hub of an outreach effort at Barnard known as the Storytelling Project, explores the impact of racial integration through the story of the first African American students to attend a white high school in Mississippi.

LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION

BARNARD

Only here do faculty members meet the demanding requirements and reap the benefits of both a top liberal arts college and a world-class university. It is the opportunity to work closely with students, both as teachers and as research collaborators, that draws such exceptional scholars to the Barnard community. In classrooms, labs, and studios across campus, students relish their close interaction with professors who are enthusiastic about undergraduate teaching and who welcome students to collaborate on their research.

The following are just a few examples of the accomplished and interesting women and men who teach and conduct research at Barnard.


LISA LOMAX ’07

FIRST YEAR

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Dance in New York City, Lives of Creative Women, Aqua Exercise, Introduction to Sociology, The Films of Pedro Almodovar

SOPHOMORE YEAR

WHERE I LIVED: Sulzberger Hall

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: The Writer’s Process, American Political and Social Welfare Policy, Environmental Science II, Problems in International Security Colloquium, Life Cycle of Communist Regimes, Latin American Literature, Modern Dance WHERE I LIVED: 600 West 116th Street (as a resident assistant)

HOMETOWN:

Houston, TX MAJOR:

Political Science

I joined the Alpha Chi Omega sorority at Columbia; as a junior I was elected vice president of intellectual development. Through AXO, I was also on the Inter-Greek Council.

I am still very close with many of the women who lived on my hall in my first year.

I CHOSE BARNARD BECAUSE THE IDEA OF A NURTURING WOMEN’S COLLEGE WITH ACCESS TO AN IVY LEAGUE UNIVERSITY AND NEW YORK CITY WAS JUST WAY TOO APPEALING TO PASS UP!

My favorite thing to do in the city was just to walk. I would go down Broadway as far as I could; I’d go to Central Park, the Village, Little Italy, South Street Seaport, and Battery Park.

I took the course Dance in New York City, which was incredible—and a great way to get introduced to college and NYC. It was a truly unique and wonderful experience.

I co-produced a play called Songs for a New World.

JUNIOR YEAR

This is the year I started as a Writing Fellow, helping other students with their writing.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Political Violence and Terrorism Colloquium, Introduction to Comparative Politics, World Migration, Political Science Research Seminar WHERE I LIVED: 600 West 116th Street (as a resident assistant) and 620 West 116th Street

SENIOR YEAR

PROFESSOR KIMBERLY MARTEN WAS INCREDIBLY INTERESTING AND CHALLENGING, AND IS PROBABLY THE REASON I STUDIED POLITICAL SCIENCE AND WORKED EXTRA HARD.

KIMBERLY MARTEN, professor of political science and department chair, decided on Barnard after meeting with some political science students during her interview and being “blown away” by their questions. Her research spans international relations, the United Nations, and Russian defense and foreign policy. She’s currently focusing on the topic of warlordism. Marten earned her undergraduate degree from Harvard and her doctorate from Stanford.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Political Science Research Seminar, Abnormal Psychology, Flamenco and Classical Spanish Dance WHERE I LIVED: Studio at 601 West 110th Street

My senior thesis was on state building in Panama after the 1989-1990 U.S. invasion and potential applications for current state-building projects.

The summers before and after my junior year, I worked at the public children’s hospital in Panama City, Panama. Mostly I shadowed physicians, went on rounds, did a little research/translation with other foreign medical students, and assisted in the most basic patient care.

BARNARD HELPED ME TO EMBRACE MY INNER SPUNK.

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BARNARD

THE BEST THINGS ABOUT GOING TO COLLEGE IN NYC? THE ART AND CULTURAL SCENES, THE UNITED NATIONS, WALL STREET, THE DIVERSE NEIGHBORHOODS AND POPULATION. THE CITY IS ITS OWN EDUCATION, AND GETTING TO ATTEND COLLEGE THERE WAS AN INTRODUCTION TO AN EVER-MORE GLOBALIZED WORLD.

I did a lot of studying in my room. But occasionally I got on the subway and found a coffee shop to study at in a random neighborhood.

I enjoyed life in New York City—and my flamenco class.

I always had an affinity for politics, but I fell in love with political science after taking Introduction to International Politics. I really enjoyed all my political science classes and felt they were helpful in gaining a broader perspective on world events.

Barnard really helped me to be comfortable with myself and nurture my intellectual curiosity. Barnard taught me to believe in myself and that if I worked hard, I could do things I would never have thought possible.

TODAY I am currently a “global child health” resident at Texas Children’s Hospital—the only official global health residency in pediatrics, with an extra year spent typically in Africa. I am also a translator and editor for the UN, mostly working with UNAIDS, UNDP, and WFP, and sometimes UNICEF.


ENGAGED IN LEARNING FROM THE START

Here’s a look at one First-Year Seminar, Reacting to the Past, a pedagogical approach that is distinctly different and distinctly Barnard.

As the newest members of the intellectual community at Barnard, first-year students take two courses that give them an intense—and intensely rewarding—introduction to learning at the College. With no more than 16 students, First-Year Seminar and First-Year Writing engage students in debating and thinking in new directions, while also creating bonds among students and faculty members. Barnard offers 15 separate topics for the First-Year Seminar each semester, while First-Year Writing courses center on three major themes.

“FIRST-YEAR WRITING, WITH THE ONE-ON-ONE MEETINGS WITH MY PROFESSOR, REALLY REVITALIZED THE WAY THAT I WRITE, SOMETHING THAT HAS HELPED ME BOTH IN MY CLASSES AND IN MY JOBS AND INTERNSHIPS.” MARLEY WEINER, JUNIOR, ANTHROPOLOGY AND JEWISH PHILOSOPHY DOUBLE MAJOR (DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAM WITH JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY)

FIRST-YEAR WRITING All first-year students take First-Year Writing, also known as Reinventing Literary History. As they explore literature from wide-ranging time periods and geographies, students learn to read critically and write convincingly. Sections of Reinventing Literary History are grouped in three clusters: Seminars on the Legacy of the Mediterranean feature classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture. Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of

canonicity, a seminar on The Americas and another on Women and Culture explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in different cultures. Students interested in pursuing these topics further can take a second term following an extended reading list. Through this and many other writingintensive courses woven throughout the curriculum, even the best Barnard writers become more accomplished and better able to manage the ambiguity intrinsic to academic exploration.

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR TOPICS Students choose from intriguing seminar topics that change each semester and are taught by experienced faculty members from disciplines throughout the curriculum. Following is a sampling from a recent semester: The Summons to Adventure The Art of Being Oneself Crisis of Authority Ethnicity and Social Transformation Revolutionary Movements: Visions and Experiences, Causes and Consequences The Hudson: America’s River Violence and Justice

BARNARD

Reacting to the Past

The Beautiful Sea Animals in Text and Society

In a series of elaborate simulation games, Reacting to the Past students take on the roles of historical figures. Instead of just reading about events, they delve into the motivations, perspectives, and thoughts of people who have shaped history. As students recreate the intellectual energy during times of tumult and change, they experience history and other disciplines in a captivating way. The impact of the seminar is significant and has spread far beyond campus since Barnard history professor Mark Carnes started it in 1996. Today, 40 colleges nationwide have developed classes that use the Reacting to the Past framework. Each year, workshops around the country introduce more faculty members to the seminar, which has won national awards for its innovative approach. The New York Times, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and the Christian Science Monitor, among others, have written about the course.

The game begins as each student is assigned a historical figure and an objective. It’s up to the students to run the class sessions; professors are there to guide rather than lead the class. Reading classic texts becomes not only an opportunity to expand knowledge, but also the basis for understanding the historical and social context of each character’s life. Students get caught up in the role-playing as they try to persuade the other players to take action according to the personality and motivations of their characters. A student might take on the role of a scholar in 16th-century China, helping to decide who should succeed the emperor. Or she may play a member of the National Assembly in revolutionary Paris in 1791, struggling to create a constitution in the midst of chaos. No matter the era or the country, the game unfolds in unpredictable and interesting ways.

HISTORICAL ROLES THAT REACTING TO THE PAST STUDENTS HAVE PLAYED First grand secretary in the Hanlin Academy of the Ming Dynasty Faculty member of the Collegio Romano in the early 1600s Governor general of the Simla Conference in 1945 India Emma Goldman, labor activist in 1913 Greenwich Village Scientist in Victorian England after the publication of Darwin’s The Origin of Species An English parliament lord during the tumultuous years of 1529– 1536 and Henry VIII Anne Hutchinson in the Massachusetts Bay Colony

“‘REACTING TO THE PAST’ IS ALL ABOUT ROLE-PLAYING HISTORY AND THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX. WE REBUILT ATHENS AFTER THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR (I WAS THE HISTORIAN) AND DEALT WITH A SUCCESSION CRISIS IN 16TH-CENTURY CHINA (I WAS THE FIRST GRAND SECRETARY). IT WAS CREATIVE, IT WAS COMPETITIVE, AND WE PRACTICED PUBLIC SPEAKING AND LEARNED HOW TO WRITE CONCISELY. IT WAS A BLAST.” ELENA MAYER, JUNIOR, POLITICAL ECONOMY MAJOR

For more on Reacting to the Past, see www.barnard.edu/reacting.

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Accent and Voice: Minority and Immigrant Women’s Literature

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Fire and Ice: Exploring Energy and Climate

HOW IT WORKS

LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION

Families, Feminisms, and States

WHAT IT IS


2,000+ COURSES AND ENDLESS WAYS TO EXPLORE THE WORLD

NINE WAYS OF KNOWING, FOUNDATION COURSES

MAJORS AND PROGRAMS ELECTIVES

BARNARD’S CURRICULUM

Exposing you to the breadth of a liberal arts education and encouraging depth in a particular discipline, the Barnard curriculum serves as a source of exploration and discovery within a framework that is both flexible and interconnected.* MAJOR

FOUNDATION COURSES

THE NINE WAYS OF KNOWING

First-Year Seminar and First-Year Writing

There are many ways of knowing the world, and Barnard has created a framework to look through nine different lenses. Far more than a loose collection of courses, these Ways of Knowing will become an interdisciplinary foundation for your Barnard education—and help determine the way you understand our ever-changing world. The requirements are designed to give you maximum flexibility. Instead of taking a prescribed list of courses, you’ll choose among many wide-ranging topics, allowing you to shape your education to your interests.

Launch yourself into the swirl of Barnard’s intellectual life through First-Year Seminar and First-Year Writing—two seminars that will help you polish your abilities to read critically, write convincingly, and speak eloquently.

THE MAJOR Deepen your studies of a particular field, starting with introductory courses, moving on to more specialized material, and then progressing to advanced-level seminars where independent research is emphasized. Pursue a capstone project or thesis of your own design, synthesizing theories and ideas while exploring your own original arguments.

Ethics and Value Explore the development of human values, reason, and thought, and ways they guide actions in the context of human rights, cultural diversity, and global equity. Social Analysis Investigate central concepts of the social sciences, critically examining social structure and the impact of individual and group behavior via qualitative and quantitative methods. Historical Studies See how historical interpretations are shaped by theories and methods of data analysis. Learn how concepts of history shape our understanding of both past and present. Cultures In Comparison Study the commonality of human experience, examining personal cultural assumptions, ideologies, and values through comparative methods. Language Develop ample proficiency to communicate with cultural fluency and work effectively in an increasingly global and multilingual society.

Laboratory Science Master the tools of science and pique your curiosity about the natural world, analyzing new information and increasing both scientific literacy and problemsolving ability. Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning Develop logical and conceptual ways of thinking, and improve your ability to use quantitative and deductive reasoning to analyze problems. Literature Acquire skills needed for an informed reading of literary texts from various times, places, and traditions, understanding the theoretical and cultural contexts by which readers interpret meaning. The Visual and Performing Arts Examine the creative process and forms of artistic expression as well as the use of art to enrich the world and human condition in a complex social and historical context.

Beyond the Ways of Knowing and major requirements, choose electives that complement your major courses, go deeper in a particular subject, or expose you to a completely new field. Pursue a specific area in depth and declare a minor or fulfill pre-med requirements even if you’re not a science major. Electives mean choice, and the focus is yours. * Curricular requirements will change in Fall 2016.

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ELECTIVES

Africana Studies American Studies Ancient Studies Anthropology Architecture Art History/Visual Arts Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures Astronomy Biochemistry Biological Sciences Chemistry Comparative Literature Computer Science Dance Economic History Economics Economics and Mathematics Education English Environmental Biology Environmental Policy Environmental Science European Studies Film Studies French German Greek (Classics) History Human Rights Studies Italian Jewish Studies Latin (Classics) Mathematics Medieval and Renaissance Studies Music Neuroscience and Behavior Philosophy Physics Political Science Psychology Religion Russian (Slavic) Sociology Spanish and Latin American Cultures Statistics Theatre Urban Studies Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION

Browse through courses in the online course catalog at www.barnard.edu/catalog.

Barnard offers bachelor’s degrees in nearly 50 fields. Students can also minor, double major, design their own majors, or pursue special degree programs in cooperation with Columbia University, Juilliard, The Jewish Theological Seminary, the Manhattan School of Music, and others.


FIRST YEAR

ANNA BENNETT ’06

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: The Interpretation of Culture, Secret Societies in Fiction, Aqua Exercise, Fundamentals of Western Music, The Opera WHERE I LIVED: Sulzberger Hall

HOMETOWN:

West Hartford, Connecticut MAJOR: Music EMPLOYER: New York City Department of Education

WHEN I VISITED BARNARD FOR ACCEPTED STUDENTS WEEKEND, I WAS SURROUNDED BY SMART WOMEN WHO CARED DEEPLY ABOUT THE WORLD AND THE PEOPLE AROUND THEM. I KNEW THAT IN BARNARD’S TIGHT-KNIT COMMUNITY, MY VOICE WOULD BE HEARD AND THAT THERE WOULD BE MANY POWERFUL VOICES TO GUIDE ME.

I really liked my First-Year Seminar, Secret Societies in Fiction, with CLAUDINE FRANK. I read so many books that I never would have chosen to pick up on my own, and they really pushed me to think and question.

My favorite spot was the restaurant Deluxe. I always knew people there from a class or an extracurricular or something. It made the Barnard community seem so cozy.

The activity that was dearest to my heart was the Columbia Urban Experience preorientation program for first-year students interested in community service.

JUNIOR YEAR

SOPHOMORE YEAR

I majored in music because I loved my music classes of my first and second years. I was focusing on flute, but I was also really interested in how music plays a role in societies around the world. My music professors were so passionate, and this passion grew inside of me, too.

I took an Introduction to Anthropology course with PAIGE WEST. She taught me how to be an observer of the world around me. She taught me the importance of sometimes stepping back and removing oneself from a situation in order to understand it and sometimes immersing yourself fully. This fine balance applies to so many situations in life.

I formed the Barnard Flute Choir because I wanted to give students a way to come together to enjoy music without pressure. We met weekly, rehearsed a lot, and performed at the end of each semester.

SENIOR YEAR

WHERE I LIVED: 600 West 116th Street

PROFESSOR PATRICIA STOKES, WHO TAUGHT MY INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY CLASS, HELPED ME DECIDE TO BE A TEACHER SO THAT I COULD PROVIDE MY KIDS WITH AN UNDERSTANDING OF WHO THEY ARE WHILE PROVIDING A STABLE ENVIRONMENT FOR THEM IN THE CLASSROOM.

WHERE I LIVED: Brooks Hall

PAIGE WEST, associate professor of anthropology, studies the connections between environmental conservation and international development. For more than a decade, she’s focused her research on Papua New Guinea, where she has studied how sustainable development projects affect people’s lives, ways of thinking, and how they relate to their surroundings.

EVERY TIME I LEFT BARNARD’S GATES, I WAS SURROUNDED BY CULTURE, BY DIVERSITY, BY BEAUTY, BY POVERTY, BY ARCHITECTURE, BY TONS OF PEOPLE . . . ALL OF THE THINGS THAT ARE “REAL” IN OUR WORLD.

I was a big fan of Butler Library. There was this room on the third floor with little book nooks up on a balcony. I loved it and went through many highlighters at those tables.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: History of Western Music, Making of the American Landscape, Introduction to Piano, Evaluation of Evidence

In my spring semester, I interned at Jazz at Lincoln Center, helping to organize a program that brought 350 high school band musicians to New York to compete against one another. For me, it was a way to explore music in a different way that wasn’t just ear training from a book.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Groups and Symmetry, Ear Training, Popular Music in Brazil, Carmen and Her Sisters, Jazz, Women and Health

I often had two or three different activities a night and loved every minute of it.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Women and Music, Keyboard Harmony/Musicianship, American Urban Politics, Judaism WHERE I LIVED: 620 West 116th Street

I will always cherish my senior year suite. I lived in 620 with four other women, and the memories I have from that year are priceless. These women helped me to become a better learner, a better friend, a better person.

BARNARD TAUGHT ME TO HAVE INDEPENDENCE, CONFIDENCE, AND TO ALWAYS STAND UP FOR WHAT I BELIEVE IN. I HOPE THAT I CAN PASS THESE VALUES ON TO MY STUDENTS AS BARNARD DID FOR ME. I was a tour guide and then a senior interviewer for the Admissions Office. I loved sharing with others what was so special to me about Barnard and helping to find students who would strengthen our student body even more.

For my senior thesis, I did a flute performance. It was a very moving experience. Looking out to see my Barnard professors sitting next to my family members and friends just proved to me how supportive the Barnard community is.

TODAY I teach second grade in an East Harlem public school.


Ireland

1 “OF ALL THE PLACES IN THE WORLD, PARIS IS MY CITY.

I’M CURRENTLY INTERVIEWING FOR JOBS IN FRANCE, AND MY STUDY ABROAD EXPERIENCE DEFINITELY GAVE ME THE CONFIDENCE TO DO SO.”

Scotland Poland

England

Austria

South Korea China

Japan 4

Tibet

Hungary

1 France

Taiwan

3 Spain

Cuba

Nicaragua

Morocco

Dominican Republic Egypt

Italy

Mali Nepal

Greece

Panama

Vietnam

India

Israel

Costa Rica

Jamaica

Learn more about Barnard’s global focus at www.barnard.edu/ global/reach.

Switzerland

Netherlands

Belize

Russia

Czech Republic

KIANA JANNESARI, PSYCHOLOGY AND FRENCH DOUBLE MAJOR

Mexico

Denmark Germany

Bangladesh

Turkey

Niger Indonesia

Senegal British West Indies

Ecuador

Thailand

Ghana

Madagascar

Cameroon Bolivia

Brazil

Australia

Uganda

Singapore

Kenya

Chile

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Tanzania

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3

2 Namibia Botswana

This map shows some of the countries where Barnard students have the opportunity to study, live, and work.

South Africa

PASSPORTS TO NEW UNDERSTANDING Sometimes your perspective changes completely when you stand in a different place. That’s what happens when Barnard students live and learn in other countries. They have many reasons to use their passports: They study abroad through programs in more than 50 countries. They conduct research, either their own original work or with established institutions. They share their findings at international conferences. They take on internships. They volunteer. These international experiences transport students literally and figuratively to new and sometimes very different places in life, often transforming their outlook on the world as they see the beauty, joy, and challenge of other countries.

ON SAFARI IN TANZANIA Photo by CHELSEA WHITTAKER, Africana studies major

SPIRALING THROUGH HISTORY IN SPAIN Photo by AMELIA LINN, psychology major

NEW YEAR’S BREAKFAST IN JAPAN Photo by ROBIN BRODER, urban studies and environmental science double major

“In the middle of my time in Tanzania, I went on a safari to Ngorongoro Crater and Tarangire National Park. It was amazing—we saw giraffes, hippos, zebras, elephants, lions, and cheetahs. Other highlights of my six months there include teaching English to local woodcarvers; frequenting the markets, fabric stalls, and tailors; traveling around East Africa; and improving my Kiswahili.”

“This is a triple spiral staircase inside a 14th-century convent that is now a Galician history museum in Santiago de Compostela. While I was studying in Madrid, I was able to take amazing courses that really incorporated the culture and history of Spain. What hit me the most from my time abroad was the magnitude of history intertwined with so many aspects of modern Spanish life.”

“On New Year’s morning in Kyoto, we came down to breakfast to find a lacquered box set for each person. After drinking the traditional sweet sake, we opened our boxes to reveal layer after layer of delicious (and unfamiliar) food. It was one of the most phenomenal meals of my time in Japan.”


GODDESS CENTRAL A building that’s hailed as a model of sustainable design occupies a stretch of Broadway on Barnard’s campus. With features that put it on the leading edge of environmentally responsible architecture, the seven-level, 70,000-square-foot Diana Center, opened in January of 2010, provides comfortable spaces for studying, performing, learning, eating, and sharing ideas. Its name is a nod to both a generous alumna and the powerful women who frequent this intellectual, social, and cultural heart of campus.

LEARN

Reflecting the way Barnard students learn and work together, The Diana Center includes not only classrooms, but also smaller rooms for group study or instruction, a reading room, seminar/conference rooms, and the largest computer lab on Barnard’s campus.

GATHER

The Diana Center offers spaces for students and faculty members to come together and share ideas and conversation in the dining room and Liz’s Café, social spaces, meeting rooms for student organizations, and a 500-seat event space.

CREATE

The building’s 100-seat black box performance theater allows for a great number of students to take part in Barnard’s theatre program, and it provides rehearsal space to the more than 1,000 members of Columbia University’s Performing Arts League. The Diana Center also features art studios, architecture studios, a digital design studio, and an art gallery.

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MORE HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE BARNARD AND COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CAMPUSES

SUSTAIN

A model of sustainable, green architecture and designed to meet the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Silver requirements, The Diana Center is constructed with recycled building materials and heated and cooled with efficient systems. It’s topped with a green roof, with plantings that help control storm water run-off, increase green space on campus, and expand the research that happens in Barnard’s biological sciences department.

ACADEMIC

SCIENTIFIC

ATHLETIC

CREATIVE

STUDENT LIFE

Students can use resources at 30+ libraries and collections with more than 11.9 million volumes on both campuses. The Columbia University library system, with more 246 miles of books and other items, is one of the top five academic libraries in the nation. In addition, Barnard’s Center for Research on Women and its recently launched Athena Center for Leadership Studies are devoted to studying ideas at the forefront of women’s leadership.

Barnard’s campus offers the 3,400square-foot Arthur Ross Greenhouse complex with specimens of more than 45 plant families, along with sophisticated biology, chemistry, neuroscience, and physics labs. Students have opportunities for research and fieldwork at the Black Rock Forest Preserve, a 4,000-acre wilderness in the Hudson Highlands, and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, New York.

Available to NCAA Division I athletes, weekend warriors, healthy competitors, and everyone in between, facilities include gyms, pools, squash/handball courts, fitness centers, and indoor running tracks. Students also have access to Baker Field, a 26-acre sports complex at the northern tip of Manhattan that includes the 17,000-seat Wien Stadium, an eight-lane all-weather track, and practice fields, as well as seven tennis courts, a soccer stadium, a softball field, and the state-of-the-art Campbell Sports Center, completed in 2014.

Students express themselves creatively in many ways and many places. They dance in studios on and off campus. They put on dramatic productions at Barnard’s Minor Latham Playhouse, The Diana Center’s black box theatre and special events space, and Columbia’s Miller Theatre. They get musical in 24-hour practice rooms and the Computer Music Center at Columbia. Students also pursue and appreciate the visual arts and architecture in studios and galleries on and off campus.

First-year students live in traditional-style residence halls clustered around Barnard’s Quad. Upperclass students live in suites and apartments, where lounges and common areas host study breaks and late-night debates. Lehman Lawn is a gathering spot for friends, classes, and events, from Springfest to the Greek Games to the occasional barbecue. And students have access to the many offerings on the Columbia campus as well: there are no invisible boundaries separating the two undergraduate populations when it comes to socializing and sharing experiences.


FIRST YEAR

ALLISON HADERS ’01

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Human Rights and Cultural Diversity, Language and Literature, Biological Diversity WHERE I LIVED: Sulzberger Hall

HOMETOWN:

MAJOR: Biological Sciences EMPLOYER: Trinitas Regional Medical Center, New Jersey

I worked at the College Activities Office from first year through my junior year, and for the Columbia Marconi Society my senior year.

JUNIOR YEAR

During my first year, I volunteered for America Reads, working with elementary school students in the local public schools to improve basic reading skills.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Neurobiology, Cells and Tissues, General Physics, Sociology of Youth, Women and Health WHERE I LIVED: Elliott (as a resident assistant)

In my junior and senior years, I was on the Executive Board of Columbia Community Outreach, which organized the entire University in one massive day of community service projects around NYC.

I MET SOME OF MY BEST FRIENDS TO THIS DAY AT BARNARD.

I loved running, rollerblading, and playing tennis and soccer in Riverbank State Park, just north of campus.

My deans gave me, and continue to give me, an amazing amount of support. Dean of the College DOROTHY DENBURG, my sophomore class dean VIVIAN TAYLOR, and dean of health professions advising ANI BOURNOUTIAN always had their doors open, and were so nurturing and caring to me. They helped me get through the adjustments and rigors of college life.

SENIOR YEAR

A proud Barnard graduate, DOROTHY DENBURG ’70 knows how the College can change lives. As Dean of the College for 17 years, her goal was to make sure students got the most out of their Barnard years. She supervised student services including counseling and health services, advising, career development, and student life. But what she always enjoyed the most, she says, was “meeting and getting to know Barnard students.”

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Black Women in America, Animal Physiology, Ethics and Medicine, African-American Religion WHERE I LIVED: 600 West 116th Street (as a resident assistant)

My senior project was the compilation of my research at Mount Sinai, a lengthy paper entitled “Disparities in Health and Socioeconomic Status.”

I played on a co-ed Barnard-Columbia club soccer team called Arsenal. We won the league championship!

I interned with the New York City Environmental Justice Alliance, examining the relationship between environmental pollutants, health, and poverty in the city. The product of this research was a manuscript, “Urban Pollutants and Health: Educating Community Leaders.”

TODAY After finishing a residency at Beth Israel Medical Center, where I was chief resident, I am now an emergency department attending physician at Trinitas Regional Medical Center.

I was president and founding member of the Network of Pre-Medical Students of Color.

SENIOR YEAR WAS DEFINITELY MY FAVORITE YEAR. I HAD AMAZING FRIENDS AND HAD BEEN PARTICIPATING IN ACTIVITIES, SPORTS, AND ORGANIZATIONS FOR FOUR YEARS. I WAS ACCEPTED TO MEDICAL SCHOOL AND WAS EXCITED TO START THE REST OF MY LIFE!

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Through the National Science Foundation, I had an internship working with the NYC Department of Health. My research was focused on the idea of creating a recreational beach in lower Manhattan. I did a bacteriologic analysis of the lower Hudson River.

FOR AN INTERNSHIP AT MOUNT SINAI SCHOOL OF MEDICINE IN THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, I LOOKED AT THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS AND THE DEVELOPING BRAIN. THIS RESEARCH LED TO MY FIRST MANUSCRIPT PUBLICATION AS A SOPHOMORE.

LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION

I was a four-year member of the Barnard Student Government Association and the Black Organization of Soul Sisters (BOSS) of Barnard and Columbia.

BARNARD

WHERE I LIVED: Brooks Hall

My favorite spots to eat near campus were Amir’s Falafel and Tom’s Diner.

WHY BARNARD? IT WAS A SMALL COLLEGE WITH AN EXCELLENT REPUTATION, AFFILIATED WITH A LARGE RESEARCH UNIVERSITY. THE LOCATION IS IN NYC—THE GREATEST CITY IN THE WORLD! AND I ATTENDED AN ALL-GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL AND KNEW THE VALUE OF ALL-WOMEN’S INSTITUTIONS. The entire city is your campus! Fantastic restaurants, museums, parks, shopping. Anything you want to do is within a short walk or subway ride.

SOME CLASSES I TOOK: Social Movements, Epidemiology, External Research in Biology, Beginning Yoga, Organic Chemistry, Evolution

I was a member of the College Democrats all four years, working to register voters in the community. I got to meet with thenPresident Clinton.

Yonkers, New York

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SOPHOMORE YEAR


2,500+

INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

THIS WORLDCLASS CITY IS AN EDUCATION IN ITSELF. AS CLASSROOM, WORKPLACE, INTERNATIONAL CROSSROADS, AND PLAYGROUND, NEW YORK CITY IS A VITAL PART OF THE BARNARD EXPERIENCE.

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BARNARD

Cabs hailed right outside Barnard’s gate take students all over the city for internships and visits to museums, art galleries, and theatres.


LIFE ON BROADWAY ON A WEEKDAY AFTERNOON* Home to seven major institutions of higher education, including Barnard, Morningside Heights has been dubbed the city’s “academic acropolis.” With dozens of studentfriendly restaurants, markets, coffee shops, and stores, as well as nearly 300 acres of parkland, the neighborhood offers a welcoming, small-town feel in the midst of the city.

Going to Dodge Fitness Center at Columbia for a Barnard African Dance class. About to hop on the subway for a quick get-away to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), where she knows the exact way to her favorite Jackson Pollock action paintings and Andy Warhol prints. (And with her Barnard ID, she’ll get in for free.)

On his way to an architecture studio class, offered only at Barnard; it’s one of five programs Barnard directs for the entire undergraduate population of the University.

Carrying balloons to a party for the third graders she tutors at an after-school program a few blocks away.

Taking her coffee to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, where she’ll sit on one of the stone benches in the garden and catch up with a friend. Dreaming of a cherry tart from the Hungarian Pastry Shop as she makes her way to the chem research lab in Altschul Hall.

Fresh from her McAC meeting to plan Spirit Day and about to catch a cab to get to her internship at CNN.

Making plans to explore the funky shops and galleries of SoHo with friends this weekend.

Heading to The Diana Center for a slice of brick-oven pizza and a visit to the SGA offices.

*

THIS IS JUST A REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLING OF WHAT STUDENTS DO BEYOND THE GATES OF BARNARD.

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On her way to take a break from her political science studies with a piano lesson at the Manhattan School of Music, one block from campus.

NEW YORK CITY

Can’t wait to tell her roommate about the pair of front-row Broadway tickets she just won through Barnard’s Student Life Office.

Returning from Korean class and walking two blocks to the 330-acre Riverside Park for her weekly dose of green.


LEARNING LIKE THIS? ONLY IN NEW YORK CITY New York City serves as a living, breathing, ever-changing resource for classes on everything from art history to political science. In top museums, you can view artworks and artifacts that others travel the world to glimpse. On stages from Broadway to Chelsea, you can study the techniques of the most famous and most avant-garde performers. At this crossroads of power and influence, you can hear the voices of leaders and experts in a variety of fields. In neighborhoods from Washington Heights to Chinatown, you can meet people from more than 180 countries. With these kinds of opportunities, learning becomes more meaningful, more authentic—and altogether unforgettable. Here, students share a few of their experiences:

135th Street/Lenox Avenue

42nd Street

“For my Religion and Civil Rights class, I went to an Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem to hear a famous pastor speak and learn about the role of religion in the civil rights movement.”

“For a Religion and Media Anthropology seminar, we explored different religious institutions in New York. The final result was astounding in the variety of cultures and religions that exist right at our doorstep. Just a subway ride away from campus at Murray Hill, I interviewed a priest at the Opus Dei Headquarters about the portrayal of the Catholic sect in the film and novel The Da Vinci Code.”

116th Street “For an English class, Home to Harlem, our professor took us to explore the areas of Harlem we were reading about, seeing the buildings and the speakeasies where the Harlem Renaissance movement was born.”

Bedford Avenue

23rd Street “I had an assignment in which we pretended to curate an art exhibit for my Women and Art course. We came up with a topic and chose the works of art to include in our exhibit—which meant going to countless museums and galleries. Then we wrote the exhibition catalogue and designed the exhibition space.”

“As a first-year, I saw 10 different professional dance performances— ranging from the American Ballet Theatre at Lincoln Center to avant-garde, experimental pieces in Williamsburg as a part of the Dance in New York City course.”

14th Street/Union Square “In my upper-level architecture studio class, we got on the subway with our professors and went to Union Square. We spent a couple of hours there, documenting the surroundings. Then we figured out what it would take to build a community center where the McDonald’s was.”

Lower East Side/ 2nd Avenue “When I studied Arabic, we visited traditional Middle East restaurants and ordered our food in Arabic.”

“After reading On the Road in my American Literature class, I went to the main branch of the New York Public Library and got to see the original manuscript of the text on display. It’s one long scroll of typewriter paper—super cool.”

86th Street “In my Introduction to Archaeology class, we had to research a New York archeological artifact and give a presentation and write a paper on it. I chose to give mine about Cypriot votives in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.”

FINDING YOUR WAY IN THE CITY

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BARNARD

81st Street/Museum of Natural History “My First-Year Seminar was Exploring the Poles, a polar literature/global warming class. We read the memoirs, diaries, and biographies of the explorers who first traveled to the poles. Then we went behind the scenes at the Museum of Natural History and got to see and touch some of the artifacts those explorers had found and brought back.”

66th Street/ Lincoln Center “My First-Year Writing class went to an opera that tied in nicely with the Italian literature we were reading.”

With the endless opportunities that Barnard, Columbia, and New York City offer, it’s hard to know just where to start. That’s why Barnard offers an intensive weeklong orientation for incoming students that covers everything from academic strategies to tips on taking the subway. About 300 current students serve as guides for your first days on campus. Orientation activities continue throughout the first semester, with optional community service projects and outings throughout the city. Check out the real New York City subway map at www.mta.info/nyct/ maps/submap.htm.


▼ ERINN SMART ’01 won a silver medal in fencing at the 2008 Olympics.

NCAA DIVISION I ATHLETICS Through the Columbia/Barnard Athletic Consortium (CBAC), established in 1983 to coincide with the admission of women to Columbia College, Barnard scholar-athletes compete (alongside Columbia undergraduates) in the NCAA Division I and the Ivy League on 16 teams led by some of the nation’s best coaches. Founded with the strength of an already-established women’s athletic program at its core, the CBAC provides the finest competitive opportunities and facilities available. Barnard College is extremely proud of the contributions its athletes have made as Columbia Lions and Barnard Bears.

ATHLETIC FACILITIES Students use facilities on both the Barnard and Columbia campuses, including Dodge and Levien gyms, along with outdoor facilities at Baker Field, a 26-acre complex at the northern tip of Manhattan. Highlights include three multi-sport gyms, two indoor pools, the newest boathouse in the Ivy League, a soccer stadium, a softball field, and a field hockey venue. ■ Dodge Fitness Center has an indoor running track, a 25-yard pool, a Scandinavian sauna, a tri-level fitness center with the latest cardiovascular and strength training equipment, 5,000 square feet of hardwood floor exercise space, and personal trainers. ■ The tennis center offers cushioned hard courts, lighting ranked among the, best in the world, and a state-ofthe-art air dome.

■ The 17,000-seat Wien Stadium—home to the lacrosse and track and field teams—includes a 400-meter all-weather eight-lane track. ■ The Campbell Sports Center provides 48,000 square feet of program space for varsity athletes—including coaches offices, meeting spaces, a multimedia classroom, a strength and conditioning area, a student-athlete lounge and study center, and a hospitality pavilion.

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WOMEN’S VARSITY INTERCOLLEGIATE TEAMS

CLUB AND INTRAMURAL SPORTS

ARCHERY

Barnard students compete in 30 club sports including sailing, water polo, equestrian, hiking, skiing, triathlon, capoeira, Muay Thai boxing, and rock climbing. The intramural sports program offers even more ways to test your physical limits—or to just have fun.

BASKETBALL CREW CROSS-COUNTRY DIVING FENCING FIELD HOCKEY GOLF SOCCER SOFTBALL SQUASH SWIMMING TENNIS INDOOR AND OUTDOOR TRACK AND FIELD VOLLEYBALL

Check on the latest athletic news at gocolumbialions.com.

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Barnard athletes regularly earn honors, including All-Ivy League, Academic All-Ivy League, AllRegion, All-American, National Academic Team, Ivy League Player of the Year, and more. They’ve gone on to compete in world championships and the Olympics.

NEW YORK CITY

BARNARD

LACROSSE


BOREDOM? NOT AN OPTION

Come to be persuaded, to be entertained, and to meet promising young voices as they debate the topics in two categories: persuasive advocacy speech and impromptu speech.

On campus, across the street at Columbia, and throughout the city, there’s always something interesting going on. The biggest challenge? Choosing what to do. Each month, Barnard alone offers dozens of ways to inspire you, make you laugh, express yourself, inform you, satisfy your comfort food cravings, or make you think. Many of the events are organized by students themselves, and some have grown into campuswide traditions that the whole college looks forward to each year.

Soccer

Here’s what the calendar looked like last October: On the STEM Trail

Karaoke Wednesdays After-School Tutoring

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, Barnard students head to Middle School 165 to tutor eighth graders in science and math.

Give your vocal chords a midday stretch with an hour of karaoke. Every singer gets a free frappuccino.

OCTOBER

Jersey Boys Get discounted tickets to the Broadway hit Jersey Boys (and other Broadway shows, movies, concerts, comedy clubs, and sporting events) by stopping by Student Life’s New York City ticket booth.

SARALYN MARK ’83, BONNIE FLEMING ’93, and TIFFANY MILLS ’03 participated in a panel discussing the keys to success for women in science: receiving encouragement from a young age, gaining confidence to overcome gender bias, and being mentored in high school, college, and beyond.

Film Screening and Lecture

Alumnae Art Opening Faust 2.0 This adaptation inquires into the gender dynamics of Goethe’s original play.

Conference Women interested in pursuing graduate education in science or engineering learn about the application process, funding opportunities, and possible career paths. This is a day to celebrate, promote, and encourage women to pursue graduate degrees in science and engineering.

Stages of Inquiry: Falling Down a Funnel

In conjunction with the theatre department’s production of Faust 2.0, Obie awardwinning scenographer and founding member of The Wooster Group JIM CLAYBURGH discussed his work in stage design.

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Black Feminist Futures and the Practice of Fugivity

Barnard celebrated the College’s 125th anniversary. Festivities included student performances, faculty panel discussions, and much dancing with Millie the Bear.

Deportation Policy Lecture

Alumni Authors Reading

RAFAEL ALARCÓN delivered a lecture that analyzed whether deported Mexican migrants had committed serious crimes other than having undocumented status.

Authors STEPHANIE FELDMAN ’05 (The Angel of Losses), MICHAL LEMBERGER ’94 (After Abel and Other Stories), and JENNY MILCHMAN ’92 (Ruin Falls and Cover of Snow) read from their newest work.

Fall Fest

Dancers and dance-makers gathered to discuss the current dance scene in Belgium, Brazil, China, Cuba, Germany, Israel, the Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden. Afterward, the Dana Ruttenberg Dance Group performed in Barnard Hall.

Barnard Family Weekend Families of students are welcome to visit, sit in on classes, explore campus, attend student performances and lectures, and more.

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Founder’s Day

Focusing on archival photographs of black communities in diaspora, TINA CAMPT explored the daily practices of black subjects whose struggles are often overlooked in an emphasis on collective and individual acts of resistance.

The WISE

Lucid Gestures: An Exhibition of Barnard Alumnae Artists opened. The exhibition was curated by two Barnard alumnae.

An outdoor celebration with music, cider, donuts, and caramel apples.

“Justice in the Home” Conference

Many campus events are organized by the 80 student organizations at Barnard and several hundred more at Columbia. For the latest list, go to www.barnard.edu/ studentlife/clubs/ organizations.

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This conference assessed research on domestic work, domestic workers, and domestic-worker organizing, and proposed next steps for this historic interchange.

Arts in the Cuban Diaspora The event integrated diasporic artistic expressions with an exhibition of Arturo Rodriguez’s drawings “The School of the Night,” related poetry by JOSÉ KOZER, BRUCE WEBER, and LAURA TARTAKOFF, a visual presentation by ALEJANDRO ANREUS, and Afro-Cuban jazz by pianist DAVID VIRELLES.

NEW YORK CITY

Barnard athletes competed in an alumane fencing match at Columbia.

Watch the women’s soccer team take on Princeton at the Rocco B. Commisso Soccer Stadium.

Barnard College joined other schools in the Columbia University community for a special online event—24 hours of linking in, giving back, and winning challenge funds for Barnard.

MIRIAM NEPTUNE discussed the experience of screening her award-winning documentary, Birthright Crisis, which focused on Dominicans of Haitian descent.

Dance!

En Garde!

Giving Day 2014

Cicero Speech Contest


MAKING A COMMUNITY IMPACT With dozens of ways to give back through volunteering, Barnard students encounter a range of issues and challenges—poverty, immigration, the environment, conflict resolution, education, job training, access to the arts, and more. As they speak out for justice, beautify the city, and work with the young, the old, and the disadvantaged, they improve lives and learn how their actions make an impact on the world—and themselves.

“The EcoRep programs have been gratifying, whether we’re painting a mural of an urban jungle scene or holding a harvest dinner with locally grown food in the dining hall. My most memorable, though, was Park(ing) Day. We took over parking spaces along Broadway for the day. We started at 5 a.m. to lay turf right outside the Barnard gates. We spread out blankets, had student bands play music, we blew bubbles, gave out food, and tried to get people to rethink our use of public space. It allowed total strangers to bond and learn—and that’s what the environmental movement is all about, what Barnard is all about, and why I am an EcoRep.” ILANA KRAKOWSKI, SOPHOMORE Barnard students can join a range of service programs. They can take part in intensive weeklong programs through the alternative break program. They can live with like-minded students through the SOCIAL JUSTICE HOUSE, one of Barnard’s special-interest housing options. They can also connect with some of the city’s 30,000 nonprofits, from New York City Audubon to Artists Striving to End Poverty. A few of the ways students have been making a difference:

Learning firsthand about the effect of pollution and littering on the health of the Hudson River, ILANA KRAKOWSKI and ADITI SHUKLA make a difference in a service project organized by Barnard’s First-Year Reach Out. The program introduces new students to service projects throughout the city during Orientation week. The Hudson River project was managed by Ilana, a sophomore and an EcoRep who works closely with first-year students on environmental issues.

During the city’s annual HOMELESS OUTREACH POPULATION ESTIMATE (HOPE

count), students join some 2,500 volunteers during the wee hours of the morning to count the homeless population throughout the city.

For details on Community Impact, the umbrella group for ongoing service programs open to Barnard and Columbia students, go to communityimpactatcu.org/.

Last summer, a team of six Barnard and Columbia students went to Tanzania for a month with the Columbia chapter of STUDENTS OF THE WORLD, which funds documentary films in developing countries. While in the East African nation, they created two short documentary films.

AFTER-HOURS TUTORING volunteers offer

homework help to children at Regent House, a family shelter. Barnard students serve as peer counselors and peer advocates at the BARNARDCOLUMBIA RAPE CRISIS/ANTI-VIOLENCE SUPPORT CENTER.

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During the Columbia Dance Marathon, students stay on their feet for 18 hours to raise funds for the ELIZABETH GLASER PEDIATRIC AIDS FOUNDATION.

Combining mentoring, education, and fun, students involved with PROJECT HEALTH help children with diseases ranging from asthma to diabetes to HIV. The programs are supervised by staff at Harlem Hospital.

NEW YORK CITY

BIG SIBLINGS make a two-year commitment to serve as mentors and friends to urban youth, spending three to five hours a week with their little brother or sister.

Each week, trained student volunteers head to public schools to teach conflict resolution to elementary and middle school students through PEACE BY PEACE.


LIVING AT BARNARD Barnard students have lived in nearly every state and more than 40 countries. They’ve graduated from every type of secondary school. They’ve been scientific researchers, high school newspaper editors, Olympic-caliber athletes, published poets, performers and artists, and volunteers. At Barnard, where more than 90 percent of students live on campus, they come together to create a vibrant, ever-changing, diverse community where lively conversations lead to enduring friendships.

“The people I live with at Barnard have become my second family. We are inseparable. Each person is so different and has her own extraordinary life goals, but it is incredible to share these four years together.”

“I live in a suite with five girls in the 600 building on West 116th Street. We all have different goals and pursuits. We’ll sit around bouncing ideas off each other for paper topics. We’ll have discussions on just about anything. It’s inspiring to be with women who are so motivated to succeed, and I’ve found my dearest friends here.”

“Even though everyone has her own background, personality, likes, dislikes, and style, for the first time in my life, I’ve found people similar to who I am. We can be who we are without compromising on personal goals or values.”

“One of the luckiest (and most frustrating) parts of being a Barnard student is that there is never time to fit in everything that sounds like fun. Between your friends, campus events, and all the options of one of the most impressive cities in the world, it’s hard to be bored.”

“When I walk on campus, I recognize people by face. There’s such a warm and inviting atmosphere. It’s a really welcoming community. People find their fit here.”

“I’m not on a meal plan. I’m in a suite with a kitchen. I like to cook, and I like to have dinner parties.”

“Being that we’re a small school, it’s really easy to get involved with clubs and extracurriculars. Word of mouth gets things around so quickly that I usually feel like I know what’s going on around campus each day.”

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“Barnard women are incredibly passionate people, and I have learned so much about life and about what I am interested in from my peers. Whether we’re together in small classes or just standing in line at Hewitt or hanging out in my suite, I’m always learning.”

NEW YORK CITY

BARNARD

“On Wednesday night, my friends and I decided to let off some steam by having an impromptu dance party in our suite. We turned on the Christmas lights and blasted loud music and danced without thinking about our exams the next week. The brilliant, wonderful women at Barnard know how to be serious students without taking themselves too seriously.”


A BAD DAY IN MORNINGSIDE HEIGHTS

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Monica’s day was starting out all wrong. She had overslept. Her computer was frozen. Her phone was on the fritz. It was going to be one of those days. And now her friend Misha had insisted they meet at the Hungarian Pastry Shop to talk about something important later that day. And no one, not a single friend, not even her sister, had remembered that today was her birthday.

Feeling half a notch higher on the happiness scale, she lumbered on, down past Community Food and Juice where, she remembered, she would be meeting friends for brunch on Sunday before heading down to see a new exhibit at the Met. Maybe they would celebrate her birthday then.

“Hey Monica!” This time it was Ronkisha, jogging across the street to join her. “Whew, am I ever late,” Ronkisha said, then immediately shut her mouth and turned a shade of pink. “I mean, I just got out of my saxophone lesson (at Manhattan School of Music), and I need some coffee!”

Monica trudged out of Barnard’s gates and headed for the pastry shop on Amsterdam. Julie behind the counter always had a big smile for her and that usually cheered her up. But Monica knew she wouldn’t be cheered up today. She forged on, only vaguely aware of walking by Ollie’s Noodles, her favorite quick lunch spot, as she brushed past the myriad of students crossing Broadway at 116th. She didn’t even bother stopping to get a whiff of the chocolate truffles at Mondel’s or to see the new window display.

They walked a few more steps before running into Josh and Eric coming out of Morningside Bookshop. “I got the latest novel by that obscure Bulgarian philosopher,” said Eric, holding up a bag. Monica nodded without smiling. She had met Eric through Community Impact last spring, and they had immediately clicked. Coincidentally, the guys were heading to the pastry shop, too.

“Hey Monica!” Her head snapped up. There was Joan, the flower lady at the outdoor Broadway farmer’s market, where she occasionally went to get a few stems for her room. Monica forced a half-hearted smile. Joan waved her over; reluctantly, she went. “You look like you need this,” Joan said, handing her a beautiful longstemmed rose. This time, Monica’s smile came a little more easily.

“Surprise!” There was laughter and shouts as about 20 of Monica’s close friends-and wait, there was her sister, too!-burst into applause. Misha stood by holding a plate with a huge slice of strawberry cake, Monica’s favorite, loaded with birthday candles. She was looking quite proud of herself for having kept the secret, and she smiled widely. This time, Monica couldn’t stop smiling back.

This story was illustrated by Barnard senior Emma Rotenberg, an art history and visual arts double major. Her work here is part of her senior project and will be on display at the senior exhibition show. After graduation, Emma heads to China for a one-year graduate-level program in Chinese and American studies at the Johns Hopkins-Nanjing Center.

Finally, they arrived at the Hungarian Pastry Shop, a fixture in the neighborhood for more than 35 years. Monica had come to love the place, with its sidewalk tables and original artwork. As she walked in the door, she thought it looked mighty crowded, though its dim lighting obscured the view.


2,500+ INTERNSHIPS From Fortune 500 companies to Broadway theaters, from medical centers to renowned museums, Barnard students gain experience through internships all over the city (and the world). More than two-thirds of students take on at least one internship during their time here.

RENI CALISTER worked with the marketing team at the French Culinary Institute in the heart of SoHo. The following year, she was selected as a Goldman Sachs Global Leader, one of 150 students from 100 universities in more than 20 countries.

ELESSE EDDY, a double major in music and architecture, interned at the Argento New Music Project, a nonprofit that produces concerts, music festivals, recordings, and more.

ELENA MAYER spent her Fridays doing non-partisan voter registration work at a nonprofit, where she worked with a film production company making infomercials, interviewing celebrities, and doing website work.

CARLA MICHEL’S internship with the sales and marketing division of New York fashion designer Heidi Weisel had her working all over the city. The economics and classics double major was also a sales intern for the online men’s publication Thrillist.

SARANYA PURUSHOTHAMAN, a neuroscience major with a minor in art history, has been conducting research on adult cardiac stem cells at Mount Sinai School of Medicine since her first year. She contributed to an article published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and traveled to Australia to present her work to investigators from around the world.

EVA PESKIN was an intern for the director of marketing and publicity at Joe’s Pub, a music venue of The Public Theater. She periodically acted as a stage manager for the concerts. One of her perks was free tickets to all the shows. She still stage-manages shows from time to time.

Barnard’s Office of Career Development helps students find intriguing internship possibilities related to career or personal interests. Some internships inspire a change in major; others lead to full-time positions. A few examples: American Museum of Natural History Bronx Zoo CNN The Daily Show with Jon Stewart DKNY Elle

New York City Office of the Mayor New York Times New York Yankees Offices of various U.S. senators and congresspeople Random House

Human Rights Watch

Sony/BMG Records

Legal Aid Society

Sotheby’s

Lincoln Center

Tiffany & Co.

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Tribeca Film Festival

Metropolitan Museum of Art Microsoft, Inc.

United Nations Wildlife Conservation Society

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New York City Ballet

NEW YORK CITY

BARNARD

Environmental Protection Agency

MTV Networks


“MY FAVORITE SPOT IN THE CITY . . .” From tiny coffee shops to famous museums, every student discovers her top places to go in New York City. “The Frick Museum is easily my favorite museum on earth. They have a beautiful atrium and two of my favorite paintings (the portraits of Sir Thomas More and Thomas Cromwell by Hans Holbein).”

Apollo Theatre

Bronx

Harlem Morningside Heights Che Bella Riverside Park St. John the Divine Cathedral

American Museum of Natural History

East Harlem

Central Park

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Upper West Side

Upper East Side

JEN THUM, SENIOR Frick Museum

“One of my favorite places is Che Bella, a small pizza eatery on 120th and Amsterdam. It is inexpensive and the food tastes amazing. And the falafel is surprisingly good.”

Lincoln Center

Carnegie Hall

Midtown

CARLA MICHEL, JUNIOR

“My favorite place in Morningside Heights (aside from campus) is probably Riverside Park. As much as I love being in the city, the best thing about Morningside Heights is that it has areas that can make you forget that you’re in a big city.” MICHELLE PELCOVITZ, SENIOR

“In a single day, I can go to the Metropolitan Museum of Art for free, head down to Chinatown to eat $1 dumplings and buy $3 pashmina scarves, and go see a few up-and-coming bands play at a loft party in Brooklyn. All of this while staying within a five-mile radius of school.” KATIE SALMON, SOPHOMORE

“I love the garden by St. John the Divine Cathedral, with the incredible statues and stone benches. Where else can you find peacocks in a major urban area? When it’s warm, I’ll grab a cup of coffee from Starbucks or the Hungarian Pastry Shop with a friend and we’ll sit in the garden and chat about life.”

Rockefeller Center

Theatre District Times Square

Garment District

Madison Square Garden

Union Square

Chelsea Whitney Museum

Greenwich Village

East Village

West Village

Strand Bookstore

SoHo

TriBeCa

Little Italy

ILANA ARJE, JUNIOR

Lower East Side

Bowery Ballroom

Chinatown

ELENA MAYER, JUNIOR

“I love theatre. I’ve gone to a lot of shows, both on and off Broadway. As Barnard students, we can see Broadway shows at hugely discounted rates. We even get discounted movie tickets.”

39 Broadway theatres. 14 miles of beaches. 8.2+ million residents. 96 museums. 840+ miles of subway track. 429 art galleries. 594,000 college students. 109 off-Broadway theatres. 1,700+ parks and playgrounds. 110 institutions of higher learning. 40+ Fortune 500 companies. 14 major dance venues. 3 airports. 18,700+ restaurants. 50 skyscrapers. 13,087 taxis. 303 square miles. 4,578 buses. 333 bookstores. 10 professional sports teams. 150 music venues. 70 newspapers/magazines.

Battery Park See what’s happening in the city this week. Go to www.timeout.com/newyork.

Grimaldi’s

Brooklyn


OF BARNARD’S FULL-TIME FACULTY ARE WOMEN— COMPARED TO 38% NATIONALLY.

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THE SUCCESS OF UNDERGRADUATE WOMEN COMES FIRST AT THIS COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. HERE, STUDENTS LIVE AMID A POWERFUL CAMARADERIE AND LEARN FROM AN ABUNDANCE OF ROLE MODELS AND MENTORS.

Graduates of women’s colleges are twice as likely as women at co-ed institutions to go to medical school and to earn doctoral degrees.


question:

What about a social life?

With several institutions of higher education in the neighborhood, including Columbia University across the street, Barnard students have the opportunity to meet many people both on and off campus. The New Student Orientation Program is for both Barnard and Columbia undergraduates, so even in your very first week here, you’ll meet quite a few men and women from Columbia. Throughout your time at Barnard, you can take classes at Columbia (and Columbia students can take classes at Barnard). You can join—and lead—student organizations and service programs on both sides of Broadway. You can eat in Columbia’s dining halls and attend University events—and Columbia students can do the same at Barnard. Plus there’s all of New York City, where you can meet interesting people through internships, volunteer projects, parties, concerts, and more.

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I HAVE LOTS OF CHOICES.

Q IS THERE EVIDENCE THAT A WOMEN’S COLLEGE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE? Yes. Here’s what the research shows: Compared to students at co-ed colleges, students at women’s colleges participate more (in and out of class). They report higher levels of academic challenge and more interaction with their professors. They have more opportunities for leadership and access to female mentors and role models. Their campus environments are more likely to encourage diverse interactions and promote a multifaceted understanding of diversity. And they develop higher degrees of self-understanding and selfconfidence. For more details on this research, go to www.womenscolleges. org and click on “Women’s Education.”

SURROUNDED BY SUCCESSFUL WOMEN At Barnard, faculty members serve as mentors and role models. Your fellow students, who come to campus with a wide range of talents and perspectives, challenge you to reach new levels of growth. And Barnard alumnae, who lead in so many endeavors, frequently return to campus to share their insights and to offer career advice, internship connections, and job leads. With this kind of environment, it’s not surprising that so many of our graduates go on to make an impact on the world. Graduates of women’s colleges constitute only about 2 percent of all female college graduates. But they make up nearly 20 percent of women in Congress and 30 percent of a Business Week list of rising women stars in corporate America.

WHY WOULD I CONSIDER A WOMEN’S COLLEGE?

Perhaps you’ve surprised yourself by including a women’s college on your list of possibilities. Many of our students start out the same way. They find that Barnard offers everything they’re looking for—a small liberal arts experience with the resources of a major research university, all in New York City. The fact that Barnard is a college for women may not be the deciding factor when you enroll but an unexpected benefit. Once you’re at Barnard, you’ll see what it’s like to live and learn in a place where everything on campus—from classes to career services to the dining hall—is shaped by the interests and needs of women. Professors, advisers, and deans are fully committed to the success of undergraduate women. You’ll experience being part of a powerful sisterhood with students who provide encouragement, support, and lasting friendship, and alumnae who offer guidance. At Barnard, you’ll find a safe place to express yourself, to discover who you are and who you want to become, and to grow in confidence.

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Barnard’s enviable student/faculty ratio offers science majors a rare opportunity to participate in research with outstanding leaders of the scientific community. Barnard’s faculty members are front and center in pursuing groundbreaking scientific research, employing cutting-edge technology and resources, and revolutionizing methods of teaching and learning. Through the Summer Research Institute (SRI), Barnard students have opportunities to gain funded hands-on research experience in labs on campus and around New York City. And it turns out that students at women’s colleges are more likely to study math or science. They graduate in math and sciences at 1.5 times the rate of women at co-ed institutions. Why? Perhaps because here they find an environment where their interests and abilities are encouraged—no matter what interests them.

COLLEGE FOR WOMEN

BARNARD

Q

I’M INTERESTED IN SCIENCE. WOULDN’T I BE BETTER OFF GOING TO A LARGE RESEARCH INSTITUTION?


MELIKA EDQUIST, JUNIOR, URBAN STUDIES

MIRI CYPERS ’08, POSTDOCTORAL STUDENT IN POLICY AND ADVOCACY AT THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

ANNA QUINDLEN ’74, WRITING IN HER NEWSWEEK COLUMN

“WOMEN ARE HALF THE POPULATION AND, ON AVERAGE, ONLY 20 PERCENT OF THE NATION’S LEADERS IN BUSINESS, IN JOURNALISM, IN POLITICS.”

SHU-WEN WANG ’04, PH.D. STUDENT, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, UCLA

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“TO ME, A BARNARD WOMAN IS SOMEONE WHO IS STRONG, INTELLIGENT AND DRIVEN, AND SOCIALLY ACTIVE AND COMPELLED TO CONTRIBUTE TO SOCIETY. MOST IMPORTANTLY, A BARNARD WOMAN IS SOMEONE WHO DEFINES HER LIFE FOR HERSELF.”

REBECCA TUCHMAN, JUNIOR, AMERICAN STUDIES/ MIDRASH (AT THE JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY)

“I AM MORE WILLING TO TAKE RISKS, TRY NEW THINGS, AND LEARN FOR LEARNING’S SAKE. THAT IS WHAT MAKES ME A BARNARD WOMAN.”

“CONFIDENCE, PASSION, EMPATHY, INTELLIGENCE: THESE ARE THINGS I IDENTIFY IN EACH OF THE BARNARD WOMEN I HAVE BEEN PRIVILEGED TO KNOW. THE CHALLENGES WE HAVE FACED IN OUR CURRICULUM AND COMMUNITY MAKE IT POSSIBLE FOR US TO SEIZE OUR UNIQUE PLACES IN THE WORLD WITH CONFIDENCE IN OURSELVES AS WOMEN, AS INTELLECTUALS, AS AGENTS OF CHANGE.”

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At Barnard, students learn—in theory, in practice, and from the role models around them—what it means to be a leader. Students discover their own approaches to leadership through the Athena Center for Leadership Studies, a program open to all majors, which offers classes, events, and workshops—as well as internships to Athena Fellows. Providing additional resources is the Barnard Center for Research on Women, which hosts lectures, panel discussions, and conferences exploring a range of feminist and social justice issues.

LEARNING LEADERSHIP

AMREEN VORA, SENIOR, WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES

“THIS IS A CONVERSATION WE HAVE ALL THE TIME IN OUR ROOMS OR OVER COFFEE. IT MEANS YOU’RE GIVEN THE TOOLS TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE OPPORTUNITIES BARNARD GIVES YOU AND THOSE THAT EMERGE LATER IN LIFE.”

Barnard students are wide ranging in their interests and passions, but they also share in a distinctive experience that creates an enduring bond: they live and learn in an environment where women always come first, where they’re surrounded by other smart and inspiring women, where they have access to opportunities such as the Athena Center for Leadership Studies and the Barnard Center for Research on Women (see below). Their paths may diverge once they graduate, but despite time and geography, they are always united by the fact that they are Barnard women. Here, five students and alumnae offer their take on what it means to be a Barnard woman.

THE BARNARD WOMAN: FIVE PERSPECTIVES “A BARNARD WOMAN IS STRONG, INDEPENDENT, AND WILLING TO TAKE A STAND. SHE IS IMMERSED IN HER EDUCATION BUT ALSO CARES ABOUT THE WORLD AROUND HER. SHE HAS A NETWORK OF FIERCE AND COMPASSIONATE FELLOW BARNARD WOMEN WHO ARE ALWAYS WILLING TO LEND SUPPORT AND IDEAS.”


BIG NAMES ON CAMPUS Situated at the global crossroads that is New York City, Barnard draws headline makers, Pulitzer and Nobel Prize-winners, renowned scholars, distinguished scientists, film directors, human rights activists, and more. Their visits to campus add another dimension to the Barnard experience. Through lectures, readings, and workshops, these leaders offer provocative new ways of seeing the world, share experiences from their own lives, and spark conversations that touch every corner of campus. A sampling of recent visitors:

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President of the United States BARACK

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BARNARD

OBAMA gave the commencement speech

to Barnard’s class of 2012. 2 OPRAH WINFREY led a discussion with Barnard students and GLORIA STEINEM, feminist, author, and activist. 3 Professor of political science MOJUBAOLU OLUFUNKE OKOME examines women’s strategies of empowerment, both spiritual and material, in the Aládurà church in the Nigerian homeland and its immigrant communities in the United States. 4 Actress LAUREN GRAHAM ’88, known for her roles on Gilmore Girls and Parenthood, welcomed Barnard’s first-year class at the New Student Orientation Program in 2014. 5 2014-2015 Distiguished Guest Artist and iconic choreographer TWYLA

THARPE ’63 delivered a lecture exploring

the creative habit and work’s relation to art and life. 6 Nobel Peace Laureate and Barnard Distinguished Fellow in Social Justice LEYMAH GBOWEE led a symposium on African women’s rights and resilience. 7 Activist, researcher, and former managing director of the World Bank MAMPHELA REMPHELE spoke during Barnard’s Global Symposium 2015. 8 ELIE WIESEL, writer, Nobel laureate, and human rights leader, delivered a lecture on the power of memory and desire for resolution. 9 Author and historian LESLIE MOCH explored the migratory patterns of young Breton women. 10 Author HISHAM AIDI examined American efforts to integrate Muslims

in Europe. 11 SHERYL SANDBERG, Facebook COO, best-selling author, and one of Time’s 100 most influential people in the world, spoke at Barnard’s commencement in 2011. 12 World-renowned Delhi-based trio RAQS MEDIA COLLECTIVE discussed their art and the ideas that inspire them as part of the Barnard International Artists Series. 13 Celebrated playwright, essayist, and actor WALLACE SHAWN examined some of the intriguing issues of our day, including social injustice, the nature of capitalism, the role of privilege, and the purpose of art. 14 Award-winning filmmaker MIRIAM NEPTUNE led a discussion after a screening of her documentary Birthright Crisis. 15 Data scientist HILARY MASON discussed data as a technical superpower.


SHARING THE BARNARD SPIRIT CAMPUS TRADITIONS The campus comes alive throughout the year during annual events that involve the whole community, including: Big Sub Students build—and then devour—a submarine sandwich that stretches more than 700 feet across campus. Midnight Breakfast (below left) Barnard president Debora Spar, deans, administrators, and trustees serve piles of pancakes to about a thousand students a few hours before final exams begin. Fall Festival The campus gets into the autumnal spirit with hot cider and caramel apples, and enjoys the musical stylings of WBAR, Barnard’s independent, free-form, studentrun radio station. Acappellooza A spring tradition featuring a cappella groups such as Bacchantae, the Clefhangers, the Metrotones, and Notes and Keys. Spirit Week Barnard students stock up on free Barnard goodies, buy “I Love BC” T-shirts, and enjoy a campuswide barbecue and live music. As part of the festivities, classes break out the togas and take part in the Greek Games competition—a tradition that dates back to 1903. (below right: freshman dance, 1925; photo credit: White Studio/Barnard College Archives)

COLLEGE FOR WOMEN

“MY JOB IS TO ENSURE THAT THE WOMEN WHO COME TO BARNARD RECEIVE ALL THE ADVANTAGES OF CHOICE; THAT THEY LEAVE HERE EVEN STRONGER AND MORE BEAUTIFUL THAN THEY WERE BEFORE, READY TO TACKLE THE WORLD AND CHANGE THE WORLD AND CHOOSE EXCELLENCE IN ALL THEY DO.” DEBORA SPAR, BARNARD COLLEGE PRESIDENT

Barnard’s most enduring tradition is the fact that it celebrates women leaders—and it’s been led by women since its founding in 1889. Barnard’s seventh president, DEBORA SPAR, came to Barnard from Harvard Business School, where she was a professor and senior associate dean, director of research. Some of President Spar’s priorities include expanding Barnard’s presence beyond the United States (with a focus on women in developing nations) and creating more opportunities to explore the theory and practice of women’s leadership. To address these priorities, President Spar hosts the annual Barnard College Global Symposium in major cities around the world, including Beijing, Dubai, Johannesburg, Mumbai, São Paulo, and Shanghai. The symposium brings together some of each country’s most prominent women leaders in business, finance, academia, media, and the arts, and features panel discussions and conversations on women’s leadership, agency, and voices, as well as lunch and networking opportunities. The 2015 symposium was held in New York City (on Barnard’s campus).

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ALUMNAE IN TRADITIONALLY UNDERREPRESENTED FIELDS

ALUMNAE IN MEDIA & ARTS BARNARD ALUMNAE MAKE THEIR MARK Barnard’s alumnae excel in virtually every field. They start and lead corporations, make important scientific discoveries, write critically acclaimed novels, develop national policy, and more. Each year, hundreds of alumnae return to campus as guest speakers, provide internships in their workplaces, and act as informal job referral sources. The results of a Barnard education The Barnard experience gives students the confidence and ability to pursue— and achieve—their goals. Our graduates’ success can be attributed to

exceptional potential and individualized preparation. Specialized advisers in the Dean of Studies Office help students and alumnae navigate fields of interest and plan for careers in health, law, and

REGINA DECICCO ’00 comedy writer

OTHER NOTABLES

Regina Decicco never believed her classmates when they voted her “class clown” in high school. It turns out they were right. After earning her bachelor’s in English, she went on to intern—and then work—at Saturday Night Live. She was executive assistant to the producers of the Whoopi Goldberg sitcom on NBC before returning to SNL for two more seasons. “For me, Barnard afforded my creativity the opportunity to function on its own for the first time, and that gave me the confidence to look inward and really discover what I wanted to do,” she says.

ANGEL CHANG ’00,

DANA POINTS ’88,

fashion designer; founder, the Angel Chang Collection

editor-in-chief, Parents magazine

MARIA HINOJOSA ’84 senior correspondent, NOW on PBS; host, Latino USA A leader in bringing Latino voices to mainstream media, Maria Hinojosa created a Latino radio show as a student at Barnard. After graduation, she began work at National Public Radio. Later, she was urban affairs correspondent for CNN for eight years. She’s also written two books. Her coverage has won her several awards, and she’s been named three times to the list of 100 most influential Latinos in the United States by Hispanic Business magazine.

MARTHA NELSON ’76 former editor-in-chief, Time Inc.

“ART IS THE ONLY WAY TO RUN AWAY WITHOUT LEAVING HOME.” TWYLA THARP ’63, AWARD-WINNING CHOREOGRAPHER

business. The Office of Career Development guides students throughout their search for a career, from developing the fundamentals to researching fields of interest. Within six months of graduation, approximately a quarter of a recent class was studying full time in graduate or professional schools, many of them at the country’s top institutions. Barnard graduates have a tradition of earning Ph.D.’s at a rate that ranked the College third in the nation.

Martha Nelson, who was named one of the World’s Most Powerful Women three years in a row by Forbes magazine, is the former editor-in-chief of Time Inc. The company publishes 130 magazines, including Time, Sports Illustrated, Fortune, and People. She was only the seventh editor-in-chief in the company’s 90-year history and the first woman to hold the post.

ATOOSA RUBENSTEIN ’93 founder, CosmoGirl; former editor-in-chief, Seventeen Atoosa Rubenstein found her first magazine internship through Barnard’s Office of Career Development. After graduating, she began working at Cosmopolitan, moving up to senior fashion editor. She was only 26 when the president of Hearst Magazines asked her to develop a prototype for a new teen magazine. Within 48 hours, she presented the idea for CosmoGirl—and was immediately named editor. “That never would have happened without that leg up from Barnard,” she notes. She later was named editor-in-chief at Seventeen. She’s now founder and president of the multimedia venture Big Momma Productions.

The L Word® © 2000 Showtime Networks Inc. All rights reserved.

GRETA GERWIG ’06, actress and

writer; nominated for 2014 Golden Globe for her role in Francis Ha, which she also wrote LAUREN GRAHAM ’88, actress on the

TV show Gilmore Girls and now stars in Parenthood

ONDINE KARADY ’91, interior designer;

finalist on Bravo’s Top Design DONATELLA LORCH ’83, award-winning

foreign correspondent for the New York Times, NBC News, and Newsweek SHEILA NEVINS ’60, president of

Documentary and Family Programming, HBO and Cinemax; creator of more than 800 documentaries; winner of dozens of Oscars, Prime Time Emmys, and other awards CYNTHIA NIXON ’88, actress most

notable for her role as Miranda Hobbes in Sex and the City; Emmy, Tony, and two-time Screen Actors Guild Award winner CHELSEA PERETTI ’00, comedian and

writer for the TV show Parks and Recreation; currently stars in Brooklyn Nine-Nine

CHRISTY ROMANO ’06, actress and

singer best known for her roles on the TV shows Even Stevens and Kim Possible SUSAN LEVITT STAMBERG ’59,

special correspondent, National Public Radio; first woman to anchor a national nightly news broadcast in the United States CYNDI STIVERS ’78, editor-in-chief

of aol.com; former editor-in-chief of Columbia Journalism Review; founding editor-inchief of Time Out New York ZUZANNA SZADKOWSKI ’01,

actress who played Dorota on Gossip Girl JEANINE TESORI ’83, composer of

musical scores, nominated for three Tony Awards TWYLA THARP ’63,

choreographer, dancer; winner of Tony and Emmy awards, the National Medal of the Arts, the MacArthur “genius” grant, and Kennedy Center honors SUZANNE VEGA ’81, singer-

songwriter, Grammy Award winner


ALUMNAE IN LAW, GOVERNMENT & PUBLIC SERVICE

OTHER NOTABLES HON. SHEILA ABDUS-SALAAM ’74, first black

woman appointed judge on the New York Court of Appeals ENOLA AIRD ’76,

founder and director of the Motherhood Project, Institute for American Values JOYA BANERJEE ’04, co-founder of

the Global Youth Coalition on HIV/ AIDS, a youthled international network of over 5,000 young people addressing HIV/AIDS in 150 countries FATIMA BHUTTO ’04, social activist,

writer, and niece of Benazir Bhutto, the stateswoman who served as the 11th prime minister of Pakistan

A political science major, Umbreen Bhatti set her sights on becoming a lawyer midway through her time at Barnard. After Barnard, she spent two years abroad— one in Pakistan and one in Syria—to explore her fascination with Islamic law. In the end, she decided to pursue U.S. law, and graduated from the University of Michigan Law School in 2005. After a stint at a major law firm in Washington, D.C., she joined the ACLU of Delaware as staff attorney. “I love the law. I love learning about it, practicing it, and making it more accessible and less intimidating to people,” she says.

GEORGANNE CHAPIN ’74,

president and chief executive officer, Hudson Health Plan ABBY CYNAMON ’81, juvenile court

judge, MiamiDade County JESSICA FINN COVEN ’02,

Washington State Director of Climate Solutions

SHARON LEE CROMER ’80 mission director to Tanzania, USAID It was Barnard’s political science department that sparked Sharon Lee Cromer’s interest in international affairs. Her interest then flared into a passion after she spent a summer helping build an orphanage in Liberia. Soon after earning her law degree, she began working with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). In her 17 years with the agency, she’s spent 15 of them overseas, taking posts in Pakistan, the Ivory Coast, Senegal, and Indonesia. She worked in Ghana, trying to help the country serve as a democratic and economic model in the West African region. In 2013, she was sworn in as the mission director to Tanzania.

“YOU NEVER QUESTION A WOMAN HOLDING A POSITION OF LEADERSHIP HERE. YOU LEARN ‘THIS IS HOW IT IS.’ THERE’S A NORMALCY GIVEN TO A WOMAN BEING SUCCESSFUL.” ELVITA DOMINIQUE ’03, SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER, STRATEGY AND EXCELLENCE, CHILDREN’S AID SOCIETY LILLIAN FORSYTH ’06, associate

director of operations, Success Academy Charter Schools ELLEN V. FUTTER ’71, president,

American Museum of Natural History; former president, Barnard College ROSALIND MARSHACK GORDON ’62,

deputy general counsel of human resources and ethics, Novitex Enterprise Solutions

JUDITH KAYE ’58,

chief judge, New York State Court of Appeals (retired) JUNKO KIM ’01,

alumni manager, U.S.-Japan Council; founder, Vision Sprout IDRIS LEPPLA ’08,

Fulbright scholar in France who studied drug addiction and treatment MARINA METALIOS ’85, director of

special projects, Urban Homesteading Assistance Board

BETH CARRERA NAPLETON ’00,

founder/executive director, Chicago Collegiate Charter School ROSALYN RICHTER ’76, justice, appellate

division, New York State Supreme Court; LGBT and disabilities rights advocate NINA SHAW ’76,

founding partner, Del Shaw Moonves Tanaka Finkelstein & Lezcano, an entertainment law

firm whose clients have included Laurence Fishburne, Jamie Foxx, and James Earl Jones JESSICA STERN ’85, policy consultant

on terrorism; lecturer, Harvard University; fellow, Harvard School of Public Health; serves on Hoover Institution Task Force on National Security and Law; Fulbright scholar

DANA HEPPER ’01 national policy development director, Stand for Children As a Barnard student pursuing her teaching certification, Dana Hepper experienced both ends of the educational spectrum: she went from tutoring fifth-graders in a low-income school in Harlem to student teaching at a wealthy charter school on the Upper West Side. The contrast made an impact. After teaching and earning a master’s degree, she decided she wanted to do more to counteract the economic disparity in education. She joined Stand for Children, which promotes grassroots activism to help children. Recently, she helped secure an additional $260 million in funding for public schools.

61

60

After graduating from Barnard, Lauren Belive moved to Washington, D.C., determined to work on Capitol Hill. An alumna connection helped her land a position with the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. From there she headed to Chicago, managing research projects in 17 states for the Obama campaign. After the election, she joined the transition team and ended up right where she wanted to be: working at the White House. “Politics is still a male-heavy profession,” she says. “But because of my Barnard education, I’ve never experienced limits to opportunities.”

UMBREEN BHATTI ’00 civil rights attorney

executive in residence, New Orleans Startup Fund/PowerMovesNOLA; MossavarRahmani Senior Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School Center for Business and Government

COLLEGE FOR WOMEN

BARNARD

LAUREN BELIVE ’06 policy director, House Committee on Rules

BINTA NIAMBI BROWN ’95,


ALUMNAE WRITERS MARISHA PESSL ’00 author

“NOWHERE ELSE IN THE WORLD CAN STUDENTS GET THE KIND OF ATTENTION THAT’S MOST HELPFUL TO THEM WITHOUT FORGETTING THEY’RE PART OF A LARGER WORLD.” MARY GORDON ’71, BEST-SELLING WRITER, NEW YORK STATE AUTHOR, MILLICENT C. MCINTOSH PROFESSOR IN ENGLISH AND WRITING AT BARNARD

While Marisha Pessl majored in English literature at Barnard, she never took a fiction-writing course. But Barnard still shaped the kind of writer she became. Her debut novel, Special Topics in Calamity Physics, published in 2006, became a New York Times best-seller. “Barnard fostered in me a great sense of independence and encouraged selfexpression,” she says. “There was a sense that each student had a voice worth listening to.” Marisha also wrote Night Film, another New York Times best-seller.

EDWIDGE DANTICAT ’90 author At 26, Edwidge Danticat was the youngest writer ever nominated for the National Book Award for Krik? Krak!, and in 2009 she won the MacArthur “genius” award. Not bad for someone who learned English at age 12. At Barnard, she wrote an essay about her life that evolved into her master’s thesis at Brown University and later the novel Breath, Eyes, Memory—an Oprah’s Book Club pick. The Washington Post called her “an enormously talented writer.” The New York Times called her writing “breathtaking.” Her 2008 book, Brother, I’m Dying, won the National Book Critics Circle Award.

LILY KOPPEL ’03 author At Barnard, Lily Koppel wrote endlessly—papers, short stories, a novel; she wrote in journals, in notebook margins, on her laptop. It was during this time that she “became a writer.” And without Barnard, she says, she never would have written The Red Leather Diary: Reclaiming a Life Through the Pages of a Lost Journal (published by Harper in 2008), which prompted coverage everywhere from Publishers Weekly to Elle to the New York Times Sunday Book Review. The incoming class of 2012 read The Red Leather Diary over the summer, and Ms. Koppel spoke to them at orientation.

KATHERINE BOO ’88 staff writer, the New Yorker Katherine Boo offers a compelling look inside the lives of those on the margins of society—women in an Oklahoma housing project, the mentally disabled, the working poor. In 2000, she won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for a series in the Washington Post. Two years later, she was awarded a MacArthur “genius” grant. She was also a New America Foundation senior fellow, exploring issues facing the working poor. Katherine’s book, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity, won the National Book Award for Nonfiction.

NATALIE ANGIER ’78,

Pulitzer-prize winning science columnist for the New York Times, author of New York Times bestseller and National Book Award finalist Woman: An Intimate Geography, and author of Natural Obsessions, The Beauty of the Beastly, and The Canon.

OTHER NOTABLES

ERICA JONG ’63,

best-selling novelist (including the groundbreaking novel Fear of Flying) and poet; winner of the United Nations Award for Excellence in Literature

REBECCA GOLDSTEIN ’72,

JHUMPA LAHIRI ’89, Pulitzer-Prize

author, philosopher, biographer; winner of MacArthur “genius” grant

winning author whose first novel, The Namesake, was adapted into a film

AMY RICHARDS ’92, feminist activist,

author of Opting In: Having a Child Without Losing Yourself and other books

CRISTINA GARCÍA ’79, novelist whose

NTOZAKE SHANGE ’70, Obie

first novel, Dreaming in Cuban, was a National Book Award finalist

Award-winning playwright, poet, novelist

FRANCINE DU PLESSIX GRAY ’52,

ZORA NEALE HURSTON ’28,

Pulitzer Prizenominated writer, literary critic, and National Book Critics Circle Award winner for Them: A Memoir of Parents

folklorist and author during the Harlem Renaissance, best known for Their Eyes Were Watching God

MARY GORDON ’71,

best-selling writer, New York state author, Millicent C. McIntosh Professor in English and Writing at Barnard

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE ’26,

ANN BRASHARES ’89, best-selling author

prolific writer on gardening, horticulture, and landscape architecture

of the five-book series The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants

ANNA QUINDLEN ’74,

former Newsweek columnist, Pulitzer Prize winner, author of seven best-selling novels, three of which were made into movies


ALUMNAE IN SCIENCE, BUSINESS & FINANCE

“BARNARD TAUGHT ME THAT I CAN HAVE IT ALL. DURING THE DAY I WORK IN FINANCE, BUT OUTSIDE OF WORK I’M AN ENTREPRENEUR, I MENTOR YOUNG GIRLS, I KNIT, I BOX, AND I VOLUNTEER FOR CAUSES THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO ME.”

OTHER NOTABLES

MARYAM BANIKARIM ’89, global chief marketing officer, Hyatt Hotels Corporation

JACQUELINE BARTON ’74, Arthur and Marian Hanisch Memorial Professor of Chemistry and Chair of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology; MacArthur Fellows Program “genius” grant winner

SHEENA GORDON ’05, RESEARCH ANALYST AT ROOSEVELT & CROSS, INC.; CO-FOUNDER, THE SMALL BUSINESS COLLECTIVE BERYL BENACERRAF ’71, clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology, Harvard Medical

School; the first to use a genetic sonogram to identify the chromosomal abnormalities of Down syndrome

GRADUATING SENIORS WHO HAVE ACCEPTED A JOB TOP 10 EMPLOYMENT SECTORS: Health or medicine 18% Financial services 18% Education 13% Nonprofit agency or NGO 12% Law 9% Communications, media, arts 7% Government 4%

DR. CAROL BERKOWITZ ’65, executive vice chair in the Department of Pediatrics and division chief of the

MARY EGAN ’89 founder of Gathered Table; previously senior vice president, Global Corporate Strategy, Starbucks After she graduated from Barnard with a degree in urban studies and political science, Mary Egan earned a master’s in early adolescence down the street at the Bank Street Graduate School of Education. She was a math teacher at a public junior high school in Harlem and worked in education policy and children’s advocacy. She then changed focus, receiving an M.B.A. from Columbia Business School, and moved on to The Boston Consulting Group in New York full time in 1997. There, she’s developed a specialization in retail and consumer goods, and her expertise gets her quoted in national media such as Newsweek and the New York Times.

Business 2%

BINTA NIAMBI BROWN ’95, lawyer and partner at Kirkland & Ellis featured in Fortune’s annual “40 Under 40” list; one of the country’s top African American fund-raisers

MAIDA CHICON ’73, former director of multicultural marketing,

Time Warner Cable

CATHRYN DEVONS ’82, assistant clinical professor, Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; senior health and internal medicine doctor, Phelps Memorial Hospital Center

JULIE YIN DJEU ’67, senior member, Immunology Department, Moffitt Cancer Center

Consulting 3% Sales or marketing 3%

Division of General and Emergency Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center; former president, American Academy of Pediatrics; internationally known expert in child abuse, neglect, and failure to thrive

DIANE E. PATAKI ’93 plant ecologist; faculty member, University of Utah For her senior thesis at Barnard, environmental science major Diane Pataki investigated the role of the terrestrial biosphere in the global carbon cycle. Her work earned her the national James Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union in 2008, a prestigious award given to outstanding young scientists in the geological sciences. Diane is an associate professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Utah. Previously, she was the founding director of the Center for Environmental Biology and the Steele/Burnand Anza-Borrego Desert Research Center at the University of California, Irvine.

GRACIELA GARCIA-MOLINER ’51, former chief, Department of Pathology,

Oncologic Hospital, Ponce, Puerto Rico

ALEXANDRA GUARNASCHELLI ’91, executive chef, Butter Restaurant in Manhattan; featured on her shows Alex’s Day Off and The Cooking Loft on the Food Network

CINDY KAN ’00, technology specialist, Intellectual Property Department, WilmerHale; former assistant professor of chemistry, Amherst College SAMANTHA UNGER KATZ ’01, IEO, Actual Markets LLC; director of community engagement, New York Distilling Company; founder, Ladies of American Distilleries; former managing director, BGC Environmental Brokerage Services; former director of California Emissions Markets, Evolution Markets

DR. DIANA PUÑALES-MOREJÓN ’83 psychologist, New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center Professionally, Diana Puñales-Morejón’s turning point came when she returned to Barnard’s Office of Career Development after graduation, looking for a way to combine her biology background and a desire to help people. She was a genetic counselor for 15 years before shifting gears to psychology. Today, she’s a psychologist at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. “I truly believe that I would not be the woman that I am today if not for the challenges, nurturing, and support that I received at Barnard as a woman and as a person of color,” she says.

SONYA KIM ’98, CEO and president of Theodore Presser Company (music publisher);

concert pianist

LIZ NEUMARK ’77, founder and CEO, Great Performances, a catering firm; proprietor of Katchkie Farm

HELEN M. RANNEY ’41, first woman to lead a U.S. university department of medicine; first woman to serve as president of the Association of American Physicians

FREYA SCHNABEL ’78, director of breast surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center; professor of surgery, NYU School of Medicine

BARNARD 64

STACIE URBACH ’93, inventor; co-founder and president of Smart Heel

ANNABELLE SANTOS VOLGMAN ’80, associate professor of medicine and medical director, Rush

University Medical Center Heart Center for Women

65

Andrea Lane Stein grew up hearing about girl empowerment. At Barnard, she lived it. “I was surrounded by so many smart, intelligent, and capable women that it raised my standards for what was possible,” she says. After earning an M.B.A. and working for other companies, she launched her own venture in 2007. Through her website, GirlMogul.com, she has sold such items as T-shirts with the line “Future leader of the free world,” books, and GirlPower kits on science and entrepreneurship. “I want GirlMogul to encourage girls to learn how to be confident and bold and to go after something,” she says.

MARTHA STEWART ’63, founder of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia; best-selling author; Emmy Award-winning television show host

COLLEGE FOR WOMEN

ANDREA LANE STEIN ’97 author; founder, GirlMogul.com


INDEX academic programs, 10–11, 16–19, 68

housing, 8–9, 14–15, 20–21, 25–27, 68

academic resources, 2, 10–11, 24–25, 50

humanities, 6–7, 10–11, 16–19

admissions, 66–68

international students, 66–67

interdisciplinary studies, 11, 18–19

advisers, 12–13, 27, 50 alumnae, cover, 8–9, 14–15, 20–21, 26–27, 50–51, 58–65 arts, 10–11, 18–21, 25, 58–59 Athena Center for Leadership Studies, 52–53 athletics, 2, 25, 34–35, 69 campus, 2–3, 24–27 career development, 45, 50–51 Columbia University, 2, 10–11, 15, 19, 24–25, 34–37, 39, 50 community service, 38–39

internships, 6, 10–12, 28, 44–45 leadership, 52–53, 57 liberal arts, 4–7, 12–13, 16–19 libraries, 2, 24, 68 majors, 18–19, 68 maps, 22–23, 32–33, 47 Morningside Heights, 42–43, 46, 68 New York City, 2, 8–11, 14–15, 20–21, 26–33, 36–39 Nine Ways of Knowing, 18 orientation, 33, 38, 50

VISITING BARNARD

APPLYING TO BARNARD

Investigate Barnard for yourself. Come to campus and take a tour, sit in on a class, grab a snack at Liz’s Place, and meet faculty members, coaches, and students.

What kind of student does Barnard look for? After carefully reviewing each application, the Committee on Admissions strives to select young women who are academically strong and show potential for further intellectual growth. While admission is highly selective, we consider each applicant in terms of her individual qualities of mind and spirit.

TOURS AND INFORMATION SESSIONS Guided hour-long tours are available yearround, Monday through Friday, at 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Tours depart from the Visitor Center in Sulzberger Annex. Information sessions follow the tours in Milbank Hall at 11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Tours and information sessions are also available on select weekends during the fall and spring. Appointments are not necessary, but check our website or call for the latest schedule before planning your visit. VISITING CLASSES

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

Check the list of classes open to visitors at www.barnard.edu/admiss or at the Admissions Office (available two weeks into the semester). No advance appointment is necessary, but do stop by the Admissions Office at least 15 minutes before the class is scheduled to begin so we can help you locate it.

• The Barnard Application consists of two parts: the Common Application and the Barnard Writing Supplement. You may submit both online at www.commonapp.org.

ADMISSION INTERVIEWS Barnard offers the option to interview— recommended but not required for first-year applicants—with current seniors, staff members, or alumnae. Interviews are available Monday through Friday from June through mid-December and on select weekend days in the fall. Make your reservation at least three weeks in advance using our online scheduler. Live outside the New York area? Ask about an interview with an alumna in your area.

curriculum, 17–19

research, 4–6, 12–13, 24–25, 50, 52–53

dance, 8–11, 14–15, 19

residential life, 40–41, 68

Diana Center, The, 24–25

sciences, 4–5, 12–13, 18–19

dining, 9, 20, 42–43, 46

seminars, 16–18

DIRECTIONS TO CAMPUS

Spar, Debora, 56–57

For directions to campus and information on parking and accommodations, visit www.barnard.edu/visitors.

diversity, 50, 67 double majors, 19, 68 employment, 58–65 enrollment, 67–68 faculty, 4–13, 15, 21, 27, 48, 50–51 financial aid, 67 first-years, 8, 14, 16–17, 20, 25–26

student life, 24–25, 30–31, 34–43, 50–51, 56 study abroad, 22–23

Barnard’s College Board code is 2038; the ACT code is 2718.

For more details on visiting campus, go to admissions.barnard.edu/ plan-your-visit.

• Application fee of $65 or fee waiver form.

websites, 17–18, 24, 33, 35, 37, 39, 47, 50, 66–68

graduate school, 49, 59, 68

women’s college, 48–53

EARLY DECISION

Admit rate ................................23% Matriculants ..............................619

• For first-year applicants: Two academic teacher recommendations from the 11th or 12th grade and one guidance counselor recommendation. For transfer applicants: recommendations from one college faculty member and one academic adviser or dean, and mid-term reports from each class in progress. • SAT Reasoning Test and two SAT Subject Tests of your choice or the ACT with writing. Applicants whose primary language is not English and who have studied in English for less than five years must also take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Transfers are not required to submit Subject Tests.

Barnard represents an investment, not only in your future, but also in your intellectual growth and personal transformation. We are committed to making a Barnard education affordable to all students, regardless of financial circumstances. We are need-blind in our first-year domestic admission process and award financial aid based on demonstrated need. We are need-aware in our review of applications from transfers and international citizens. We meet each admitted student’s demonstrated need, working closely with each family to answer questions and help make the best financial choices. FINANCIAL AID DEADLINES

WHERE STUDENTS COME FROM

Percent of all Barnard students receiving some form of financial aid:

39 states, plus DC and territories

50

Average total grant for first-year students in 2014-2015 including federal, state, and institutional grants:

If you think you will need financial aid to attend Barnard, you must apply at the same time you apply for admission and meet the required deadlines. Below are some very general guidelines on when you must start submitting financial aid materials. For a complete listing of financial aid deadlines, go to www.barnard.edu/finaid.

$41,722

23% New York

11.5% New England

14% Mid-Atlantic

18% South

17% West

Average loan indebtedness (Class of 2014):

6.8% Midwest/

Southwest

33 countries represented

7.4%

international citizens

EARLY DECISION

November 1

FIRST-YEAR

February 15

2015–2016 tuition and fees:

INTERNATIONAL

February 15

FALL TRANSFER

April 15

$47,631

2015–2016 room and board:

$15,110

BARNARD’S LOAN COUNSELING PROGRAM

3.7% permanent residents

3.5% U.S. citizens living abroad

HOW STUDENTS DESCRIBE THEIR ETHNIC BACKGROUNDS Caucasian (52%) Asian/Asian American (21%) African American/ Black (12%)

Native American (2%)

FIRST-YEAR

TRANSFER

INTERNATIONAL FIRST-YEAR

Early Decision

Spring Admission

Early Decision

Apply by 11/11 (postmark date)

Apply by 11/1 (postmark date)

Apply by 11/1 (postmark date)

Notification by mid-December

Notification by mid-December

Notification by mid-December

Regular Decision

Fall Admission

Regular Decision

Apply by 1/1 (postmark date)

Apply by 3/15 (postmark date)

Apply by 1/1 (postmark date)

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Notification by early April

Notification by mid-May

Notification by early April

Visit admissions.barnard.edu or e-mail admissions@barnard.edu.

WHAT ENROLLED STUDENTS SCORED

Middle 50%: SAT Critical Reading ...... 630–730 SAT Math ....................... 620–710 SAT Writing .................... 650–730 ACT Composite.................. 28–32 Average GPA ...................... 3.9 (A-)

FINANCIAL AID APPLICATION DEADLINES

(The national average loan indebtedness is $33,000.)

$16,964

Other or unknown (2.7%)

APPLICATION DEADLINES

AFFORDING BARNARD

HOW NEED IS DETERMINED All federal financial aid administered by Barnard is based on demonstrated need as determined by the Federal Methodology formula. However, need for institutional aid is determined using a Barnard Need Analysis formula, which takes into consideration all sources of income and all assets. Barnard gives no merit scholarships. The College believes that the primary responsibility for financing educational costs rests with each student’s family, and all College aid is supplementary to family resources. Once need has been established, Barnard uses a combination of grant, loan, and employment opportunities to meet 100 percent of demonstrated need. APPLYING FOR FINANCIAL AID We encourage you to apply for financial aid. Submit a complete financial aid application by the required deadline, and you will be considered for all types and sources of financial aid administered by the College, including federal, state, and institutional grants, loans, and work programs. If you’re an entering first-year student, you’ll be notified of financial aid decisions when you are notified of admission. Please note that awards are not automatically renewable; students must reapply for financial aid each year by the published deadlines.

When it comes to paying for college, families of college students have options that include federal loans and loans from private lenders. In the past, for families pursuing private loans, Barnard had only to provide proof that the student was enrolled. Then it was up to the parents to secure the loan. Now, families are required to meet with a financial aid officer before the College certifies a student’s enrollment. These sessions have proved invaluable, helping families sort through their options, understand that private loans tend to have higher interest rates (and rates that aren’t always fixed)—and save money. Since beginning the program two years ago, Barnard has seen an 85 percent drop in the volume of private loans, from $1.5 million to $240,000. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT FINANCIAL AID www.barnard.edu/finaid E-mail: finaid@barnard.edu Phone: 212/854-2154 Fax: 212/854-2902

Download forms at www.barnard.edu/ finaid/procedures.html. BARNARD

If you’ve selected Barnard as your first choice, you might consider Early Decision, a binding commitment to attend should you be admitted. You will hear by mid-December. Submit a nonrefundable deposit to hold your space in the class, and we’ll see you in the fall!

Applications ........................... 5,676

Hispanic/ Latina (11%)

transfer students, 66–67

first-year seminars, 8, 14, 16–18, 20, 26,

WHO APPLIED, WHO WAS ADMITTED

• Official transcripts from each academic institution you have attended (including all secondary schools and colleges). For international students: Transcripts and official documents must be in English or accompanied by certified English translations.

traditions, 36–37, 66

visiting campus, 66

CLASS PROFILE: THE CLASS OF 2018

67


BARNARD FACTS CHARACTER

MAJORS

SPORTS AND ATHLETICS

A liberal arts college for women in New York City founded in 1889. Barnard has a long tradition of graduating leaders in the arts, business, government, and science.

Barnard offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in nearly 50 fields in the humanities, social sciences, arts, natural sciences, and interdisciplinary areas. For a list of majors, see page 19.

LOCATION

ACADEMIC PROGRAM

Barnard students compete in the NCAA Division I and the Ivy League through the Columbia/ Barnard Athletic Consortium. There are 16 intercollegiate teams. Students also have opportunities to compete at the intramural and club levels. For details, see pages 34–35.

Barnard’s neighborhood, Morningside Heights, is a university community that is academic home to more than 45,000 students from around the world.

Rigorous but flexibly structured. Students must complete a major and fulfill general education requirements. For details, see pages 18–19.

BARNARD-COLUMBIA PARTNERSHIP

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Through Barnard’s unique and historic partnership with Columbia University, students and ideas flow both ways between campuses. Students can register for classes, use libraries, get involved with organizations, participate in athletics, and attend events at both institutions. In a typical year, Barnard course registrations at Columbia average 7,000, and Columbia course registrations at Barnard average 6,900, demonstrating an almost equal exchange of academic resources.

Joint degree—Offered in cooperation with Columbia University and other academic institutions. Five-year A.B. from Barnard and M.I.A. from Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs; five-year Barnard A.B. and M.P.A. from Columbia’s Graduate Program in Public Policy and Administration; five-year Barnard A.B. and B.S. from Columbia’s Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science. Qualified students may enter Columbia Law School after three years at Barnard. Qualified students may enter Columbia’s School of Oral and Dental Surgery after three years at Barnard.

ENROLLMENT More than 2,500 students from nearly 50 states and more than 50 countries. OFF-CAMPUS OPPORTUNITIES Barnard students may choose from nearly 100 approved study abroad programs in more than 50 countries. Senior Scholars undertake a single project for a year or semester under the guidance of faculty. The Writing and Public Speaking Fellows programs offer opportunities for peer coaching in writing. Applicants may also apply to the Juilliard School or the Manhattan School of Music for the lesson exchange program. More than 2,500 internship opportunities in New York City provide practical experience. Barnard also offers domestic study programs at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, and Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Double degree—Barnard A.B. and another undergraduate degree from List College of The Jewish Theological Seminary. Music students may qualify for a Barnard A.B. and a Master of Music from Juilliard. Lesson exchange—Qualified students may audition at Juilliard or the Manhattan School of Music. RESIDENTIAL LIFE More than 90 percent of students live in 12 traditional hallway- or suite/apartment-style residence halls. Students entering as first-years are guaranteed housing all four years. Hewitt Dining Hall offers a range of options, including vegetarian, vegan, Kosher, and Halal. The cafeteria in the Diana Center serves a full lunch menu, including brick oven thin crust pizza.

COMMITTED TO BEING GREEN From local produce in the dining hall to technology that allows students to monitor their own energy usage, Barnard is committed to being green. For a list of sustainable practices already in place, go to www.barnard.edu/about/green/initiatives.html. To minimize our environmental impact, this booklet was printed with vegetable-based ink using 100 percent wind power and waterless printing at a carbon-neutral EPA Green Power Partner facility. It is printed on paper that contains a minimum of 20 percent post-consumer recycled fiber manufactured with electricity in the form of renewable energy. By using environmentally friendly paper and processes to produce this brochure, Barnard saved the following resources:

2.19 trees preserved for the future

1,600,000 BTUs energy not consumed

930.3 gallons wastewater flow saved

97 pounds air emissions not generated

103.1 pounds solid waste not generated

232 cubic feet natural gas unused

202.6 pounds net greenhouse gases prevented

Equivalent to planting 7 trees or not driving 118 miles

sources: epa.gov and enviromentaldefense.org

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS Students can take part in more than 500 student organizations on both the Barnard and Columbia campuses. Student groups include theatre and vocal music groups, ethnic organizations, language clubs, community service groups, and yearbook and literary magazine staffs. The student newspaper, the Barnard Bulletin, is published biweekly. Check out Barnard’s club listings on the Student Government Association website, eclipse.barnard.columbia.edu/~sga/, and Columbia’s A–Z list of student organizations at www.columbia.edu/students/org_gov_az.html. CONTACT US Office of Admissions Barnard College 3009 Broadway New York, NY 10027-6598 212/854-2014 admissions@barnard.edu www.barnard.edu Barnard College admits students without regard to race, color, religion, creed, national origin, sexual orientation, or disability. In accordance with its own values and with federal, state, and city statutes and regulations, Barnard does not discriminate in employment programs or educational programs and services on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, or disability. Barnard College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 5624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 215/662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation. The Title IX Director has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: 212/854-0037, located in 105 Milbank Hall.

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BEST-SELLING AUTHOR AND PULITZER PRIZE-WINNING JOURNALIST ANNA QUINDLEN ’74

UNAFRAID

I MAJORED IN

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Profile for Barnard College, Office of Admissions

Senior Viewbook 2015  

This view book is sent to seniors on our mailing list. It is also available to visitors.

Senior Viewbook 2015  

This view book is sent to seniors on our mailing list. It is also available to visitors.

Profile for middleca
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