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Farm Credit

leader

TURN TO PAGE 12 TO MEET THE WINNER OF AGPITCH18!

VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 1 | $3.95

leading the way


in this issue farm and land

4 SERVING, LEARNING AND

6 AN UNFORGETABLE

8 A LIFE OF GIVING TO

Brian Boyd grew up on a farm in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, providing the basis for his role as Vice Chairman of our Board.

Aside from owning and oper-

Jenny Rhodes of Centreville, Maryland has dedicated her life to serving the agriculture community, including her role as Chair of our Board.

SHARING

12 13 14 15 17

FRIENDLY FACE

ating a farm and market in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Paul Baumgardner has served on our Board for 14 years.

our association

AGRICULTURE

10 LEADERS APPEAR IN MANY FORMS

Serving on his farm in Winchester, Virginia and on various committees and boards, such as ours, comes naturally to Joe Snapp.

social media

AGPITCH18

facebook.com/MidAtlanticFarmCredit

ANNUAL STOCKHOLDER MEETINGS

@midatfarmcredit

SHIFTING ECONOMIC MEGATRENDS

@midatfarmcredit

THE SEVEN PRINCIPLES OF A COOP

mafc.com/blog

community PROPERTIES FOR SALE

youtube.com/user/MidAtlanticFC

WANT TO RECEIVE THE LEADER VIA EMAIL? Send a message to Katie Ward at kward@mafc.com to join the list! Our fourth quarter issue will be distributed by email only.

questions or ideas

MidAtlantic Farm Credit, ACA

If you have any questions or ideas for the editorial staff of the Leader, contact Katie Ward at 888.339.3334, email her at kward@mafc.com or write her at MidAtlantic Farm Credit | 45 Aileron Court | Westminster, MD 21157. This publication is for you, our reader. We’d love to hear from you!

Thomas H. Truitt, Jr., CEO

The Leader is published quarterly for stockholders, friends and business associates. If you wish to no longer receive this publication, please email: unsubscribe@mafc.com. Use “Unsubscribe Leader” in the subject.

Jennifer L. Rhodes Chairman

The Farm Credit Administration does not require the association to distribute its quarterly financial reports to shareholders. However, copies of its complete report are available upon request or see quarterly updates online at mafc.com. The shareholders’ investment in the association is materially affected by the financial condition and results of operations of AgFirst Farm Credit Bank and copies of its quarterly financial report are available upon request by writing: Susanne Caughman AgFirst Farm Credit Bank | P.O. Box 1499 | Columbia, SC 29202-1499 Address changes, questions or requests for the association’s quarterly financial report should be directed to: MidAtlantic Farm Credit, ACA by calling 800.333.7950 or writing: MidAtlantic Farm Credit | 45 Aileron Court | Westminster, MD 21157

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MidAtlantic Farm Credit Board of Directors

Brian L. Boyd Vice Chairman Paul D. Baumgardner Gary L. Grossnickle Laura M. Heilinger Dale R. Hershey Walter C. Hopkins Anthony M. Ill T. Jeffery Jennings M. Wayne Lambertson Fred R. Moore Michael S. Nelson Dale J. Ockels Alan N. Siegfried Douglas D. Scott Joseph D. Snapp Fred N. West


president’s message

president’s message

The Farm Credit

difference

events | deadlines

MAR

EVENT

5 VA Governor’s Conference on Agricultural Trade 9-10 Washington County Homeshow

PLACE

Richmond, VA Hagerstown, MD

10 Daylight Saving Time begins

15 Sales closing for spring planted crops

16-17 Frederick County Homeshow

APR EVENT

Frederick, MD PLACE

2 Annual Stockholder Meeting

Thurmont, MD

3 Annual Stockholder Meeting

New Holland, PA

4 Annual Stockholder Meeting

Dover, DE

21 Easter

MAY EVENT

1 Sales closing for nursery

3 Farm Credit Employee Event

27 Memorial Day

PLACE

Offices Closed

We say it often, but it’s true­—we’re not like other banks. In fact, we’re not a bank at all. Farm Credit is a nationwide agricultural lending cooperative, providing our members with access to consistent, reliable credit, in good times and bad. There are many benefits to being a member of Farm Credit, one of which is having a say in how your cooperative is run. Each year, our members have the opportunity to vote for our board of directors. The best part? The candidates are their peers—fellow hardworking Farm Credit customers who understand the challenges farmers face and are willing to be the voice of their community. In this issue of the Leader, we introduce four of our directors. They, together with our other board members and customers, ensure our association continues on a successful path, that we live up to our mission, and remain a constant source of support to our members, their families, and our communities. Brian Boyd of Lebanon, Pennsylvania, owns and operates a poultry operation and custom planting enterprise. Brian, with help from his wife, Amy, and the two eldest of their six children, make sure the operation runs smoothly, allowing time for Brian to serve as our board’s Vice Chairman. In 2005, Paul Baumgardner of Emmitsburg, Maryland joined our board. After years of running a dairy operation, then transitioning to hay, beef, and produce, Paul and his family opened Harvest Barn Country Market in 2018, providing consumers with access to locally sourced food and handcrafted gifts. Jenny Rhodes, current Chair of our board, grew up immersed in agriculture, at a time when young women were not often seen in the field. Today, Jenny owns and operates both a poultry operation and grain farm on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, while also serving as a senior agent with Queen Anne’s County Extension. Lastly, we introduce you to Joe Snapp of Winchester, Virginia. Joe and his family own West Oaks Farm, a diverse operation growing apples, peaches, row crops, and Angus cattle, which also includes a farm market and event center. Joe and his wife, Mary, are the ninth generation to farm this land, and they make sure their children are included in every aspect of the family business. Not only does this issue give you a glimpse into the lives of some of our directors, but it also includes a recap of AgPitch18, information about our 2019 annual stockholder meetings (which are right around the corner, by the way), and an overview of the seven principles all cooperatives abide by, including Farm Credit. We covered a lot, so grab a cup of coffee, find a comfortable chair, and enjoy! Wishing you a safe spring season,

Offices Closed

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY SALLY SCHOLLE | BRIAN BOYD GREW UP ON A FARM IN LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA, WHERE

HIS PARENTS GREW SMALL GRAINS AND OPERATED A SEED AND FERTILIZER BUSINESS. BRIAN’S LIFE-LONG

ERS APPEAR

EXPERIENCE IN THE AG WORLD AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT PROVIDED THE BASIS FOR ONE OF MIDATLANTIC FARM CREDIT.

LEAD

“By the time I was of age, our family farm was an agribusiness,” says Brian, explaining his ag background. “I started working at a feed mill when I was 17; sweeping floors and mixing feed, then drove a truck, and was mill manager the last five years I was there.” Although Brian is now retired from that industry, he gained valuable knowledge and numerous connections in the ag community. Brian put up his first poultry house in 2009 and now has four houses on two properties, raising broilers for Bell and Evans. Brian raises about one million birds every year with no employees, relying on help from his wife Amy and the two eldest of their six children. Through his custom planting enterprise, Brian puts about 2,000 acres of crops in the ground each spring. He also operates an ag commodity trucking business, which helps keep him in touch with a larger ag circle. Brian says the Farm Credit Board of Directors is diverse and represents a wide range of ag enterprises, including dairy, poultry, vegetables, crops, agribusiness, and agritourism. During his initial months on the board, Brian recalls not knowing a lot about how the board functioned or his role. However, he quickly learned how Farm Credit serves its members and how he could contribute. Now in his ninth year on the board, Brian is serving as Vice Chairman. Brian’s

long-time association with the farm community allows him to pick up on attitudes, moods, spending habits, optimism, and pessimism; all of which help him serve the board and members. Brian says serving on the board is an interesting challenge, and describes himself as someone who thinks outside the box. “Because of the custom work and raising poultry, I’m connected to the industry,” he says. “I know how it feels on the ground.” A position on the Farm Credit board means a commitment to monthly meetings, some local and others that require travel. “Trainings are held throughout the United States, which provides an opportunity to meet other leadership,” says Brian, adding that he has acquired valuable people skills. “Through networking, we can see how others work with their CEOs and their associations. Discussing land prices with those in other areas provides good perspective and comparison. We can talk about their citrus farm or cotton farm – it’s incredible to see ag technology throughout the country.” Brian’s experience meeting with farmers from different states has given him a broader outlook on agriculture. “I bring that information back to my farm and community,” he says. “Things are changing, and there’s more awareness about what’s going on nationally and globally.”

HIS MOST IMPORTANT VOLUNTEER ROLES TODAY: VICE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR

in many forms FORGETTABL E AN UN

When Brian started serving on the board, he was 37 and loaded with debt as he grew his operation. “I knew how it felt, and how well Farm Credit treated me,” he says. “As the youngest board member, I am excited to continue diversifying the age range of our board in the future to cover the experiences of multiple generations and incorporate more thoughts about technology and new trends,” says Brian. While Amy sometimes accompanies Brian on national board trips, he says she learns more about their own farm when he’s away. “I might have to walk her through a problem over the phone,” says Brian. “My family sees what I go through in the middle of a cold night when the alarm goes off.” In addition to serving on the Board of Directors, Brian is a member of Farm Bureau, serves on the South Lebanon Township Land Preservation Committee, is active as a church elder, and hosts church youth in a spacious, inviting section of his farm shop. Brian says serving on the board is a serious responsibility, and leaving his farm for several days at a time to attend meetings can be challenging. However, he has found that part of being a good manager of his own farm is being able to leave it. “First I trained, then delegated,” he says. “Now I can walk away and say to my wife or my son, ‘I trust you—you can do it.’” l

friendly face F E O F G I V I N G TO I L A

agriculture

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THE BOYD’S PRIDE IN AGRICULTURE IS REFLECTED IN EVERY ASPECT OF THEIR FARM, FROM TRACTORS AND EQUIPMENT TO BUILDINGS AND THEIR FARMSTEAD. FOR THOSE NOT DIRECTLY INVOLVED IN AGRICULTURE, SEEING A WELLKEPT FARM IN THE COMMUNITY IS A GREAT AMBASSADOR FOR AGRICULTURE. BRIAN SAYS THE FARM CREDIT SYSTEM PROVIDES OUTSTANDING TRAINING WITH SPEAKERS WHO GIVE INSPIRATION AND GUIDANCE, AND HE TAKES WHAT HE HAS GAINED TO HIS FAMILY, FARM OPERATION, AND CHURCH. SERVING ON THE BOARD IS A WAY FOR BRIAN TO GIVE BACK TO BOTH LOCAL AND NATIONAL AGRICULTURE COMMUNITIES, AS WELL AS FARM CREDIT STOCKHOLDERS.

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FORGETTABL E AN UN

friendly face STORY AND PHOTOS BY ANDREA HAINES | A GENERAL HUNT FOR THE DEFINITION OF “LEADERSHIP” FINDS YOU

THESE DESCRIPTIONS: STRONG COMMUNICATION, PASSION AND COMMITMENT, POSITIVITY, AND COLLABORATION.

G I V I N G T when needed, but sharing that open F O E F I L “I then moved on to the [retail] Ocommunication between members is inA 1914. grandfather John Baumgardner began

A visit to The Harvest Barn Country Market in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, to

agriculture hay business, beef raising, and farming

important. The role of a director is an

produce. It was through this transition that

honor and to be taken seriously. After all

I gained the most businesses relationships.”

we are the voice of the fellow farmers that

Collaboration is a strong business trait for

entrust their livelihoods and investments.”

you feel like you’ve known him for years.

the farmer. He’s learned this by serving on

Paul describes his experiences on

It was apparent to me, observing for just

many boards over the years, specifically

a short while, the excitement and general

MidAtlantic Farm Credit’s Board of Directors.

have a chat with the market’s owner, Paul D. Baumgardner, reminded me of a few of those key descriptions. What I found was a positive, friendly face; a man that makes

the board to be positive and innovative.

TO T H E F U T “We always went to these ‘learning N I G N has served as Chairman of the Usessions’ , and I would come back to my interest he took in each visitor crossing the Y I Paul R L E F own business pumped up and ready Board of Directors, Vice Chairman, and market’s threshold.

of agriculture member of the audit committee for

to apply what I had learned,” he shares.

Emmitsburg, Maryland, Paul is now heavily

MidAtlantic Farm Credit. “The first two

“It’s encouraging and a privilege to be

invested in the operations of the market.

to three years on the board, you learn

surrounded by like-minded and smart

“I milked cows for some time,” he explains.

to listen,” he says with a grin, reflecting

people. I know it’s what has helped me

The farm has changed a good bit since his

on his induction in 2005. “Offering input

grow over the years.”

A once acclaimed dairy farmer from

THE HARVEST BARN COUNTRY MARKET

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shifting economic megatrends

IS WHERE CONSUMERS GO TO LEARN A LITTLE ABOUT AGRICULTURE AND

TAKE FRESH, LOCAL PRODUCTS HOME. THE BAKERY CASE OFFERS SWEET TREATS TO HUNGRY SHOPPERS WHILE THEY BROWSE THROUGH LOCAL HANDMADE GIFTS. YOUNGER GUESTS CAN ENJOY THE OLD FASHIONED

CANDY BOOTH. VISIT THEIR WEBSITE AT HARVESTBARNCOUNTRYMARKET.COM FOR A LIST OF VENDORS AND PRODUCTS OFFERED.

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In similar suit, Farm Credit loan officers

members on the Farm Credit board.

for the “deal of the day” to place atop their

also offer this type of resource to customers.

“We have full time employee Kelly Wivell

kitchen tables. “Our daily deal is made up

“Our loan officer is Mary Jane Roop. She’s

at the barn. She handles most of the

of products that would essentially make a

just as invested in seeing us succeed as we

day-to-day needs of our customers,” he

meal,” shares Sarah. “It allows our customers

are,” claims Paul, referring to the market.

says. “The atmosphere for business is

a chance to easily prepare a meal with

“The customer service is commendable,”

essentially the same, working together,

what we are offering seasonally.”

explains Chad Knox, market manager and

managing risk, developing innovative

Paul’s stepson. He and his wife, Sarah, who

avenues to reach customers.”

handles all of the barn’s marketing, have

Speaking of branching out to the

This business venture is another example of the experience Paul has gained over the years. “Don’t get me wrong, I’m still

learned a lot from both resources. “Working

consumer, The Harvest Barn Country

surprised by some things that work within

closely with both our loan officer and Paul

Market was established this past summer,

business, I’m always learning. That may

has nourished interest in our future. I look at

reconstituting an old antique barn into a

come as a surprise to some of the younger

what he [Paul] has done and am excited to

“farm to table” market where customers

members of the board,” Paul says with a

take on the role of the next generation.”

can find fresh and local products. “What we

chuckle. “I’ve hit, what you would call the

Paul keeps everyone in the loop

don’t grow ourselves, we outsource from

‘vintage stage’ serving more as an advisor

when it comes to business decisions.

local farms,” says Paul. The barn is located

to new members.” One thing is for sure,

Working alongside his wife, Susie, he

in the heart of “antique country” where

whether you see him at a meeting or in his

encourages the ideas of market personnel

out-of-state shoppers can pop in for a

element at the farm, he’s adorned with that

and family just like he does with younger

snack or special gift, or locals can frequent

unforgettable, friendly face.

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F E O F G I V I N G TO I L A

agriculture “FAMILY FOR ME IS THE MOST IMPORTANT. I COULD NOT DO ALL THAT I DO IF IT WASN’T FOR MY FAMILY,” SAYS JENNY RHODES, WHOSE ENTIRE

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FAMILY LIVES NEARBY. HER SON CHRIS FARMS AND RAISES CHICKENS FOR

GI N I Y L

PERDUE; HE AND HIS WIFE SHANNON

HAVE TWO SONS, HUNTER AND COLE, AND A NEW DAUGHTER, AUDREY. HER SON RYAN GROWS FOR ALLEN HARIM AND ASSISTS IN HIS MOM’S CHICKEN OPERATION; HE AND HIS

WIFE RACHEL HAVE A SON OLIVER AND ARE EXPECTING A NEW ADDITION.

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JENNY’S PARENTS, TEMPLE AND PAT RHODES, OPERATE CHESTNUT VALE FARM LANE FARM.

STORY BY NANCY L. SMITH | PHOTOS BY REMSBERG, INC. AND NANCY L. SMITH | “IT’S REALLY ALL ABOUT AGRICULTURE,”

SAYS JENNY RHODES, CURRENT CHAIR OF THE MIDATLANTIC FARM CREDIT BOARD OF DIRECTORS. REFERRING TO HER MANY ROLES IN MARYLAND AGRICULTURE, JENNY COULD HAVE ALSO BEEN DESCRIBING HER ENTIRE LIFE—EMPHASIZING AGRICULTURE FROM HER CHILDHOOD TO HER CURRENT FULL PLATE OF ACTIVITIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES.

Jenny was active in 4-H and FFA at a time when young women were uncommon in the industry. She received a business degree from Chesapeake College in Wye Mills, Maryland. “Later, when I was running a farm, taking care of children, and working for Extension, I went back to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and got my degree in agriculture and my masters in extension education.” Jenny has been growing chickens for 31 years and currently grows about a half million birds a year for Allen Harim. She also operates a 100 acre irrigated grain farm. 8

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She has been on the Delmarva Poultry Industry board for many years, serving as President in 2012 and currently serves on the executive committee. In 1997, she joined Queen Anne’s County Extension. Now as a senior agent, “I focus on agronomy, poultry, and risk management, and under that comes women in agriculture.” Jenny is proud of Annie’s Project, an Extension program created to empower women in agriculture to develop networks and skills. In 2006 she graduated from LEAD Maryland. LEAD Maryland fellowships focus on public issues, education, skills building, and leadership development.

“4-H and FFA were a foundation, but it was LEAD Maryland that pushed me to the next step of leadership,” says Jenny. “My class went to China. There is hardly a day that goes by when we don’t talk about China or trade with China, so being able to be there and see the way they farm and the government, I think it all ties back to really making me a better board member.” In 2008, she was recruited to run for the Farm Credit board. “I thought, ‘Wow, that’s a pretty big honor.’ I was pretty humbled by that. “Part of being in LEAD Maryland is


to give back in leadership and I thought, ‘here’s my time to give back.’” Since joining the board, she led the human resources, governance and audit committees before ascending, in less than 10 years, to the position of chair in May 2018. “The role of the Chair is to be the leader,” explains Jenny. “To listen and generate good discussion, to make sure, before we vote, that we’ve had enough discussion and that everybody understands what the topic is; to help to set the board agenda; and to have good discussions with the CEO [Tom Truitt] to make sure we are thinking strategically because we really want to be a leader in the Farm Credit system.” Jenny stresses the importance of “the relationships you build with board members of other associations. Anytime you go to a meeting, it’s about learning,

but it’s about the networking, too. “I can bring that information back to make our board a better board. That’s always my goal—to improve and make things better.” “The hardest thing about being board chair,” she says, “is that you really don’t get to vote unless there’s a tie. I’m pretty boisterous, so for me it is important to learn to listen and make sure everybody is being heard.” She explains board operations, “The chair and vice chair work together with senior management and the CEO to set the agenda. The board works collaboratively together. My job is to navigate the board in making decisions through open discussion.” In recognition of Jenny’s leadership and contributions, Chesapeake College recently created an endowed scholarship in her name.

“The school raised $30,000 for the scholarship. That is proof to me that the things I have done really do pay back. Each one of the poultry companies gave $5,000. Even though I grow for one company, [as a DPI board member and Extension agent] you represent all of them when you speak about the whole commercial poultry industry in general. To me, that was one of the ‘aha!’ moments.” When the college approached her about establishing the scholarship, she stipulated, “My scholarship was not only for tuition, but it could be for books, it could be to pay for child care, it could be to pay for gas to get there. There is so much more to college than just paying the tuition.” A plaque in her office reads, “This is no ordinary farm girl you’re dealing with.” Nothing could be more true. l

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farm and land

LEAD

ERS APPEAR

in many forms STORY AND PHOTOS BY ANDREA HAINES | TRADITIONALLY, LEADERS ARE VIEWED AS A BOSS OR PEER, FOR OTHERS IT’S

REVEALED IN DECADES OF FAMILY MENTORS. FOR THE SNAPP FAMILY OF WEST OAKS FARM IN WINCHESTER, VIRGINIA, THE OPPORTUNITY TO “STEP UP TO THE PLATE” HAS BEEN WELCOMED AND FRUITFUL.

Joe Snapp and his wife, Mary, are

aspirants to “step up to the plate.”“My

RGETTABL FO N UNJoe. “It is my dream to be able E Acomments

the ninth generation to harvest the

philosophy is similar with my children,”

bounty from the family’s land, making their three children (Ben, Levi, and

is apparent, signs of a close-knit family, but are “all business” when it comes to talking agriculture.

friendly face to watch my children take the reins as I

West Oaks Farm has made some

Tesla) the tenth generation. The farm’s

‘fade away’, a smooth transition. I think

transitions over the last few years,

stewards have been raising Angus cattle,

that’s what every parent wants. It takes

growing from their original farm market

growing apples, peaches, strawberries,

a lot of work and commitment, though,”

stand to what is now a large-scale

and other fruit, along with row crops, a

he says with a smile. The commitment

market and event center. “I think serving

farm market, and are invested in their

he’s referring to is not only dedication

on the board has helped our family

children’s success for an agricultural-

to a task, but the promise that he is

think out of the box,” explains Joe. “I’ve

totally transparent with his leadership

been able to see how other members

based future if they choose to pursue a similar path. After sorting through those “day-to-day” activities, Joe also serves on various committees and boards in

F E O F G I V I N G TO I L Aroles so that his children (or younger

agriculture

choose to do business, visit other farms

board members) are privy to the same

and markets, which encouraged my

resources he’s utilized to gain the

wife and me to do our research. Farm

knowledge he’s accrued over the years.

Credit has helped with our investment

addition to his role on the farm. The

“Some parents don’t share

role he serves as a MidAtlantic Farm

everything with their kids,” says Levi.

now.” The market is open to the public

Credit director comes naturally to Joe,

“We’re lucky, we get to be involved in

for purchasing produce, pick-your-own

according to his family. “I’ve had the privilege of watching him serve in

from the planning stages to what we are

TO T H E F U T strawberries in the summer, and school N I G I Nway, whatever happens.” Joe notes U field trips. “We plan on going further this E offering farm-animal observation, F LYthat he had a similar relationship with Rand the process, and I feel more prepared

of agriculture

various leadership roles,” shares Levi.

“Both of my parents are strong advisors

his father. “I feel like I took more interest

interactive demonstrations for visitors,

to my siblings and me. I’ve watched

in the farm when I was more invested in

and farm-to-table choices for our guests

him serve our church, Farm Bureau, and

the procedures and changes,” adds Joe.

to come and picnic at our eating area,”

feed cooperative (Southern States). It’s

The same concept applies to their oldest

explains Levi.

been encouraging for us to follow in his

son, Ben. “Our father has also allowed

footsteps and reach for those leadership

us to choose our own path,” shares Ben.

All of this would possibly seem like a

U R A L L E A D E dream without the support and financial T L U roles within our FFA and 4-H groups.” planning brought forth by participation I C handles much of the marketing, R S H R“Levi G For years, Joe has been encouraging onIforward-thinking committees and A products, and public relations. I am P

shifting economic megatrends

others through his work. “I enjoy

happy working with the retail side of

boards. “I’m always for programs and

working on the Farm Credit Board of

our orchards, fields, and with the cattle.”

business ventures that will sustain the

Directors,” says Joe. He has worked on the

The couple’s daughter, Tesla is also

land and spark new growth in our young

governance committee, and is always

involved in 4-H and FFA showing beef

people,” shares Joe. “I’m glad to have the

encouraging new directors and potential

and swine. The siblings’ friendly jeering

opportunity to serve.”

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WEST OAKS FARM IS MUCH LIKE ANY OTHER FAMILY-RUN ESTABLISHMENT. EACH MEMBER OF THE SNAPP FAMILY PLAYS A LARGE ROLE IN THE SUCCESS OF THE FARM. DAILY COMMUNICATION, CHORES, AND OVERSEEING PLANTS, ANIMALS, AND EMPLOYEES ARE JUST A FEW OF THE TASKS AT HAND. JOE’S WIFE, MARY, MANAGES MOST OF THE MARKET AND PROMOTIONAL WORK WITH THEIR SON LEVI. JOE SHARES HIS KNOWLEDGE OF THE ORCHARD AND LIVESTOCK WITH HIS THREE CHILDREN, ALL PAST AND CURRENT MEMBERS OF FFA AND 4-H PROGRAMS. FOR A VISIT, FIND THEM AT WESTOAKSFARM-MARKET.COM.

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BY KATIE WARD, FARM CREDIT MARKETING SPECIALIST | FARM CREDIT AWARDED MARYLAND DRONE TECHNOLOGY COMPANY, MADTECH, AS THE WINNERS OF AGPITCH18.

AgPitch18 was held on December 6, 2018 as part of the Grow and Fortify Summit in Stevensville, Maryland. This “Shark Tank” style event featured five entrepreneurs who presented their agriculture business ideas in front of a live audience and a panel of judges. The participants were competing for a $7,500 cash prize, in addition to business services. Farm Credit received applications from nearly 30 creative and innovative entrepreneurs looking to make a positive impact on the agriculture industry. These applicants went through a round of pre-judging, where several industry professionals evaluated each application for viability, innovation, and to see if they were “ready for prime time.” The five finalists who pitched at the event on December 6 were: Marnane Agricultural Drone Technologies (MADTECH), Johnny Oysterseed, 1000 EcoFarms, AgriMetis, and GreatAlga. Each finalist had five minutes to pitch their business to a panel of judges and an audience of over 250 people, who were able to participate in the voting process. The judging panel consisted of Isvara Wilson, Chief Administrative Officer of AgFirst Farm Credit; Alex Moore, Sr. Partner of Stratagon, Inc. and Immediate Past President of MANRRS; Mike Thielke, Executive Director of the Eastern Shore Entrepreneurship Center; and Jan Baum, Director of the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Towson University. “I admire the passion and enthusiasm all five finalists have for the ideas they presented at AgPitch,”

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From left to right: Charlie Taylor, Zach Marnane, Eric Peterson, Tom Marnane

says Tom Truitt, CEO of MidAtlantic Farm Credit. “Hearing the pitches and learning about each organization has me certain that the future of the agriculture industry is in good hands. We’re excited for MADTECH and look forward to watching the business develop.” The total tally of votes from the judges and audience members was counted immediately after the event concluded, and revealed MADTECH of Huntingtown, Maryland as the winner of AgPitch18. MADTECH was founded by a father-son team that has developed “The MADTECH System,” which captures real-time farm data using advanced Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) network management to fly two types of very sophisticated fixed wing drone technologies simultaneously. The data gathered by the drones is coupled with rapid lab testing, targeted ground proofing, and writing optimized prescriptions for farm equipment to enable a farm to be continuously optimized for efficiency in real time.

“We are honored to have been chosen to present our business concept to the judges and audience of the 2018 AgPitch event,” says Tom Marnane, Co-Founder and President of MADTECH. “I am very confident in our technology and the opportunities it can bring to farmers in Maryland and across the country. We can’t thank Farm Credit enough for creating such a venue to allow agriculture companies like MADTECH to enhance our business and expand our impact.” All five finalists receive membership into the F3Tech pre-accelerator program, which will give them the opportunity to explore avenues to help grow their business ideas. To learn more about MADTECH, visit madtechfarm.com or email Thomas Marnane at tomm@madtechfarm.com. For more information about AgPitch, visit agpitch.com.


FARM CREDIT

| CHARTING the COURSE

2 0 19 A N N U A L M E E T I N G S

The agriculture community is made up of farmers, ranchers, extension agents, scientists, environmentalists, and many others. Farm Credit is proud to work with leaders across the industry, including our members, to chart the

course for the future of our organization and agriculture as a whole. We want to celebrate each and every one of you who work hard to protect the lifestyle we all love and educate others on the importance of agriculture!

Please join us at the location nearest you to meet fellow agriculture community members, including Farm Credit staff and directors, for some great food, and to learn what your association has planned for the upcoming year.

2019 ANNUAL MEETING DATES

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April 2: Thurmont Event Complex

Thurmont, MD

April 3: Yoder’s Restaurant

New Holland, PA

April 4: Modern Maturity Center

Dover, DE

Please plan to arrive at 5:45 for some tasty appetizers and the opportunity to network with Farm Credit directors, staff members, customers, and industry representatives. If you have a question about your association or the industry, this would be a great time to come out and learn more. MEETING AGENDA 5:45 pm Registration, Networking and Appetizers 6:45 pm Call to Order 7:00 pm Dinner 8:00 pm Business Meeting

All of those who attend can enter to win a 2018 John Deere Gator, and have the chance to win some really fun door prizes. TWO WAYS TO REGISTER Visit mafc.com/annual-meetings and complete the online registration form by March 22. Fill out and mail back the RSVP postcard in your annual meeting information statement, which you will be receiving soon.

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If you can’t make a meeting this year, don’t worry! You can follow along on social media using #MAFCAM. We hope to see you in April! VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 1 | mafc.com | 13


our association

AGRICULTURAL

LEADERSHIP

| SHIFTING ECONOMIC MEGATRENDS

BY DR. DAVID M. KOHL | HOW WILL ECONOMIC MEGATRENDS PRESS THE PARADIGMS OF FUTURE LEADERS IN THE AGRIBUSINESS SECTOR? THIS THOUGHT-PROVOKING QUESTION PROVIDES

INSIGHT INTO THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES THAT ARE AHEAD IN THE AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY. WHAT STRATEGIES WILL INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS NEED TO IMPLEMENT TO PREPARE FOR PROACTIVELY MANAGING AND CAPITALIZING ON ECONOMIC MEGATRENDS? WHILE THIS SUBJECT COULD FILL A SEMESTER OF LECTURES IN A UNIVERSITY CLASS, LET’S FOCUS ON A FEW KEY ASPECTS.

VOLATILITY Historically, the agriculture industry has been required to navigate business operations in a volatile environment. The future leader will be confronted with extreme volatility in an economic environment of smaller margins. During the economic commodity super cycle from 2006 to 2012, high commodity prices were the norm, making it easier for producers to more easily absorb fluctuations in prices and cost. However, with today’s suppressed margins, the ability of a leader in the agricultural field to execute a well-managed game plan will be a requirement, not an option. In the future, these leaders will have to integrate changes in currency values and the impact of foreign and domestic trade negotiations into both short- and long-term strategies.

INTEREST RATES The agriculture industry has experienced a decade of low, flat interest rates. In the next few years, agriculture leaders must manage debt and capital in an environment of increasing interest rates. These rising rates, coupled with tighter margins, increase the emphasis on financial sensitivity analysis of cash flows, overall debt structure and repayment terms.

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| VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 1 | mafc.com

Special emphasis must be placed on working capital and overall capital management to absorb occasional negative changes in profits as a result of price, cost or interest rate variability. This will be the buffer for adversity, but also the catalyst for opportunity and change.

CONSUMER TRENDS There is a saying that “90 percent of success in business is about alignment.” The forward-thinking leader will align land, labor, capital and information resources with talent and management. These two components will then be meshed with changes and forces in the marketplace. Closely watching consumer trends, both domestically and internationally, will be critical for future business leaders. The marketplace has splintered as a result of shifts in consumer preferences of Millennials and Generation Z. These generations seek experiences, and agribusiness leaders must adapt to these changes. The future of agriculture and agribusiness will not be one-size-fits-all. Some businesses will be best positioned for the commodity markets with a model based on efficiency and low cost. Other businesses will be adaptable and tap into niche markets to fulfill a need or provide a service. Some producers

will employ a combination of both marketing strategies.

PEOPLE People management will be the differentiator of business performance in the future. Independent leadership will be replaced by individuals who are interdependent and can build a productive work and business culture of high-performing employees and customers. As younger generations move toward technology, maintaining the balance between interpersonal skills and technology will be a challenge. Future business leaders must embrace the confluence of these skills as an opportunity. Many economic megatrends will impact the future of the agriculture industry. Volatility can result in opportunities, but it also can result in failure if not managed proactively. Interest rates will impact the cost of doing business and asset values. Consumer trends will require constant research and assessment. People management will continue to be an important business skill. There is a bright future for the agriculture industry when its leaders embrace these changes. If you have questions or just want to “talk shop”, give us a call at 888.339.3334 or visit mafc.com!


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principles of a cooperative Cooperatives around the world operate according to the same set of core principles and values, adopted by the International Co-operative Alliance. Cooperatives trace the roots of these principles to the first modern cooperative founded in Rochdale, England in 1844. These principles are a key reason that America’s financial cooperatives operate differently from other financial institutions, by putting the needs of their members first. Farm Credit is proud to be a cooperative because our borrowers are also our members and have a voice in how we operate as an association. We pride ourselves on the community environment created by the cooperative structure and hope that if you’re a member, you feel like family.

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COOPERATIVE PRINCIPLES

OPEN AND VOLUNTARY MEMBERSHIP Membership in a cooperative is open to all persons who can reasonably use its services and stand willing to accept the responsibilities of membership, regardless of race, religion, gender, or economic circumstances.

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DEMOCRATIC MEMBER CONTROL Cooperatives are democratic organizations controlled by their members, who actively participate in setting policies and making decisions. Elected representatives (directors/ trustees) are elected from among the membership and are accountable to the membership. In primary cooperatives, members have equal voting rights (one member, one vote); cooperatives at other levels are organized in a democratic manner.

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MEMBERS’ ECONOMIC PARTICIPATION Members contribute equitably to, and democratically control, the capital of their cooperative. At least part of that capital remains the common property of the cooperative. Members allocate surpluses for any or all of the following purposes: developing the cooperative; setting up reserves; benefiting members in proportion to their transactions with the cooperative; and supporting other activities approved by the membership.

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AUTONOMY AND INDEPENDENCE Cooperatives are autonomous, self-help organizations controlled by their members. If they enter into agreements with other organizations, including governments, or raise capital from external sources, they do so on terms that ensure democratic control as well as their unique identity.

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EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND INFORMATION Education and training for members, elected representatives (directors/trustees), CEOs, and employees help them effectively contribute to the development of their cooperatives. Communications about the nature and benefits of cooperatives, particularly with the general public and opinion leaders, helps boost cooperative understanding.

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COOPERATION AMONG COOPERATIVES By working together through local, national, regional, and international structures, cooperatives improve services, bolster local economies, and deal more effectively with social and community needs.

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CONCERN FOR COMMUNITY Cooperatives work for the sustainable development of their communities through policies supported by the membership.

Membership to a cooperative association like Farm Credit means you’re united with a group of like-minded people who all have an equal say in how the organization should run. If you have questions about how being a member-borrower of Farm Credit can be beneficial for you, call us at 888.339.3334 today!

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Right where

YOU BELONG

Co·op·er·a·tive noun An enterprise or organization owned by and operated for the benefit of those using its services.

When you work with Farm Credit, you’re not just a customer. You become part of a community, and have a voice in how we operate as an association. Give us a call today to learn more about the many benefits of a Farm Credit membership.

888.339.3334 | mafc.com |


Greenwood, Delaware

Harrington, Delaware

Chestertown, Maryland

If you’re looking for a small farm with nearly 1,000 feet of road frontage for possible lots, look no further. Approximately seven acres tillable with two acres wooded. Barns are sold as-is. $179,900.

Purchase your dream land on 18 wooded acres with approved site evaluation for sand mound. Property holds abundant wildlife and has a 1.5 acre food plot in the back left of the property. Property line is to the middle of the tax ditch allowing for easy access around the perimeter of the property. $125,000.

Situated on the banks of Comegys Bight on the Chester River, this 51.55 acre farm compound is often referred to as Camelot. The location of the main house, three cottages, in-ground pool and pool house in the critical area buffer make this waterfront property extremely rare.. $2,425,000.

Contact Jamie Masten, Masten Realty LLC. 302-422-1850.

Contact Wes Cromer, Masten Realty LLC. 302-448-1032.

Contact Stacy Kendall, Cross Street Realtors. 443-480-3453.

Earleville, Maryland

Elkton, Maryland

Emmitsburg, Maryland

This is a unique opportunity to own more than 32 acres on Maryland’s upper Eastern Shore. Nestled between Ponds Creek and the Chesapeake Bay, this is a rolling site with a pond and 1,400 feet of water frontage. Property includes a boat slip which is part of the Community Common Area on the Chesapeake Bay. $749,000.

Enjoy this beautiful stone rancher with a red terracotta tile roof on 1.4 acres in Fair Hill, Maryland near to the Fair Hill Natural Resource Management Area. House is well maintained with many recent upgrades. $314,900.

Check out this historic Frederick County manor house, circa 1800, largely and lovingly restored. Situated on 6.2 acres with four acres in woods on the scenic Middle Creek. Elegant center hall with authentic details throughout and generously proportioned rooms. As-is condition. $485,000.

Contact Joseph A. Zang III, Coldwell Banker Chesapeake. 410 885 2200.

Contact Marion P. Bagnal, Harlan C Williams Co. 302-588-7108.

Contact Margaret Lamberton, Harry Lamberton Real Estate. 202 422 7200.

Frederick, Maryland

EQUAL HOUSING

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY Build your dream home on OPPORTUNITY this breathtaking

agriculture lot with a view of the neighbor’s fish ponds. The lot features well, electric, and a 3,000 square foot, two-story, insulated building with a concrete floor, two oversized overhead doors, a walk-in door, air compressor, and built-in air hose stations. Wildlife is plentiful! $242,000. EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

Contact Deb Bargeski, ReMax Plus. 301-748-6719.

Hagerstown, Maryland

Check out this beautiful farm for sale on 172 acres in the Beaver Creek area! Featuring an 1809 limestone farmhouse, bank barn, spring house, smoke house, garage, spring/stream, and mountain and pastoral views. The property has potential for cell tower income, subdivisions, 120 acres of crops and pasture, and 40 acres of woods. $1,395,000. Contact Shirley Bayer, RE/MAX Achievers. 301-573-0827.

Properties for sale

community

Need financing for any of these properties?*

Call Farm Credit at 888.339.3334.

* Financing availability subject to loan approval and property eligibility.

VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 1 | mafc.com | 17 REALTOR

®

EQUAL HOUSING

REALTOR OPPORTUNITY

®

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY


community Laytonsville, Maryland

Middletown, Maryland

Salisbury, Maryland

Calling all horse lovers and trainers! Check out this 84 acre horse training and boarding farm, improved by a 54 stall stable with a 220’ x 83’ foot indoor and a 300’ x 100’ lighted outdoor arena. On the eastern edge of the AR zone that now allows on-farm breweries, distilleries, or wineries. The farm can be subdivided into two parcels. $2,300,000.

Located just minutes from Route 340, this 158 acre property is a great investment and location for a farm market and commuters. Own this operating farmette with a main house and rentable tenant property. Includes a bank barn, dairy barn, loafing shed, additional buildings, and a stream. $1,650,000.

Don’t miss out on this 100 acre piece of land in Salisbury, Maryland! Approximately 35 acres of farmland and 26 acres of timber, this property has great exposure with 2,100 feet of road frontage, a pond in the back, and planted power lines. Subject to subdivision. $290,000.

Contact Tim McGrath. 301-606-0066.

Contact Sue Kelley, Kelley Real Estate Professionals. 240-674-1089.

Contact Tom Ruch, Adventure Group of Long & Foster. 443-235-1347.

Woodbine, Maryland

Woodbine, Maryland

Conestoga, Pennsylvania

Build your dream home on eight cleared acres near the Howard County line with gorgeous views and a tranquil setting. Only five minutes from I-70, the land is zoned ag. The barn has original stone foundation and needs some work. Perc requires validation, well/septic requires verification. Existing house is sold as-is. $369,000.

This 8.6 acre Lancaster County farmette offers plenty of room to stretch out and raise animals. Including a detached two-car garage, implement shed, barn with a loft, and a shed. The two-story home features wood floors, wide baseboard trim, transom windows, a front porch, and balcony. $362,000.

A beautiful panoramic estate setting on 41 acres adjoins Patuxent State Park in Howard County. Perfect for horse lovers with riding trails nearby, the property features a 4,110 square foot 2.5 story farmhouse, 40 x 40’ equipment building, small barn, 18 acre meadow, 23 acre mature woodland with stream, and the possibility to subdivide up to four lots. $1,150,000. Contact Garry Haines, Haines Realty. 410-876-1616.

Coopersburg, Pennsylvania

Contact Stephen J Ferrandi, Maryland Land Advisors. 866-910-5263.

Contact Cheryl A. Fuss, Gateway Realty, Inc. 717-587-2046.

Lebanon, Pennsylvania

These listings were submitted by individual real estate agents. MidAtlantic Farm Credit

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A five-star equestrian center located in beautiful Bucks County. Property includes a fieldstone farmhouse on 40.47 acres of rolling and flat pastures, indoor and outdoor arenas with German Geo Textile footing, a five-stall bank barn, and a trainer’s apartment. $1,795,000.

The perfect operating horse farm on nearly 26 acres. Featuring a renovated farmhouse with beautiful wood floors, attached residential rental, horse barn, machine shed, five run-in sheds, 11 paddocks, large lighted and fenced riding ring, bank barn with heated bays, warehouse, stables, and springs and a stream on the property. $749,900.

Contact Cindy Stys, Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd. 610-849-1790.

Contact Dave Simpson, Suburban Realty. 717-269-6688.

EQUAL HOUSING

is not responsible for OPPORTUNITY typographical errors or pricing discrepancies. EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

| VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 1 | mafc.com REALTOR

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EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY REALTOR®


Call Farm Credit at 888.339.3334.

* Financing availability subject to loan approval and property eligibility.

Bentonville, Virginia

This magnificent property has been in the family for decades. The land encompasses over 180 acres of countryside, offering peace and privacy. Includes a pond, pole barn, and spring house. A 1780s stone farmhouse presides over the property, preserving many of the home’s original features. $1,500,000.

Don’t miss the views from every window of this newly renovated brick Cape Cod. Sunlight pours onto the refinished oak flooring. The house sits on one parcel and the remainder of the land on another parcel for a total of 34 acres, leaving plenty of options to build. The farm is country living at its best. $542,000.

Contact Lisa Tiger, Century 21 Gold, 710-207-6186.

Contact Melissa Crider, Sager Real Estate. 540-335-1387.

Properties for sale

Need financing for any of these properties?*

Mertztown, Pennsylvania

HAVE YOU SEEN OUR

WEBSITE RECENTLY? We have given our website a fresh new look to be more user friendly! Highlights of the revamp include: • Easier to navigate with more visuals • Newsroom with updated articles and blog posts • Videos on webpages with customer testimonials • Contact forms that make it easier to get in touch with us Check it out for yourself at mafc.com.

VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 1 | mafc.com | 19


PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID BALTIMORE, MD PERMIT NO. 1608

45 Aileron Court Westminster MD 21157

Protect Your Investment We know that farming is a risky business. Crop insurance mitigates that risk and protects you from major loss. Give us a call today to discuss your crop insurance options.

888.339.3334 | farmcreditcropinsurance.com

Profile for MidAtlantic Farm Credit

Leading The Way  

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