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Midlothian Resource Guide

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Resource Guide for Operations Staff Working with Young People with Additional Support Needs 2012

1. Introduction 2. The Act and Code 3. Post 16 Options 4. Which Options? How to make it happen? 5. Accessing the Options: Support & Suggestions 6. National and Local Provision 7. Other Sources of Help Supported Employment and Access to Work

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1. Introduction ASN Resource to Staff This section has been developed to help SDS Operations Staff to support young people in mainstream and special schools or units who have additional support needs (ASN) and/or disabilities to consider all their options at 16 years of age and to make appropriate career and support plans leading to positive and sustainable transitions. As the Code of Practice supporting the ASL Act 2009 states “whatever children and young people require to learn in order to make the transition successful should in good practice, be planned for carefully and in a timely manner� (CH 6, pt 20).

2. The Act & Code The Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2009 (The ASL Act) aims to ensure that all children and young people are provided with the necessary support to help them work towards achieving their full potential. It promotes collaborative working among all those supporting children and young people. The Act places duties on education authorities and other agencies including SDS including that they must at least 12 months prior to the expected school leaving date, request and take account of, information and advice from appropriate agencies likely to make provision for the child or young person when he or she leaves school. The Code states: Preparation for adulthood should involve explicit recognition of the strengths, abilities, wishes and needs of the young person as well as identification of relevant support strategies which may be required (The Code, CH6 pt 18). Schools should ensure young people have sufficient information on which to base decisions about relevant choices of National Training Programmes (MAs, Get Ready for Work, Targeted Pathways), employment, college or Higher Education and they should have opportunities to sample options through visits and work experience. (The Code, pt.21)

To read the Act and the full Code click this link: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/04/04090720/0

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Definitions as per ASL Act 2009 It must be noted that the 2009 Act automatically deems that all looked after children and young people have additional support needs. It is the education authority who determines that they do not require additional support in order to benefit from school education. What does „disabled‟ mean in this Act? The meaning of disability, used in the Code, is as defined in the Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (c50), section 1 (1). This states that “a person has a disability for the purpose of this Act if he has a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his ability to carry out normal dayto-day activities”. Legal definition of additional support needs 1.-(1) A child or young person has additional support needs for the purposes of this Act where, for whatever reason, the child or young person is, or is likely to be, unable without the provision of additionalg support, to benefit from school education provided or to be provided for the child or young person. (1A) Without prejudice to the generality of subsection (1), a child or young person has additional support needs if the child or young person is looked after by a local authority (within the meaning of section 17(6) of the children (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.36)) (1B) But where, in the course of identifying (in accordance with the arrangements made by them under section 6(1)(b) the particular additional support needs of a child or young person who is looked after by a local authority (within the meaning of section 17(6) of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.36)), and the education authority form the view that the child or young person is, or is likely to be, able without the provision of additional support, to benefit from school education provided to, or to be provided for, the child or young person, subsection (1A) ceases to apply”. What is meant by additional support? Additional Support “1.-(3) in this Act “additional support” means(a) in relation to a prescribed pre-school child of school age or a young person receiving school education, provision or not educational provision) which is additional to, or otherwise different from, the educational provision made generally for children or, as the class may be, young persons of the same age in schools (other than special schools) under the management of the education of the child or young person, or in the case where there is no such authority, the education authority for the area to which the child or young person belongs.

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(b) in relation to a child under school age other than a prescribed pre-school child, such provision (whether or not educational provision) as is appropriate in the circumstances� Example of Support within Education The following are examples of additional support provided from within education services to children and young people: learning assistant supporting a young person with an autistic spectrum disorder in a nursery class teacher helping a young person by following a behaviour management programme drawn up in consultation with a behaviour support teacher tutorial support from a support for learning teacher to help with a reading difficulty use of communication symbols by a young person with autism designated support staff working with gypsy/traveller children/young people on their site to help them improve their literacy and numeracy skills in-class support provided by an English as an Additional Language (EAL) teacher for a young person whose first language is not English. receiving support to access the secondary mathematics curriculum for more able young person at the later stages of primary school Use of voice recognition by a child with dyslexia

3. Post 16 Options This section has been written to support SDS staff and assumes no prior knowledge or experience of working with people with additional support needs and/or disabilities. It is underpinned by the social model i.e. it assumes people with disabilities have the same aspirations, desires and needs as people without disabilities. It is recommended that staff dip into the relevant sections as required. (This information is not intended to cover options for those with the most profound and complex needs). It is well documented that young people with ASN often make several transitions post 16 before finding a positive outcome, and as the Equality and Human Rights Commission observe, 45% of disabled people in their 20s are not in employment, education or training (How Fair is Britain, 2010). Planning for these young people should begin no later than 12 months before their school leaving date, but the earlier the better, is the advice of expert agencies. At transitions meetings, it is important that all key partners are present to develop the most effective plan for the young person, agree support required and which agencies will fund this, to maximise each partnerâ€&#x;s contribution.

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So what are the options at 16? National Training Programmes MAs Targeted Pathways to Apprenticeships Get Ready for Work Training for Work (over 18s) Further Education College (FE) Mainstream course(s) with support Specialised courses focusing on life skills and core skills. Specialist College Continuing at school Higher Education Employment – full or part-time Self Employment Voluntary work or other self development programmes such as the Princeâ€&#x;s Trust Supported Employment e.g. with Enable or through Family Firms, Remploy Activity Agreements Many young people with ASN will be able to plan and progress their career goals through mainstream routes, or perhaps with some support to facilitate this, whilst other clients will feel they have done all they can to progress, but are encountering barriers, and they will require some more tailored or supported options to move forward. For each of the post 16 options above, there are examples of the support available, although this will vary by local authority and college, together with the key questions or issues for your clients and their parents/carers to consider, in deciding what is right for them. Later sections give information on local organisations that provide support in your area; to participate in education or employment, or to gain employability skills, or attend and participate in training.

4. Which options? How to make it happen? 16+ Learning Choices should ensure all young people completing compulsory education have: 1. an offer of a suitable place in post-16 learning and 2. that financial support should be accessible so staying in learning is a viable option. 5


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Work Experience The senior phase of the Curriculum for Excellence i.e. S4-S6 emphasised the need for young people to gain practical experience of the world of work. As work experience is increasingly required to support UCAS and college applications, as well as applications to Modern Apprenticeships and employment, it is essential that young people with ASN and disabilities get this opportunity. It is the responsibility of schools to organise work experience. Step 1 Career Guidance Establish what the young personâ€&#x;s career ideas and aspirations are. Our unique role is to provide careers information, advice and guidance. Step 2 Routes to achieve careers goals. Identify possible routes to achieve careers goals. Step 3 Preferred Options Working with the young person and his/her parents or carers to establish the preferred option. This may require: further information e.g. criteria for GRfW and MA funding information from, for example, the College, to establish if support is required and also what support the college could give financial advice, perhaps from the Disability Employment Adviser (DEA) for JC+. the Adviser to check if the young person has a social worker; it is then useful to ask what financial or other support could be available post 16. (Other sources of information on financial information include Enquire, local authority welfare rights/ employability advisers, CAB etc). NB. at 16 young people can claim in their own right. Step 4 Meeting with Key Partners This is not always as straightforward as it is in schools, where they organise these meetings and invite attendees. If key partners are present: Establish young persons preferred route to achieve careers goal. Identify support required agree who will be providing funding and which elements are required to ensure coherent package is available.

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Key Partners Who should be at a Transition Meeting? This will depend on several factors including:What barriers to progression/support is required to move forward What the young personâ€&#x;s career goals and preferred routes are A Transition Meeting will always include: The young person and his/her parent(s) or carer(s) - who know about their child School staff member(s) e.g. PCS Learning Support (the school will chair the meeting) Careers Adviser &/or Key Worker. A Transition Meeting could also include a whole range of other people including: Social Worker(s): from Throughcare and Aftercare or other teams, home family support, criminal justice etc. Educational psychologist – if they have been involved Doctor - if the person has a medical condition Activity Agreement Co-ordinator Learning Provider College representative Disability Employment Adviser (DEA)

Step 5 Apply for agreed option Assist young person and her/his parents and carers to apply and to prepare for selection process: Maintain contact to check progress. Support client and obtain feedback from her/his applications, advocate for client where appropriate.

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5. Accessing the Options: Support & Suggestions National Training Programmes (NTPs) There are currently very few young people with disabilities and/or ASN on NTPs e.g. just 154 of 32253 MAs in 2010/11 were recorded as having a disability or other support needs – ie 0.5% and just 20 recorded with a disability on GRfW (also 0.5%). 3 in Life skills out of 530 young people and 17 in mainstream NTPs out of 3083. The reasons for under-representation are complex, however NTPs are the gateway to many well paid and rewarding occupations and career paths from administration and engineering to chef or construction careers. Please don‟t let someone discount NTPs if it is right for them, just because it appears easier just to stay on at school or just to transfer to college. Typical Issues Issue 1 - parents of young people with ASN fear the young person will be bullied, or will not succeed at the application stage or later on. They may also face uncertainties about finance if the young person leaves early or does not progress. Solution: These worries are very natural for everyone making transitions and especially for these young people. A year at college/school can seem “safer”. Please make sure parents and carers know what support is available by: making them aware that a young person could perhaps be assigned a Key Worker for the first few weeks/months. arranging a visit to the provider/employer for the parents/carers before applying ensuring they know access to GRfW is for 16, 17 and sometimes 18 year olds and they are fully funded on MA only 16-19 years. highlighting that GRfW and Targeted Pathways providers have to have equalities policies. emphasising that this is the best option for some occupations and SDS is here to support them and the young person.

Issue 2 (re Progression to a MA Programme) - no relevant work experience and do not know anyone in the sector to ask. Solution: In S4 senior phase, get the school to organise work experience even if it is in a holiday period. Consider an Activity Agreement where an elements of it is work 8


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experience. Go onto a GRfW programme(See Operations Handbook and/or Provider Central) Seek support from e.g. Remploy, Enable or local group e.g. real jobs. Issue 3 (re Progression to a MA Programme) - needs specialist equipment or support with exams or transport there. Solution: Access to Work Scheme. In some locations, organisations offer free support e.g. Contact Point in Dunbartonshire will loan wheelchairs etc... (See local support sections for what is available in your area.)

Further Education Mainstream Course Special courses focusing on life skills and core skills Specialist colleges – www.natspec.org.uk Enquire tell us they receive lots of enquiries around the question “What support should I get at college?” and “What is reasonable?” Enquire advise people to start as early as possible to try and organise support for going to college. Points to note: All colleges have to produce a disability statement detailing the support they can offer students. The student services team should be able to provide advice on support available. LEAD Scotland will also provide support to FE (and HE) students – support varies geographically – check what is available in your area. (hyperlink) If something is agreed, make sure funding does not just stop at 18 years old but that the young person will have the opportunity to complete the courses and exams. Mainstream If this is the option that is right for the young person, encourage them to contact the development &/or student services prior to application for a visit and to discuss support required and that the college can offer. Encourage the college to send a representative to the transition meeting. It may be necessary to agree which key partners will provide which element of the support required e.g. social work may provide transport, the college may provide specialist equipment, SDS may be able to provide Key Worker support for the induction period.

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Specialist Course It is important that the young person has a programme of study which builds from what they have already achieved and does not just repeat it. Please encourage young people and their parents or carers to visit and ask about/consider: progression from this course, where do most students go on to? the extent to which the course can be tailored support available to attend is this definitely the right option if compared to mainstream courses or GRfW on the Activity Agreement? Specialised College (Residential) If the young person wishes to look at this option, they should ascertain how this will be funded as soon as possible.

6. National and Local Provision National Provision

Local Provision

Aberlour Childcare Trust Aberlour help children and young people who need additional care and support to achieve their potential and to live safe, fulfilling lives. http://www.aberlour.org.uk/aboutus.aspx Tel: 01786 450335 Children whose lives are affected by parental drug and alcohol dependency, young people who have social, educational and behavioural difficulties, children and young people who run away from home and are exposed to risk of harm, children and young people who have a disability, young children to experience positive parenting, play and early learning. AbilityNet AbilityNet is a national charity helping disabled adults and children use computers and the internet by adapting and adjusting their technology. http://www.abilitynet.org.uk/about 10


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Freephone 0800 269545 or 01926 312847 (if you call from work, minicom accessible) Additional Support Needs Tribunals for Scotland (ASNTS) ASNTS is an independent body that considers appeals on certain matters relating to the provision of additional support, particularly co-ordinated support plans. www.asntscotland.gov.uk Advice Service Capability Scotland (ASCS) The ASCS is part of Capability Scotland and is a disability organisation offering a range of services and support for those with cerebral palsy and other disabilities. www.capability-scotland.org.uk Barnardos Barnardos works to give disadvantaged children help to build their future. It runs local projects, including those for families of a child with additional needs. www.barnardos.org.uk Fostering and adoption services and support, helping children break free from sexual exploitation, support young carers and helping children living in poverty. Capability Scotland Capability Scotland provides a broad range of services to adults and children with disabilities. www.capability-scotland.org.uk Capability Scotland provides residential care; support for independent living; education, Early Years and Childcare and Allied Health Services.

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Common Ground Mediation Common Ground Mediation helps to resolve disputes between parents and carers of children with additional support needs and the local education authority and/or schools. www.commongroundmediation.co.uk Contact a Family (CaF) Scotland Contact a Family provides support, advice and information for families with disabled children, no matter what their condition or disability. It can also link families who have a child with a rare or specific syndrome. The CaF Directory online contains details of specific medical conditions and rare disorders. www.cafamily.org.uk 0808 808 3555 Disability Alliance (includes SKILL) Disability Alliance is a national registered charity which works to relieve the poverty and improve the living standards of disabled people. Their eventual aim is to break the link between poverty and disability. http://www.disabilityalliance.org 0800 328 5050 Dyspraxia Foundation The Dyspraxia Foundation supports families affected by developmental dyspraxia and aims to increase understanding and awareness of dyspraxia. www.dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk 0141 445 1955 Education Law Unit - Govan Law Centre The Education Law Unit is Scotland's expert legal resource in school education, providing information and advice, training 12

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and legal representation. www.edlaw.org.uk 0141 445 1955 Enable Scotland Campaigns for a better life for children and adults with a learning disability and supports individuals and families. Run a growing range of flexible services, including training and supported employment for individuals based on their interests. www.enable.org.uk 0141 226 4541 Enquire (Action for Children) Scottish advice service for additional support for learning. Managed by Children in Scotland and funded by the Scottish Government. http://enquire.org.uk/about Telephone helpline – 0845 123 2303 Scottish advice service for additional support for learning. Epilepsy Scotland Epilepsy Scotland provides services to people with epilepsy, friends and family and care professionals. www.epilepsyscotland.org.uk 0808 800 2200 Epilepsy Society Provides information and support to people with epilepsy, their families, friends and professionals involved in their care. www.epilepsysociety.org.uk 01494 601 400 Headway

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UK organisation - the brain injury association http://www.headway.org.uk/Regions/Scotla nd.aspx 0808 800 2244 Inclusion Scotland Inclusion Scotland is a consortium of organisations of disabled people and disabled individuals http://www.inclusionscotland.org

Independent Special Education Advice (ISEA) ISEA offers information, advice and support, including advocacy/representation, to parents and carers of children and young people with additional support needs. www.isea.org.uk Telephone/Fax 0131 454 0096/0144 LEAD Scotland Lead Scotland, (Specialists in Linking Education and Disability), is a voluntary organisation to widen access to learning for disabled young people and adults and carers across Scotland. www.lead.org.uk 0131 228 9441 textphone: (18001) 0131 228 9441

NATSPEC (Association of National Specialist Colleges) Natspec is the membership association for independent specialist colleges providing further education for young people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities www.natspec.org.uk

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Remploy Remployâ€&#x;s provide specialist training and support to help individuals to secure and sustain employment. Services include: Confidence Building; job Search; Applying for Work; Interview Preparation; Job Coaching; BSL Interpreters. http://www.remploy.co.uk/about-us.ashx Individuals 16+ with health conditions, disabilities &/or multiple barriers to getting into work. Resolve ASL (Children In Scotland) Resolve: ASL is Scotland's independent additional support for learning mediation service offering a child-centred approach or resolving conflict in education. www.resolveasl.org.uk Scottish Disability Equality Forum The Scottish Disability Equality Forum (SDEF) is a membership organisation, open to all disability organisations and to individuals with any type of impairment. www.sdef.org.uk (01786) 446456 Scottish Sensory Centre The Scottish Sensory Centre is for everyone who is involved in the education of deaf children, deaf/blind children and visually impaired children and young people, the young people themselves and their families. www.ssc.education.ed.ac.uk Self Directed Support Scotland Self Directed Support Scotland is a Scottish Government website providing information about self-directed support for service-users and health and social support for professionals. 15

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www.selfdirectedsupportscotland.org.uk Shaw Trust Shaw Trust is a national charity which supports disabled and disadvantaged people to prepare for work, find jobs and live more independently. www.shaw-trust.org.uk SKILL (National Bureau for Students with Disabilities) - now part of Disability Alliance Promotes opportunities for people with any kind of disability in learning and employment. Disability Alliance now provides parts of SKILL: Updated FAQs and information booklets for disabled students. Young people's website. Helpline service policy and campaigns work. www.skill.org.uk Disability Alliance: http://www.disabilityalliance.org Disability Alliance freephone number: 0800 328 5050 - freephone helpline 0800 328 5050 or email skill4disabledstudents@disabilityalliance.o rg.

Working Links Working Links supports people into sustainable employment. http://www.workinglinks.co.uk/about_us/off ice_finder/scotland.aspx 0800 917 9262

Carers Barnardos Barnardos supports young carers and families with various services to make it possible for a child just to be a child. http://www.barnardos.org.uk/what_we_do/t 16

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urn_around/young_carers Carers Scotland

MECOPP

Carers Scotland supports people who care for an elderly relative, a sick friend or a disabled family member.

Website: www.mecopp.org.uk

http://www.carersuk.org/about-carersscotland

Black and minority ethnic carers and communities

Client Groups and eligibility:

Services: Casework and representation, respite and training, advice and information Refer by: Self – email: info@mecopp.org.uk Chinese language line: 0131 467 2996 Asian language line: 0131 467 2997 NHS Carer Support Website: www.nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk Client Groups & eligibility criteria: Carers in Lothian Services: Information, advocacy and advice, stress management courses and counselling, respite, financial and benefit advice, courses on specific medical conditions, support groups, 1:1 case work Refer by: Through carer support team: 0131 536 3371 carer.support@luht.scot.nhs.uk VOCAL – Voice of Carers Across Lothian Website: www.vocal.org.uk Client Groups: 17


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Carers of people of any age who need help to manage a long term condition, disability, physical or mental health problem or addiction. Eligibility Criteria: Being a carer and living in Edinburgh/Lothian Services: Information and advice, support, training, groupwork, counselling and advocacy. Refer by: Self referral, carer referral, professional referral Email: centre@vocal.org.uk Phone: 0131 622 6666 The Princess Royal Trust for Carers The Princess Royal Trust for Carers provides support to carers in families affected by disabilities or illness, including advocacy for parents of children with additional support needs. www.carers.org.

Communication Disorders Afasic Scotland Afasic is the UK charity representing children and young adults with communication impairments, working for their inclusion in society and supporting their parents and carers www.afasicscotland.org.uk 0845 3 55 55 77 - open 10.30am-2.30pm Mon – Fri National Autistic Society

Number 6

Support people affected by autism and Aspergers syndrome to live as independently as possible. Provide

Website: www.number6.org.uk Client Groups: Adults with high18


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information, support and pioneering services, and campaign for a better world for people with autism.

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functioning autism and Asperger syndrome Eligibility Criteria: as above and living in Edinburgh and the Lothians.

www.autism.org.uk

Services: A one-stop shop with advice, information, social opportunities. Also offers outreach support to individuals and some supported housing. Refer by: self or appropriate professional. Scottish Autism (previously Scottish Society for Autism) Provides services and training in education, care, support and life opportunities for people of all ages with Autistic Spectrum Disorder http://www.scottishautism.org 01259 720 044

Speakability Speakability is the UK charity that supports and empowers people with Aphasia to overcome the barriers they face. http://www.speakability.org.uk/About+Spea kability/news/speakability_communication_ forum_scotland 0808 808 9572

Employability Shaw Trust

Shaw Trust CBC House 24 Canning St Edinburgh EH3 8EG Tel 0131 272 2776

National charity which works with employers, social services and the disabled to help people with disabilities find employment. www.shaw-trust.org.uk Referrals have to go through the DEA at Jobcentre Plus.

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Client Groups: a specialist employment and support service for people with an acquired brain injury or Aspergers. Eligibility Criteria: People with Aspergers or an acquired brain injury who are motivated to look for employment or training. Must live in Edinburgh, Midlothian or East Lothian. Services: employment support services – vocational assessment, vocational and recruitment advice, assisted job search, support to employers, aftercare service Refer by: self or appropriate agency STEM 1 Eskdail Court Dalkeith EH22 1AG Tel 0131 270 8935. Website: www.midlothian.gov.uk Client Groups: For adults with a physical, sensory ,learning or mental health disability who wish to access employment. Eligibility Criteria: Anyone in the above group living in Midlothian. Must be receiving disability living allowance. Services: Trains and supports people to gain employment, work experience or work as a volunteer. Can include travel training. Refer by: By a social worker, any other professional or self referral.

Remploy Remployâ€&#x;s provide specialist training and support to help individuals to secure and sustain employment. Services include: Confidence Building; job Search; Applying 20


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for Work; Interview Preparation; Job Coaching; BSL Interpreters. http://www.remploy.co.uk/about-us.ashx

Learning Disabilities Advocacy Scottish Independent Advocacy Support The Scottish Independent Advocacy Alliance (SIAA) promotes, supports and defends the principles and practice of independent advocacy across Scotland. http://www.siaa.org.uk British Dyslexia Association Provides advice and support to dyslexic people and those with whom they come into contact as well as campaigning on behalf of dyslexic people and promoting research. www.bdadyslexia.org.uk 0845 251 9002 Cherry Road Resource Centre 8 Cherry Road Bonnyrigg EH19 3ED Tel 0131 561 5402 Website: www.midlothian.gov.uk (see website booklet) Eligibility Criteria: Anyone in the above group living in Midlothian. Services: They help people to access all kinds of leisure and independent living type activities either within the centre or out in the community. Refer by: By a Social worker following a community care assessment. Cornerstone 21


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Providing services for adults and children with learning disabilities. http://www.cornerstone.org.uk/ Down’s Syndrome Association Information and help for people with Downâ€&#x;s Syndrome. www.downs-syndrome.org.uk Down's Syndrome Scotland Down's Syndrome Scotland offers a range of support services and information for individuals with Down's Syndrome, their families and people working with them. www.dsscotland.org.uk 0131 313 4225 Dyslexia Action Scotland Dyslexia Action provide services and support for people with dyslexia or literacy difficulties focusing on assessment and education http://www.dyslexiaaction.org.uk Dyslexia Scotland Dyslexia Scotland is the voluntary organisation representing the needs and interests of dyslexic people in Scotland. www.dyslexiascotland.org.uk 0844 800 84 84 helpline open 10am-1pm and 2pm-4pm PAMIS Works with people with profound and multiple learning disabilities, their family carers and professionals who support them. www.pamis.org.uk Scottish Consortium of Learning 22

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Disability Work with people with all ages who have learning disabilities and their family carers. http://www.scld.org.uk

Mental Health Integrated Mental Health Services (NHS and LA) Refer to local authority. Telephone: 0845 456 6000 Momentum Helps disabled and excluded people throughout Scotland achieve their potential. Includes information about activities and fund-raising. www.momentumscotland.org

Penumbra A mental health charity which aims to improve mental well being throughout Scotland. www.penumbra.org.uk

SAMH (Scottish Association for Mental Health)

Scottish Association for Mental Health

Information services and direct services (housing and employment) for people with mental health problems.

Website: www.samh.org.uk

www.samh.org.uk 2-4pm Monday to Friday freephone 0800 917 34 66 Tourette Scotland Tourette Scotland provides advice and support for children and adults with Tourette syndrome and the people who live and work with them. www.tourettescotland.org 0300 11 11 462 23

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Young Minds A national charity committed to improving the mental health of children and young people. Offers a Parentsâ€&#x; Information Service, leaflets and booklets as well as a magazine. www.youngminds.org.uk 0808 8025544

Physical Disability Action on Hearing Loss (formerly RNID) Royal National Institute for the Deaf Provides wide range of support to people who are deaf or hard of hearing. www.rnid.org.uk now www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk Telephone 0808 808 0123 (freephone) Textphone 0808 808 9000 (freephone)

Deaf Action Provides a range of services to deaf, deafblind and hard of hearing people, their families and carers, mainly in Edinburgh and the Lothians. www.deafaction.org Deafblind Scotland To help deafblind people in Scotland live as rightful members of their own communities and to encourage and support contact between deafblind people and sighted hearing people. http://www.deafblindscotland.org.uk 0141 777 6111 Headway Brain injury association promoting understanding of all aspects of head injury. Provides information, support and services 24

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to people who have suffered a head injury, their family and carers. www.headway.org.uk 0808 800 2244 Momentum Momentum works in partnership to enable and empower disabled and excluded people to identify and achieve their goals. www.momentumscotland.org National Deaf Children Society (NDCS) Scotland NDCS aims to remove the barriers to the achievement of deaf children. www.ndcs.org.uk 0808 800 8880 Royal Blind Royal Blind operates four distinct services: The Royal Blind School, Forward Vision, Braeside House, and the Scottish Braille Press. http://www.royalblind.org Royal National Institute for the Blind

RNIB Employment and Learning Centre

Offers advice and support to people with sight problems in areas such as education, Website: www.rnib.org.uk training, employment and leisure Client Groups and eligibility criteria: www.rnib.org.uk Blind and visually impaired people throughout Scotland and the North of RNIB Employment and Learning Centre England. www.rnib.org.uk Services: Client Groups and eligibility criteria: Designed to enhance the Blind and visually impaired people independence of blind and partially throughout Scotland and the North of sighted people and to help them secure England. the best possible employment opportunities. Services: Designed to enhance the independence of Refer by: blind and partially sighted people and to Self or by a professional help them secure the best possible employment opportunities. Refer by: Self or by a professional 25


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Sense Scotland Sense Scotland provides services and is involved in policy development for children and adults with complex support needs due to deafblindness or sensory impairment, learning disability or physical disability. www.sensescotland.org.uk

Other relevant organisations Apex Scotland Helps ex-offenders and young people at risk realise their potential through employment Tel: 0131 220 0130 www.apexscotland.org.uk Big Plus The Big Plus is Scotland's campaign to promote the free help that's available across the country. http://www.thebigplus.com 0808 100 1080 Children 1st Work with children and families and campaign for children's rights. www.children1st.org.uk Children In Scotland (see Enquire) A membership organisation representing the interests of children and young people in Scotland on behalf of its members. www.childreninscotland.org.uk Childline Scotland Childline Scotland offers children and young people confidential advice. www.childline-scotland.org.uk 26

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Bullying helpline: 0800 441111(for children and young people experiencing bullying) and The Line: 0800 884444 (for children and young people living away from home) Citizens Advice Scotland The Citizens Advice service helps people resolve their legal, money and other problems by providing free, independent and confidential advice, and by influencing policymakers. www.cas.org.uk Directgov Provides information on a range of subjects including looking for work, financial support, tax information, benefits and adult learning and skills. The website also contains online benefit and allowances application forms. www.direct.gov.uk Education Scotland (previously Learning and Teaching Scotland) Education Scotland is the national body responsible for reviewing the curriculum, developing assessment to support learning and providing national guidance and advice to the education system on the use of ICT to support learning and teaching. www.educationscotland.org.uk Equality and Human Rights Commission Information and advice on legislation and rights. www.equalityhumanrights.com Equity in Education aims to improve educational and social outcomes for children and young people, particularly those with additional support needs. Their services include the Transforming Transitions project. 27

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www.equityineducation.org. Inspiring Scotland A venture philanthropy organisation that looks at improving the lives of Scotland's most vulnerable people. http://www.inspiringscotland.org.uk/Home JobCentre Plus Disability Employment Support Disability Employment Advisers (DEA) is based in the following Jobcentre Plus offices. Refer to local office. Mid and East Lothian Drugs (MELD) Website: www.meld-drugs.org.uk Client Groups: drug users, their families and friends Eligibility Criteria: as above and living in East and Midlothian Services: advice, information, support and counselling for drug users, needle exchange, family support service. Refer by: self and other people – referral form on-line Local Authority Provide housing support, literacy and numeracy, educational and psychological services, community learning and development youth work team, supported employment services.

Midlothian Council Social Work Department Community Care Team 4 Clerk St Loanhead EH20 8DR Tel 0131 271 3900 Website: www.midlothian.gov.uk (look under Health & Social care and then Disabilities) Client Groups: For adults with a physical, mental or leaning disability, those who are frail or unable to cope or those with substance misuse problems and their carers.

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Eligibility Criteria: Those in the above categories who are resident in Midlothian and over 16 years of age. Services: Social workers provide a community care assessment to help people to access the support and funding they need to live in their own homes or in a community setting. This might include accessing activities at a local resource centre or elsewhere in the community e.g. at college, leisure centre etc. Refer by: Can be by school, other professional or self referral.

Malani, malani@midlothian.gov.uk 3 Eskdaill Court Dalkeith EH22 1AG Tel 0131 270 8900 Provides adult literacy and numeracy help to adults over 16, and lip reading skills,basic IT skills and beginners courses in English as a second language.

NHS24 NHS 24 provides information and advice on health services, practices and procedures. www.nhs24.com 0845 4242424 Racial Equality Council Refer to local information Schoolhouse Home Education Association Schoolhouse offers information and support related to home-based education. www.schoolhouse.org.uk Scottish Council Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) 29


Midlothian Resource Guide

Provides information about voluntary groups, projects and volunteer opportunities in local areas. Please refer to local office. www.scvo.org.uk Scottish Child Law Centre The Scottish Child Law Centre is the only law centre in Scotland working exclusively for children and young people, providing free expert legal advice. www.sclc.org.uk 0800 328 8970 Scottish Government The official website of the Scottish government gives news and information about government publications, reports and government consultations. www.scotland.gov.uk Scottish Mediation Network The Scottish Mediation network aims to ensure mediation becomes a core part of resolving disputes and provides information on mediation services available in Scotland. www.scottishmediation.org.uk Scottish Network for Able Pupils (SNAP) SNAP provide support and advice to schools on how to meet the needs of highly able pupils. www.ablepupils.com Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) The SPSO is the final stage in handling complaints about public services in 30

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Scotland. www.spso.org.uk 0800 377 7330

Scottish Refugee Council The Scottish Refugee Council provides advice, information and assistance to asylum seekers and refugees living in Scotland. www.scottishrefugeecouncil.org.uk Scottish Traveller Education Programme (STEP) www.scottishtravellered.net Transforming Transitions Transforming Transitions provides personcentred planning for children and young people around school transition times. www.equityineducation.org. Turning Point Turning Point provided services in Scotland - it provides a person centred service for individuals with severe and enduring mental health issues. http://www.turningpointscotland.com Victim Support Scotland Offers support to victims and witnesses of crime. www.victimsupportsco.org.uk Volunteer Scotland Scotland's gateway to volunteering. Includes database of volunteering organisations. See also local volunteer centre. http://www.volunteerscotland.org.uk 31

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WEA The WEA is a provider of communitybased and workplace-based adult learning. We make a unique contribution to lifelong learning. The WEA's priority is to reach people who face barriers to learning. http://www.weascotland.org.uk Who Cares? Scotland Who Cares? Scotland provides support, information and advocacy for children and young people who are in care, looked after and accommodated in Scotland. www.whocaresscotland.org Youth Services

MYPAS Website: www.mypas.co.uk Client Groups: young people Eligibility Criteria: must be young (12 to 25) and living in Midlothian Services: art therapy, counselling, sexual health advice, substance use advice, group work and outreach Refer by: self or an interested agency

Welfare Rights Midlothian Council 4 Clerk St Loanhead EH20 9DR Tel 0131 271 3900 Website: www.midlothian.gov.uk Client Groups: For adults with a physical, sensory, learning or mental health disability in Midlothian. 32


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Eligibility Criteria: Anyone in the above group living in Midlothian. Must be receiving a service from Social Work or from a health professional e.g. community psychiatric nurse or referred by a teacher. Services: Benefits advice Refer by: By a social worker, any other professional or self referral Volunteer Centre Midlothian The Computer House Dalkeith Country Park Dalkeith EH22 2NA 0131 660 1216 Website: http://www.thistle.org,uk/ www.volunteermidlothian.org.uk Client Groups and eligibility criteria: For adults and young people in Midlothian. Services: Helps people find volunteering opportunities within Midlothian. Also run a supported volunteering project (Transform) for young people (15 -20) with opportunities to work as befrienders in care homes or environmental projects. Refer by: Can self refer or be referred by professionals. Citizen’s Advice Bureau Midlothian operate at numerous venues in Midlothian (check the website) Website: http://www.midlothian.gov.uk/ http://www.eastlothian.gov.uk/ www.cas.org.uk Client Groups and eligibiilty groups: For anyone needing their advice. Services: Information on all topics including 33


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welfare, consumer, debt, employment, family, housing, legal issues. CAB has a website, with information on a large variety of topics at www.adviceguide.org.uk Refer by: Self referral.

7. Other Sources of Help Supported Employment What is Supported Employment? “Providing support to people with disabilities or other disadvantaged groups to secure and maintain paid employment in the open labour market” (European Union of Supported Employment 2005) The EUSE asserts that income security and individual autonomy equality and full inclusion of people with disabilities in society can only be reached through labour market participation because employment is crucial for securing income. Although SDS advisers recognise securing a job is one stage in an individual‟s career development and he or she will need to upskill and change jobs to remain in employment. How does it work? Supported employment is a person centered method of working with people with disabilities, additional support needs or from other disadvantaged groups, enabling them to access and maintain employment through the ongoing provision of appropriate support. The method is a 5 stage process built on the “place – train – maintain” principle. 1. Engagement. Engage clients, provide CIAG to enable them to decide if they wish to participate in supported employment and leave full time education. 2. Vocational Profiling. Working with individuals to identify their strengths, skills and preferences. 3. Job Finding. Searching for appropriate employment opportunities considering the needs of clients and employers. 4. Employer Engagement. To identify what the employer requires and how to meet the job seekers support needs. 5. On/Off employment support. Support for both the client and the employer depending on their respective needs. How to access Supported Employment or Family Firms. Opportunities vary considerably across Scotland with a number of established projects in Edinburgh, Fife and one in Stirling. Members include Remploy, Enable, 34


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RNIB, SAMH to learn more about supported employment and what is available in your area look at the Scottish Union for Supported Employment web site http://learning.susescotland.co.uk What is Access to Work? Access to Work can help if ill health or a disability affects the way someone does their job. It gives the employee and employer advice and support with extra costs which may arise because of additional needs. Access to Work might pay towards: a support worker the equipment someone needs at work the cost of getting to work if the person cannot use public transport. a communicator at job interviews (covering some or all of the costs) Who can get Access to Work? A person: in a paid job unemployed and about to start a job unemployed and about to start a Work Trial self-employed with a disability or health condition which stops them from being able to do parts of their job. The disability or health condition may not have a big effect on what a person does each day, but may have a long-term effect on how well a person can do their job. To check if you can apply for Access to Work support go to: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/DisabledPeople/Employmentsupport/WorkSchemesAnd Programmes/DG_4000347 If a person is eligible they can print a confirmation letter and use it when they are talking to their employer about a job. Access to Work is also available to self employed people. The letter is not an application for Access to Work. Access to Work - check eligibility and get a letter opens new window How to contact Access to Work Access to Work contact centres Find your local Jobcentre Plus office 35


Midlothian Resource Guide

Source: DWP website

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ASN Resource Guide Midlothian  

Midlothian resources

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