Page 1

NORTHERN FRANCE

The Remembrance Trails 14 - 18 4 Trails Discover the sites and events of the Great War.


S. Dhote

Contents The First World War Remembrance Trails take in the sites and memorials which encapsulate the momentous events that took place in Northern France at the beginning of the last century. Behind the peaceful beauty of every site lies the gripping story of a soldier, a regiment, a battle or a place. Canadian National Vimy Memorial

This brochure provides historical and practical information about thirty-six major sites which can be found on four easy-to-follow trails. Follow the Remembrance Trails and discover how the conflicts of the 20th century marked the region of Nord-Pas-de-Calais.

Editorials

1 - The Western Front................................................. p. 4

The First World War Remembrance Trails

Two world wars have conferred upon the

in Northern France are the fruit of a vast

region of Nord-Pas-de-Calais a wealth of

programme initiated by the Regional Council

heritage in the form of military cemeteries,

to honour the sacrifice made by previous

war memorials and archaeological remains.

generations who fought to ensure that peace,

This heritage is the silent and poignant reminder

freedom and a sense of fraternity would one

of the events which shaped these conflicts.

day reign over Europe. The purpose of the First World War Far from being backward-looking and

Remembrance Trails in Northern France is to

nostalgic, this initiative is proof of our concern

provide the public with an insight into some

for the world of today and provides us with

of the major events of world history and to pay

much to reflect upon as we build the world

tribute to the men and women from around

of tomorrow.

the globe who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Mr Daniel PERCHERON Senator for Pas-de-Calais Chairman of Nord-Pas-de-Calais Regional Council

Mrs Régine SPLINGARD Regional councillor Chairwoman of Nord-Pas-de-Calais Regional Tourist Board

2 - The war of movement and the first German occupation........... p. 10

3 - The Allies’ logistics base on the Channel coast. .................................... p. 14

4 - Post-war reconstruction. .............................. p. 16

Photo Credits: S. Dhote - E. Roose - A.S. Flament - P. Morès

3


A.S. Flament

Richebourg Neuve-Chapelle Indian Memorial

In October 1914 the British Army in Flanders was reinforced with troops arriving from India who would take part in a number of battles in the region, including the Battle of Neuve-Chapelle (1915) where 4,047 men of the Indian Corps were lost. With its 15-metre high column flanked by two tigers and topped with the Star of India, the Neuve‑Chapelle Memorial is the only place of remembrance on the Western Front to commemorate the sacrifice made by Indian soldiers during the Great War.

Rue Delval 59249 FROMELLES

Today, the numerous military cemeteries which punctuate the region are testament to the fierceness of these battles, the provenance of the men who fought them, and the miserable conditions soldiers of both sides endured in the trenches.

Crossroads between Route d’Estaires and Rue du Bois (RD 171) 62136 RICHEBOURG

2

One of the most beautiful Commonwealth cemeteries Encircled by a moat and crowned with weeping willows, Le Trou Aid Post Cemetery is one of the most beautiful Commonwealth cemeteries in the region and the last resting place of 356 soldiers who fell on the “Forgotten Front“. Although outside the most important strategic areas, the front between Armentières and La Bassée nevertheless saw numerous minor operations which were very costly in terms of human life: Le Maisnil in 1914, Aubers and Loos in 1915, and Fromelles in 1916.

I Jz er

N 369

Richebourg La Bassée

D 91 6

11 12

Mont-Saint-Eloi

10

Monchy-le-Preux

14

E 17 4-

0

N6 48 N

Hébuterne

6 93

ld

Assevent D 936

la S

D 962

re amb

Maroilles

Flesquières

Caudry

Le CateauCambrésis

Avesnes-sur-Helpe Ors

Les Rues-des-Vignes Trélon

- E 19

17

Combles

7

29

Longueval

D 101

01 10

D

D9

A2

D 64 3

Fourmies

Wassigny Canal de S

D

Albert

Villers-Bocage

Bapaume

40

FRAN NCE

CAMBRAI

D9

N 25

18

17

-E1 5

Beaumont-Hamel Serre-Puisieux

19

5

Maubeuge

Le Quesnoy

63 0

16

0 D 9933

Acheuxen-Amiénois

-E

Bouchain

D

Bullecourt Doignies Grévillers

Bavay

D 649

Aubignyau-Bac

Héninel

D 91 9

D

92 8

N

Feignies

t

4 D 93

Bernaville

N 90

Valenciennes

Denain

15

Ayette

Mons (Bergen)

N 455

5

Pozières Hallencourt

Lewarde

0

7 -E1

40 2

Douai D 95

Saint-Laurent-Blangy Athies

A 26

-E

Wallers

3 64

A 16

Raismes Cuincy

99339

Domart-enPonthieu

2 40

Marchiennes

Vis-en-Artois D N2

A7

St-Amand-les-Eaux

D

Ailly-le-HautClocher

Condésur-l'Escaut

A 23

D 938

HéninBeaumont

Vimy 9 Thélus

Souchez

Doullens

Picardie

Abbeville

-E 28

A1

de

7

A 21

Aix-Noulette

34 1

91

Harnes

D 93

Liévin

Lens

D 917

Frivillescarbotin

Sc

h D 617

N 47

D

Neuville-Saint-Vaast

Auxi-le-Château

D 925

7

A2

D

19 ev ille

A

La Louvière

0

N2

8

6

Loos-en-Gohelle

01

Ablain-Saint-Nazaire

Saint-Pol-sur-Ternoise

Saint-Valerysur-Somme

bb

56

A 16

uN ord

A 16 - E 402

D 929

Nouvion

d'A

N6

N

sc au

D3

41 D9

13 ARRAS

me

N7

N5

Crécy-en-Ponthieu

ari ti

Tournai (Doornik) A 27 - E 42

M

7

la C anc he

Hesdin

429

Ath (Aat)

Villeneuved'Ascq

Annoeullin

A 1 - E 17

Noeux-les-Mines Bruay-laBuissière Houdain

94 3

la Sca rpe

Gamaches

LILLE

-E

la

Azincourt

Rang-duFliers

A8

Seclin

a el al d Can

Béthune

Fressin

Montreuil-sur-Mer

Ca na lM

Roubaix

N 55

Saint-Josse

Rue

Tourcoing

Wattrelos

Fruges

Merlimont Merlimont

94 0

Aubers D 941

Ronse (Renaix)

Mouscron (Moeskroen)

9

2

Lillers

3

Fromelles De ûle

15

43

Lomme

Fleurbaix

A.S. Flament

el

Marcqen-Baroeul Lambersart

5 94

Vieille-Chapelle

D

D

N 32

02 E4 16 -

A

Manche

D 12 6

16

-E

D9

D

N8

N 50

D9

4 5 Busnes

A 26

D 901

6 D 12

9

A

4

2

la Lys

Aire-sur-la-Lys

Nord - Pas de Calais

Hucqueliers

Wambrechies

Armentières

Saint-Venant

Sainte-Cecile-Plage

BerckBercksur-Mer sur-Mer

Wervicq-Sud

Ploegsteert

Steenwerck

8 92

Fauquembergues

Stella-Plage Stella-Plage

Comines

D

Méteren

D 642

Lumbres

Hardelot

D 93

Messen (Messines)

Bailleul

Hazebrouck

Desvres

Dannes

Etaples-sur-Mer

Oudenaarde (Audenarde)

N 42

D

A 10

Kortrijk (Courtrai)

Menen Menen (Menin) (Menin)

Kemmel Kemmel

3 93

Arques

Saint-Etienne-au-Mont

e Touquetaris-Plage

D

Godewaersvelde

5 N 36

SAINT-OMER

Wimille Saint-Martin-Boulogne

Leie

A 19

Steenvoorde

Cassel Clairmarais

Wimere u x

BOULOGNESUR-MER

Ieper leper leper (Ypres) (Ypres)

Watten

Houlle

Licques

Wimereux

N 38

N 47

Poperinge 94 3

N9

Passchendaele

42

D

Sl ack

1

Wormhout

r l'Yse

La Reconstruction dans les territoires dévastés

Roeselare (Roulers)

13

Langemark

8

ais

Tournehemsur-la-Hem

Marquise

N

N

Audinghen

N3

-

Audruicq

15

Ardres

4

-E

Guînes

25

36

Wissant Tardinghen

Maintenay

Lakenhalle (Cloth Hall) Grote Markt 34 8900 IEPER (YPRES) BELGIUM Tel. +32 (0)57 239220 www.inflandersfields.be

Ca l

A

N

l de Cana

l'Aa

A.S. Flament

Hondschoote Bergues

Bourbourg

40

N 17

Dendermonde (Termonde)

N4

A 16 - E

N 35

Le Littoral, base arrière des armées alliées

N 50

Cap Blanc Nez

Petit-Fort-Philippe Grand-Fort-Philippe

DUNKIRK

Gravelines

CALAIS

Sangatte

D 240

In October 1914 the Western Front stabilized several kilometres from Ypres, creating a salient in the German line. Five battles of the Great War, involving troops from all over the world, centred on the rich Flemish city of Ypres. Today the city’s famous Cloth Hall, destroyed during the war and since rebuilt, is home to the “In Flanders Fields“ Museum which tells the story of the First World War through the eyes of a soldier and a civilian of the period.

Gent (Gand)

403

Mer du Nord

Ambleteuse

The Ypres Salient

A 14 - E 17

La guerre de mouvement et la première occupatio

Veurnes (Furnes)

E 42

Rue de Pétillon 62840 FLEURBAIX

Grande-Synthe

Oye-Plage

A 26

Ypres – In Flanders Fields Museum 1

(La Panne)

Zuydcoote Malo-les-Bains

A 17 - E

P. Morès

E. Roose

l 'E

Fleurbaix Le Trou Aid Post Cemetery

4

In honour of the Indian soldiers of the Great War

D 644

The Western Front ran like a scar across the countryside of Northern France between the historical provinces of Flanders and Picardy. After a number of minor operations in the Artois Hills, the French Army handed over to British troops in 1915. The following years saw an increase in military activity with major offensives at Arras in April 1917 and Cambrai six months later.

The statue in Memorial Park shows Sergeant Fraser carrying a wounded comrade out of no man’s land in the aftermath of the Battle of Fromelles, an operation launched to divert attention away from the major Allied offensive on the Somme. The nineteenth of July 1916 shall ever be remembered in Australia as the day their soldiers first fought in action on European soil during the First World War and one of the country’s most tragic episodes which resulted in 5,533 Australian casualties.

A2

By late 1914 both sides had lost all hope of a rapid victory. The French and British Armies found themselves pitted against their German counterparts along a line which stretched nearly 800 kilometres across France from the Belgian coast to the Swiss border. A long war of position and attrition had begun.

“Don’t forget me Cobber”

ar cq ue

1

The Western Front

Fromelles Australian Memorial Park 3

Le Catelet Bohain-en-Vermandois

La Capelle

5


Richebourg – Portuguese National Cemetery 5

French National War Cemetery at Notre-Dame de Lorette 7

The sole place of remembrance for the Portuguese soldiers of the Great War Intent on showing its support for the Allies, the young Portuguese Republic organized an expeditionary force in 1916. Portuguese soldiers were placed under British command and assigned to the front between Laventie and Festubert in French Flanders. On 9 April 1918 the Portuguese suffered numerous casualties during the German offensive on Lys Plain. Richebourg is the only Portuguese war cemetery on the front and the final resting place for the 1,831 Portuguese soldiers who died in 1918.

Route d’Estaires (RD 947) 62136 RICHEBOURG

Vimy Ridge National Historic Site of Canada

9

“Modern Canada was born in the trenches of Vimy“

The largest french military cemetery In May 1915, French troops attempted to wrest control of the Artois Hills S. Dhote from the German Army. They failed at Vimy Ridge but succeeded in retaking Lorette Spur, at a cost of 102,000 men. Today, the National First World War Cemetery is the final resting place for some 40,000 French troops, including 22,000 unknown soldiers. Lorette Spur is the largest of the French war cemeteries and a poignant reminder of the huge losses sustained by every sector of society during the Great War.

Chemin du Mont de Lorette 62153 ABLAIN-SAINT-NAZAIRE

Canada’s monument to her 11,285 soldiers reported lost on French soil during the Great War stands at the heart of a 107-hectare park overlooking the Pas-de-Calais coal basin. Built at the place where, on 10 April 1917, Canadian troops fighting as part of the British Army captured Vimy Ridge, the memorial’s white pylons and sculpted figures mark a defining event in the history of Canada.

Chemin des Canadiens 62580 VIMY Tel. +33 (0)322 767086

Thélus Lichfield Crater and Zivy Crater

P. Frutier

S. Dhote

P. Frutier

S. Dhote

S. Dhote

10

A mine crater for a grave United for the first time in a single army corps, the 4 Canadian Divisions of the Allied Army launched an attack on the heavilydefended Vimy Ridge on Lichfield Crater 9 April 1917. The officer in charge of burials used a mine crater at the foot of the ridge to inter the one hundred soldiers who were killed in the fighting. Today the burial grounds of Lichfield Crater and Zivy Crater are beautifully gardened although they still retain their circular shape, a unique feature among the Commonwealth War Cemeteries.

A.S. Flament

Loos-en-Gohelle Dud Corner Cemetery and Loos Memorial 6 “If any question why we died, tell them, because our fathers lied!“ Loos Memorial, which encircles Dud Corner Cemetery, immortalizes the names of the 20,000 soldiers of the British Army who have no known grave. Most of these soldiers were killed at the Battle of Loos in late 1915. Among them was the only son of the famous writer Rudyard Kipling. The author of The Jungle Book never got over the loss, as can be clearly felt in his Epitaphs of the War wherein he wrote the lines, “If any question why we died, Tell them, because our fathers lied“.

Route de Béthune (RD 943) 62750 LOOS-EN-GOHELLE

Souchez Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery

8

“There’s some corner of a foreign field that is for ever England“ (Rupert Brooke, in The Soldier) Before the war there was a house in Souchez named Cabaret Rouge. The house was destroyed with the rest of the village however its name lives on in the war cemetery which was created in 1917 by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to concentrate the graves of the 103 burial grounds in the region. Situated between two war cemeteries, one French and the other German, Cabaret-Rouge Cemetery today contains 7,655 Commonwealth burials of the Great War, more than half of them unidentified.

Lichfield Crater Hameau du Vert-Tilleul 62580 THÉLUS Zivy Crater Road to Neuville-Saint-Vaast 62580 THÉLUS

Memorial to Polish volunteers

Neuville-Saint-Vaast Memorial to Polish Volunteers Czechoslovak Cemetery and Memorial 11 “For our freedom and yours“ Intent on fighting German and Austro-Hungarian rule in their native countries, Czechoslovak and Polish immigrants living in and around Paris at the outbreak of the war were quick to enrol in the French Army and take part in the Second Battle of Artois in May 1915. Standing opposite the memorial to the soldiers of the Nazdar Company which marks the entrance to the Czechoslovak Cemetery, the Polish Memorial bears the motto “Za wolność naszą i waszą“ which means “For our freedom and yours“.

Road to Souchez (RD 937) 62580 NEUVILLE-SAINT-VAAST

Rue Carnot 62153 SOUCHEZ

6 P. Frutier

12 September 1920 – Procession to the War Cemetery at Notre-Dame de Lorette

7


S. Dhote

Neuville-Saint-Vaast – German War Cemetery at La Maison Blanche 12

Monchy-le-Preux Newfoundland Memorial

Doignies-Louverval Military Cemetery and Cambrai Memorial 16

14

The Caribou of the Newfoundland Regiment

“Reconciliation above the graves“ Neuville-Saint-Vaast – German War Cemetery is the largest of its kind in France. Established by the French at the end of the war, the cemetery is the final resting place of 44,833 German soldiers who died in S. Dhote Artois. The German War Graves Commission (Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge – VDK) redesigned the cemetery in the 1970s. A cross at the entrance to the site bears the words, “Peace to men of goodwill“, an aspiration shared by the VDK in their motto, “Reconciliation above the graves“.

Close to Monchy-le-Preux Church a bronze caribou stands proudly on the ruins of a German fortified post. On 11 April 1917, during the Battle of Arras, the village of Monchy-le-Preux was held briefly by Allied soldiers until a German counter-attack S. Dhote on 14 April drove them all out except for the brave men of the Newfoundland Regiment who held fast until relief came four hours later. Today the bronze Caribou of Monchy-lePreux commemorates the courage and bravery of those Newfoundlanders.

A new weapon: the tank On the 20 November 1917 the British Army launched an attack on German Lines at Cambrai. This operation was the first of its kind to rely on tanks to support the infantry and in all 476 Mark IVs were used. Initially things went well and the British broke through the Hindenburg Line; however the German counter-attack, which came a few days later, pushed them back. Next to the Louverval Military Cemetery stands a memorial to the 7,000 men of the Commonwealth killed in the Battle of Cambrai.

Serre Road – French and Commonwealth War Cemeteries

18

The battlefield cemeteries Although a mere 5 kilometres long, the road which runs from Serre-Puisieux in the department of Pas-de-Calais to Mailly-Maillet in Somme is bordered by no fewer than twelve war cemeteries. The area saw intense fighting in the Great War when the French, in June 1915, and later the British, in July 1916, took on the German Army in the Battle of the Somme. Today this historic landscape is home to the peaceful gardens of the Commonwealth and French War Cemeteries of the Serre Road.

Road from Serre-Puisieux to Mailly-Maillet (RD 919) 62116 PUISIEUX

RD 930 62147 DOIGNIES

Rue de Chaussy 62118 MONCHY-LEPREUX

Ayette Indian and Chinese Cemetery 19 The Asian Labourers of the Great War in Europe

Road to Arras (RD 937) 62580 NEUVILLE-SAINT-VAAST

Bullecourt Australian Memorial Park 15 S. Dhote

The Diggers of Bullecourt S. Dhote

Arras – Wellington Quarry

On 11 April 1917 the British 5th Army stormed the village of Bullecourt, an important link in the German defence known as the Hindenburg Line. A second offensive was launched on May 3rd but neither of these two operations achieved their objective and the five Australian divisions which took part in the fighting suffered heavy losses, close to 10,000 dead. The Australian Memorial Park in Bullecourt honours those courageous Diggers who lost their lives in these two events of the Battle of Arras.

13

When British soldiers rose from the earth On 9 April 1917 the British Army launched a huge surprise attack on the German lines before Arras to divert attention away from the main French offensive which was to take place on Chemin des Dames Road in Aisne. That morning saw 24,000 soldiers flood out from the network of old chalk-quarry tunnels to attack the German defences. Today the tunnels of Wellington Quarry are open to the public and invite the visitor to discover the gripping story of the Battle of Arras.

Rue Delétoille 62000 ARRAS Tel. +33 (0)321 512695 www.carriere-wellington.com 8

Digger Memorial Rue de Douai (D956) 62128 BULLECOURT

P. Morès

S. Dhote

Grévillers Military Cemetery and New Zealand Memorial

17

War and the great flu pandemic of 1918 The Grévillers Memorial was erected in honour of the 450 soldiers from New Zealand who were killed in action in 1918 but have no known grave. The monument stands in a cemetery which is the last resting place of 2,106 men, many of whom were declared “DOD” (Died of Disease) and probably succumbed to “Spanish Flu”. Between early 1918 and mid 1919 a particularly virulent form of flu spread far and wide as civilians and troops moved around the world, and it probably killed at least 25 million people.

The Ayette Indian and Chinese Cemetery is the final resting place of some eighty Asian labourers who died on the Western Front in Artois and Somme. To make up for a lack of available labour in Europe, the British Army recruited volunteer workers from India and China, but some also came from Egypt and South-Africa. These men carried out manual tasks in the supply bases along the French coast and at the Western Front. In the aftermath of the war many stayed behind to work on rebuilding France.

Route d’Ablainzevelle (RD 7) 62116 AYETTE

D29 62450 GRéVILLERS Ribécourt - Camp of Moroccan Spahis

9


The war of movement and the first German occupation

2

On 4 August 1914 the German Army put the Schlieffen Plan into action and launched its troops across Belgium with the ultimate objective of taking Paris. Despite the resistance of the Belgian Army and British and French expeditionary forces, the Germans continued their advance towards the French border which they soon crossed near the town of Maubeuge. After the stalemate of the First Battle of the Marne and the Race to the Sea, the Western Front stabilized and the belligerents dug in. The war of movement had turned into a war of position. The German Army occupied the territory it had conquered. Local resistance to the new military masters soon developed but was mercilessly suppressed. The summer of 1918 saw a return to the war of movement. The Allied Armies, placed under the sole command of French Marshal Ferdinand Foch, launched a huge offensive which would break the German lines of defence and lead to the liberation of the occupied territories.

Monument to the executed of Lille

Seclin Fort

2

The fort which never saw action Designed by General Séré de Rivières to defend the Belgian border, Seclin Fort is one of nineteen fortifications which were built around the city of Lille after the defeat of 1871. Seclin never saw action because Lille was declared an “open city“ on 1 August 1914 and subsequently occupied by the Germans in October later that year. Patiently restored by the Boniface Family since 1996, Seclin Fort is today home to the Artillery Museum.

Chemin du Petit Fort 59113 SECLIN Tel. +33 (0)320 971418 www.fortseclin.com

P. Morès

1

The Lille Resistance during World War I

(La Panne)

Zuydcoote

A 14 - E 17

La guerre de mouvement et la première occupatio

Veurnes (Furnes)

Malo-les-Bains

I Jz er

Lewarde

0

E 17 4-

N 60 19

Feignies

Denain

3 64

Monchy-le-Preux

t

5

Aubignyau-Bac

Le Quesnoy

D 6644 3

A 16

E4

-E

40 2

Acheuxen-Amiénois

Grévillers

02

Pozières

6 93

29

Combles

7

D9

Longueval

D 101

01 10

Albert

Villers-Bocage

Flesquières

A2

D 936

Caudry Les Rues-des-Vignes

ld

la S

D 962

re amb

Maroilles

Ors

4

Avesnes-sur-Helpe

Trélon

- E 19

Fourmies

Wassigny Canal de S

D

D

Hallencourt

Doignies

0 D 93

Bapaume Warlencourt Warlencourt -Eaucourt -Eaucourt

D 644

SerrePuisieux Beaumont-Hamel

Domart-enPonthieu

Le CateauCambrésis

D 91 7

Ailly-le-HautClocher

uN ord

Abbeville

Hébuterne

Bernaville

- E 17

Picardie

ev ille

A 26

Frivillecarbotin

bb

-E1 5

d'A

Doullens

D 925

N 25

me

Assevent

63 0

CAMBRAI

4 D 9933

Ayette ari ti

Maubeuge

40

D

Bullecourt

D 917

Saint-Valerysur-Somme

5

N

6

9

Héninel

D 91 9

92 8 D

N2

Bavay

9 49 D 64

Bouchain

Vis-en-Artois D 93

N 90

Valenciennes

N 455

D

ARRAS Auxi-le-Château

Mons (Bergen)

N2

D 91 6

Wallers

Douai D 95

SaintLaurent-Blangy

Crécy-en-Ponthieu

A

Sc

Raismes Cuincy

Mont-

Nouvion

Gamaches

48

D 617

Marchiennes

Athies

10

A2

ar cq ue M

HéninBeaumont

la Sca rpe Saint-Eloi

NeuvilleSaint-Vaast

A7

St-Amand-les-Eaux D 938

Vimy

Souchez

7

-E

Liévin

A

La Louvière

0

Condésur-l'Escaut

A 23

7

A 21

D9 35

91

Harnes

Aix-Noulette

34 1

Saint-Pol-sur-Ternoise

A 16

A2

D

D 929

Hesdin

Maintenay

D

Lens

56

la

N5

Loosen-Gohelle

01

AblainSaint-Nazaire

Seclin

Annoeullin

sc au

A 16 - E 402

la C anc he

N6

l ''EE

D3

N7

N 55

Noeux-les-Mines Bruay-laBuissière Houdain 41 D9

Tournai (Doornik)

N

La Bassée

94 3

9

A 27 - E 42

a el al d Can

3

42

De ûle

15

Béthune

Azincourt

2

-E

Ath (Aat)

Villeneuved'Ascq

Aubers

Richebourg

Lillers

A8

1

Lille

Fromelles

D 941

43

h

de

Fleurbaix

Ronse (Renaix)

N 47

-E

D9

Fressin

Montreuil-sur-Mer

28

Roubaix Wattrelos

Lomme

Vieille-Chapelle

Busnes

A 26

D 901

Saint-Josse

Ca na lM

Tourcoing

Marcqen-Baroeul Lambersart

5 94

A 1 - E 17

Aire-sur-la-Lys

el

Mouscron (Moeskroen)

9

2 D

la Lys

Fruges

Rue

A1

N 32

02

E4

16 -

A

N 369 16

8 92

Nord - Pas de Calais

6 D 12

9

94 0

D

Wambrechies

D9

D 240

D

N8

N 50

Steenwerck

D

Bercksur-Mer

Comines

Ploegsteert

Armentières

Hucqueliers

Rang-duFliers

N 47

Méteren

Saint-Venant

Etaples-sur-Mer

42

D 642

Wervicq-Sud

(Messines)

Bailleul

Hazebrouck

Lumbres

D

Merlimont

N

Manche

4

3 93

Desvres

Fauquembergues

Stella-Plage

Kortrijk (Courtrai)

Menen (Menin)

Godewaersvelde

N 42

Hardelot

D 93

D

Arques

Dannes

Touquetaris-Plage

A 10

Oudenaarde (Audenarde)

Steenvoorde

365

Clairmarais

Sainte-Cecile-Plage

Leie

A 19

Cassel

SAINT-OMER

Saint-Etienne-au-Mont

leper (Ypres)

N 38

Watten

Houlle

Wimere u x

E. Roos e

N4

94 3

Wimille Saint-Martin-Boulogne

BOULOGNESUR-MER

N9

Passchendaele

Poperinge

Licques

Wimereux

La Reconstruction dans les territoires dévastés

Roeselare (Roulers)

13

Langemark

8

36

15 D

Sl ack

N

Audruicq

Tournehemsur-la-Hem

Marquise

N3

-

Wormhout

r l'Yse

N 17

Dendermonde (Termonde)

N

-E

Ardres

25

403

de C

A 26

Guînes

A

s al a i

l'Aa

l Cana

Wissant Tardinghen

Hondschoote Bergues

Bourbourg

40

E 42

A 16 - E

Cap Blanc Nez

Audinghen

DUNKIRK

Gravelines

CALAIS

Sangatte

Petit-Fort-Philippe Grand-Fort-Philippe

N 35

Le Littoral, base arrière des armées alliées

N 50

A 17 - E

Oye-Plage

Mer du Nord

Ambleteuse

Grande-Synthe

Parade of German troops in Lille main square

Gent (Gand)

N

Square Daubenton 59000 LILLE

D 12 6

E. Roose

The World War I monument in Lille shows the four leaders of the city’s Resistance lined up against a wall just moments before their execution by the German Army in the dungeons of the citadel. Along with Léon Trulin, who can be seen lying at their feet, Eugène Jacquet, Georges Maertens, Ernest Deceuninck and Sylvère Verhulst set up a network for communicating information to the Allies about the German occupiers of Lille. They were eventually betrayed and executed on 22 September 1915.

Le Catelet Bohain-en-Vermandois

La Capelle

11


Le Quesnoy New Zealand Memorial

Annoeullin Communal Cemetery German Extension 3

5

The Kiwis of Le Quesnoy On 4 November 1918 the town of Le Quesnoy was liberated by New Zealand troops who scaled the Vauban fortifications using simple wooden ladders. Fastened to the rampart wall, the New Zealand Memorial not only depicts the events of that memorable operation it also shows the Kiwi national emblem: a silver fern. Ninety years on from the Armistice of the First World War, the liberation of Le Quesnoy remains one of the most significant events in the history of the New Zealand Army.

Here lies Albert Ball, ace of the Royal Flying Corps Of all the graves in Annoeullin Cemetery one in particular stands out: that of flying ace Albert Ball. Transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in 1916, Ball was the leading Allied ace with 44 victories when, on 7 May 1917, his plane crashed after a battle with the squadron of Lothar Von Richthofen (brother of the Red Baron). The Germans claimed a victory while the British cited mechanical failure. Recovered by the people of Annoeullin, the body of Albert Ball was laid to rest with military honours.

S. Dhote

Rue du Vent de Bise 59112 ANNOEULLIN

Feignies – Leveau Fort

Ramparts (access on Rue Jeanne d’Arc and Avenue des Néo-Zélandais) 59530 LE QUESNOY

6

The longest siege of the First World War

P. Morès P. Morès

Ors Communal Cemetery

4

The final resting place of the great war poet Wilfred Owen “What passing bells for these who die as cattle? Only the monstrous anger of the guns“, wrote Wilfred Owen in the opening of Anthem for Doomed Youth. Like many of the poets of World War I, Owen described the lives of the soldiers in the trenches and denounced the horror of the fighting. He was killed in action on 4 November 1918, as his company tried to cross La Sambre Canal near the village of Ors, and laid to rest in the military section of the local cemetery.

Communal Cemetery Rue de la Gare 59360 ORS

S. Dhote

In the summer of 1914 the German Army marched through Belgium and entered France where they came up against the fortified outworks of Maubeuge. Designed by General Séré de Rivières, they had been built to defend the French border after the defeat of 1871. On 25 August 1914 the Germans surrounded the town in what was to become the longest siege of the war: it lasted a fortnight. Today the museum of Leveau Fort tells the story of Maubeuge during the two world wars.

Rue de Mairieux 59750 FEIGNIES Tel. +33 (0)327 623707 http://fortdeleveau.site.voila.fr

S. Dhote

12

S. Dhote

Scottish soldiers in a rear camp

13


3

Formerly a vast British Army field hospital, the site is now the largest Commonwealth War Cemetery in France. The final resting place of almost 11,500 soldiers, Étaples Military Cemetery is all that remains of a vast hospital complex which was set up to treat the wounded and evacuated troops of the British Army during the Great War. The town of Étaples was also home to the largest training camp outside Great Britain for recruits coming from all parts of the Commonwealth. Millions of men passed through the forty barracks of Étaples on their way to the A.S Flament Western Front.

In 1916 the General Headquarters of the British Army took up residence in the village of Montreuil-sur-Mer which subsequently became the nerve centre of an immense logistics chain stretching along the Channel Coast.

In the cemetery of St Étienne-au-Mont stands a pagoda‑shaped gate which marks the entrance to the final resting place of 160 Chinese and 10 South-African civilians. Organized into Labour Corps, these non-military workers carried out manual tasks for the British Army in the ports and depots which supplied the soldiers at the Front. In 1919 about eighty thousand Chinese were still at work in France clearing up the battlefields and burying the soldiers who had died in the Great War.

Communal Cemetery Rue Edmond Madaré 62360 SAINT-ÉTIENNE-AU-MONT t

r IJze

N 32

A 21

Raismes

Douai

D 91 6

Monchy-le-Preux

N

Maubeuge

Aubignyau-Bac

63 0 D

Grévillers

6 93

29

Combles

7

D9

D 101

01 10

Albert

Villers-Bocage

D 962

re amb

Avesnes-sur-Helpe Ors

Les Rues-des-Vignes Trélon

- E 19

ld

Fourmies

Wassigny Canal de S

D

D

Hallencourt

Longueval

Flesquières

Le CateauCambrésis

17

Pozières

A2

Caudry

D9

02

0 D 93

Bapaume Warlencourt -Eaucourt

uN ord

40 2

Acheuxen-Amiénois N 25

-E

SerrePuisieux Beaumont-Hamel

Domart-enPonthieu

-E1 5

Ailly-le-HautClocher

Doignies

7 -E1

Abbeville

la S

Maroilles

Hébuterne

Bernaville

A 26

Picardie

vil le

D 936

FRAN NCE

CAMBRAI

4 D 93

Doullens

D 925

be

Assevent

Le Quesnoy

9

Bullecourt

D 917

'Ab

Bavay

D 649

Bouchain

Héninel

40

Feignies

t

Vis-en-Artois

5

D 91 9

92 8

Athies

ARRAS

Valenciennes

N 455

Denain

3 64

D

Lewarde

0

N 90

D 64 3

Frivillecarbotin

A

D 95

SaintLaurent-Blangy

Ayette

E4

Wallers

19

Marchiennes Cuincy

D

N2

Saint-Valerysur-Somme

28

0

D 938

HéninBeaumont

D 93

Auxi-le-Château

Mons (Bergen)

-E

Lens

Liévin

Vimy

NeuvilleSaint-Vaast

Nouvion

ed

7

La Louvière A7

St-Amand-les-Eaux

Mont-

Nord - Pas de Calais

arit im

A

0

Condésur-l'Escaut

A 23

7

Aix-Noulette

Souchez

Crécy-en-Ponthieu

Ca na lM

56

N2

34 1

91

Harnes

D9 35

D

AblainSaint-Nazaire

Saint-Pol-sur-Ternoise

N5

Loosen-Gohelle

la Sca rpe Saint-Eloi

Rue

A 16

N 47

94 3

01

D

D 929

Hesdin

N6

N

sc au

D3

Houdain 41 D9

Maintenay

Place du Théâtre 6 2170 MONTREUIL-SUR-MER

M

Noeux-les-Mines Bruay-laBuissière

Azincourt Fressin

la C anc he

A 16 - E 402

94 0

N7

l 'E

Montreuil-sur-Mer

Tournai (Doornik) A 27 - E 42

la

A 1 - E 17

5

Rang-duFliers

Bercksur-Mer

N6

de

h D 617

Annoeullin

429

N 55

La Bassée

D

Gamaches

A2

2 15

Béthune

6 D 12

Seclin

a el al d Ca n

ar cq ue

-E

Richebourg

Lillers

-E

Ath (Aat)

Villeneuved'Ascq

D 941

N8

A8

LILLE

Aubers De ûle

A 26

Hucqueliers

43

Fruges

Saint-Josse

Roubaix Wattrelos

Lomme

Fromelles

Vieille-Chapelle

Busnes D9

Ronse (Renaix)

Marcqen-Baroeul Lambersart

5 94

Fleurbaix

Saint-Venant

Merlimont

Sc

02

E4 16 -

N 369

Aire-sur-la-Lys

Fauquembergues

Stella-Plage

Tourcoing

42

16

D

la Lys

7

N

Wambrechies

el

Mouscron (Moeskroen)

9

N 50

D9

8 92

N4

A

4

Manche

N4

Wervicq-Sud

Ploegsteert

Armentières

Hardelot

D

Comines

D

Méteren

Steenwerck

D

Etaples-sur-Mer

Messen (Messines)

Bailleul D 642

N 42

Dannes

4

36

3 93

Hazebrouck

Kortrijk (Courtrai)

Menen (Menin)

Godewaersvelde

Desvres

Le TouquetParis-Plage

N 50

D

Arques

Saint-Etienne-au-Mont

A 10

Oudenaarde (Audenarde)

Steenvoorde

5 N 36

Clairmarais

Sainte-Cecile-Plage

Leie

A 19

Cassel

Lumbres

3

leper (Ypres)

N 38

Watten

SAINT-OMER

A 16

14

Wormhout

r l'Yse

Houlle

Wimere u x

D 901

In Wimereux Cemetery, among the graves of the 3,000 soldiers and nurses who died in the British Army field hospitals, lies the final resting place of Lt-Col John McCrae. A Canadian doctor, McCrae was the author of the famous poem In Flanders Fields which he dedicated to those who fell in the Great War. The subsequent popularity of his poem contributed greatly to the poppy being chosen as a symbol of remembrance: “In Flanders fields the poppies blow, Between the crosses, row on row“.

943

Wimille Saint-Martin-Boulogne

Boulogne-sur-Mer

N9

Passchendaele

Licques

Wimereux

Roeselare (Roulers)

13

Langemark

8

Poperinge

40

In Flanders fields the poppies blow…

2

N

N 17

Dendermonde (Termonde)

N

15

2

D

Sl ack

N3

-

Audruicq

Tournehemsur-la-Hem

Marquise

Ambleteuse

de C

-E

Ardres

25

s al a i

A 26

Guînes

A

Bourbourg

40

l'Aa

l Cana

Wissant Tardinghen

Bergues

E 42

A 16 - E

Cap Blanc Nez

N 35

Hondschoote

Gravelines

CALAIS

Sangatte

Petit-Fort-Philippe Grand-Fort-Philippe

403

Oye-Plage

Audinghen

A.S Flament

Gent (Gand)

DUNKIRK

Grande-Synthe

T he equestrian statue of Field Marshal Haig is one of the few reminders of the British presence in Montreuil during the Great War. It was here that Douglas Haig, Commander-in-chief of the Britishet laArmy, installed his General La guerre de mouvement première occupatio Headquarters between 1916 Le Littoral, base arrière des armées alliées and 1919. Montreuil suddenly La Reconstruction dans les territoires dévastés became the British Army’s centre of operations for the supply of troops, provisions and equipment from the French ports of Boulogne, Calais and Dunkirk to the nearby front in Flanders, Artois and Somme. A 14 - E 17

Veurnes (Furnes) A 17 - E

1

Communal Cemetery Rue Jean Moulin 62930 WIMEREUX

A.S Flament

(La Panne)

Zuydcoote Malo-les-Bains

Mer du Nord

Wimereux Communal Cemetery

The GHQ of the British Army

A2

A.S Flamen

Montreuil-sur-Mer – The Equestrian Statue of Field Marshal Haig 5

17

During the Great War the German Army prosecuted underwater operations against the military and merchant navies of the Allies in an attempt to close the shipping routes between England and France and so deprive the British forces on the Continent of supplies and reinforcements. The Dover Patrol Memorial on the French headland of Cap Blanc-Nez honours “the glorious cooperation of the French and British Navies“ whose heroic efforts kept the Strait of Dover open to Allied shipping.

-E

The guardians of the Strait of Dover

Cap Blanc-Nez Sente du Blanc-Nez 62179 ESCALLES

RD 940 62630 ÉTAPLES

The Chinese Labour Corps of the Great War

48

1

3

A 14

St. Étienne-au-Mont Communal Cemetery

D 12 6

Cap Blanc Nez The Dover Patrol Memorial

A.S Flament

N

Boulogne-sur-Mer and other Channel ports saw a steady flow of supplies and fresh troops entering France from all over the world. After training, the new recruits were sent to the various sectors of the Western Front under British control, such as Flanders, Artois and Somme. Vast hospital complexes were also set up on the coast to care for the wounded returning from the Front.

D 644

The Allies’ logistics base on the Channel coast

Étaples Military Cemetery 4

Le Catelet Bohain-en-Vermandois

La Capelle

15


Post-war reconstruction

4

Zone Rouge (lit. Red Zone) was the name given to the area in France which had been ravaged by four years of fighting. The ground had been laid bare and the towns and infrastructure had all but been destroyed.

Place du Général de Gaulle 62300 LENS

Veurnes (Furnes)

I Jz er

Monchy-le-Preux

D9 16

5

63 0 D

Pozières

6 93

29

Longueval Combles

7

D9

D 101

01 10

Albert

Villers-Bocage

ld

la S

D 962

re amb

Caudry

Avesnes-sur-Helpe Ors

Les Rues-des-Vignes Trélon

19 2-E

Fourmies

Wassigny Canal de S

D

D

Hallencourt

A

D 936

Maroilles

Le CateauCambrésis

17

Acheuxen-Amiénois

Flesquières

D 64 3

D9

2 40

Doignies

0 D 93

Bapaume

uN ord

E

02

Grévillers

Warlencourt -Eaucourt

- E 15

28

E4

6

N 25

A1 6-

SerrePuisieux Beaumont-Hamel

Domart-enPonthieu

Cambrai

7 -E1

Ailly-le-HautClocher

Bullecourt

Hébuterne

Bernaville

Assevent

FRAN NCE

9

A 26

Picardie

ev ille

Abbeville

A

Doullens

D 925

bb

Maubeuge

Le Quesnoy

Héninel

D 91 9

92 8 D

N2

Bavay

D 649

Bouchain Aubignyau-Bac

Vis-en-Artois D 93

40

Feignies

t

4 D 93

d'A

Frivillecarbotin

Gamaches

3 64

me

N

Denain

D

5

N 90

Valenciennes

N 455

Lewarde

0

Athies

917 D 91

ari ti

0

Raismes Wallers

Douai

Ayette al M

N6

de

Marchiennes Cuincy

D 95

SaintLaurent-Blangy

Arras

Saint-Valerysur-Somme Ca n

Sc h

ar cq ue D 938

Beaumont

Crécy-en-Ponthieu

Mons (Bergen)

19

4

Vimy

A7

St-Amand-les-Eaux

Lens Hénin-

Liévin

Aix-Noulette

La Louvière

0

Condésur-l'Escaut

A 23

7

-E

91

Harnes

D9 35

D

NeuvilleSaint-Vaast

Auxi-le-Château

7

A2

Loosen-Gohelle

Mont-

Nouvion

A

M

N5

la Sca rpe Saint-Eloi

Rue

7

N 32

D 617

2

De ûle

A 16

N 47

94 3

Souchez

Saint-Pol-sur-Ternoise

N6

56

N2

Maintenay

a el al d Can

sc au

Hesdin

N7

la

AblainSaint-Nazaire 34 1

429

N

Annoeullin

01

D

D 929

-E

Seclin

A 21

41 D9

la C anc he

Tournai (Doornik)

l 'E

94 0

A8

A 27 - E 42

D 644

D

Ronse (Renaix)

Ath (Aat)

Villeneuved'Ascq

A 1 - E 17

Rang-duFliers

BerckBercksur-Mer sur-Mer

D

Houdain

Wattrelos

Aubers

La Bassée

Noeux-les-Mines Bruay-laBuissière

Azincourt Fressin

Montreuil-sur-Mer

Roubaix

A2

02

E4 16 A

Manche

N 369

3

Tourcoing

LILLE

Lomme

Fromelles

el

Mouscron (Moeskroen)

9

N 55

Béthune

D

Stella-Plage Stella-Plage Saint-Josse

Lambersart

Richebourg

Lillers

7

43

Wambrechies

D 941

N4

D9

Fruges

9

Merlimont Merlimont

2

Fleurbaix

42

15

6 D 12

N

-E

Nord - Pas de Calais

Hucqueliers

Wervicq-Sud Wervicq-Sud

MarcqArmentières en-Baroeul

5 94

Vieille-Chapelle

Busnes

N8

N 50

16

la Lys

Aire-sur-la-Lys

A 26

Sainte-Cecile-Plage

A 16 - E 402

Place du Général de Gaulle 59280 ARMENTIÈRES

D

Saint-Venant

D 901

Used extensively by the Commonwealth for stationing troops prior to the various Battles of Ypres, the Flanders town of Armentières was also the setting for the song Mademoiselle from Armentières. Reduced to rubble in the fighting, the town centre was redesigned after the Great War by the architect Louis-Marie Cordonnier. His regionalist ideas can be seen in many features of the town, notably the design of the bell tower which adheres faithfully to the style of the Flemish Renaissance.

8 92

Comines Comines

Ploegsteert

Steenwerck

Lumbres

D 240

Mademoiselle from Armentières and Flemish Renaissance

D 642

Messen (Messines)

D

N 42

Fauquembergues

D 93

1

Bailleul

Méteren

Hazebrouck

Desvres

Hardelot

Etaples-sur-Mer

Kemmel

3 93

Arques

Dannes

Touquetaris-Plage

D

Godewaersvelde

5 N 36

Clairmarais

D

Oudenaarde (Audenarde) Kortrijk (Courtrai)

Menen (Menin)

Steenvoorde

D9

Armentières – Town Hall and Bell Tower 2

A 10

A 19

Cassel

SAINT-OMER

Saint-Etienne-au-Mont

4

Watten

Houlle

Wimere u x

La Reconstruction dans les territoires dévastés

Leie

36

94 3

Wimille Saint-Martin-Boulogne

BOULOGNESUR-MER

leper (Ypres)

N 38

N 17

Dendermonde (Termonde)

Le Littoral, base arrière des armées alliées N9

Passchendaele Wormhout

r l'Yse

Gent (Gand)

Roeselare (Roulers)

13

Langemark

8

Poperinge

Licques

Wimereux

N

N

15 D

Sl ack

N3

-

Audruicq

Tournehemsur-la-Hem

Marquise

25

E 42

-E

Ardres

Audinghen

P. Morès

de C

A 26

Guînes

A

s al a i l'Aa

l Cana

Wissant

Hondschoote Bergues

Bourbourg

40 A 16 - E

403

CALAIS

Tardinghen

DUNKIRK

Gravelines

Cap Blanc Nez

Ambleteuse

Petit-Fort-Philippe Grand-Fort-Philippe

N 35

A 14 - E 17

La guerre de mouvement et la première occupatio

N 50

A 17 - E

Mer du Nord

Grand’Place 59270 BAILLEUL

Grande-Synthe

Oye-Plage

Sangatte

16

Grand’Place 62400 BÉTHUNE

(La Panne)

Zuydcoote Malo-les-Bains

N4

Spared from much of the fighting in the early days of the war, the town of Bailleul was eventually destroyed in the German spring offensive of 1918. During reconstruction the local authorities commissioned "regionalist" architects, such as Louis-Marie Cordonnier, to give a traditional Flemish appearance to what would be in fact a modern and carefully-planned urban area. Today, as a result of their work, post-war Bailleul is undoubtedly one of Flanders’ most beautiful towns.

During the Battle of the Lys, in the spring of 1918, the German Army attempted to take the town of Béthune and, following their failure, showered the town centre with incendiary shells. The 14th century bell tower in the main square was one of the town’s few architectural features to have survived. In the aftermath of the battle the houses which bordered the square were rebuilt in a mixture of styles. The town hall, designed by Jacques Alleman, is the central piece of P. Morès this architectural ensemble.

E1

The ideal Flemish town

A new setting for the bell tower

4-

P. Morès

It took more than two years after the end of the war to clear away the rubble before the reconstruction of the ruined town of Lens could begin. In 1926 architect Urbain Cassan drew up plans to build a new station in the shape of a steam locomotive, with a clock tower for its funnel and exaggerated arches for its wheels. Inside the station Cassan added a mosaic on the themes of railways and coal-mining to reflect the building’s purpose and the history of the town.

A1

1

Béthune – Town Hall, Bell Tower and Main Square 3

4

The station in the shape of a locomotive

D 12 6

The Town of Bailleul

Lens – Railway Station

48

Modernity was also reflected in the choice of materials used during the period of reconstruction, reinforced concrete was immensely popular, however traditional materials such as brick and stone were far from ignored.

S. Dhote

N

The reconstruction of the villages, towns and cities was driven by the wishes of the elected representatives and the imagination of the architects who were commissioned to draw the plans. The rich architectural heritage of Arras was faithfully rebuilt to its pre-war glory whereas towns such as Bailleul adopted a traditional regional style which they combined with innovative town planning. Other towns such as Cambrai and Lens chose to rebuild in the modern Art Deco style.

Le Catelet Bohain-en-Vermandois

La Capelle

17


annel

28

E4

02

'Ab

be

5

A e Abbeville

viill le

Oisemont

Hallencourt

10

Hesdin

Fressin

E4

02

Ailly-le-HautClocher A1 6-

8 92

Clairmarais

01 10

D

Picquigny

Domart-enPonthieu

Bernaville

Auxi-le-Château

D 929

Azincourt

Fruges

r l'Yse

Arques

Amiens

Doullens

D

25

-

3 93

41 D9

43

Villers-Bocage

D

34 1

D

94 3

Mont-Saint-Eloi

la Sca rpe

AblainSaint-Nazaire Souchez

01

Noeux-les-Mines Bruay-laBuissière D

5

29

Albert

Beaumont-Hamel

SerrePuisieux

D9

Ayette

Aubers

Bray-sur-Somme

91

7

Harnes HéninBeaumont

A 21

50 D9

Bapaume

Combles

Longueval

d al Can

A2

7

Péronne

9 -E1

Doignies

Bullecourt

D9 39

Vis-en-Artois

0 D 9933

Menen (Menin)

la

Mouscron (Moeskroen)

Kortrijk jk Court Courtrai) o trai) rai) (Courtrai)

Flesquières

Aubignyau-Bac

Lewarde

D 938

0

N9

A 14 - E 17

A 11

4 -E3

Bouchain

N 455

D 6644 3

Denain

Wallers

Le Catelet

Les Rues-des-Vignes

Caudry

el

Bohain-en-Vermandois

Le CateauCambrésis

Valenciennes

Raismes

Condésur-l'Escaut

A 16

Ronse (Renaix)

9 49 D 64

N7

N5

0

Ath (Aat)

-E

Bavay

A8

9 42

Wassigny

Ors

la S

D 1029

Maroilles

re amb

Le Quesnoy

Oudenaarde Oudenaar Oude naarde de (Audenar (Aud (A Au enarde) de) (Audenarde)

Post-war reconstruction

A7

N

56

Mons (Bergen)

N9

Maubeuge

Feignies

N8

The Allies' logistics base on the Channel Coast

Tournai (Doornik)

CAMBRAI

t

Dendermonde (Termonde)

0 N7

La Capelle

A 10

Trélon

Hirson

Fourmies

Avesnes-sur-Helpe

D 962

D 936

Assevent

N

40

N6

IUM

The war of movement and the first German occupation

St-Amand-les-Eaux

Leie

The Western Front

First World War remembrance trails in Northern France

A1

Marchiennes

A 23

A 27 - E 42

Wattrelos

Villeneuved'Ascq

Roisel

Brugge (Bruges)

Roubaix

Tourcoing

Douai

Cuincy

Seclin

Lomme

Monchy-le-Preux Héninel

Roeselare (Roulers)

LILLE

en-Baroeul Lambersart

Saint-Laurent-Blangy Athies

Warlencourt -Eaucourt Pozières

D

Lens

Grévillers

A 1199

Passchendaele

Wambrechies

Annoeullin

D 941

a el al d Can

Fromelles

Thélus

Vimy

Liévin

Aix-Noulette

33

N3 2

Comines Wervicq-Sud

N

N9

Armentières Marcq-

Ploegsteert

Messen (Messines)

Loosen-Gohelle

La Bassée

N

N 35

3 31

Ieper (Ypres)

Langemark

Richebourg

ARRAS

Hébuterne

N2

D

Fleurbaix

5 94

Vieille-Chapelle

Béthune

N 38

Steenwerck

Neuville-Saint-Vaast

Houdain

Lillers

Acheuxen-Amiénois

Saint-Pol-sur-Ternoise

D9

Busnes

Saint-Venant

8

Kemmel

N

Bailleul

Godewaersvelde

Poperinge

Veurnes (Furnes)

Méteren D 642

la Lys

Steenvoorde

Hondschoote

Hazebrouck

Cassel

Wormhout

A

Bergues

Aire-sur-la-Lys

SAINT-OMER

Watten

Nord - Pas de Calais

Picardy

D 925

D

Houlle

Fauquembergues

Lumbres

Bourbourg

Gravelines

DUNKIRK

Zuydcoote

A 18

D 101

D 936

Kilometres

ed

Crécy-en-Ponthieu

94 3

Grande-Synthe Petit-Fort-Philippe Grand-Fort-Philippe

Malo-les-Bains

De Panne (La Panne)

Nieuwpoort (Nieuport)

I Jz er

Oostende (Ostende)

int-Qu Canal de Sa

Blangysur-Bresle

A

0

arit im

N 99

Nouvion

Maintenay

la C anc he

Montreuil-sur-Mer

6 D 12

Hucqueliers

D

la i s

Audruicq

a de C

40

D

Gamaches

FrivilleEscarbotin

Ca n

al M

Rue

Saint-Valerysur-Somme

94 0

Rang-duFliers

Saint-Josse

Etaples-sur-Mer

Sainte-Cecile-Plage

Merlimont

D

Hardelot Dannes

Stella-Plage

Bercksur-Mer

Saint-Etienne-au-Mont Desvres

l Cana

A 16 - E

Tournehemsur-la-Hem

N 42

Ardres

Licques

Guînes

CALAIS

BOULOGNE-SUR-MER

Wimille Saint-Martin-Boulogne

Wimere u x

Sangatte

Sl ack

Marquise

Wimereux

Ambleteuse

Audinghen

Tardinghen

Wissant

Cap Blanc Nez

Le TouquetParis-Plage

English Ch

02 E4 16 -

A

North N th SSea

92 8 D

D1 26

Oye-Plage

D9 16

De ûle

7

4 N3

D 9911 9

A 1 - E 17

N 369 -E1 5

A 16 - E 402

N 25

N 47

D 917

uN ord

A 26

17

D 901

3 64

D9

5

4 D 9933

A1

N 32

ar cq ue

40

E1

D 644

6A2

63 0

16

sc au

5 E1

D9

D D

50 N 50

l 'E'E

E1 4A1

de

6A2

Sc h

l'Aa

48

When the Germans retreated from Cambrai in October 1918 all they left their Canadian successors was a ghost town with a burned-out centre. The architect Pierre Leprince-Ringuet was given the job of rebuilding the town and he gave Cambrai new squares and streets, concentrated the administrative buildings and shops into specific areas, and designed a brand new town hall. Today the architecture in Cambrai’s centre is a mixture of traditional regional styles and the more modern concept of Art Deco. 5 N 36

N

A new town centre raised from the embers

0

Grand’Place 59400 CAMBRAI

6 N6

Cambrai – The Town Centre E 42

19

S. Dhote 403

-E

Arras – The main square devastated by war 36

D9 35

Grand’Place and Place des Héros 62000 ARRAS 42

A2

7

N 90

La Louvière

A

N 17

N1 6

A7

Bruxelle (Brussel)

A 12

18 A 17 - E

N

N 55

D 946

By the end of the Great War, after suffering almost constant shelling from 1914 to 1917, Arras was in ruins and a “martyred city“. It was decided that its prominent features, such as the bell tower, the town hall and the facades of the houses bordering the main square, should be rebuilt as faithfully as possible to the originals. Using a mixture of reinforced concrete and stone facing, architect Pierre Paquet managed to restore much of the rich architectural heritage of Arras. N 50

M

The faithful reconstruction of a martyred town 4 N

7

Arras – Town Hall, Bell Tower and Squares 5 N4

7 N2

N4

N2

E. Le Brun - Light Motiv 3 N5

entin

7 -E1

6 93

19


PEFC/10-31-1269

© Copyright: CRT Nord-Pas-de-Calais, 2010. Any reproduction, even partial, is prohibited without prior written consent from Nord-Pas-de-Calais Tourist Board. Publication date: 2nd quarter 2010. Printers: Graphic Arts Deschamps. Cover photos: P. Frutier - S. Dhote. Traduction : Graham macLachlan.

Follow the Remembrance Trails on the Internet: www.remembrancetrails-northernfrance.com

Write to us: Comité Régional de Tourisme Nord-Pas de Calais 6, place Mendès France BP 99 - 59028 Lille Cedex

Tel. +33 (0)320 145757 www.northernfrance-tourism.com

Remembrance trails in Northern France  

Discover a wealth of little-known heritage which witnessed the world-changing events in the Europe of 1914–1918 and learn more about the Fir...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you