Page 1

m i c h i g a n v e t e r i n a r y m e d i c a l a s s o c i at i o n

Compensation and Benefits Survey

e in this issue . . . 10

Upcoming Conferences

12

Find Stories You Are Sitting On — Right Now!

14

Advances in Surgical Tumor Pathology, Part 1: Margin Assessment & Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumors

18

Dr. Tim’s Alaskan Adventure: An Opportunity to Give Back

21

Build the Importance of Preventive Healthcare: Partners for Healthy Pets Power Tools

22

MAHF Revamps Memorial Card Program

24

State Veterinarian’s Bulletin

25

Golden Retriever Lifetime Study

arlier this year, the MVMA conducted a survey to allow its members to evaluate their compensation and benefit policies compared to those of other MVMA members. In the spring of 2013, we asked 514 practice owners who were MVMA members to respond to this survey. We received 176 responses — a 37% response rate! Practice owners were asked to answer questions regarding the compensation and benefits offered to their associates and the practice team (practice managers, technicians, assistants, and front office staff ). Owners were asked to exclude their own compensation. Survey questionnaires were gathered through the survey website. The survey examined several areas (type of practice, years in practice, location, etc.) and evaluated their effects on the level of compensation for associate veterinarians and the practice team. In the compensation categories, we’ve reported median figures. The median is the mid-point of all responses (50th percentile). A generally accepted way of analyzing compensation data, the advantage of using the median is that the results are not influenced by extreme (high or low) responses, whereas the average (mean) would be. Not every question was answered by all the volume viii

number 3

fall 2013

respondents, so the number of responses shown in each table varies. The Responses column shows the total number of responses to a specific question. In the compensation category, these responses were used to calculate the median data. In other tables, the number of responses in each data category is shown. In compensation categories where there were fewer than two responses, data is not reported due to confidentiality concerns. Compensation data reported by practice owners may be influenced by factors unknown to us. The reports summarize the following for veterinary practices in Michigan who participated in the survey: n n n

n

n

General demographics Associate compensation Health care team compensation (practice manager, technician, assistant, front office staff ) Benefits (paid time off, vacation and sick leave, professional fees, continuing education, medical and other insurance, retirement savings plan, profit-sharing plan) Additional comments

. SURVEY RESULTS ARE GIVEN ON PAGES 4–6.


AUGUST 4, 2013 MEETING

board update Professional excellence. Compassionate care. 2144 Commons Pkwy., Okemos, MI 48864-3986 tel (517) 347-4710 · fax (517) 347-4666 email mvma@michvma.org web www.michvma.org facebook www.facebook.com/ilovemyvet twitter www.michvma.org youtube www.youtube.com/michiganvma pinterest http://pinterest.com/michvma Published quarterly in March, June, September, and December. Deadlines are the first of the preceding month. editors Karlene B. Belyea, MBA

Sheri Fandel

2013 mvma officers & directors officers Dr. Ralph Huff, President Dr. Therese Burns, President-Elect Dr. Julie Cappel, 1st Vice President Dr. Kevin Stachowiak, 2nd Vice President Dr. Susan Sayles, Immediate Past President Dr. Nancy Frank, AVMA Delegate Dr. Kathleen Smiler, AVMA Alternate Delegate Karlene Belyea, MBA, Chief Executive Officer directors representing districts Dr. Matthew Taylor, (1) Southern Dr. Gary Gillette, (2 & 3) Michiana & Southwestern Dr. Melissa Owings, (4) Jackson Dr. Lauren Gnagey, (5 & 9) Washtenaw & Livingston Dr. Christian Ast, (6 & 8) Wayne & Oakland Dr. Tari Kern, (7) Macomb Dr. Jamie Snow, (10) Mid-State Dr. Chad Ackerman, (11) Western Dr. Kurt Dunckel, (12) Saginaw Dr. Rebeca Barr, (13) Thumb Dr. Jessica Christensen, (14) Northeastern Dr. Bruce Cozzens, (15) Northern directors representing associations Dr. Mike Thome, MI Equine Practitioners Dr. Steven Bailey, Southeastern Michigan VMA at-large directors Dr. Erin Howard, Food Animal Dr. Charles DeCamp, MSU CVM Dr. Lori Penman, Lab Animal Medicine layout/design Charlie Sharp/Sharp Des!gns, Lansing, MI printing & mailing BRD Printing, Lansing, MI ▪ The Michigan Veterinary Medical Association represents the veterinary profession in Michigan, advances the knowledge and standards of its membership, and promotes the science, practice, and value of veterinary medicine for the benefit of animal and human health.

Strategic Plan Initiatives MANDATORY CONTINUING EDUCATION

Since the administration is currently working to downsize government entities through the Office of Regulatory Reinvention (ORR), they are not interested in assisting with pursuing mandatory CE right now. Senate Bill 92, which deals with expanding what pharmacy technicians can do and adding a mandatory CE component, may help push this forward because it opens the door to adding regulations if it passes. STRENGTHENING MVMA’S CE Jeffrey Powers performs surgery.

The Strengthening CE Task Force met via conference calls in February and April to share thoughts and ideas on existing CE programs and to discuss exploration of alternative delivery formats in the future. Suggested improvements on existing events are being implemented. Staff is working with MSU CVM to determine the best way to provide online sessions from the Michigan Veterinary Conference that have been previously recorded and that will be recorded in the future. The Membership Committee is also gathering information from recent grads to begin work on a series of webinars

designated to assist them with financial challenges and debt. CAPITALIZING ON TECHNOLOGY

MVMA’s database and website provider has been purchased by another company. Consequently, MVMA must transition all database information, conference information, website, electronic communication system and accounting to a completely new system. Staff believes that our new systems will be superior to what we have been working with. The website has been rewritten and redesigned and we are working with our software vendor to help us upload content and visuals. In addition, MVMA has developed a new Michigan Animal Health Foundation website at www.michanimalhealthfoundation.com and a new VET-PAC website at www.mivetpac.org.

Legislative Update MVMA’s Legislative Advisory Committee met on June 26, 2013, and discussed legislative issues. The more recently introduced legislation includes a proposed Animal Abuse Registry, which includes:

Call for Award Nominations

t

he MVMA Awards Committee is requesting nominations for 2013 MVMA awards. This is the association’s opportunity to recognize someone who has contributed significantly to the veterinary profession or the animals and clients it serves. Nominations should be accompanied by supporting information. MVMA awards include: n

MVMA Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award. Established in 1970 as the Distinguished Life Membership Award, it was retitled in 1992. The award is

n

conferred upon only a few individuals of the highest professional caliber who have completed 35 consecutive years of active membership and have partaken actively in association obligations and otherwise served the veterinary profession in an exemplary fashion at the state and/or national levels. This is the highest award conferred by the MVMA. W. Kenneth McKersie Service Award. Established in 1956 as the MVMA Service Award, the award was renamed in memory of the late Dr. McKersie in 1989. It is conferred upon a member of the MVMA for cumulative service and accomplishments benefiting the profession of veterinary medicine, the community, and the Association. Only the Distinguished Life Achievement Award ranks


MVMA BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND VET-PAC ENDORSEMENT

Hank Vaupel, DVM n

n

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Prohibiting individuals who have been convicted of certain crimes against animals from owning an animal for five years Eliminating a requirement that the county sherriff euthanize unlicensed dogs Providing remedies for people who purchase a cat or dog that is determined to be unfit for sale Prohibiting ownership of nonhuman primates as pets Changing the way game species are chosen Implementing a trap/neuter/return program for feral cats Euthanizing a dog or cat in an animal control shelter Allowing dogs to be seated with customers at outside restaurants, and Proposing new shelter holding times for dogs and cats in shelters.

as sentient beings. Animals are conscious and have the ability to feel, perceive and have subjective experiences. The evidence of sentience is supported by biological, medical, behavioral and welfare science. Daily and long-term management, husbandry, and veterinary care should not only provide for the animals physical needs, but also minimize pain, distress, and suffering. Caretakers should also consider the animal’s social and behavioral needs, and recognize that animals generate responses to external stimuli or triggering situations.

MVMA Second Vice President The MVMA Leadership Development Committee has nominated Board member Dr. Bruce Cozzens to be the 2014 MVMA Second Vice President. The Board reviewed his résumé and enthusiastically supports the nomination.

Animal Sentience The Board approved a new position statement on animal sentience: The Michigan Veterinary Medical Association supports the concept of animals

n

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above it in significance of recognition by one’s peers as members of the MVMA. MVMA Public Media Award. This award is to recognize a person or organization within the broadcasting or publishing professions for activities that benefit the veterinary profession or the ideals associated with it. MVMA Business Service Award. This award is conferred upon a company that, by its efforts and activities, has promoted the profession of veterinary medicine in any of its many facets in a way that qualifies for an award. MVMA Public Service Award. To qualify for this award, the nominee must be a political official or organization whose efforts have significantly benefited the veterinary profession.

CANDIDATE FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE IN LIVINGSTON COUNTY

n

n

MVMA Community Service Award. This award is to honor an animal-related organization or individual, who is not a veterinarian, for contributions that have significantly benefited society, MVMA, or animal welfare. MVMA Merit Award. This award may be presented to any person who has devoted an extraordinary amount of time and effort to a particular project or activity of benefit to the MVMA and/or the veterinary profession.

Additional information and a nomination form can be found at http://michvma. org/displaycommon.cfm?an= 1&subarticlenbr=65. Send nominations to the MVMA office by November 1, 2013.

An MVMA member since 1975, Hank Vaupel served on the MVMA Board of Directors for 6 years, chaired the MVMA Legislative Advisory Committee and represents MVMA on the Health Professional Recovery Committee. He has been active as an advocate for the veterinary profession in the legislature for decades. Hank earned his B.S. and DVM degrees from Michigan State University. After college, Hank proudly served as a Captain in the United States Army from 1968–1971. In 1972 Hank returned home to Livingston County and independently started his veterinary practice, Kern Road Veterinary Clinic, P.C., which now includes eight veterinarians and provides equine and small-animal veterinary service to most of southeast and central Michigan. Hank later sold the practice yet he still continues to work on staff as a business manager. Since 2000, Hank has served as an adjunct professor with MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. He was appointed to the Michigan Board of Veterinary Medicine in 2003 and reappointed in 2006. He served on this Board until 2010 and chaired the Board for the last three years, working closely with MVMA on mandatory CE and to make changes in the Public Health Code adding clauses for medical records and the veterinarian client patient relationship. He is also involved with the Michigan Equine Practitioners Association and the Livingston County VMA. VET-PAC endorsed Dr. Vaupel at their meeting on July 3, 2013, and the MVMA Board of Directors endorsed him on August 4, 2013. Visit VET-PAC’s new website at www.mivetpac.org or visit Dr. Vaupel’s website at www.VoteVaupel.com for more information! the michigan ve terinarian • fall 2013

3


COMPENSATION & BENEFITS SURVEY RESULTS

5: COMPENSATION BASED ON

medicine

percentage

range

PERCENTAGE OF INVENTORY

All

20%

1–25%

REVENUE (no base salary)

Companion

20%

18–25%

Percentage of inventory-based production

Mixed

11%

1–21%

used to calculate compensation where

Equine

the associate receives no base salary.

Food/Farm

he following information is just a portion of the data collected for the state of Michigan. Additional demographics and benefits information for the state of Michigan as well as full reports for seven geographic regions around Michigan are available on the MVMA website at www.michvma.org. Your members-only login is required to access the information. Once you are at the MVMA website, click “Member Login.” Enter your preferred email address (all lowercase) as the username and if this is your first time logging in your default password will be MVMA (all caps) for the password. You will be prompted to change your password after you login. If you have difficulty, please call our office at (517) 347-4710 since we have just switched database programs and may encounter a few “bugs” that will need to be worked out.

6: COMPENSATION BASED ON

medicine

PERCENTAGE OF SERVICE REVENUE

All

(in addition to base salary)

Companion

22%

2–25%

Percentage of service based production

Mixed

25%

10–25%

used to calculate compensation where

Equine

the associate receives a base salary.

Food/Farm

7: COMPENSATION BASED ON

medicine

PERCENTAGE OF INVENTORY

All

REVENUE (in addition to base salary)

Companion

13%

2–25%

Percentage of inventory-based production

Mixed

20%

20–20%

used to calculate compensation where

Equine

the associate receives a base salary.

Food/Farm

Full-Time Associate (≥ 30 hrs/wk)

Part-Time Associate (< 30 hrs/wk)

1: TYPE OF MEDICINE

1: TYPE OF MEDICINE

t

medicine

compensation

range

experience

range

2–25%

percentage

range

13%

2–25%

range

hrs/wk

range

experience

range

hrs/wk

70,000

30,000–500,000

7

0.5–46

40

30–84

All

44,058

12,740–112,081

15

2–49

20

7–28

Companion

71,018

30,000–500,000

8

0.5–46

40

30–84

Companion

46,000

16,920–112,081

15

2–49

20

7–28

Mixed

70,000

48,000–120,000

5.5

0.5–35

45

30–76

Mixed

32,500

12,740–39,000

10

3–14

15

7–15

Equine

51,000

50,000–52,000

7.5

2–13

43

36–50

Equine

27,250

25,000–29,500

25.5

11–40

19.5

14–25

Food/Farm

70,000

65,000–73,500

3.5

0.5–5

47.5

45–50

Food/Farm

years

compensation

range

22%

All

2: EXPERIENCE

medicine

percentage

range

2: EXPERIENCE

compensation

range

compensation

range

< 1 to 5

66,000

30,000–95,099

experience

2

hrs/wk

40

years

< 1 to 5

43,000

21,528–60,776

experience

3

hrs/wk

19.25

6 to 10

73,838

48,000–250,000

8

42

6 to 10

40,000

12,740–60,000

8

20

11 to 15

68,000

42,000–250,000

13

38

11 to 15

46,800

19,182–75,000

13

21

16 to 20

72,000

43,746–500,000

20

40

16 to 20

40,000

28,899–70,000

20

21.25

21 to 25

79,000

65,000–85,800

24.5

36

21 to 25

39,220

21,840–100,819

24

20

26 to 30

83,500

71,500–142,273

28

40

26 to 30

43,500

18,000–112,081

30

22

31+

82,000

65,000–106,061

35

45

31+

33,500

25,000–100,000

40

20

3: ANTICIPATED RAISE

3: ANTICIPATED RAISE

Where a raise was anticipated, the median amount was 3%. Range was 0.5–25%.

Where a raise was anticipated, the median amount was 3.5%. Range was 1.5–10%

4: COMPENSATION BASED

medicine

4: COMPENSATION BASED

medicine

percentage

range

ON PERCENTAGE OF SERVICE

All

ON PERCENTAGE OF SERVICE

All

22%

18–27%

REVENUE (no base salary)

Companion

REVENUE (no base salary)

Companion

22%

18–27%

Percentage of service-based production

Mixed

Percentage of service-based production

Mixed

used to calculate compensation where

Equine

used to calculate compensation where

Equine

the associate receives no base salary.

Food/Farm

the associate receives no base salary.

Food/Farm

4

the michigan veterinarian • fall 2013

percentage

range

21%

2–31+%

20.5%

2–25%

26%

21–31+%


5: COMPENSATION BASED ON

medicine

percentage

range

PERCENTAGE OF INVENTORY

All

18%

5–25%

3: CVPM This table includes data for certified practice managers.

REVENUE (no base salary)

Companion

18%

5–25%

medicine

compensation

range

experience

range

hrs/wk

range

Percentage of inventory-based production

Mixed

All

25.00

20.00–30.00

10

5–20

40

16–45

used to calculate compensation where

Equine

Companion

25.00

20.00–30.00

10

5–20

40

16–45

the associate receives no base salary.

Food/Farm

Mixed

Equine

6: COMPENSATION BASED ON

medicine

percentage

range

Food/Farm

PERCENTAGE OF SERVICE REVENUE

All

21%

19–23%

(in addition to base salary)

Companion

20.5%

19–22%

Percentage of service based production

Mixed

used to calculate compensation where

Equine

the associate receives a base salary.

Food/Farm

7: COMPENSATION BASED ON

medicine

PERCENTAGE OF INVENTORY

All

REVENUE (in addition to base salary)

Companion

Percentage of inventory-based production

Mixed

used to calculate compensation where the associate receives a base salary.

3: ANTICIPATED RAISE Where a raise was anticipated, the median amount was 3%. Range was 1–10%.

Technician

percentage

range

15.5%

3–22%

21%

3–22%

This table includes data for technicians regardless of licensure status.

Equine

medicine

range

hrs/wk

range

Food/Farm

All

14.50

8.50–25.00

6

0–44

36

4–45

Companion

14.50

8.50–25.00

6

0–44

35

4–45

Mixed

14.00

10.00–22.00

6

0–33

36.5

4–45

11.38

9.50–16.09

5

2–10

40

5–45

1: TYPE OF MEDICINE (all technicians)

Equine

compensation

range

Practice Manager

Food/Farm

1: TYPE OF MEDICINE

2: EXPERIENCE (all technicians)

experience

This table includes data for all practice managers, regardless of certification status.

This table includes data for technicians regardless of licensure status.

medicine

compensation

range

range

hrs/wk

range

All

17.00

11.00–33.00

years

compensation

range

experience

9

0.3–33

37

7–55

< 1 to 5

13.00

8.50–19.50

2.5

Companion

16.75

11.00–33.00

6

0.3–33

38

7–55

6 to 10

14.75

10.00–22.50

8

Mixed

18.00

36

12.00–26.00

16

4–28

37

10–45

11 to 15

16.95

11.50–25.00

15

35

16 to 20

17.00

10.00–20.00

20

29.5

14.17

12.00–17.80

18

1.5–20

30

30–40

21 to 25

17.43

14.90–22.50

25

40

26 to 30

18.75

18.00–22.00

30

40

31+

16.93

15.00–22.50

37

38

Equine Food/Farm

experience

2: EXPERIENCE

hrs/wk

35

This table includes data for all practice managers, regardless of certification status. years

experience

hrs/wk

3: ANTICIPATED RAISE (all technicians)

compensation

range

< 1 to 5

16.50

11.00–28.00

2

40

6 to 10

15.50

12.00–30.00

10

36

11 to 15

20.00

15.50–26.00

13

40

4: TYPE OF MEDICINE (LVT)

16 to 20

17.75

12.00–24.50

18

30

This table includes data for technicians who are licensed.

21 to 25

17.38

15.00–20.00

24

33

medicine

26 to 30

18.00

15.50–33.00

30

35

All

15.00

9.25–25.00

6

31+

17.00

15.50–18.50

33

26

Companion

15.18

9.25–25.00

6

Mixed

14.50

11.00–22.00

6

13.37

11.50–16.09

Where a raise was anticipated, the median amount was 3%. Range was 1–17.5%.

Equine Food/Farm

compensation

range

experience

range

hrs/wk

range

0–40

36

4–42.5

0–40

36

4–40

1–30

40

4–42.5

4.5

2–5.5

40

36–40

.

the michigan ve terinarian • fall 2013

5


Assistant

5: EXPERIENCE (LVT) This table includes data for technicians who are licensed. years

compensation

range

< 1 to 5

14.00

9.25–19.50

experience

3

hrs/wk

36

6 to 10

15.80

12.00–22.50

7

36.5

11 to 15

17.75

13.00–25.00

15

35

16 to 20

17.63

15.45–20.00

19

31.25

21 to 25

18.50

16.25–22.50

25

40

26 to 30

19.00

18.00–22.00

30

40

31+

16.93

15.00–22.50

37

40

1: TYPE OF MEDICINE medicine

compensation

range

range

hrs/wk

range

All

10.00

7.40–25.00

experience

4

0–40

25

2–40

Companion

10.00

7.40–25.00

4

0–40

25

2–40

Mixed

11.00

7.75–16.00

3.5

0.1–20

30

15–40

Equine

Food/Farm

2: EXPERIENCE 6: ANTICIPATED RAISE (LVT)

years

compensation

range

Where a raise was anticipated, the median amount was 3%. Range was 1–10%.

< 1 to 5

9.12

7.40–14.00

2

20

6 to 10

11.00

8.50–15.00

8

30

11 to 15

12.54

8.90–15.01

15

30

7: ADVANCED CERTIFICATION compensation

range

experience

range

hrs/wk

hrs/wk

16 to 20

12.50

10.50–16.00

20

34

range

21 to 25

This table includes data for technicians who hold an advanced certification. medicine

experience

All

21.00

16.50–21.00

15

10–30

40

26–40

26 to 30

13.20

10.50–14.23

28

25.5

Companion

18.75

16.50–21.00

12.5

10–15

33

26–40

31+

20.00

14.61–25.00

35

40

Mixed

Equine

3: ANTICIPATED RAISE

Food/Farm

Where a raise was anticipated, the median amount was 3%. Range was 1–12%.

range

hrs/wk

range

Front Office Staff

8: TYPE OF MEDICINE (non-LVT) This table includes data for technicians who are not licensed. medicine

compensation

range

All

13.00

8.50–21.00

8

0–44

35

4–45

Compensation is shown as an hourly rate. Unless otherwise noted, data shown is the

Companion

13.25

8.50–21.00

8

0.3–44

35

4–45

median of all responses.

Mixed

13.00

10.00–18.00

6

0–24

30

10–45

11.00

9.50–11.25

8

3–10

40

5–45

Equine Food/Farm

experience

1: TYPE OF MEDICINE compensation

range

experience

range

hrs/wk

All

11.00

7.40–19.95

4.25

0–40

32

4–45

9: EXPERIENCE (non-LVT)

Companion

11.20

7.50–18.75

4.25

0–40

32

4–45

This table includes data for technicians who are not licensed.

Mixed

11.00

8.25–19.95

5

0.25–30

36

5–43

years

Equine

10.25

7.40–14.00

2

0.5–12

30

10–38

< 1 to 5

compensation

range

11.00

8.50–14.00

experience

hrs/wk

2

30

medicine

Food/Farm

range

6 to 10

13.50

10.00–16.25

10

35

11 to 15

15.85

11.50–21.00

14

38

2: EXPERIENCE

16 to 20

15.80

10.00–18.00

20

27

years

21 to 25

16.00

14.90–17.50

23

35

< 1 to 5

10.00

7.40–18.00

2

26 to 30

6 to 10

12.00

9.00–16.50

8

34

16.88

16.00–17.75

39.5

37

11 to 15

13.75

9.00–18.75

13

35

16 to 20

14.00

9.25–17.25

20

34 34.5

31+

compensation

range

experience

hrs/wk

30

10: ANTICIPATED RAISE (non-LVT)

21 to 25

12.88

12.00–16.00

22

Where a raise was anticipated, the median amount was 3%. Range was 2–17.5%.

26 to 30

15.00

10.00–19.95

27

40

31+

16.66

15.50–17.81

37

25.5

3: ANTICIPATED RAISE Where a raise was anticipated, the median amount was 3%. Range was 1–15%.

MVMA thanks the Oregon VMA for their assistance in structuring and compiling survey results! 6

the michigan veterinarian • fall 2013


2013 MVMA

summer conference MVMA’s summer conference at Boyne Mountain Resort was a huge success this year! The weather was great, the food was fabulous, the CE was top-notch, and the evening events were lots of fun. MVMA thanks all who participated in the conference. Be sure to join us July 13–15, 2014, at Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island for next year’s summer conference!

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the michigan ve terinarian • fall 2013

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the michigan veterinarian â&#x20AC;˘ fall 2013


the michigan ve terinarian â&#x20AC;˘ fall 2013

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!

upcoming

sav

d

conferences

he et

s ate

10

the michigan veterinarian • fall 2013

small animal seminar series 10:00 am–5:30 pm / East Lansing Marriott

It’s not too late to sign up for MVMA’s Small Animal Seminar Series. This popular series will feature the following great topics and speakers: n

n

october 2, 2013 Dr. Lester Mandelker, Pharmacology november 6, 2013 Dr. William Brown, Cardiology

n

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december 11, 2013 Dr. Ashley Wiese, Anesthesia march 12, 2014 Dr. Michael Broome, Diagnostic Imaging

MVMA / MSU·CVM orthopedic lecture & wet lab forum

surgery

November 9, 2013 @ 8:30 am–4:30 pm / MSU Veterinary Medical Center Drs. Charlie DeCamp, Loïc Dèjardin, Dan Degner, and Curtis Probst

This one-day lecture and laboratory course is designed for the small-animal practitioner with an interest in orthopedic surgery, and will emphasize valuable tips and step-bystep techniques to stabilize the cruciate deficient stifle, correct patellar luxation, and perform femoral head and neck excision. Procedures to be covered will include mini-arthrotomy and traditional arthrotomy, partial and complete menisectomy, meniscal release, extra-articular stabilization, block and wedge trochleoplasty, tibial tubercle transposition, and capsulorrhaphy. In ad-

dition, as time permits, femoral head and neck osteotomy (FHO) has been added as a procedure for those with interest. The laboratory will be taught by four board-certified orthopedic surgeons and several surgery residents with a maximum enrollment of 22 practitioners, to ensure the greatest personal attention and surgical instruction. A morning brunch, break refreshments, and a lunch will be provided. All attendees will receive a DVD detailing the surgical procedures discussed during this surgical forum.

animal welfare conference “animals & society: how we interact”

MVMA

November 25, 2013 @ 8:30 am–4:30 pm / MSU Pavilion

Once again, the Michigan Veterinary Medical Association brings together experts in animal behavior and welfare from across the world for a full day of educational sessions you won’t want to miss. Sessions include: n

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Assessing Canine Behavior in Shelters. CJ Bentley, Michigan Humane Society Understanding the Disconnect Between Society and High Tech Agriculture. Jan Shearer, DVM, Professor and Extension

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Veterinarian, Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Ames, IA Animal Welfare—A Historical Perspective. David Favre, JD, Professor of Law & The Nancy Heathcote Professor of Property and Animal Law, Michigan State University College of Law Facial Expressions of Animal Pain. Jeff Mogil PhD, E.P. Taylor Professor of Pain Studies and the Canada Research Chair in the Genetics of Pain, McGill University,


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Montreal, Canada Who Has the Better Welfare—The 4H Chickens or the Small Commercial Flock? Courtney Daigle, PhD, and Dana Campbell, PhD, Visiting Research Associate, MSU Animal Behavior and Welfare Group

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The Unwanted Horse Issue: What Now? Camie Heleski, PhD, Coordinator of Michigan State University’s Horse Management Program, Chair of the Equine Scientists’ Committee Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Horses, Canada

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Pig Handling Demonstration: How to Get That Pig to Do What You Want! Janice Siegford, MS, PhD, CAAAB, Assistant Professor, Animal Behavior and Welfare Group, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University

michigan veterinary conference January 24-26, 2014 / Lansing Center

The 2014 Michigan Veterinary Conference will be packed with dynamite speakers and fun events. You won’t want to miss it! Here are just a few highlights . . . n

speakers

neonatal care for small ruminants, Dr. Judy Marteniuk

COMPANION ANIMAL n n n n n n n n n n

Neurology, Dr. Jared Galle Dermatology, Dr. Jenise Daigle Behavior, Dr. Theresa DePorter Ophthalmology, Dr. Kerry Ketring Nutrition, Dr. Sarah Abood Cardiology, Dr. Rob Sanders Internal Medicine, Dr. John Kruger Ophthalmology, Dr. Joshua Bartoe Veterinary Hospice Care, Dr. Page Yaxley MSU Resident Presentations

EMERGING ANIMAL HEALTH & DISEASE n

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Human influenza and the role of animal disease, Dr. Eden Wells (MD) Swine medicine and influenza, Dr. Jim Kober Small- and large-animal diagnostics, Dr. Roger Maes Health certificates and animal traceabiliby, Dr. Jennifer Juers-Green Veterinary forensics and abuse investigations, Dr. Melinda Merck

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Farm record analysis, Dr. Mark Kirkpatrick Drug residues, avoidance, and compliance issues, Dr. John Hallberg Integrated parasite management for small ruminants and urinary calculi, Dr. Richard Ehrhardt Urinary calculi, Dr. Susan Holcombe Periparturient problems and basic

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EQUINE n n

Foot issues, Dr. Andy Parks Dentistry, donkeys, Dr. Michael Lowder

wet labs NONTRADITIONAL n n

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Reptile medicing, Dr. Paul Gibbons Exotic Animal Anesthesia, Dr. George Bohart Alternative pain management in exotics (acupuncture), analgesia and anesthesia techniques, Dr. Lori Bidwell Avian respiratory system surgery, orthopedics and surgical approaches to Coelom in reptiles, Dr. Avery Bennett

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Avian wet lab, Dr. Avery Bennett Cold laser therapy wet lab for veterinarians and veterinary technicians, Genia Smith Clinical pathology: blood and intestinal parasites wet lab for veterinary technicians, Dr. Bernadette Herman Dental wet lab for veterinarians, Dr. Michael Lowder

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT & STAFF DEVELOPMENT n n

Practice management topics, Louise Dunn Practice internal controls, finances, and leadership, Shelley Johnson

special events n n n

VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY n

FOOD ANIMAL

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pancreatitis, management of DKA, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperglycemia in the ICU, David Liss, RVT Ophthalmology, Donna Letavish, LVT Cold laser therapy, Genia Smith Pain management, Dr. Lori Bidwell ECG and anesthesia troubleshooting, Drs. Sanders and Bohart

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Behavior, Dr. Marie Hopfensperger Nutrition, Dr. Mack VTS Panel Session Responsibilities for reporting abuse and working with local rescue groups, Detroit Dog Rescue Radiology techniques, Dr. Anthony Pease Clinical pathology blood and intestinal parasites, Dr. Bernadette Herman Endocrine testing, kidney disease, acute

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Exhibit Hall Breakfasts Large Animal and Equine Reception MSU CVM Alumni Reception SCAVMA Auction

For all conferences, contact MVMA at mvma@michvma.org or (517) 347-4710, or visit www.michvma.org for additional information and to register online.

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Find Stories You Are Sitting on – Right Now! ure you’d like some media coverage, but you feel your business or subject is just too dull. You just can’t think of anything you can do that would be media-worthy. Perhaps you’ve tried a press release or two, maybe even called a reporter with an idea, but all to no avail. You may even be frustrated that a competing company has been on the local news with several stories or opinions, yet your business is bigger and more experienced. So why isn’t the media calling you?

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You have to be creative and persistent! In every business, in every pursuit, there are ways to take your everyday work and make it interesting to a news or talk show audience. This report will help you search inside your business or practice for newsworthy ideas and creative techniques for generating interesting events that can easily become a good story. First of all, realize that the media has lots of airtime and paper to fill every day. With corporate conglomerates chewing up radio and television stations, there are fewer reporters and producers to do the same amount of work. This spells opportunity for you. The media needs your input. They want to know about your expertise, unique product or service, and your contribution to the community. In fact, because you are a local business, you have fulfilled the first and most important criteria for local news: it must be local. All you have to do is find the story you’re sitting on and package it in such a way that the media has to say yes. Here’s how you do that: Localize a national or regional news story. The best way to get a reporter’s attention is to show them how you and your business are involved in a national story or trend.

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case example: Millions of people saw and heard of the KUSA morning anchor

The email to the reporter was simple information about the mistakes made, signs overlooked, and how the situation could have been avoided. The email turned into a week-long feature report and Dr. Hetts received valuable publicity for her business as well as providing a needed service to the community. By simply being up-to-date with national news, localizing it, and using helpful information to her benefit, Dr. Hetts received tremendous visibility.

speculation as to the reasoning. Some even were ridiculing the anchor. A local Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist, Dr. Suzanne Hetts, took the opportunity to reach out and connect with her contacts at the station. 12

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case example: The continuing story about chicken jerky treats from China causing illness in dogs has piqued the interest of many local reporters. Dr. Dan Rodgers, a VNN member in Fort Wayne, Indiana, used this to his advantage on his local TV segment. By having messaging ready (available at MyVNN.com) and reaching out to his contacts, Dr. Rodgers

Be ready for breaking news. When news breaks, reporters and producers don’t have the time to search for a local expert. However, they still want the local angle and local expert opinions on events. So, reporters keep a source list of experts in their area that they know they can call on. You should be on that list! Send a one-sheet résumé and cover letter to the local reporters and producers letting them know your area of expertise and that you would be happy to be available during a breaking news event for expert commentary. Offer them all your contact information, including your home phone number. This meets the reporter’s needs and helps you become a real asset and source to them. In doing so, you do not appear commercial or self-serving at all, and after you have proven yourself to be a good expert source, the media is more likely to allow you to do more promotional stories.

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being bitten by a dog live on-air. There was much misinformation and a lot of

expertise to the local reporters. Be sure to offer yourself as an expert for urgent or breaking news. Because you have access to your insider industry publications, you know trends before the press does in many cases. This gives you time to localize the trend and notify the press. Reaching a reporter and communicating the local and topical nature of your message may even help you counteract adverse trends. A great way to localize a national trend is to identify the trend and then poll your clients or customers. Find out what your group says about the national trend.

Identify a trend and localize it. You know better than anyone what the national trends are in our profession. Either that trend alone or its local implications will make a good story. If you haven’t already, this would be an excellent time for you to introduce yourself and your business or

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was able to appear on air and professionally discuss the latest news in this continuing issue.

If a reporter does a story on a national trend without the local expert angle, it may be bland. With your input, the story can be more interesting to the local community and you can receive valuable public relations benefit. So don’t be shy about approaching media using this idea — it’s a winner! In this same area, you can successfully use national corporate promotions to punch up your story. Corporations which sell products and services to your industry or profession put a great deal of time, PR talent, and creative work into national promotions. These promotions usually follow an industry trend or a seasonal flow. These companies are usually happy to provide graphics, props, samples, video news releases, and information for use in news stories. You can take a corporate promotional story and turn it into a story about you and your business with professional materials at almost no cost to you. The recent Pet Dental Health Month is a great example of how you can use corporate resources to help you reach out in the media. —Jim Humphries, DVM, CVJ, Veterinary News Network


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h

istorically, the goal of histologic examination of tumor biopsies was to provide an accurate diagnosis and prognosis of a tumor entity and, in the case of excisional biopsies, to evaluate tumor margins. There is an increasing need for more accurate prognostic and predictive markers in veterinary oncology because of an increasing number of treatment options, the increased financial costs associated with treatment, and the emotional stress experienced by owners in association with the disease and its treatment. Over the last decade the ability of the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health (DCPAH) to perform these services has been significantly advanced by integrating molecular tools such as immunohistochemistry (IHC) into the biopsy service to more accurately diagnose tumors, to provide an individualized prognosis, and to predict

ADVANCES IN SURGICAL TUMOR PATHOLOGY: PART 1

Margin Assessment & Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumors

1. Cross section Biopsy

2. Cross section

Mass

3. Cross section

Figure 1a: Cross-sectioning method of margin assessment, also known as radial method or “halves and quarters.”

Matti Kiupel, Dr. vet. med habil., PhD, Dipl ACVP Section Chief, Anatomic Pathology, MSU Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health Rebecca Smedley, DVM, MS, Dipl ACVP Academic Specialist, Anatomic Pathology

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Mass

SLIDE Section

Figure 1c: The next step of the crosssectioning method is to bisect each half through its longest axis.

Mass

Section

Figure 1b: In the crosssectioning method, the tumor is first bisected along its shortest axis.

Mass

Section

SLIDE


therapeutic responses. In addition, the use of modern technology allows us to deliver images to our clients that significantly enhance the assessment of tumor margins. The purpose of this two-part article is to familiarize the reader with advances we have made in margin evaluation as well as the current status of the diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic prediction of some of the most common tumors seen in veterinary medicine. In Part 1, we will look at margin assessment and canine cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs). Part 2, coming in the winter 2013 issue of Michigan Veterinarian, will examine canine oral melanomas, feline intestinal lymphomas, and a new diagnostic option for bone biopsies.

Figure 2: Parallel slicing (complete bread loafing, serial sectioning) at regular intervals.

Margin Assessment Assessment of surgical margins is a challenging task for the histology technician, pathologist, and submitting veterinarian. It is often difficult to communicate results of a margin evaluation to a submitting veterinarian in a written report, or even by phone. This task is further complicated by the various techniques applied in different laboratories to assess margins. The most commonly used method to evaluate tumor samples is the crosssectioning method, also known as the radial method or “halves and quarters” (Fig. 1a). The tumor is bisected along its shortest axis (Fig. 1b). Then, each half of the tissue is bisected through its longest axis, creating quarter sections that demonstrate the mass in a different plane (Fig. 1c). While we use this method for routine evaluation of submitted biopsies, this method is not favored for complete margin evaluations since it evaluates a very limited portion of the margin area and makes the erroneous assumption of symmetrical expansile growth of the tumor. Parallel slicing at regular intervals (complete bread loafing, serial sectioning) increases the percentage of margin area

Figure 3: A modified technique combines radial and parallel techniques. This allows for evaluation of tissue immediately adjacent to the bulk of the tumor and evaluation of some distant margins.

Figure 4: Tangential sections (shaved edge sections, “orange peel”) provide a complete assessment of surgical margins. Multiple 2- to 3-mm sections are shaved off the edge of the sample and laid into cassettes with the cut surface down.

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examined (Fig. 2). Since the distance between sections determines the quality of the margin evaluation, the cost of this approach limits its use in veterinary medicine. A modified technique combines radial and parallel techniques (Fig. 3). This allows for evaluation of tissue immediately adjacent to the bulk of the tumor and evaluation of some distant margins of the sample. Tangential sections (shaved edge sections, “orange peel”) provide a complete assessment of surgical margins (Fig. 4). Multiple 2- to 3-mm sections are shaved off the edge of the sample and laid into cassettes with the cut surface down. Any tumor present in the sections is interpreted as incomplete excision. The disadvantage is that the distance of tumor to margins cannot be assessed. By combining cross-sectioning with tangential margin evaluation, we deliver the most complete margin assessment. While expensive, due to the large number of slides and time required for this method, it should be requested for all mast cell tumors, melanomas, soft tissue sarcomas, mammary tumors, and other carcinomas to more accurately determine tumor extent. By inking the tumor margins the clinician can guide evaluation of certain regions and insure examination of the surgical margins. Regardless of the method used to evaluate margins, the clinician needs to know to which margin the tumor extends in order to better direct additional resection or select advanced therapy, e.g., radiation. We therefore provide online photographs of tumors submitted for full margin evaluation that detail the exact position of each margin slide that was created by our technician (Figs. 2–4). This allows our pathologist to indicate in the biopsy report where neoplastic cells extend to the margin, and the clinician can view the photos and decide exactly where additional surgical resection may be needed.

Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumors Canine cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) are one of the most frustrating tumors for 16

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veterinary practitioners in terms of advising their clients. The inconsistency of the traditional histologic grading of MCTs has made it difficult to give an accurate prognosis and to select a treatment plan. We have published a new two-tier grading system for canine MCTs in order to more accurately identify more aggressive tumors and to eliminate interobserver variation. According to this system, MCTs are graded as high-grade or low-grade based on the number of mitoses, presence of multinucleated cells (3 or more nuclei) or bizarre nuclei, or karyomegaly. High grade MCTs have been shown to be significantly associated with a shorter time to metastasis, MCT associated mortality, and a shorter overall survival time. A low-grade designation has been shown to be significantly associated with longer survival times and a decreased risk of metastasis. However, some low-grade MCTs may still exhibit aggressive biological behavior. In addition to grading, we offer an exclusive panel of tests that dramatically increases prognostic certainty and predicts response to targeted therapy. The panel includes cell proliferation analysis (Ki-67, AgNORs), c-Kit PCR to detect internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations in exon 11 and exon 8, and KIT IHC to analyze expression of this tyrosine kinase receptor. The nuclear protein Ki-67 determines the number of proliferating cells. The number of AgNORs correlates with the speed of cell proliferation. Research indicates that neoplastic cell proliferation activity cannot be reliably predicted using a single measure, but prognoses developed from this combination of tests are highly correlated with survival and metastasis. ITD mutations in exon 11 of c-Kit have been detected in about 20 to 30 percent of canine cutaneous MCTs. MCTs with such mutations are highly aggressive, but respond well to tyrosine kinase inhibiting (TKI) therapies, such as Kinavet or Palladia. ITD mutations in exon 8 of c-Kit are less common and have been detected in 2 to 5

percent of canine cutaneous MCTs. Tumors with this mutation are also expected to respond to TKIs, but no prognostic association has been established. In addition, aberrant KIT expression patterns have been linked with decreased survival. MCT grading, cell proliferation analysis, c-Kit PCR, and KIT IHC results are all linked to MCT-associated survival and metastasis. While each test can be run independently, prognoses developed from interpretation of all tests offer the highest level of certainty, especially for low grade MCTs (Fig. 5). PCR for internal tandem duplication mutations in exon 11 of c-Kit is recommended for all high grade MCTs in order to assist in determining whether or not a TKI drug would be indicated. To download our “Mast Cell Tumor Flowchart” to support therapeutic decisionmaking based on prognostic parameters, visit our website at animalhealth.msu.edu under “Diagnostic Sections > Immunohistochemistry.” Unlike dogs, most cutaneous MCTs in cats are benign and cured by complete surgical excision. Occasionally, more aggressive feline cutaneous MCTs and systemic mastocytosis (generally affecting the spleen and/or liver) are seen. For these more aggressive forms, we also offer PCR to detect mutations in exon 8 of c-Kit. Again, tumors with a c-Kit mutation are expected to respond to TKI therapy.

Submitting Samples All of the above described tests for MCTs can be performed on routine formalin-fixed biopsy material as well as previously submitted biopsy samples. Alternatively, clients can submit the paraffin block of the lesion in question or at least 10 unstained, positively charged slides of this block. For more information, please contact the DCPAH Anatomic Pathology lab at (517) 3531683, or visit our website at animalhealth. msu.edu. Drs. Ralph Huff and Jim Lloyd at graduation.


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Incomplete Excision

Systemic Chemotherapy

Candidate for Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

Not a Candidate for Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

KIT IHC Pattern I

KIT IHC

Systemic Chemotherapy

No Additional Therapy

No Evidence of RLN or Systemic Involvement

Clinical Staging Evaluation of RLN, Liver, and Spleen

Evidence of RLN or Systemic Involvement

No c-Kit Mutation

KIT IHC Pattern II or III

Figure 5: Flowchart to support therapeutic decision-making based on prognostic parameters for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors.

Radiation Therapy

Wide Local Excision Not Possible

c-Kit Mutation

PCR for c-Kit Mutation

c-Kit Analysis

Proliferation Analysis

High Ki67, AgNOR, Ag67

High Grade

Histologic Grading

Low Grade

Low Ki67, AgNOR, Ag67

Wider Excision or Local Radiation Therapy

Wide Local Excision Possible

No Additional Therapy

Complete Excision

Margin Evaluation

PROGNOSTIC EVALUATION OF CANINE CUTANEOUS MAST CELL TUMORS


DR. TIM’S ALASKAN ADVENTURE

An Opportunity to Give Back r Timothy A. Hunt, DVM

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ecently, I had the opportunity to conduct a spay/neuter and vaccination clinic in several Yup’ik villages along the Kuskokwim River in western Alaska. Funded by an USDA grant and working in conjunction with two other people, one from the Alaska Native Rural Veterinary Corporation and the other from Yukon Kuskokwim Delta Health Corporation, we left Bethel, Alaska, via the “Kusko,” headed first for Napaskiak, a small village of Yup’ik. We arrived at Napaskiak and quickly set up our M*A*S*H practice in a machine shop, though without my anesthetic machine.

● Napaskiak

The airline didn’t know where it was! We used the downtime to walk the village of 200 to vaccinate dogs, and followed the lead of a gaggle of excited kids — strangers in town! — who enthusiastically pointed out the homes of families with dogs. Many of the dogs were very similar in stature, age, and color throughout the village and vaccinating close to 50 dogs was an accomplishment. We then spent the night in the health clinic, hoping the anesthetic machine wasn’t circling the luggage carousel in some far-away airport. After a few phone calls to the airline explaining that we needed


this machine for “brain surgery,” it finally and mysteriously showed up at the Bethel Airport. We back-tracked to Bethel, returned to Napaskiak and pulled up anchor for our next village, Kwethluk. In Kwethluk, we again did a house-tohouse vaccination tour, followed by a spay/ neuter clinic the following day. We set up our mobile surgical unit in the village police station and were able to spay and neuter 18 dogs and vaccinate over 50 dogs in that community. The area residents were happy and supportive of our services and although we could have done more surgeries, we had additional ground to cover up the river. Our anesthetic protocol included the use of a mobile gas anesthetic machine, generously donated for this trip by the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine, an autoclave for sterilizing the surgical packs, injectable induction agents, and intubation for maintaining the patient. Our boat was full of medical gear, plus a few fishing poles for some late-night casting, as daylight never really ends this time of year in Alaska. We started off towards Akiak but unfortunately got lost for two hours on various sloughs until finally circling back to Kwethluk and starting all over again. The second time around, we found the village despite rough water on the river. Akiak is another small settlement roughly fifteen miles farther up the Kuskokwim River with a population of about 200 people and just a few stray dogs. Some villages have a very strict stray dog policy and this was evident here. We dropped our personal gear in the health clinic, as we had done in the previous villages, and set up the surgical area in the local bingo hall. At the end of the day we had 12 more spays and neuters under our belt, plus additional vaccinations. Our final leg of the journey was back to our first village, Napaskiak, where we concluded our odyssey with ten more spays/ neuters. We ended up with a total of 40 spays and neuters and close to 200 dogs being vaccinated — a successful trip! We hope to increase the frequency of these rural spay/neuter/vaccine clinics as

more veterinarians become intrigued with spending a week or so in the bush. This is not hospital-style surgery, so adaptation is required but definitely doable, enjoyable, and fulfilling with the right crew. There are no après-clinic martini bars, restaurants, or coffee shops, but there is great fishing, solitude, and the opportunity to connect with an entirely wonderful, indigenous culture. Hopefully, others down the road will want to connect, as well. If you are interested, please drop me a line at drtim@drtims.com or contact the director of the Alaska Native Rural Veterinary Corporation, a 501(c)(3)

nonprofit organization, Angie Fitch, at angief@alaska.net. For more detailed information and statistics, please visit www. alaskanativeruralveterinary.co. Offering something back is what we all need to do and sometimes just finding the right time and place can be difficult. These animals would never be afforded any veterinary care without this direct approach. It’s not just the animals that benefit, but the “participant observer” children who keenly watch this happen. It’s a powerful experience and together, we can make a difference.

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member benefits

spotlight The MVMA is introducing two new member benefit programs to help save you money and make your life easier! GET $75 BACK ON DISH NETWORK SERVICE

Order as a new customer and receive access to packages starting at just $19.99 plus a $75 Prepaid Visa card! As an MVMA member you will also get 30 premium movie channels for free for 3 months, free standard installation, HD free for life, and free HD DVR service. PROTECT YOUR HOME OR OFFICE WITH AN EXCLUSIVE DISCOUNT FROM ADT

New MVMA member customers receive a free ADT Monitored Security System valued at $850 for no activation or equipment costs, and only $99 to install. Along with a $100 prepaid Visa cards, you will also get free keychain remote valued at $120, front and back door protection for one low price, and free infrared interior motion detector. TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE OFFERS . . . AND MORE !

MVMA Thanks Dr. Janver Krehbiel for Years of Service n 2007, Dr. Janver Krehbiel was elected by veterinarians in Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia as the representative for District V on the AVMA Executive Board. In 2012, the AVMA Executive Board elected him as its chair. Dr. Krehbiel has done a tremendous job on the AVMA Board representing organized veterinary medicine. We thank him for his progressive work, tremendous dedication, and many years of service. He has also served as president of the MVMA, president of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology, chairperson of the Association of Academic Deans, chairperson of the AVMA Informatics Committee, chairperson of the National Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners and six years as a member of the AVMA Council of Education and the Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities. We hope you and Linda will now have some time to relax and enjoy your cottage.

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Call Connect Your Home Discount Partner at (888) 515-5919 and use promo code 7888801 to order DISH Network Service, or use promo code 7888803 to sign up for service from ADT. Looking for more ways to save money using your MVMA membership? Contact us at mvma@michvma.org or (517) 347-4710 to request a Member Benefits Guide, or visit the MVMA website at www.michvma.org and login to the “Members Only” section to find more ways to make your membership pay.

In Memoriam Wayne E. Bannink, DVM, died on June 27, 2013, at the age of 80. He graduated from Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine and was a life member of MVMA. He was a partner in the Sparta Animal Clinic, practicing veterinary medicine for many years. Dr. Bannink was the 1995 recipient of “Birth of a Purebred” Food Animal Practitioner Award from MSU. Dale F. McKenzie, DVM, died on July 16, 2013, at the age of 67. He graduated from Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine and was a life member of MVMA. He was the senior partner at SouthKent Veterinary Hospital in Caledonia, practicing large animal medicine serving the west Michigan farming community for over 43 years. The MVMA extends its sympathy to the friends and families of departed members. In memory of deceased members, the MVMA contributes $50 to the Michigan Animal Health Foundation. Friends of deceased members may send memorial contributions to the Foundation. When contributions reach $500, the member’s name is entered on a memorial plaque displayed in the MVMA office. The MVMA staff thanks those thoughtful members who take time to notify the office and send obituaries of our recently deceased members.


BUILD THE IMPORTANCE OF PREVENTIVE HEALTHCARE

Partners for Healthy Pets Power Tools eople have a special relationship with their pets, and most recognize that visiting a veterinarian enhances that relationship. But you see it every day in practice — pet owners who have been bombarded with incorrect and incomplete information and are confused about what’s best for their pets. So much so that they may not follow your clinical advice, and may not bring their pets to critical preventive care appointments at all.

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n As a profession, we have a great opportunity to help pets and pet owners enjoy a longer and healthier life together. Veterinary professionals work hard to provide the best possible care to pets so that they and their owners can enjoy long and healthy lives together. Partners for Healthy Pets was founded to help you make the preventive healthcare you provide even more powerful. We’ve developed tools and resources — available at no charge — that can help you build better relationships with owners and help them understand the value of preventive healthcare so that more patients can benefit from what you do best. n Individual practice involvement is key. The Partners for Healthy Pets Practice Resources Toolbox was conceived to provide the profession with a sound mix of information and materials that collectively elevate the level of preventive care offered across the country. Each of the tools and resources provide dynamic ways to reinforce a practice-wide focus on preventive pet healthcare. Used collectively, they can help healthcare teams enhance communications with pet owners about the value of and need for routine care and take preventive pet healthcare to an optimum level within your own individual practice. n Make the decision to be a voice for vitality . . . of the veterinary profession, of your practice, and of our nation’s pets! It’s easier than you might think: n Adopt and widely communicate Preventive Healthcare Guidelines to pet owners through your newsletters, website, and within each preventive care visit. n Focus on communicating the value and benefit of preventive pet healthcare to pet owners at all points of contact, from receptionist to technician to veterinarian. n Use the tools and resources available from Partners for Healthy Pets to help find communication gaps, train staff, and gather new ideas that will compliment current programs and plans. Partners for Healthy Pets is dedicated to ensuring that pets received the preventive healthcare they deserve through regular visits to a veterinarian and is committed to working with you to enhance the health of your patients and your practice. Learn more and explore the Resources Toolbox at www.partnersforhealthypets.org. the michigan ve terinarian • fall 2013

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MEMBERS CAN TRY IT FOR FREE !

MAHF Revamps Memorial Card Program

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he Michigan Animal Health Foundation (MAHF) has a new logo and marketing materials to help promote its mission to provide financial assistance to individuals and institutions for educational and scientific purposes in order to advance science to benefit the health and welfare of animals. Memorial/Sympathy cards are being offered in two ways — as sympathy cards with envelopes and as a smaller insert to include in your own card which indicates that you have made a thoughtful memorial contribution to the MAHF in the deceased pet’s name. What better way to show your clients how much you care! Until October 15, 2013, practices can contact the MVMA to re-

inserts: 10 for $135 / 20 for $255 / 30 for $375

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ceive one card and one insert to try out at no charge. Larger quantities can be purchased at the discounted rates until December 31, 2013 (see images and captions). All funds received for cards and inserts are tax deductible and go to help the foundation fulfill its mission.

MAHF Funds Two Research Grants MVMA’s nonprofit arm, the Michigan Animal Health Foundation (MAHF), is a charitable trust founded in 1969 to give veterinarians and their clients an opportunity to fund critical research that benefits the health and welfare of animals. Over the years, the foundation has been involved in a wide variety of research projects for both small and large animals. The MAHF Board of Trustees

met in June and evaluated several excellent proposals. Trustees agreed to provide grants for three of the research projects: EVALUATION OF REPRODUCTIVE PATHOLOGY IN OTTERS

Otters are not only a key player in the river ecosystem in Michigan and elsewhere in the world, a so-called “keystone species” reflecting the health of the entire ecosystem; but they are also charismatic zoo ambassadors which engage the public and raise awareness of the need for conservation at a regional level. Unfortunately, due to resource and space limitations, zoos can only hold a limited number of animals and must control their reproduction to maintain the genetic diversity and sustain zoo populations. To do so, hormonal contraception is frequently used by zoo managers in otters. Recently scientists, veterinarians, and zoo professionals have identified reproductive diseases associated with these hormonal contraceptives and these may be a significant cause for infertility. Few studies have been done on reproductive endocrinology and diseases in wild or zoo otters, yet understanding factors that influence reproductive potential and population dynamics is key to captive breeding programs and conservation in the wild. The Reproductive Health Surveillance Program (RHSP) has archived reproductive tracts from otters of six species and preliminary results suggest that otters as a group have a propensity for endometrial hyperplasia and possibly other reproductive tract lesions (similar to that seen in domestic dogs and cats). These diseases have also been seen in animals that were never contracepted. However, the RHSP archive is not large enough to produce definitive results and more cases are needed. In order to increase the number of cases for analysis, contributions from other pathologists are being recruited and MAHF funds will be used to ship, process, and further evaluate these cases. The long-term goal of this project is to contribute to otter management and conservation through a better understanding of otter reproduction and reproductive disease.


PREDICTING THE THERAPEUTIC RESPONSE OF DOGS WITH ORAL MELANOMAS TO TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS

Malignant melanoma (MM), the most common canine oral malignant tumor, is highly destructive, has a high rate of metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs, and is generally associated with less than one year survival. However, a proportion of oral melanomas are less aggressive, do not require treatment beyond surgical removal, and are associated with longer survival times. Ki-67, a marker of cell growth fraction, can be used to predict behavior of oral melanomas and to identify which dogs will require additional therapy due to poor prognosis and which will not. Because standard chemotherapy is of little benefit to dogs with oral MM that have a high Ki-67 index, targeted drug therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor drugs (TKIs) are currently being explored as therapeutic options. A small percentage of human mucocutaneous melanomas have mutations in a gene called c-Kit, and respond to TKI therapy. KIT is the protein produced by this gene. The purpose of this study is to determine the response to TKIs in dogs with oral MMs that either express KIT and/or have mutations in c-Kit. We hypothesize that dogs with oral MMs with a high Ki-67 index that express KIT, and/or have a c-Kit mutation, will respond to TKIs. Twenty-five dogs with oral MMs that have been treated with TKIs and 25 dogs that have been treated with surgery +/– radiation alone will be included. MMs will be analyzed for KIT expression and

cards with envelopes: 10 for $225 / 20 for $425 / 30 for $625

mutations in c-Kit. Disease progression and survival time of all dogs will be compared between different groups. Evaluation of KIT expression and mutations in c-Kit in canine oral MMs will provide additional cost-effective tests to assess the behavior of these tumors and to determine which tumors will respond to TKIs, thus, saving clients from spending unnecessary money. SUBCLINICAL HYPOCALCEMIA AS A PREDICTOR OF POSTPARTUM HEALTH DISORDERS AND PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE IN HOLSTEIN DAIRY CATTLE

Calcium is an essential mineral for maintaining the health and productivity of dairy cows. A condition known as subclinical hypocalcemia may occur in dairy cows after calving. Cows with subclinical hypocalcemia have lower blood calcium levels than normal dairy cows. Although no overt clinical signs are present in these cows, it is known that subclinical hypocalcemia increases the risk that such cows develop one or more diseases after calving, and that they may have lowered milk production. In North American dairy herds, it is estimated that subclinical hypocalcemia affects between 25% and 47% of cows. We hypothesize that

subclinical hypocalcemia may be remedied by supplementing cows with a calcium product. In the proposed study, we will assess: (1) if supplementing a calcium product by mouth, to cows that have just calved, decreases the occurrence of subclinical hypocalcemia, and (2) if changes in the occurrence of subclinical hypocalcemia results in changes in the occurrence of negative health and performance outcomes. In order to determine the effects of calcium supplementation on health and production, 206 cows will be enrolled in a study in which half will be supplemented with calcium twice at calving and the other half will not. Study outcomes will include uterine and udder infections, displacement of the abomasum, ketosis as well as milk production. In addition to measuring calcium four times around calving, cows’ energy balance status will also be determined before and after calving. The health and performance outcomes described above will be compared between the two study groups. We expect results from this study will provide valuable information on how to reduce levels of subclinical hypocalcemia on dairy operations, and consequently reduce the occurrence of negative health and production outcomes. the michigan ve terinarian • fall 2013

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n June 9, 2013, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) Director Jamie Clover appointed me, James Averill, to the position of State Veterinarian within MDARD’s Animal Industry Division. I am honored to be in this role and look forward to a collaborative working relationship with MVMA and members. I was born and raised in Maine on a dairy and sheep farm and came to Michigan to attend Michigan State University where I received a degree in veterinary medicine and a PhD in Epidemiology. I began working at MDARD in 2009 as the Bovine Tuberculosis Program Coordinator and became Animal Industry Division Director in 2011. I look forward to continuing the close working relationship Dr. Steve Halstead had with the MVMA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health. In the coming months, the Animal Industry Division will be reviewing our daily activities, as well as short-term and long-term goals, to develop a strategic plan. I welcome your input and hope you contact me with comments, suggestions for improvement, or discussions on how we can better conduct regulatory activities, education, and outreach.

O state veterinarian’s bulletin

In this issue, I would like to provide a quick update on the bovine tuberculosis (TB) eradication efforts in the Saginaw area of Michigan which is currently bovine TB–free. On March 26, 2013, Michigan designated a large dairy herd in Saginaw County as bovine tuberculosis (TB)-positive and subsequently began investigating the source of the disease and the potential spread. Since March, 69 percent of the 264 farm investigations related to the Saginaw County TB-positive dairy farm and two subsequent TB-positive dairy beef (feeder steer) herds are complete. Each TB-positive farm has a number of trace investigations and special surveillance testing associated with them (outlined below):

within that radius are to be tested. Herds in a Special Surveillance Area are not under quarantine until the testing begins on each individual farm. All cattle, bison, and privately owned cervids 12 months of age and older; and all goats co-mingled with the cattle six months of age and older, must be tested within six months of the declaration of the Special Surveillance Area. The three circles in Saginaw, Gratiot, and Midland Counties overlap and many farms have already been tested. As a reminder, cattle farms in the Special Surveillance Areas must complete testing in order for MDARD to declare an area free of bovine TB. To date, 52 percent of the farms in the three circle testing areas have completed testing.

TRACE TESTING

SPECIAL SURVEILLANCE CIRCLE TESTING

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James Averill, Animal Industry Division

Saginaw County: 172 farms. Testing completed on 129 thus far and all but two (Midland and Gratiot, listed below) have been negative. Midland County: 1 farm. Testing on the one trace farm is complete and the cattle were negative. Gratiot County: 92 farms. Testing completed on 53 thus far and all have been negative.

Public Act 466, of 1988, as amended, the Animal Industry Act requires MDARD to conduct circle testing around TB-positive farms. These Special Surveillance Areas are ten-mile radius circles and all herds 24

the michigan veterinarian • fall 2013

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Saginaw Circle: 74 farms; 54 completed remaining farms must test before September 26, 2013* Gratiot Circle: 62 farms; 18 completed remaining farms must test before November 6, 2013* Midland Circle: 14 farms; 6 completed remaining farms must test before November 6, 2013*

* Unless a farm has a written herd plan with MDARD permitting it to test after that date.

My door is always open. If you have any questions or comments, please contact me at averillj1@michigan.gov, office (517) 2845667, or cell (517) 449-0228.


JOIN RESEARCH HISTORY IN THE MAKING

You can help in many ways.

Golden Retriever Lifetime Study

Morris Animal Foundation still needs the help of dedicated veterinarians to reach the recruitment goal of 3,000 dogs. You can register yourself as a veterinarian willing to participate, and you can also increase awareness with the following steps: n

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n September 2012, Morris Animal Foundation launched the largest prospective research study ever conducted in veterinary medicine. The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study is recruiting 3,000 purebred Golden Retrievers, their owners, and their veterinarians into a lifelong observational study to evaluate the influence of genetics, diet, and environment on the incidence of cancer and other diseases. We are pleased that so many veterinarians have already joined the study in both roles — as veterinarians and as dog owners. Michael Lappin, DVM, owner of The Animal House in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, has four patients in the study and also enrolled his own dog Isaac. “It has been heartbreaking in my 40 years as a practicing veterinarian to see young, seemingly healthy Golden Retrievers struck down in what should be the prime of their lives,” he says. “I have been driven by the need to do as much as I can to help this wonderful breed enjoy a longer, healthier life.”

Build long-term relationships with your clients. In addition to helping to improve canine health, the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study provides an opportunity for veterinarians to build long-term relationships with dedicated clients. The Morris Animal Foundation study team has observed that owners who enroll their dogs in this study are extremely committed to canine health. Many have, unfortunately, already lost a dog to cancer and are, therefore, even more dedicated to advancing veterinary medicine to benefit their current and future pets. “I enrolled my Golden Retriever Journey in the study because I have always wanted better health for my dogs,” says Nancy Bishop, a veterinary technician who is also participating in the study. “I can’t thank

Morris Animal Foundation enough for taking on this pioneering study to help my beloved breed and other dogs.” Every year, for the lifetime of their enrolled dog, owners will complete a detailed online questionnaire about their dog’s diet, travel, reproductive history, living environment, exercise, and behavior. Owners must also take their dogs to their veterinarian annually for a physical examination and collection of blood, urine, feces, hair, and nail clippings. The veterinarian enters the exam results into an online database and ships samples to a biorepository for long-term storage, where they will be made available to future researchers for additional studies. Samples are also submitted to Antech Diagnostics for a serum chemistry panel, a total T4 test, and complete blood cell count as well as urinalysis, fecal analysis, and a heartworm antigen test. Antech Diagnostics sends test results to the veterinarian at no cost. Clients are also expected to bring their dog to their veterinarian for all other health events that take place while the dog is in the study, and the veterinarian must provide Morris Animal Foundation with a brief online summary of the findings from these additional visits. If a dog develops cancer during the study, the veterinarian will collect samples for evaluation and submission to the biorepository. As of July 15th, 600 dogs were enrolled in the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study, and more than 1,000 additional dogs were completing the application process. Dogs eligible for enrollment: n

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Review your client database for owners of Golden Retrievers younger than 2 years of age Contact those owners and encourage them to apply to the study Help us spread the word. Tell your clients and colleagues about the study and provide brochures in your waiting room

Be part of research history. Join us at www.CanineLifetimeHealth.org or email us at 4Dogs@CanineLifetimeHealth.org if you have questions. —Michael Guy, DVM, MS, PhD

Must be a healthy, purebred Golden Retriever Have a verifiable three-generation pedigree Be younger than 2 years of age Reside in the contiguous United States the michigan ve terinarian • fall 2013

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classified ads & relief vets classified ads veterinarians wanted Do you want to practice high-quality medicine? Meet with great clients? Provide the highest standard of patient care? We have a full-time position available for an experienced veterinarian at our well-established, modern and fully equipped hospital located in Howell, MI. Candidates must have great surgical and medical skills and have the ability to communicate well with clients. We offer competitive salary and benefits, including Blue Cross Blue Shield health insurance. Please send résumé to hiringvet@gmail.com. Grow with us in one of our small-animal hospitals in southeastern MI. We are a small group of high-end practices devoted to practicing the highest quality of medicine. Staff are fully utilized, so you will focus on diagnosing, prescribing medications, and surgery only. End result, these are well-managed practices focused on providing the best medical and client care in a fun and profitable environment. We currently have part-/full-time openings in the greater metropolitan Detroit area including our Whittaker Road Animal Clinic location in Ypsilanti Twp. Contact Jeff Rothstein, DVM, MBA, at 734/645-0267, email jknis@sbcglobal.net, or fax 734/372-6318. Banfield Pet Hospital is seeking Veterinarians to join our full-service, preventative care, companion animal hospitals in southeast MI. At Banfield, we celebrate and enrich the family-pet relationship through our knowledge, expertise, and products to make a better world for pets and people. We offer continuing education, opportunities for mentorship and coaching, unbeatable benefits, and the opportunity to continue to grow in your career. Visit http://www.banfield.com/veterinary-professionals/ careers to apply. VCA Woodland Animal Hospital is seeking an experienced and highly motivated P/T associate veterinarian to join our progressive, 2-doctor small-animal and pocket pet practice in Kentwood, MI, located outside of Grand Rapids. Our well-equipped facility features surgical laser, ultrasound, dental ultrasonic, dental radiology, video otoscopy, and computerized radiography. Strong surgical skills, including orthopedics, a big plus! Please contact Dr. Christine West, Medical Director, at 616/942-7802 or christine.hoornstra@vcahospitals.com for more information. Full-time position available for an experienced veterinarian at our well-established, modern, and fully equipped hospital located in Southfield, MI. Candidates must have great surgical and medical skills, and have the ability to communicate well with clients. We offer competitive salary and benefits, including BCN health insurance. Please email résumé to michiganvet@yahoo.com. Two positions available for privately owned busy, 6-hospital group with a 12,000 SF central hospital and 24-hour

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the michigan veterinarian • fall 2013

emergency services. These AAHA-certified hospitals are located in the northern Macomb area. Facilities are award winning, receiving 2 Veterinary Economics awards, and fully equipped. The technical and veterinary staff is experienced and dedicated with a board certified (ABVP) owner, and several internship trained veterinarians. The first opening is an overnight veterinarian. Duties include emergency out-patient, triage of animals transferred from other hospitals, monitoring of in-house critical care patients, and emergency surgery. We provide flexible scheduling and competitive salaries. The second opening is a general practitioner in a rural satellite hospital. Duties include general out-patient care, in-hospital patient evaluation, and surgery. This is a unique opportunity for an experienced practitioner that provides independence but also support from the central hospital. Schedules are flexible and salary competitive. Contact John Wilson or Heidi Dortenzio at 586/752-6217 or email to h.dortenzio@ sbcglobal.net. Sprinkle Road Veterinary Clinic seeks a FT associate to join our progressive, 3-doctor small-animal practice. We see a variety of interesting cases and boast a fun working environment with great leadership and excellent support staff. Our modern facility includes equipment such as full in-house lab (IDEXX), digital dental x-ray, endoscopy, and ultrasound. We value a team-oriented approach to veterinary medicine so candidates must be team players and have exceptional communication skills. Contact Dr. Christopher Rohwer at crohwer@vetcor.com. VCA Allen Park Animal Hospital (AAHA accredited), located between Southfield Rd. and Outer Dr. on Allen Rd. in Allen Park, MI, is looking to welcome an enthusiastic, compassionate associate veterinarian to our client and pet-focused team. We offer digital radiography, ultrasound, acupuncture, and herbs. Experience/interest in holistic medicine a plus. Full benefits and excellent CE. All interested candidates, please forward a résumé to Dolores.Collins@vcahosptals.com. VCA St. Clair Shores Animal Hospital, located at the corner of Harper Ave. and 10 Mile Rd. in St. Clair Shores, MI, is seeking a highly experienced veterinarian to lead our busy, AAHA-accredited, 1½-doctor practice as medical director. All interested candidates, please forward a résumé to Dolores.Collins@vcahosptals.com. Growing small-animal/equine practice seeking small-animal relief veterinarian and/or full-time associate in Coldwater, MI. Practice is well-equipped, has licensed technicians, in-house lab, digital radiography, ultrasound, and hard-working staff in a beautiful clinic setting. Surgical experience and equine interest preferred. Position starts immediately. Contact practice manager at 517/369-2161, mspica@bronsonvetservices.com. Part- or full-time position available for an experienced veterinarian in a 9-doctor small-animal practice with two locations in the Grand Rapids area. Find out more about

our AAHA-accredited facility at www.chfa.net. High-quality medicine, surgery, and customer service emphasized. Well-trained support staff including 12 LVTs. Wages commensurate with skills and experience; excellent benefits package. Mail or email résumé to Cascade Hospital for Animals, 6730 Cascade Rd. SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546, email thertel@chfa.net. Well-equipped, progressive, team-oriented equine/SA practice located in SE Michigan seeking an enthusiastic and highly motivated veterinary associate for full-time SA position. Experience in medicine and surgery preferred. Compensation commensurate with experience. Benefits include medical, dental, 401k, vacation, continuing education, dues, liability/disability insurance. Kern Road Veterinary Clinic, PLLC. 517/223-9618, info@kernroadvet. com. Full-time veterinarian needed for well-established smallanimal house call practice in Genesee County. 32-hour work week, no emergency or weekend hours. Option available for purchase of practice, excellent financial opportunity. Email dr.karen@bayareapethospitals.com. Have a desire to make a difference? Humane Ohio’s Spay/ Neuter Clinic in Toledo, OH, is seeking a part- or full-time veterinarian to join our medical team in providing quality spay/neuter surgeries in a fast-paced environment. Be part of a progressive organization working toward reducing homeless pets in 6 counties. Great hours, great environment, opportunity to be involved in shelter medicine consulting and outreach programs if interested, plus competitive salary and benefits including CE and health insurance. Contact Aimee at 419/874-9584 or info@ humaneohio.org. Part-time veterinarian needed in a progressive, solo doctor, small-animal practice in Livingston County. We are dedicated to providing high-quality care for our patients with a personal touch. Experienced veterinarians preferred, but will consider all applications. If you are trying to remember why you got into veterinary medicine in the first place, our team is looking for you. Please email résumé to girlfridayservices@charter.net. F/T or P/T DVM to join dedicated, compassionate, client/ service-oriented team at Livonia Veterinary Hospital or Royal Oak Animal Hospital. Reply to Lisa at roanimalhospital @gmail.com. Well-established 2-doctor practice seeking a full-time and a part-time veterinarian for our busy small-animal practice around Lansing, MI. Candidates must be compassionate, energetic, and enjoy working up critical cases. Good medical surgical and client skills needed. We are a highquality, patient/client-focused practice with excellent support staff. We have in-house diagnostic lab, x-ray, and latest up-to-date equipment. We offer competitive salary and benefits. Please email your résumé to vetlansing @gmail.com, or fax 989/723-7116. Full- or part-time veterinarian wanted for small-animal practice in Southgate, MI. Quality medicine, clientfocused, great support staff, and the latest up-to-date equipment in a quaint setting. Permanent position available for the right candidate. Email résumé to vetsearch@ yahoo.com. Emergency DVM needed: Bay Area Pet Hospital is a progressive companion animal practice located in beautiful Traverse City, MI. The hospital offers general practice as well as 24/7 emergency and critical care. Candidates must be compassionate, energetic, and enjoy working up critical cases. Minimum one year emergency experience required. Generous benefit package, flexible scheduling. Send résumé to dr.karen@bayareapethospitals.com.


Part- to full-time veterinarian for small-animal practice in vibrant city of Royal Oak. Very experienced staff to support and full lab, digital ultrasound, and many more toys to practice high-quality medicine. Email résumé with 3 references to vetsearchdvm@outlook.com. Part-time veterinarian for work on Saturdays or evenings at our Wellness Clinics in Auburn Hills or Detroit. Must be compassionate with a focus on helping pets. Contact Jan, All About Animals, Warren 586/435-6930 or fax 586/9332565. PT available. Well-established (1955) high-volume small-animal hospital in suburb of Flint, MI, is looking for a full-time veterinary associate. No emergency and rotating weekends. Health insurance, liability insurance, vacation pay, and competitive salary. Friendly working environment. Contact Dr. Ehrman at DrLarryE@aol.com. Progressive, 2-veterinarian, small-animal and pocket pet practice in beautiful downtown Gaylord looking to hire full-time associate with buy-in potential. Laser surgery, digital radiography, ultrasound, and full in-house lab. We are here for the animals and their people, looking for a team player. Send résumé to hallvetclinic@yahoo.com. Looking for exciting cases in a relaxed atmosphere with an experienced, “makes your life easy” staff? Animal Emergency Hospital of Macomb is looking for a full- or part-time associate to join our team. 401k matching, CE allowance, health, dental, optho, and life insurance benefits along with an above-the-norm salary make this an exciting opportunity for the right person. Call Dr. Deciechi at 810/394-7412 or email résumé to dr.deciechi@ eahvet.com and we will have lunch and discuss this opportunity! Well-established 4-doctor AAHA practice seeking a parttime (possibly full-time) veterinarian for our busy smallanimal practice in Lansing. We have an in-house IDEXX laboratory, radiography w/digital dental, fully utilized LVTs, etc. Responsibilities include surgery, dentistry, out-patient/wellness visits with rotating weekends; after-hours emergencies are referred. Benefits include health and liability, insurance, CE allowance, vacation, simple IRA, and paid dues. Experience preferred but new graduates will be considered. Please email résumé to waverlyanimalhospital@gmail.com. Growing small-animal/equine practice seeking smallanimal relief veterinarian in the Grand Rapids area. Practice has licensed technicians, lab, digital radiography, ultrasound, friendly staff in a quaint setting. Permanent position available for the right candidate. 616/897-7877 or 616/560-9455. Looking for FT veterinarians for Lake Huron Veterinary Clinic in Port Huron and Advanced Animal Hospital in Sterling Heights, MI. We offer competitive salary and benefits including health insurance, liability insurance, vacation pay, 401k, and paid dues. Please send résumé to Dr. Dhillon at dhillondvm@gmail.com.

dustyladd48612@sbcglobal.net or fax to 989/790-3742. Growing small-animal hospital looking for full-/part-time associate in Macomb Twp. Emphasis on building bonds with clients. Super supportive staff. Well-equipped with U/S and in-house blood machines. Please email résumé to creeksideah@sbcglobal.net. Well-established and growing small-animal hospital in Trenton, MI, seeking PT veterinarian for 2 days of work with potential to grow. Must have great client communication skills, practice compassionate, high-quality medicine, and have a team attitude. Experienced veterinarians preferred, but will consider all applications. Please send résumé or CV to trentonvet1@gmail.com or mail to 2737 W. Jefferson Ave., Trenton, MI 48183. lvts wanted Full-time veterinary technician needed for progressive small-animal clinic. We are a full-service clinic with an emphasis on client communication and dentistry. We are looking for a motivated, compassionate, and outgoing technician that has good communication skills. Benefits include paid CE, health insurance, uniform allowance, paid vacation, and profit sharing. Submit résumé and references to bmortimerdvm@comcast.net or mail to East Lansing Veterinary Clinic, 1880 Haslett Rd., East Lansing, MI 48823, Attn: Bruce Mortimer, DVM. Dowagiac Animal Hospital is a busy, full-service. 3-doctor practice that believes in letting LVTs explore, utilize, and expand their skills in a mentoring environment. We provide quality and caring medical care in an out-of-the-way town in southwest MI within reach of numerous inland lakes, Lake Michigan, some great resort communities, nearby South Bend and Kalamazoo, and 2 hours from Chicago and Detroit—you can take the train to either. Clients come from a large radius and includes everyone from hickish-types to professors and professionals. We strive to make the work environment fun and rewarding. Please send a résumé, and more important, a letter telling us about yourself and what factors in a practice you are looking for to flourish. Dowagiac Animal Hospital, 54791 M-51 North, Dowagiac, MI 49047. Full-time LVT needed for busy 7-doctor hospital located in Jackson, MI. The hospital is open 6 days a week and also offers emergency services. Open availability is required. Please send résumé to Gaide Veterinary Hospital, 539 N. Blackstone, Jackson, MI 49201, or fax to 517/787-0399. practices & equipment for sale Small-animal practice for sale in the Upper Peninsula metropolitan area. Annual revenue $615K. Practice is growing and vibrant. Excellent equipment and facilities. Purchase practice and real estate for $775K. Contact Total

Practice Solutions Group, Dr. Kurt Liljeberg, 800/3806872, or kurt@tpsgsales.com. When buying or selling a veterinary practice, rely on the expertise of the Total Practice Solutions Group. See our display ad this issue. Even if you plan to sell your practice yourself, contact Dr. Kurt Liljeberg for a free consultation. We would be happy to help: 800/380-6872 or kurt@ tpsgsales.com. Warrick County, IN: profitable SA hospital; 2,200 SF w/RE. 2 exam rooms. Great place to live! Other practices available: AL, FL, GA, NY, NC, TX & WV. Our services include seller representation, buyer representation, and practice valuations. PS Broker, Inc., 800/636-4740, PSBroker.com. Practice for sale: Grand Rapids area. Established singledoctor SA hospital offers small amount of services for equine, birds, pocket pets. Charming 1½-story, 1,396 SF brick facility on 4+ acres. For more info, visit www. SimmonsInc.com or call 888/746-3717 (Listing MI062A). Practice for sale: North central MI. Established and wellmaintained, primarily SA hospital in a 2,640 SF facility. Both the practice and the real estate are for sale. For more info, visit www.SimmonsInc.com or call 888/746-3717 (Listing MI062B). Practice for sale: Beautiful northwest MI. Single-doctor practice providing SA medical-surgical services in an attractive free standing 1,600 SF facility on one of the main roads in town. For info, visit www.SimmonsInc.com or call 888/746-3717 (Listing MI304). Small-animal practice for sale in north Oakland County. Profitable, gross receipts $500K+ located on high traffic road in busy shopping mall for over 20 years. Owner will help with transition. Email inquiries to ownit1234@yahoo. com. New listing: Attractive, well-maintained, solo, companion-animal practice for sale in Detroit area. Well-established practice in the same location for 53 years, located on a high traffic road. The facility has 1,500 SF with the reception area, 2 exam rooms, pharmacy, radiology, treatment area, surgery, business office. For additional information on this listing please send an email with your name and phone number to ddch365@gmail.com. Priced to sell, won’t last long. New listing: Upper Peninsula, rural practice—very strong growth with high net; 45+%. 1,500 SF remodeled clinic, beautiful home set on 40 acres, $580K. Local bank financing available. Call 651/249-9674 for pictures/details. How much is your practice worth? Find out today! Reasonable fee. Valuations, consultations. Contact Dr. Fred Zydeck, Broker, at fzydeck@aol.com or phone 248/8913934.

Growing small-animal practice in Gaylord, MI, seeking part- or full-time associate veterinarian. Wonderful area, great clientele and excellent staff. Full IDEXX vet lab and digital radiography. Ownership opportunity available. jenweber33@charter.net, 989/858-0600. AAHA-accredited small-animal hospital since 1975 located in central MI has immediate opening for a full-time associate veterinarian experienced in general surgery and dentistry. Fully equipped and staffed with 3 LVTs, practice manager, and lay staff. IDEXX lab equipment, ultrasound, class 4 therapy laser, digital x-ray, and digital dental xray. No emergency or weekend hours. Salary commensurate with skill and experience. Please email résumé to

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Do you desire to work less or earn more? 2,300 SF, 3 exam room veterinary hospital for lease. $1,000 per month. Ideal as full-service hospital or spay/neuter clinic. Owner is relocating. Call Dr. Don Sheets at 989/245-3123.

relief veterinarians Deborah Baron (Allen), DVM, 313/595-7490. MSU 98. SA relief, SE Michigan. Emergency/critical care, general medicine, soft tissue surgery, ultrasound, exotics. Excellent patient care, client communication, and records.  Will follow practice guidelines. drdeb98@gmail.com. Kirsten Barton, DVM, 774/230-6878. MSU 97. SA relief work in SE Michigan, within 1 hour of Pontiac. Friendly and personable, with excellent communication skills. References available. kurabartondvm@gmail.com.

emergency, available within 2 hours of Lansing. Friendly, excellent client-communication. References. Completed rotating internship, worked ER/shelter medicine last two years. ronan_eustace@yahoo.com. Marj Field, DVM, 734/658-4774. MSU 90. SA/exotic/ emergency relief work in southeastern MI. Excellent client service, comfortable surgeon, high ACT, and able to multitask. Extended travel can be negotiated. marj.field@ me.com. Edward Greene, DVM, 517/812-1540. MSU 59. SA relief. Competent medical/surgical skills. Cheerful interactions with your clients and staff. Your practice procedures adhered to. LuckyPetVet@comcast.net. Lisa Harris, DVM, 616/261-4743. MSU 89. Available for relief in Grand Rapids/Lakeshore area. Experienced SA medicine and surgery, avian, exotics. Friendly, good communicator. drllharris@gmail.com.

Norman Bayne, DVM, MS, 248/506-1104. MSU 81. SA relief work in southeast MI area. Will travel. Friendly, excellent client communications skills. norman@baynevet.com.

Sean D. Hughes, DVM, 517/552-0993; 734/674-7061. MSU 76. SE Michigan SA relief since 1999. Part-time. Prefer SE; will travel for right circumstances. HughesDVM@ aol.com.

Kirsten Begin, DVM, 616/446-3154. MSU 09. SA relief in Grand Rapids and surrounding areas. Will travel. Friendly, excellent client communication. References. Completed rotating and surgical internships. kbegin4@gmail.com. 

Jill Haver-Crissman, DVM, 989/631-2790 or 989/2978594. Ontario 80. SA relief or part-time. Medicine, soft tissue surgery, ultrasound. Works well with others. Not available Wednesdays. jhcrissman@gmail.com.

Sharisse Berk, DVM, 248/851-0739. MSU 95. Available for SA relief or part-time work in southeast MI. Rhonda Bierl, DVM, 248/467-1987. MSU 00. SA/emergency relief within 1 hour of Pontiac. General medicine, soft-tissue surgery, ultrasound experience. houserrh@ yahoo.com.

Cindy Kalicki, DVM, 313/291-2466. MSU 94. Eight years full-time, two years relief in SA general medicine/soft tissue surgery. SE MI, part-time or relief. Charlotte Kim, DVM, 517/643-4069. MSU 08. SA relief work in SE Michigan. Soft tissue surgery and medicine. Friendly and dependable. kimcharl0824@gmail.com

Patricia Partridge, DVM, 231/938-9338. MSU 70. SA relief, PT or FT. Former practice owner. Based in Traverse City and Big Rapids, willing to travel. petvet2@torchlake.com. Amy Peck, DVM, 231/557-4423. MSU 97. Available for relief in west MI/Grand Rapids/Lakeshore area. SA general medicine. Excellent communication skills, experienced and reliable. apeckdvm@gmail.com Jeffrey F. Powers, DVM, 231/881-4408. MSU 80. Available to provide SA/MX relief work in MI, practice owner for 29 years. jfpowers@tds.net. Ann-Marie Sekerak, DVM, 505/563/0944. ILL 05. SA relief or PT, within 1 hour of Ann Arbor. Positive attitude, excellent patient care and client communication. sekerakDVM @gmail.com. Teri Sexton, DVM, 517/231-1256 cell; 517/371-2930 home. MSU 92. SA/PT work w/in 1 hour of Lansing. Can make your clients and staff feel at ease. Strengths: dermatology, soft tissue surgery. TeriLSexton@earthlink.net. Jennifer Sherrill, DVM, 231/215-0924. UICVM 01. SA relief PT. 9 years’ experience. General medicine/surgery. Excellent client care. West MI/Grand Rapids. Willing to travel. References. sherrilljen@comcast.net. Alan Sibinic, DVM, 734/481-1901, 231/547-6212. MSU 75. Relief or part-time anywhere in MI. Flexible, wide-variety practice experience. 5+ years relief work. References. SA/ EQ/FA. Margaret Sudekum, DVM, 616/676-2720 MSU 89. Available for part-time SA relief work in Grand Rapids and the surrounding areas. Good client communication skills. msdvm@sdkm.us.

Archie Black, DVM, 248/417-2667. MSU 83. SA relief, entire state. Practice owner for 20 years. Excellent communicator. vetdocblack@ameritech.net.

Joan Koelzer, DVM, 616/437-6415. MSU 85. SA medicine and surgery, single-day relief, Grand Rapids/west MI. Skilled in difficult spay and neuters. jekoelzer@yahoo.com.

Alan Supp, DVM, 616/732-1263 days; 616/874-4171 evenings. MSU 90. Companion animal practitioner available Saturdays only, as-needed basis in the greater Grand Rapids area.

Laurie Brush, DVM, 616/498-1316. MSU 98. Experienced, SA relief in Grand Rapids and surrounding areas. Excellent client communication, record keeping. lauriebrush @hotmail.com.

Delta Leeper, DVM, 248/396-7525. MSU 03. Part-time or relief, SE Michigan. Cats and dogs only; medicine, dentistry, routine surgeries. Internship trained, good communicator, team player. catdrdelta@hotmail.com.

Connie R. Sveller, DVM, 517/388-3434. MSU 85. SA relief work within 1 hour of East Lansing. Experienced/reliable/ former practice owner (16 years). docconnie1@aol.com.

Tama Cathers, DVM, 269/203-6800. NCSU 96. Experienced SA relief work/short term/PT wi 30 miles Plainwell/ Kalamazoo. Positive attitude, friendly, fitting into your practice. tcathers@gmail.com.

Mike Lin, DVM, 269/743-7770 or 269/348-1145. MSU 97. SA part-time or relief work in Kalamazoo/Grand Rapids and surrounding areas. Surgery, general medicine, and emergency experience. Excellent client communication skills. maddisondog@hotmail.com.

Aimee Cochell, DVM, 616/558-4905. Ross 01. Available for SA relief in Grand Rapids area. Willing to travel. Good client communication skills. References. abcochell@ comcast.net. Kenneth Corino, DVM, 248/217-5235. MSU 94. SA relief work. SE MI, medicine and surgery. corinodvm@aol.com. Nichole Corner, DVM, 616/634-9777. MSU 99. SA relief work in Grand Rapids/Kalamazoo area. Excellent client communication skills. References available. haweslake@ charter.net. Jennifer M. Dec, DVM, 248/224-1990. MSU 04. Smallanimal general practice and emergency relief. Surgery, ultrasound, and excellent communication skills,  drrockstarbc@gmail.com. Susan Drapek, DVM, CVA, 517/663-0428. MSU 90. Available within two hours of Lansing. Relief experience since 1997. Small-animal medicine, surgery, and acupuncture. smdrapekdvm@sbcglobal.net. Ronan Eustace, DVM, 502/409-3245. WCVM 10. SA/

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Richard M. Mieczkowski, DVM 734/735-2279. MSU 71. Relief, experience, competent, dependable, smallanimal, references, north Oakland County and vicinity. rmackj@aol.com. Denise Jorgensen Montagna, DVM, 231/557-1536. CSU 90. SA relief or part-time in western MI. Excellent client relations. References available. djmontagnadvm@ charter.net. Peggy Newman, DVM, 616/570-1101. MSU 75. 32-year mid-Michigan practice owner. SA medicine and surgery. Seeking relief work in mid- and west MI. docpeghoort@ hotmail.com. Kris Parnell, DVM, 517/881-2845. MSU 91. Available for SA relief or part-time. Will travel 1 hour of Lansing area. References upon request. kparnelldvm@comcast.net. Christine Parker, DVM, 616/866-1965. MSU 88. Available for SA relief or short-term. Experienced and dependable. References available. Will travel. cparker@wmis.net.

Andrea Switch, DVM, 248/302-2255. MSU 84. Available for part-time or relief work. SA general medicine/soft tissue surgery in SE MI. andreaswitch@yahoo.com. Kirsten Ura-Barton, DVM, 774/230-6878. MSU 97. Available for SA relief in SE Michigan within 1 hour of Pontiac. Experienced in both general and emergency practice with excellent communication skills. Résumé available upon request. kurabartondvm@gmail.com. Jacqueline Walsh, DVM, 248/680-2461. MSU 89. Available for SA relief work in the greater Detroit area. Amy Wildrose, DVM, 517/420-5891. MSU 00. Experienced, proficient, dependable, and convivial. Available for SA relief or part-time. Based in Lansing. Willing to travel. a_wildrose@hotmail.com. Georgia A. Wilson, DVM, 248/830-5325. 19 years’ experience, SA, pet exotics and emergencies, licensed. Available immediately for Oakland County and southeast MI. vxn8n@aol.com. Jennifer Zablotny, DVM, 517/896-9146. MSU 97. Experienced SA relief for southeast and mid-MI. References available. drzablotny@gmail.com.


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michigan veterinary conference

mvma animal welfare conference

southeastern michigan vma

▸ January 24–26, 2014 Lansing Center & Radisson Hotel, Lansing, MI

▸ November 25, 2013 @ 8:30 am–4:30 pm MSU Pavilion, East Lansing, MI

veterinarians (9 am–5 pm )

mvma small animal seminars

mvma board of directors

▸ Pharmacology (Dr. Lester Mandelker) October 2, 2013

▸ September 18, 2013 University Club, Lansing

▸ Cardiology (Dr. William Brown) November 6, 2013

▸ December 18, 2013 Diagnostic Center for Population & Animal Health

▸ Anesthesia (Dr. Ashley Wiese) December 11, 2013 ▸ Diagnostic Imaging (Dr. Michael Broome) March 12, 2014 Seminars 10:00 am–5:30 pm at the East Lansing Marriott. Contact MVMA at (517) 347-4710 or register online at www.michvma.org.

mvma committees ▸ Animal Welfare (Dr. Marcie Barber, Chair) October 3, 2013 @ 10:00 am ▸ Executive (Dr. Ralph Huff, Chair) September 5, 2013 @ noon December 5, 2013 @ noon ▸ Leadership Development (Dr. Mike Thome, Chair) October 14, 2013 @ noon (conference call) ▸ Legislative Advisory (Dr. Jean Hudson, Chair) September 11, 2013 @ 1:30 pm November 20, 2013 @ 1:30 pm ▸ Public Health (Dr. Joe Kline, Chair) September 4, 2013 @ 1:30 pm December 4, 2013 @ 1:30 pm Meetings held in the MVMA office unless noted.

orthopedic surgery lecture/wet lab ▸ Saturday, November 9, 2013 @ 8:30 am–5:30 pm Veterinary Medical Center, MSU CVM

saginaw valley vma ▸ Thoracic Radiography: Interpretation (A Review) (Dr. Joana Coelho) September 25, 2013 / Frankenmuth ▸ Diagnosing and Managing Cutaneous Adverse Food Reactions, New Drugs in Veterinary Dermatology, and You Need Only Four Different Shampoos to Practice Veterinary Medicine (Dr. Paul Bloom) October 23, 2013

livingston county vma ▸ November 14, 2013 @ 7:00 pm All meetings held at Downtown Main Martini Bar & Grill, Brighton.

western michigan vma ▸ Veterinarian CE Seminars 3rd Tuesday of each month, January–May & September–November @ 7:00 pm / Grand Rapids Contact Jeff Johnson, DVM, (616) 837-8151, or jdandcj2008@ dishmail.net.

southwestern michigan vma ▸ October 23, 2013 Presenter, topic, and location TBA

▸ Infectious Diseases (Dr. Michael Lappin) October 9, 2013 ▸ Cardiology (Dr. Philip Fox) November 13, 2013 ▸ Emergency Medicine (Dr. Justine A. Lee) December 4, 2013 ▸ Dermatology (Dr. Valerie Fadok) February 5, 2014 ▸ Ophthalmology (Dr. Elizabeth Giuliano) March 5, 2014 te chnicians (6–8:30 pm) ▸ Compassion Fatigue (Dr. Page Yaxley) October 9, 2013 ▸ Cardiology (Dr. Philip Fox) November 13, 2013 ▸ Toxicology (Dr. Justine Lee) December 4, 2013 ▸ Dermatology (Dr. Valerie Fadok) February 5, 2014 ▸ Anesthetic Monitors / Hypothermia (Heidi Reuss-Lamky) March 5, 2014 Seminars are held in the Management Education Center, 811 W. Square Lake Rd., Troy, MI 48098. For questions, contact Barb Locricchio at 888/736-8625, M–F, 9 am–noon, or email admisemvma@semvma.com.

thumb vma ▸ Updates on Anticonvulsants, Life without Phenobarbital (Dr. Andrew Isaacs) September 19, 2013 / JJ Jamokes, Caro ▸ Large Animal Topic TBD (Dr. Cortese) October 16, 2013 / Woodland Hills, Sandusky

▸ December 4, 2013 Holiday party

people, pets & vets ▸ Saturday, November 2, 2013 @ 11 am–3 pm Macomb Community College

due to the number of requests for ce announcements, the michigan chigan veterinarian limits listings to ce programs in michigan.

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michigan veterinary medical association

Professional excellence. Compassionate care.

2144 Commons Parkway, Okemos, MI 48864-3986

Presort Standard U.S. Postage PAID Lansing, MI Permit #713

Fall 2013