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Volume 80 – Number 23

michiganchronicle.com

February 15-21, 2017

Black

State of the schools: DPSCD prepares to battle

in Blue:

How the rebellion of 1967 shaped the lives and careers of two Detroit police officers Part 2

By Keith A. Owens Senior Editor

Mary Jarrett Jackson, the first female deputy police chief in Detroit history — and the first female chief of any major department in the world — who was appointed by Mayor Coleman Young in 1986, was already a veteran of the Detroit Police Department when she got the nod for the promotion. After applying for a position on the DPD in 1957, she was hired one year later. This means that by the time Young had been elected as the city’s first black mayor in 1974, Jackson had already been toiling away inside the belly of the beast for close to two decades.

By Roz Edwaard

DETROIT

MANAGING EDITOR

I

1967- 2017

n a political climate rife with enacting shortsighted and ill-advised action to dismantle the country’s most important institutions and critical legislation, the State of Michigan has joined the ranks of the reckless with its decision to close 38 Michigan schools. Twenty-four of the schools to be shuttered include 16 DPSCD and eight EAA schools which are primarily located in low income communities of color. DPSCD is currently comprised of 114 schools.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

As the battle rages over the fate of DPSCD schools and the students affected, school board officials assembled announced plans to engage the services of the Miller Canfield law firm to oppose the state’s decision.

Mary Jarrett Jackson Anthony Holt

“We made a motion to pursue with Miller Canfield a declaratory injunction.” said Iris Taylor in a special meeting last week at the DPSCD offices in the Fisher Bldg. “We are going to attempt to work with the state as we move forward and at the point where we feel it’s appropriate to initiate that decision, we’ll be ready to go.”

Wayne State University Police Chief Anthony Holt was a black youth of only 17 years when the city erupted into chaos, but much of what he saw and experienced during those five days, and in the ensuing years, made him believe that the best way to make things better for the next generations was to become a police officer himself. He has been police chief since 2008 and an officer for 40 years.

After a closed session, the board members voted 7-0 authorizing DPSCD to take legal action when timely and appropriate to present why they believe the school closures suggested by the SRO cannot legally move forward.

In their own words, because they tell their own stories the best, two of Detroit’s finest recall their experiences from an earlier Detroit that dramatically shaped their lives and careers.

Opponents of the proposed closings erupted in cheers at the announcement. “We’ve been engaged with Miller Canfield prior to tonight … they did the preliminary work when Judge Rhodes was here, so the board with this motion is basically saying to proceed with the work that’s already been done,” said DPSCD board member Angelique Mayberry, adding, “It’s financially prudent to stay with the firm.”

MARY JARRETT JACKSON When Mary Jarrett Jackson first approached the Detroit Police Department for employment in 1957, her desire was to work in the DPD lab. She certainly had the qualifications for the position, but that didn’t matter to the white male officers seated behind the desk that day, who thought it was hilarious that a black woman actually thought she could ever get a job like

Retired federal Judge Steven Rhodes, who successfully managed Detroit’s bankruptcy case, was appointed by Gov. Rick Snyder as the fifth Detroit Public Schools’ emergency manager to assist with

See SCHOOL

CLOSINGS page A-4

See BLACK

WHAT’S INSIDE

IN BLUE page A-4

Hey! You forgot to take your money with you! Too many Detroiters not claiming tax credit, losing money By Keith A. Owens Senior Editor

Remembering

Ala true Jarreau original (1940-2017)

See page D-1

Either a lot of Detroiters have so much money in their bank account that there just isn’t room for much more, or perhaps they don’t know about the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) that they may be eligible for. Lisa Howze, Detroit’s chief government affairs officer, says that she — and her boss, Mayor Mike Duggan — are pretty certain the problem isn’t too many rich Detroiters. Which means not enough people know about the EITC, which is why Howze is now in charge of the effort to help educate more Detroiters this tax season about how they can claim their fair share of the literally millions of dollars that go unclaimed every year. So if you don’t make a whole lot of money, and could use some more, this bit of information just might be for you.

$1.00

MC: What is the issue we need

Lisa Howze – Keith A. Owens photo to let people know about? LH: The issue is that there’s been an estimated $80 million per year that’s left on the table in unclaimed federal income tax credits, in the city of Detroit. So when you think about where that number come from. The IRS estimates that about $327 mil-

lion comes back to the City of Detroit for residents who do file and claim the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) So they account for that being about an 80 percent uptick. So when you do the math, the 20 percent that’s not being account-

See TAX

CREDIT page A-4

North End ‘godmother’ makes transition Dolores Bennett brought joy to many See page A-5


news

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2017

Page A-2

‘True Black History’ comes to Howell

AARP recognizes phenomenal achievements in Black History Month

In celebration of Black History books, newspapers, and photographs Month, Cleary University has brought from as far back as the late 1700s. the traveling exhibit, True Black History The collection will be on display on Museum Collection, to its Howell cam- Wednesday, Feb. 15 from 10 a.m. until 4 pus. This renowned collection includes p.m. in Cleary University’s Chrysler Hall over 1,000 rare and authentic artifacts, T:5”corridor near room 205.

By Lisa Whitmore Davis AARP Michigan Associate State Director for Multicultural Outreach

It was a day of jubilance! A day of joy! People were happy. People were excited. Some had thought it wouldn’t be possible. Some said “never.” Songs had been written. Laws were made. And finally, the possibility became real. And in the year 200 — for the firsttime ever — the first national holiday honoring an African American was recognized in not just some, but in all 50 states. The entire United States would celebrate. And rightfully so. It was Martin Luther King Jr. Day! At AARP, we celebrate the power of real possibilities that help make this world a better place for all people, for all generations.

We celebrate Black History Month with a national campaign highlighting the accomplishments and contributions of African American/blacks both past and present, beginning last month with remembering the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The theme for this year’s observance, “First After 50,” recognizes and celebrates contemporary African Americans/blacks who have achieved phenomenal accomplishments at age 50 or older, such as Morgan Freeman, winner of this year’s Movies for Grownups Career Achievement Award. See more at AARP.org/backcommunity

Michigan sheriff defends forcing woman to give birth on jail floor

Woman was forced to give birth on a dirty jail cell floor

“They told me to knock my crap off, to stop lying to them, they could put another charge on me if I kept lying to them,” Preston says. “I should have gone (to the hospital) first thing in the morning, but when I come to you bleeding, eight months pregnant, you go to the hospital.” Surveillance video shows her going to the infirmary three times and being sent back to her cell. Five days later, Preston finally gave birth without a doctor present, CBS noted. “I was scared,” Preston said. “I was terrified. I was so worried for both of us that either one of us could catch something that would be life-threatening.”

This isn’t the first time Macomb County Jail has been accused of ignoring the medical needs of its inmates. Officials are currently facing two federal lawsuits. In 2014

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“That’s always our plan, you know, to make that happen. But in this situation she was brought down, our medical staff was attending, and when they went back in the baby started to come. Safe delivery, baby was healthy.” To add insult to injury, after Preston gave birth, she had to come back to the Macomb County Jail to finish serving her time. Preston said, “I know they said that they were holding me because I had prior warrants. OK, you’re right, I did but what does that have to do with taking me to the hospital

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Calling all Detroit High School Seniors

While the jail has come under fire for their treatment of Preston, Sheriff Tony Wickersham told CBS that he doesn’t believe his staff did anything wrong. “I’m 100 percent that our people did what they needed to do,” Wickersham said. “At some point, she said she had to go to the hospital, the baby came before that happened.

one inmate was found dead in his cell after going through withdrawal of methadone and in 2013 another inmate died in her cell from a severe bacterial infection.

From our leadership to our employees, we’re proud to champion diversity. We’re committed to supporting people, programs and organizations that contribute to the growth of African American entrepreneurship and develop future tech leaders in our Atlanta community and beyond.

T:10.5”

According to national news reports, Jessica Preston, who was eight months pregnant at the time, was arrested last March and placed in jail for 14 days for driving with a suspended license. Unable to pay the $10K bond, Preston waited behind bars at the Macomb County Jail. During that time, she went into labor prematurely and was forced to give birth to son Elijah on the floor because jail officials refused to take her to the hospital.

when I’m in labor?”

Cricket is proud to support Black History Month

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None presents the 2nd annual The MichiganType/Unit: Chronicle Unit ID: S.W.A.G. Awards inNone Detroit. S.W.A.G., which stands Material Date: 02.06.17 for Students Wired forDueAchievement and Greatness, is Insertion Date: 02.13.17 a scholarship program recognizing outstanding high Publication: Chronicle school seniors who have Michigan demonstrated a commitment to community, integrity and service. Current students that are economically disadvantaged, live and attend school in Detroit or the Metro Detroit area and planning to attend college or a trade school are eligible to apply.

The Michigan Chronicle is awarding scholarships up to $10,000 Apply by March 31, 2017 NO PURCHASE OR PAYMENT NECESSARY. 2016-2017 Michigan Chronicle S.W.A.G. Awards entry period starts at 12:00 AM ET on 12/7/16 and ends at 11:59:59 PM ET on 3/31/17. Open only to 12th graders who are 16 and older who are legal residents of City of Detroit or the Metro Detroit area who: (a) attend a public, charter, or private high school. (b) are economically disadvantaged (as defined in Section2b of the complete Official Rules); (c) will graduate in spring 2017; (d) have at least a 2.5 grade point average (or equivalent); and (e) are in good community standing. Visit www.michronicleonline.com/swag-awards for entry instructions. Submission requirements prizes and complete details. Only one (1) Submission per entrant. Void where prohibited or restricted by law. SPONSORED BY

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THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2017

Page A-3

Grow Detroit’s Young Talent kicks off 2017 enrollment By Alisha Dixon During a breakfast hosted by DTE Energy at its Detroit headquarters, Mayor Mike Duggan announced the beginning of open enrollment for the Grow Detroit’s Young Talent program, a summer youth employment program. “GYDT is all about preparing our young Detroiters for their first jobs and ultimately their careers. Youth participating in this year’s program will have more opportunity than ever to receive the kind of training and experience that could make them immediately employable,” Duggan said. The open enrollment period is not only for youth, but also local businesses that want to hire GDYT youth. GDYT employs youth between 14 and 24 for six weeks during the summer through partnerships with local businesses. "The business and philanthropic community really stepped up to the plate, and our community came together to make it clear that we care about the kids in this city and we want to make sure that they have access to opportunity. It means so much to tell our young people that the community is here for you, and we believe in you," said the mayor. "There's going to be 300 to 400 companies to choose from. You are going to have options, from police and fire to sports teams to medical facilities. There will be a whole range of options for our young people.” In 2015, GDYT’s first year, 5,600 youth were employed through the program. Due to the program’s success, each year interest in GDYT almost doubles. Last

year, GDYT received over 25,000 applications and out of those, 8,100 were chosen. Each year the program hopes to employ more youth. As the program’s popularity grows, Tonya Allen, president and CEO of The Skillman Foundation, said the impact of programs like GDYT extends beyond helping youth, but it also helps the community. "Hiring a young Detroiter through this summer jobs program is a direct way for those in the private sector to make an immediate impact on the life trajectory of our kids and our city," said Allen. "Not only are we helping our young people begin their careers, we are strengthening their capacity to contribute to Detroit's recovery as part of its workforce." The program has proven to inspire growth and build confidence for youth through readiness training, vocational training and employment. DeAnna Gardner is an example of that. Gardner, a Cass Technical High School student and participant in GDYT, believes she has grown since becoming a part of the program. “Being involved has been a great experience. I have been able to see new things and have some new experiences,” Gardner said. “The program has opened me up. Before, I wasn’t as social and involved. I’m looking forward to another year.” The application process for GDYT is open now and ends on March 31, 2017. To apply, youth must be eligible to work in the U.S. and be residents of the city of Detroit. To sign up, go to www.GDYT.org.

Decision on soccer stadium vs. jail should not be rushed, says county executive By Keith A. Owens Senior Editor

One thing was rather clear at Monday morning’s press conference with Wayne County Executive Warren Evans. He doesn’t plan to put any kind of rush order on Rock Ventures CEO Dan Gilbert’s last-minute proposal to build a new Wayne County jail. Despite Gilbert’s public maneuverings to have his way — and have it now — by putting pressure on Evans to go along with his vision of building a soccer stadium on the unfinished Gratiot Avenue jail site and relocating the jail to Gilbert’s proposed new address up the street on East Forest. Evans made it plain that he intends to take his time and thoroughly vet Gilbert’s proposal to his satisfaction before arriving at any kind of decision. Currently, Evans said, in response to a reporter’s question, he views Gilbert’s recent offer as a “starting point in negotiations.” Although Gilbert has said he would like to have an answer to his proposal by Feb. 20 (it was submitted Monday, Feb. 6), Evans responded, “I appreciate that Dan Gilbert and the Rock team has submitted their proposal prior to our deadline, but there will not be enough time by the Feb. 20 date for us to be able to do the complete vetting that would be necessary. …There are some positives in the deal, but there are many questions that need to be answered.” For example, “Is the estimated $420 million proposed to be spent by Rock adequate for the county’s needs? We don’t know that yet. I personally have

doubts that $420 million will be enough to build what we need, and I’m not talking about cost overruns. I’m talking about the amount of money needed to build the facility to meet our needs. If we determine that it’s going to take $500 million, what then?”

lion bonds were issued related to jail construction on the current Gratiot site. “If we build it somewhere else, there’s a possibility that the government, the IRS, could say we were in violation of the agreement with these bonds and we’d have to pay back ... the concessions that were granted because of it. It could be many millions of dollars that the county could be on the hook for, which would probably scuttle the whole deal.”

Meanwhile, the plan is to continue moving forward with Walsh Construction, the Chicago-based company that submitted the only viable bid for finishing the Gratiot site late last year. Walsh is scheduled to present its formal proposal to the county by May 3 of this year, after which the administration will review the proposal over the following two months (May-June) to decide on whether to enter into a design-build contract with Walsh. In light of Gilbert’s proposal, Evans plans to propose to the County Commissioners a stipend agreement of up to $500,000 for Walsh Construction that would basically serve as an insurance incentive to Walsh that they would be fairly and adequately compensated for their time and effort should Rock Ventures ultimately win out. But the stipend would only be paid if Walsh does not ultimately win the bid. “We need to continue on both tracks. It’s the only prudent move for us. And while I want closure on this mess as badly as all of you do, we have to get it right,” said Evans. “This is a tremendously complex proposal. So is finishing a partially-built jail.” “We don’t expect that the vetting of Rock’s proposal will take any longer than Walsh’s proposal to finish the RFP. We spent the better part of 18 months working to issue the

And then there is the issue of convenient access for the public, which is extremely important given the fact that the population most likely to be taking the most advantage of the jail site — wherever it winds up being located — are people much less likely to have access to cars, and there currently is not a convenient bus stop near the proposed new location. “I think you have to look at things like bus routes, which we haven’t looked at yet, because jurors have to be able to [get to the location] to serve. ...We have to make it easy for the public to access the site,” said Woronchak.

Wayne County Executive Warren Evans – Keith A. Owens RFP, and I have no intention of slowing down the process. Perhaps had Rock submitted an offer sooner, that might not have been the case. I’ve stated on many occasions I think finishing the Gratiot jail on the existing site is the most cost-effective option for us. I have yet to be persuaded otherwise.” Wayne County Commission Chair Gary Woronchak, who was also present, weighed in with his own concerns.

“It’s an intriguing plan. I’m a little concerned that it’s coming so late in the game. Frankly, Rock has known all along that this was the direction we were going in. They could have given us this proposal a year ago, not when we were so far along with Walsh Construction. “I think another point that’s missed is that we used Recovery Act bonds … and that could actually scuttle the whole thing” because those $200 mil-

On the plus side, Evans and Woronchak both said they thought it was good that Rock Ventures would cover any cost overruns of the project, and “the thought of three brand new facilities is enticing to most anyone” said Evans. “I agree with Dan Gilbert that this is a 50-year decision, but it’s important to remember that we’re nearly a decade into this debacle that we inherited. It will continue to cost Wayne County taxpayers for decades. Getting this right for them trumps any other concerns I have.”


news

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2017

School closings

Tax credit From page A-1

From page A-1

ed for amounts to about $80 million.

Detroit Public Schools reform and transitioning the school system to local control.

MC: Why aren’t people claiming this money?

“It is just a big puzzle. It’s curious why we would go through the motions last summer of providing a financial fresh start for the district, going through the motions of holding an election, and then taking this incredibly destabilizing step, explained DPSCD board member Sonya Mays. Detroit schools recently regained local control after being under emergency management since 2009. During that period, state emergency managers closed more than 150 schools in Detroit. The newly elected school board contends that the state continues to usurp the elected board’s authority and has essentially inherited an illegally imposed and failed approach to Detroit’s school crisis. “Our whole point is that right now, this should not be decided by anyone but the locally elected and empowered school board. So I look forward to presenting those plans for the board to review and [we] give permission to proceed with legal action so we can actually improve schools,” said interim school superintendent Alycia Merriweather. “I don’t work in this district to close schools and I took this job to improve schools and make things better for children. And that is my main goal … and I am confident we are going to be able to make this work.” Equally as erroneous as the decision to close schools in disadvantaged communities is the mislabeling or mischaracterization of these schools as “priority schools” when they are anything but. School closing opponents criticize the “priority school” designation as a misrepresentation, and point out that the term is deceptive and misleading to parents and students. The priority school designation does not mean that underperforming schools will receive special attention or additional resources to enhance performance. It instead denotes that consistently failing schools are in the greatest jeopardy of being permanently shuttered. “The decision by the Michigan School Reform office is just another blow to the progress we are trying to make for Detroit’s schools, students and families,” Ivy Bailey, Detroit Federation of Teachers president, said in a statement. “Shuttering schools, displacing students and burdening parents isn’t the way to improve public education in Michigan.” As the conflict escalates over how best to serve students in failing schools with plunging enrollment, activists insist that instead of closing schools and shipping off students, more equitable distribution of resources as a major part of preventing schools from failing is a more just and sensible approach. National studies indicate that all too often, students from closed schools are transferred to schools that are not much

Black in Blue

better than the ones they attended. More than half (52 percent) of them were placed in schools ranked in the bottom third of the district for math scores, while 43 percent found themselves at new schools ranked in the bottom third for reading. Moreover, the researchers tracked test scores, four years after transfers, and found little academic difference between the students who were relocated and students of similar socioeconomic backgrounds who remained in the district. “DPSCD, the family, thanks the board which is like the guardian of the district, so I just want to be on record to say thank you to the board for fighting for the district,” said Merriweather. The DPSCD management team is reportedly working around the clock meeting with administrators and faculty from the affected schools to develop individual plans for those 16 DPSCDC schools on the school closure list. Merriweather indicated that within 10 days of the Feb. 8 meeting, the board would be prepared to share alternative plans with parents, students and the general public. “There are going to be some very different approaches that are being made under local control,” she stated.

MC: What are the levels?

From page A-1

She was told the tests would be administered at the same time, but they weren’t. Jackson still took the test, but she wrote across the top that she was taking the test under protest because “this is not what we agreed on.”

“I set up the blood bank when they opened Sinai Hospital. And they said, ‘Oh you’re ideal.’ But I guess they had time to get down to personnel, and they didn’t understand when I spoke to them to find out that I was black. And then I didn’t get any callbacks,” she said. When she finally called to ask why she didn’t get a callback, Jackson was told the position had already been filled by someone named Campbell. But she said, “You haven’t even posted it.” She continued to get the runaround, so Jackson contacted someone she knew who checked into this Campbell guy’s experience. “He didn’t have any schooling. Never been trained in anything scientific,” said Jackson, adding that the man had worked as nothing more than an aide. “I went to my dad again, crying, and said ‘I just can’t ever seem to get anything to go right. I’m thinking of quitting the police department because I’m never going to get into the lab.’ He said, ‘Didn’t I tell you that you don’t respond that way, baby? Let me take care of it.’” Her father called [now Judge] Damon Keith, who would be elected co-chair of the Michigan Civil Rights Commission the following year in 1964, and Councilman William T. Patrick, the first African American to serve on that body since the 1880s, and told them about the situation. They arranged for a meeting with the Berg brothers, who Jackson recalls were the superintendent and deputy superintendent of the DPD, and had a meeting. Eventually it was decided that an exam would be given, and the person who scored the highest would get the position, and Campbell would be removed. “I said, ‘Excuse me, will we all take the test together? At the same time?

LH: Yes. They would complete a tax return, and a part of that return is the EITC schedule that would get filed along with their federal tax return. The EITC is based on income, the number of dependents or qualifying children that you file for. So it can be zero up to three or more. And the filing status. So single, head of household, qualifying widower, is that person that’s considered single, or individual. And then there are families. So a married couple filing a joint return. You have to file a joint return, not married filing separately.

“This idea of closing 24 schools and parents not having a quality alternative makes no sense. We have to stop these school closings,” he said. “I am going to be very supportive of Detroit schools to that end. It’s completely unjustified to close those schools and it needs to be stopped.”

Jackson majored in chemistry and physics at Howard University, from which she graduated in 1952. She minored in zoology.

Five years later, in 1963, Jackson heard about an opening in the lab, thanks to a white female colleague who’s boyfriend was also an officer and had told her about the position. Cautiously excited that maybe, just maybe, things might be going her way, Jackson called whoever was responsible for doing the hiring and described her extensive lab experience, plus how much blood work she had done at Sinai Hospital.

MC: And this money would come directly to them?

In an exclusive interview with the Michigan Chronicle, Mayor Mike Duggan addressed the issue of school closings.

Because if I’m taking the test one day and you’re taking it another, I don’t know whether you have the answers or not,” said Jackson.

Nevertheless, they told Jackson that the only shot she had a such a job was to work as a police officer first. She couldn’t just walk in, a black woman in Detroit, and expect to ever get hired. So even though she never really wanted to work as an officer, at her father’s urging she applied and was accepted onto the force the following year in 1958.

LH: They don’t know about it. [They think] hey, I don’t have to file a tax return this year because I didn’t make a lot of money, and so those people won’t file. But in order to claim the EITC, you have to file a tax return. So if you think about who falls into that category more; probably your younger individuals. Maybe they worked a part-time job in some type of service job. Maybe it was fast food. Maybe they only worked the latter portion of 2016. So if that person only earned, say, $8,000, they’re single, they don’t have any dependents to claim. They earned $8,000 in 2016, then they could be eligible for $500 in EITC. So you literally can get more money back from the federal government than you had to pay in.

The proposed academic plan to counter school closures will be conducted with detailed input from the DPSCD board and assures that each school improvement plan will be an individual plan and will include significant community input along with involvement of external partners, as well as national and local exemplars.

that. One that required such expertise and a significant amount of relevant schooling. The kind of schooling that she already had.

“I was trying to go to med school, but again, there were quotas at Wayne State, and at Howard where I went to school. … Wayne State would only take 72 students, and of that 72, two — did you hear me? — two were minorities. They could be Chinese, blacks, anything but white.”

Page A-4

"And so they said, ‘well, are you gonna take the exam or not?’ and so I took it.” “Later I was called and told I had the highest grade. I don’t know if I had the highest grade or not, but that’s how I got the position and got in there. Because I couldn’t believe that a young man who had never had any chemistry, biology, nothing, no blood experience, could do better than myself or any of the other four officers. I just would not accept that. So when they told me that I had passed as the highest, I didn’t question it. I was just relieved.” Coleman Young hired Jackson because of a case she handled that got a Detroit police officer, Raymond Peterson, fired for wrongly killing a black man. Peterson and another officer were taunting a man who was on his way to his midnight shift at the auto plant. Peterson later alleged that the man assaulted him, which was why he had to kill him. Peterson was an undercover cop who dressed as a woman to try to engage black men, said Jackson. He was responsible for killing nine out of 13 men whom he claimed had assaulted him and had to be killed. So when Jackson heard his claim about what had happened, her antennae shot up and she worked the case closely and demanded all the evidence to ensure she came to the correct conclusion. She told them she needed everyone’s clothing, because otherwise “I won’t have the complete picture.” She also tested the knife that Peterson carried. By the time she tested all the evidence from the clothing and the knife, it was clear to her what had happened. “I knew I was onto something and I knew that it was going to cause me trouble,” she said. She already knew that the knife did not belong to the victim, and now it was just a matter of proving it. Jackson worked on the case every day for six months with a white female officer “until I knew I was right, and when I went to trial, I was ready for whatever.” Jackson was given officers to examine her car before she went home to make sure there wasn’t a hidden bomb planted. She received death threats. “They were threatening me and they were threatening my family,” she said. “When you live through horrible times, you know you’ve done something right, and I think that’s why I was on the mayor’s radar.” The man was fired, even though he was allowed to keep his pension. “But at least he wasn’t on the street killing people anymore.”

Jackson retired in 1994.

ANTHONY HOLT Anthony Holt always wanted to join the force, but he graduated from college when he was 20, and you could not join the DPD until you were 21. So to bide

his time, he took a series of other jobs straight out of college. “You won’t have a lot of people tell you this, to be honest, but people were being rejected, African Americans, if you had your wisdom tooth in, or sometimes you might break your finger and it doesn’t heal right, but it doesn’t have anything to do with your physical performance as a police officer, you were being rejected. So there was not a big recruiting effort to bring African Americans onto the job.” Holt joined the force in April 1977. Although there was racism there as well, he noted that the atmosphere was not as bad as with the DPD. “When you came to Wayne State University Police, the education level was much higher, and the university was a diverse area. But the area we patrolled was always the south side of campus, and we saw the difference in the attitudes of police officers. If you talked to police officers who joined the DPD in ’75 or before, they will tell you it was a very difficult time. When STRESS was out there, there was a white squad and a black squad. Cop cars were not integrated. White officers would flat out say they would not work with black officers.” At WSU, “We were probably the second unit in the country to require a bachelor’s degree. So everybody had a degree, but it was not bias-free at all.” When Holt joined the Wayne State Police, “there were a total of three black officers. No officer in a command position. No officer in a division like investigations or plain clothes or anything.” Reflecting on the times surrounding the ’67 rebellion, when he was still a youngster, Holt said, “The justice system was not looking at people with an open eye. It was very shaded. They were just picking you up, locking you up and putting you in the precinct. And then when you had Judge [George] Crockett go to the precinct, I’m not sure which precinct, and held court right there. Bring people out and arraign them right there, and then release people. I’m pretty sure it was Judge Crockett who went to the precincts and said I’m a judge, and I’m gonna hold hearings right now, and had all these people released because they were just being detained. They were locking people up in the elephant house on Belle Isle.” “The difference in police work today, is you will be challenged,” he said. “You know, when I was coming up, if a police officer told you to stand still you stood still. I can remember sitting on my porch and watching a police officer pull over two cars with a total of about eight people in them. It was strictly about fear. They would tell you, ‘if you do this, you’re gonna get shot.’ That fear of a police officer, people call it a lack of respect, but it’s not. To get respect you have to give it and I think that fear of police officers is not there now, especially with the younger generation. If I see these kids about to fight, I tell them to come over here, they say ‘why?’ And they’ll come over, but they’ll come over at their own pace. They’re gonna send you a message, I am not afraid of you.”

LH: So let’s say a married couple filing a joint return collectively earned $23,000 in 2016 and they had three children. That family would qualify for the maximum EITC which is $6,269. Let’s say, for example, you are a family that made $8,000, you could earn as much as $500 back. Now there are some people who say, “I made a little bit more than $23,000 last year, but not quite the $54,000.” That’s the upper limit? For the married couple with three children? Let’s say I fell within that range; I made $27-33,000. That family would get back upwards of $4,600. So it’s a significant amount of money that’s available to them. The other part of this campaign is to really let Detroiters know that there’s access available to free tax assistance. So they can keep more of their tax refund by seeking out free tax assistance that’s made available through the Accounting Aid Society (AAS). That’s the organization that the City of Detroit has partnered with in this initiative. We have set a goal to increase the number of EITC returns by at least 1,000 in 2017. And so the more we build awareness around this, the more we also direct people toward self-preparation that they can get comfortable in taking ownership of their own financial health, and their own financial lives to where they can keep all of their money and expedite the process of getting that return done. MC: What’s the qualification to be accepted by AAS for free tax assistance? LH: For married couples, it’s almost synonymous with what the income levels are for the EITC. If you earn less than $54,000 a year, then you will be eligible to receive that free tax assistance. MC: How long has this been an issue for Detroiters not claiming benefits? LH: It’s a federal program that has been available for a number of years. Mayor Duggan actually mentioned last year that he wanted to make this a priority for his administration. He saw what they were doing in New York in that they were able to increase the number of people filing for the EITC over a threeyear period of time. MC: What’s the benefit for the city when more people apply for EITC? LH: Well the main thing is you’re putting more money back into people’s pocket, that will allow them to, number one, avoid tax foreclosure so they’ll be able to stay in their homes. They can put more food on their table, purchase clothing, gain access to transportation, and really create a savings for the future. So this is money that we can ill afford to have left in Washington, D.C., as tough as times are. MC: Does AAS provide financial counseling? LH: They do have that as a part of their portfolio. One of the main things is we want to make sure that not only do people get extra money back, but they also have some options for what they can do with that money [to help people maximize their financial potential]. MC: Have you seen evidence that people are responding? LH: Ever since the mayor’s announcement on Jan. 26, there has been a significant increase in people calling 211 about the credit.


news

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2017

Page A-5

North End ‘godmother’ makes transition

Dolores Bennett brought joy to many

such as Wayne County Circuit Court Judge Craig Strong and Sheriff Benny Napoleon as well as business and civic leaders routinely made donations to the early December effort.

By Ken Coleman

“It’s early Christmas for kids receiving warm clothing, toys and bikes,” Mrs. Bennett pointed out several years ago. “Even with this economy, the spirit of giving has not been taken a back seat when kids are involved.”

It will be impossible to drive along Brush Street or Oakland Avenue just north of Grand Boulevard and not be reminded of Dolores Bennett’s easy smile and warm Southern drawl.

Myron Wright, a single father on disability, participated in Adopt-A-Child in 2011. His children, ages 3, 5, 9 and 10, were beneficiaries of Bennett-inspired kindness. “I’m struggling and I couldn’t get them too much for Christmas this year. This is a true blessing, people helping other people,” he said.

The founder of the North End Youth Improvement Council and its leader for more than 40 years died on Feb. 6. She was 84. I met Mrs. Bennett during the mid1990s while she and I were staffers in the office of Detroit Councilwoman Brenda M. Scott. The Tennessee-born woman with a grandmotherly demeanor was one of our team’s community liaisons, someone who we relied upon to impart keen insight into what the streets were saying and thinking. Fact is, her highly regarded counsel was sought by many, from city hall to community centers, from boardrooms to the boulevard. Last spring, public relations executive Charlene Mitchell Rodgers approached me about helping Mrs. Bennett write a memoir. After many decades of service to her community, she was ready to document her story. We met at her home on King Street and a group of us discussed the project. It was clear that Mrs. Bennett had thought it through — the people, the events, the order in which they would be positioned — even the book’s title. Unfortunately, we didn’t have a follow-up meeting. I suspect that Mrs. Bennett, her family, and other advisors were finalizing various aspects of the project. Her contributions are known to many. During the late 1970s, Delores Bennett became a member of the Wayne County Board of Commissioners. She defeated Conrad Mallett, Sr., a formidable incumbent who had previously worked as a top aide to former mayor Jerome P. Cavanagh and was currently transportation director under Mayor Coleman A. Young. “If I had to be defeated by anyone,” Mallett conceded in 1978, “I would pre-

Delores Bennett, who was honored as a Michiganian of the Year by the Detroit News in 1988 and received a National Child Labor Committee special citation in 1992, had bouts with sickness from time to time, but I always had the sense that she would be around for a long time serving the community that she loved. God had another plan.

Dolores Bennett fer it was Mrs. Bennett.” It was during that period she led a successful effort to transform a gritty neighborhood park located at Smith and Beaubien streets that had become overrun with gang activity from the notorious Dirty Players, M&Ms and Dillingers. Led by Mrs. Bennett, the community negotiated with gangbangers and political leaders. The result was a new swing set, a shiny children’s slide, and a black-top basketball court. The park was named Dolores Bennett Playground in July 1977 and became an oasis for many North End children and adults as well. She saw to it that the park was always in good shape, never covered with litter or out-of-control grass.

Moreover, for decades, Mrs. Bennett sponsored the annual Adopt-A-Child Christmas program, where hundreds of people presented about 4,000 deserving children with gifts. It became a holiday season staple at Cobo Convention Center. In fact, many area elected officials

A candlelight prayer vigil and public viewing were held earlier this week. A “Community Salute,” hosted by Greater New Mt. Moriah Baptist Church, located at 586 Owen Street, will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 15, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Her homegoing celebration will be held at Greater New Mt. Moriah on Thursday, Feb. 16. It will include an additional viewing from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. The funeral will start at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that contributions made to Adopt-AChild Program, 111 King Street, Detroit, MI 48202

Michigan Unions: State budget should prioritize good jobs for working families Snyder’s budget shows Lansing Republicans side with corporate donors over working families Michigan AFL-CIO President Ron Bieber issued the following statement on Governor Rick Snyder’s budget presentation: “Today’s budget shows that Governor Snyder and Lansing Republicans care more about helping their wealthy corporate campaign donors than regular working people. It’s time to get our priorities straight and build an economy that works for everyone, including the middle class. “We need a state budget that will create good-paying jobs for working families by ending tax breaks for cor-

porations that send Michigan jobs overseas. And we need a real plan to fix our crumbling roads and infrastructure that makes corporations and the wealthy pay their fair share. “But after six years of total control in Lansing, it’s clear that Republicans still don’t get it. They gave corporations a $2 billion tax break while raising taxes on seniors and working families. And Republicans passed a roads package that raised taxes and fees on regular families, making it more expensive to own a car. Meanwhile, our roads are still falling apart and getting worse every day. “This budget should serve as a stark reminder to all working families that Governor Snyder and Lansing Republicans are not on your side.”

New legislation boosting veteran employment and veteran-owned business opportunities Michigan Chronicle reports

The Veteran Business Owned Roundtable, a Veteran entrepreneur advocacy organization “Serving Those Whom Have Served” since 2005, announces its support of proposed new legislation presented by Michigan State Senator Patrick Colbeck (7th MI Senate District). The legislation is designed to boost employment for Veterans separated from active duty service, and increase procurement opportunities for veteran owned businesses and service-disabled veteran owned businesses with the State of Michigan. “We are proud that 660,000 veterans call Michigan home,” said Senator Patrick Colbeck. “The citizens of Michigan owe a debt of gratitude to those who have served and sacrificed so much to defend the freedoms we hold dear. When the State of Michigan purchases goods and services from veteran-owned businesses on behalf of our citizens, it helps our veterans find and maintain employment and business opportunities as they return home from their service and re-enter society.” Current legislation assists veterans with identifying potential job opportunities, matching them with employers. It also sets goals for the state to buy goods and services from Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Businesses. Senator Colbeck’s proposed legislation enhances these functions by incentivizing employers to hire more veteran employees, include more veteran-owned businesses as subcontractors, and expand the pool of veteran-owned businesses the State of Michigan purchases from. The State of Michigan has a goal of spending 5 percent of its annual pro-

curement budget with veteran businesses. Often, that goal is not met due to the lack of available qualified VOBs in many industry sectors. Senator Colbeck’s proposed legislation expands the pool of available veteran-owned businesses by recognizing not only service-disabled veteran owned businesses, but also all qualified and certified veteran-owned businesses. “The Veteran Owned Business Roundtable is pleased by the efforts of Senator Colbeck to ensure that our veterans have access to opportunities with the State of Michigan and other companies,” said, Rod Rickman, president of the Veteran-Owned Business Roundtable. “Recognizing our veterans for their service with procurement and employment opportunities helps them as they transition to civilian life. This proposed legislation, when passed, will help Michigan’s veterans continue to serve our great state through their economic contributions.” Everyone can take part in helping our veterans by supporting this legislation. Citizens, veterans and supporters of veterans can contact their state legislators in the state Senate and House of Representatives and express their support for this legislation The VOBRT is dedicated to helping veteran-owned businesses develop contracting opportunities with governments and private corporations. The mission is to promote, advocate, advise, connect and mentor for veteran entrepreneurs. Using programs, events and technology, the Roundtable strives to supply assistance to those who have honorably served our country and choose to serve again in our nation’s industry.

We Work Ar ound Your Work. HENRY FORD WALK-IN CLINICS Fever? Flu? Or just a funny feeling in your stomach? Get seen now at any one of our five Walk-In Clinics. We’re open seven days a week with extended hours, so you can stop in on your way from work or home. Plus, you’ll get the world-class care of a Henry Ford clinician for the copay of a primary care visit. Simply walk in or go online to reserve your place in line. HenryFord.com/SkipTheWait 1-800-HENRYFORD

Dearborn . Grosse Pointe . Northwest Detroit Novi . Sterling Heights


T:10” Page A-6 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • February 15-21, 2017

T:21”

LAFAYE BAKER STUNTWOMAN/COORDINATOR FIRST SUNDAY

Breaking Barriers With over 20 films to her credit, LaFaye Baker is living proof that whatever a stuntman can do, a stuntwoman can do, too… and in high heels. Join us as we celebrate women who are making magic behind the scenes. To see LaFaye’s work and more, visit Black Film & TV on XFINITY On Demand, where Black History is always on. Visit xfinity.com/CelebrateBlackTV

Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. XFINITY TV with On Demand required. © 2017 Comcast. All rights reserved.


SECTION B

COMMUNITY Powered by Real Times Media

michiganchronicle.com

PAWS, Al Taylor of Comerica Bank, Jay Alexander of Detroit PAL and Detroit Police Officer Demetrius Pitts joined together for an on-field check presentation during Fan Appreciation Weekend at Comerica Park. Taylor presented Detroit PAL with a big check for $25,000 for the renovation of the Calcara Park baseball field.

February 15-21, 2016

Comerica Cares volunteers (from left) Alicia Stephens, Wendy Holmes, Amanda Mansour, Latrese Forest of CBRE, Annette Zyski and Patricia McCann gathered before greeting colleagues who attended an employee rally featuring the Detroit Tigers. Comerica announced the completion of the Calcara Park baseball diamond renovation during the Tigers Winter Caravan stop at the bank’s Michigan Market headquarters.

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Detroit community baseball diamond renovation complete Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander answers a question asked during the Detroit Tigers Winter Caravan visit to Comerica Bank.

Comerica Bank and Detroit PAL invites public to celebrate first game at Calcara Park May 13

A Detroit neighborhood park, once long neglected, has a new life and an upcoming inaugural baseball game thanks to Comerica Bank volunteers and partners. Detroit Police officers will join youth players involved with the Detroit Police Athletic League baseball programs for a special first game scheduled for Saturday, May 13, to celebrate the completion of the new field and kickoff the 2017 PAL season. Comerica and PAL are inviting the neighborhood community to join them in the celebration and watch the game.

Marvin Rushing, retail district manager for Comerica Bank, helps paint the backstop at Calcara Park to kick off the renovation of the park’s baseball diamond.

The announcement of the first game was made by Mike Ritchie, president of Comerica’s Michigan Market, during the Detroit Tigers Winter Caravan stop at the bank’s Michigan Market headquarters. The employee rally featured Tigers’ Announcer Mario Impemba, Manager Brad Ausmus, Shortstop Jose Iglesias and Pitcher Justin Verlander, among others. “We hope Calcara Park is a new field of dreams for PAL and our city’s youth,” said Ritchie. “This project is a great example of what can be achieved by working together to improve our community and enhancing lives through the love of baseball is something we can all be proud of.” Theresa Caparaotta, account closing specialist at Comerica, said she was pleased to learn about the restoration and upcoming event at Calcara Park.

The backstop at Calcara Park before Comerica Cares volunteers helped clear overgrown shrubbery on it.

“I think it’s wonderful when you work for a company that shows that they care,” Caparaotta said. “They go above and beyond, especially with volunteering. Comerica looks out for the community and that’s what

The newly restored Calcara Park baseball diamond will be used by PAL for t-ball and coach pitch games. I love about working here.” Last year, Comerica awarded a $25,000 Grand Slam Grant to PAL to renovate the field, located at Charlevoix St. and Ellery St. in Detroit. Comerica volunteers joined members of PAL, the Detroit Police Department, Bailey Park Project and Ross Hill Academy to kick off the renovation in October by cleaning and painting the backstop, which was the only evidence a baseball diamond once existed at Calcara Park. The renovation included removing the grass that was in the infield and replacing it with a new infield, as well as adding benches and protective fencing. Patricia McCann, vice president and national employee volunteer

program manager at Comerica Bank, has been volunteering with the project since it began. “To see the whole thing come to fruition, and a game being played, will be really exciting,” she said. McCann said these types of community projects are a key part of Comerica’s work. “We can’t be a strong business without a strong, healthy community. It’s part of our responsibility and it’s a part of who we are; it’s in our DNA to be committed to the community.” In addition to hosting Detroit PAL T-ball and coach pitch games, students from Ross-Hill Academy and children from the surrounding community will have access to play on the diamond throughout the year, something that would not have been possible without the collaboration among so many organizations and volunteers. “With our deep roots in Detroit and our name on the Tigers’ ballpark, it’s an honor to support the efforts of our police officers, who give their time as coaches and mentors to PAL athletes, by providing this field for our city’s youth,” said Marvin Rushing, district manager for Comerica Bank. In partnership with the DPD and community volunteers, Detroit PAL builds character in young people through athletic, academic and leadership development programs.

Comerica Bank’s Michigan Market President, Mike Ritchie, welcomes Comerica colleagues to an employee rally featuring the Detroit Tigers, where he announced plans for Comerica to join Detroit PAL in celebrating the first game played on the newly renovated baseball diamond at Calcara Park. Comerica Bank was one of the stops on the Detroit Tigers 2017 Winter Caravan.

“Detroit PAL is a character building program striving to channel kids’ energy into positive activities like sports,” said Jay Alexander, manager of philanthropic strategic partnerships for Detroit PAL. “Baseball is a big part of our program and safe, quality fields are paramount for player participation and the success of the program. We are incredibly grateful for Comerica helping to add another safe field to promote youth baseball opportunities in Detroit.”


community

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2016

Page B-2

Comerica Bank’s Michigan Index continues gains Comerica Bank’s Michigan Economic Activity Index improved in November, up 1.3 percentage points to a level of 129.7. November’s reading is 56 points, or 75 percent, above the index cyclical low of 74.1. The index averaged 123.6 points for all of 2015, five and four-fifths points above the index average for 2014. October’s index reading was 128.4. “The Comerica Bank Michigan Economic Activity Index increased for the second consecutive month in November. The state economy is showing broad-based gains, with six of the eight index components up for the month. Nonfarm employment, unemployment insurance claims (inverted), housing starts, home prices, sales tax revenues and hotel occupancy were all up in November. State exports eased, as did auto production. Yearover-year job growth for Michigan remains above the U.S. average, dipping slightly to 2.1 percent in November. The state’s unemployment rate declined to about even with the national average by late 2015 and remains close. Many Robert A. Dye industries report very tight labor market conditions and this will keep upward pressure on wages through 2017,” said Robert Dye, chief economist at Comerica Bank. “The Trump Administration is focused on keeping auto sector jobs in Michigan and this will help to extend the current positive business climate for the state.”

Comerica Bank to invest $3 million as it reshapes its presence in and around downtown Detroit

Comerica Bank plans to reshape its presence in and around downtown Detroit, investing $3 million as it opens new locations, relocates offices and sells offices to make way for new developments downtown.

on their development of a new cancer center and a new development nearby that will open in 2018. Comerica’s W. Grand Boulevard-Sterling location is being sold to Henry Ford to make way for the new cancer center.

Detroit’s continuing economic development, including the Henry Ford Health System’s new cancer center, the District Detroit development with the new Little Caesars Arena, and the Gordie Howe International Bridge, are helping to drive these changes.

To continue serving W. Grand-Sterling customers, a temporary drive-thru office will open in early April at 2838 West Grand Blvd. This new location, at the corner of Lincoln and W. Grand Boulevard, will include a 24-hour ATM and two “Banker Connect,” or interactive teller-like, machines in which “We opened our first bank in down- customers can talk to a virtual customer town Detroit in 1849 and it’s an honor for service representative, make deposits or us to continue to serve the city’s residents withdrawals, cash checks and much more. and businesses almost 170 years later,” Customer accounts will be moved to Coexplained Mike Ritchie, Comerica’s Michi- merica’s nearby Fisher Building office, locatgan Market president. “The developments ed 3011 W. Grand Blvd., between Second under way will spark further growth in De- and Third streets, effective April 28, 2017. troit’s economy and we’re proud to sup- Comerica plans to open a new office in the port that growth through these changes.” CBP-6100-12 CRE Ad-MM.pdf 1 8/3/16 10:07 AMThird and Grand development that will Comerica is working with Henry Ford provide its West Grand Blvd.-Sterling and

Fisher Building customers with enhanced services, including extended banking hours. Comerica also plans to relocate its Fort-Washington office to a location nearby. Fort-Washington is in the 201 W. Fort Street building, which is currently for sale. The sale is contingent on the purchase or lease of a nearby site to provide continuing service to Fort-Washington customers. Other changes planned include the installment of ATMs and the opening of a new banking center in the District Detroit Development, and the acquisition of Comerica’s Fort-Military location by MDOT. That acquisition, to make way for the new Gordie Howe International Bridge, will result in the May consolidation of that office with the Vernor-Inglis banking center. Comerica will continue to evaluate options for potential sites in this area as construction of the new bridge progresses and plans for related developments evolve.

The Michigan Economic Activity Index consists of eight variables, as follows: nonfarm payrolls, exports, hotel occupancy rates, continuing claims for unemployment insurance, housing starts, sales tax revenues, home prices, and auto production. All data are seasonally adjusted, and indexed to a base year of 2008. Nominal values have been converted to constant dollar values. Index levels are expressed in terms of three-month moving averages. Comerica Bank, with one of the largest banking center networks in Michigan, is a subsidiary of Comerica Incorporated (NYSE: CMA), a financial services company headquartered in Dallas, Texas, and strategically aligned by three business segments: The Business Bank, The Retail Bank, and Wealth Management. Comerica focuses on relationships, and helping people and businesses be successful. In addition to Michigan and Texas, Comerica Bank locations can be found in Arizona, California, and Florida, with select businesses operating in several other states, as well as in Canada and Mexico. To subscribe to our publications or for questions, contact us at ComericaEcon@comerica.com. Archives are available at http://www.comerica.com/economics. Follow us on Twitter: @Comerica_Econ.

Let’s grow, right now. When it comes to business, timing is everything.

MEMBER FDIC. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY LENDER. Comerica Bank NMLS ID: 480990 *Comerica ranks first nationally among the top 25 U.S. financial holding companies, based on commercial and industrial loans outstanding as a percentage of assets. Data provided by SNL Financial, June 2015. CBP-6100-12 08/16

And, with historically low rates, there’s never been a more opportunistic time to expand your business with a commercial real estate loan from Comerica. As the leading bank for business*, we’ve been financing business expansion for nearly 150 years. Whether you need to build or purchase, expand or refinance, it’s the right time. Are you ready? Call 800.705.2387, stop by a Comerica banking center or visit comerica.com/cre.

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RAISE YOUR EXPECTATIONS.


February 15-21, 2017 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • Page B-3


HIRAM E. JACKSON Publisher

A Real Times Media Newspaper 479 Ledyard • Detroit, MI 48201

(313) 963-5522 e-mail: newsdesk@michronicle.com February 15-21, 2017

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CATHY NEDD Associate Publisher KEITH A. OWENS Senior Editor SAMUEL LOGAN Publisher 1933-2011

JOHN H. SENGSTACKE Chairman-Emeritus 1912-1997 LONGWORTH M. QUINN Publisher-Emeritus 1909-1989

Closing schools, a wrongheaded move with serious consequences Angelique Peterson-Mayberry

uations that become a reality because of it.

Word has recently come from the State of Michigan that 16 Detroit Public School Community District facilities and eight Education Achievement Authority schools are set to close in the near future. What’s more disturbing is that the DPSCD will absorb those eight EAA facilities this summer, bringing the total to 24 potential district closings.

Additionally, several schools slated to close are new facilities recently built, or facilities that have received considerable upgrades and community partnership donations resulting in added programs and major infrastructure improvements. To now make the decision to toss those investments aside does no good to our students, our educators or to the community.

As a duly elected board member, I find this decision problematic on many levels. For starters, the school board had no say in the matter. With the school district under emergency state management from 2009 until last month, buAngelique reaucrats in LanPeterson-Mayberry sing decided unilaterally to shutter these educational facilities. The state’s independent resolution makes an already troublesome decision that much worse. The choice to close schools should come from the Detroit School Board, just as it is in every other district in the state where boards make decisions of that sort. Why Detroit isn’t afforded the same opportunity is wrongheaded and not in the best interest of the broader community. In an effort to fight for justice and fairness for the students and educators in our district, the entire school board voted unanimously last week to retain Miller Canfield as our legal representative. Miller Canfield will file an injunction against the State of Michigan’s School Reform Office regarding the school closures and its process. Secondly, closing schools would leave massive educational deserts in communities all over the city. The northwest side of Detroit, for example, would be left with only two public high schools — Renaissance and Communication & Media Arts. For those students whose schools may close, where are they expected to go for their education? And how would they get there? These are the practical questions that must be asked when making such decisions that look doable on paper but fail to address hardship sit-

In no time, closed buildings would become relics and symbols of decay, as many of those neighborhoods are already combatting those challenges. Take a look at Kettering and Cooley high schools — buildings that were closed that still remain in our community as abandoned eyesores. Furthermore, it would prove emotionally and psychologically demoralizing for our students to see a once-relevant structure turn into a forsaken edifice with broken windows, missing doors and unkempt and overgrown grass. Our kids should not be subjected to such an environment. As board members, we all acknowledge and are aware of the challenges facing our district. We also are aware of and acknowledge the varied strategies that can be employed to meet those challenges. The district’s complications cannot be conquered with shortsighted thinking that disregards the impact on our students. It is our goal to work every day to ensure that doesn’t happen. This challenge is personal for me. I’m a proud DPS graduate of Martin Luther King High School with two children currently in DPSCD high schools. I know the district can produce some of our country’s finest leaders. Our past graduates hold political office, are CEOs, entrepreneurs, entertainers and thought provoking leaders. I am confident that the current generation of DPSCD students can have a similar impact if given the opportunity and the proper tools. Our students see and hear what’s going on. They don’t exist in a bubble. What kind of message is being sent to them? How does it make them feel to know that some people only view them as names and numbers on a spreadsheet? It is important that we ensure they are more than just names and numbers on a spreadsheet. We will ensure that they have a voice — a voice that, for the first time in a long time, is heard.

Who’s your brother? By Veronica M. Brown-Comegys I keep colliding with anti-black racism from other people of color, yet all around me African Americans are automatically shouting “brother,” “sister” at anyone who carries the designation “minority” and has even a microscopic degree of color. Experience taught me to check my naiveté. Often ingrained cultural and white supremacist ideology bring to a halt comradeship. Will there be backup or backbiting in the eternal battle for equal rights? After escaping the cold fish atmosphere in the local Catholic church, I attended mass at the Hispanic house of worship. When I entered, the believers waved and smiled at me. The Veronica M. welcome was like Brown-Comegys an embrace. Yet a chilling unfriendliness drifted in when the parishioners caught sight of a dark Afro-haired brother. Their heads slightly turned in his direction and immediately jerked back. Meanwhile, the interloper’s noggin was bowed, his shoulders slumped. He radiated sadness. At the end of the service everyone lined up for a personal farewell by the priest, who had been raised in a Mexican village. When each person stood before him, his arm darted forward for a handshake, and he smiled while murmuring a few words. However, when I faced him, his limb seemed cemented to his side, and he stonily looked over my shoulder as if sighting something yards away. Meanwhile, I thought about his mega-black complexion and straight hair. My Alabama-raised grandmother was his color and she had straight hair. Later that day I turned to Facebook for conversation about color prejudice. Instead, Tanya, my Afro-Mexicana friend, in Chiapas, bawled me out saying, “We should stay out of those patriarchal places.” She heads a group that fights for equality for black Mexicans. Within two days I returned to the church in order to talk with the secre-

tary about Afro-Latinos. She and the other fair-skinned people in the office beamed at me. I thought, it’s a good thing that I did not become any darker since my previous visit. The woman promised to contact candidates for interviews, but warned that most would not admit to “blackness.” Later, while examining a Hispanic magazine, I discovered all the models looked like they had arrived here from Sweden. Everyone was blond. Apparently, there is a once per year issue featuring the Afro-Latinas. In another incident, over the telephone, the head honcho of a local Hispanic organization okayed my attendance at a yearly party so that I could sell a large picture of Machu Picchu. In person, however, he had a mood swing. He barked, “Who told you about this party?” In addition, while I was asking a question, he turned his back and stalked away. On the other hand, armed with family genealogical data, I dove into the local Native American community, and befriended an Ojibway. She had a dull, yellowish-brown complexion, bloated body and her black hair reached her waist. Although sweet-natured, she was awkward and unaware of the ways of the world; she had a poor upbringing in Northern Michigan. One day the longtime, state government employee said she was saving every penny because she could not live on the $200 monthly Social Security payment everyone receives upon retirement. “That’s all my mother got,” she said. “Your mother must not have worked,” I said. “Well, I guess she didn’t work a lot.” Customarily, we celebrated our September birthdays together. However, after a few years her tribe won a battle with the government and she received some land. Consequently, there was an immediate attitude adjustment. We had planned to meet in front of City Hall, and walk a few yards to the restaurant. But she did not show up. When I telephoned her, my “sister” asked me to trudge 10 blocks to her office and bring her to the eatery. I cancelled the date, and broke off contact. I’m wondering, are the “others” looking at us with the eyes of our traditional oppressor?

Gov. Snyder should intervene against DPSCD school closures By Sharlonda Buckman Dear Governor Snyder: The Detroit Parent Network is a membership organization of thousands of parents across Southeast Michigan. As parents, we are asking you and the State Reform Office to approach the life-altering and community-changing issue of school closures with more consideration for the children and families impacted by your actions. We would also like to work with you to create strategies that will help students in high-concentrations of poverty across Michigan so they can be successful in school. We agree with State Senator Phil Pavlov that the “failing schools” Sharlonda Buckman law (Section 1280c of the Revised School Code) is “deeply flawed” and that the process has been “chaotic.” The recent letter from Natasha Baker to parents in failing schools is but one example of the chaotic process. She recommends school districts that are so far away from Detroit and unlikely to open their doors that one wonders what her motive was in sending it. Her timing in sending this letter six years after the School Reform Office was created but only 20 days after the Emergency Manager left the Detroit Public Schools Community District created unnecessary tension and unanswered questions. This is exacerbated by a 30-45 day review process that is shrouded in mystery. Certainly, the State can do better than that for the parents in Detroit, as we believe a much more thoughtful process would have taken place if the students lived in West Bloomfield, Gross Pointe or Ann Arbor. Schools serving the highest concentration of children in the lowest 5% of socio-economic inputs are likely to often end up on the lowest 5% of academic outputs. That is not an excuse for failure; it is an acknowledgement of the obvious so we can serve schools better rather than put them on the “failing schools” merry-go-round. While we do not believe that one’s zip code should determine one’s destiny, we do know and believe that the forced disruption of schools in the lowest quartile of socio-economic indicators every few years does more harm than good, despite whatever intentions lie behind it. Therefore, we are asking you, the State Reform Office and the State Legislator, to consider and embrace the following steps to help restore trust, repair

the social fabric, and renew the physical conditions in our most vulnerable communities. We believe these conditions represent the pathway for our children and families to be healthier and in a stronger position to thrive. From a practical level, we ask that the State: Share what it has learned. Of the 25 schools in Detroit on the State’s list for possible closure, 24 have been under the control of the State for the last eight years. When the EAA was created in 2012, the State had every opportunity to do what the State Reform Office now has the power to do, yet 8 of the 15 schools in the EAA are still on the lowest 5% list---despite having virtually all new leaders and new teachers and no collective bargaining agreement in place. Likewise, emergency managers were given almost unfettered discretion over academics and finances within Detroit Public Schools. If simply reconstituting schools were the solution, the State would have a much better record. The State and the School Reform Office should be clear about what it has learned from this process, because it currently seems doomed to repeat it. Stop the proposed school tours. A half-day visit from state officials to determine the fate of a school and the future of its students is too little time to be useful to officials and too much time away from the classroom to be helpful to the students they purport to serve. The State should use the information already available through the 5 Essentials Survey, a research-based school improvement tool with decades of data behind it, and which our parents and community partners helped to conduct at most schools in Detroit over the last five years. This data should be used to help schools, not to penalize them. For more information, see: www.excellentschoolsdetroit.org. Celebrate What’s Working. Within the lowest quartile of schools, we know that many are safe and engaging places buzzing with energy and learning. We also know that others can be dreary and devoid of the much-needed oxygen of hope. Instead of conducting trust-destroying tours to close schools, the SRO should be conducting trust-building tours at successful schools to showcase what others can learn from them. I, and the thousands of parents that make up Detroit Parent Network, look forward to working with you to make conditions better for children in our State who need help the most. *This column had to be trimmed for space. To read Sharlonda Buckman’s column in full, please visit www. michronicleonline.com

National Black Caucus of legislators calls for debt collection reform By Charlene Crowell When many consumers think of billion-dollar industries, banks and Wall Street often come to mind. Yet there is another industry in the same lucrative league that affects over 70 million consumers each year: debt collection. In recent years, debt collection has consistently topped the list of consumer complaints received by the Federal Trade Commission, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and state Attorneys General. Further and accord- Charlene Crowell ing to the CFPB, more than 25 federal debt collection cases have been filed for deceiving and abusing consumers. Collectively, the cases have brought more than $300 million in restitution and another $100 million in civil penalties have resulted from these filings. As state legislatures convene across the country for 2017 sessions, it appears that the National Black Caucus of State Legislators has taken note of the harms that are caused by illegal debt collection practices. An NBCSL resolution calling for an end to abusive debt collection practices was ratified during the group’s annual December meeting. Sponsored by North Carolina’s Senator Floyd B. McKissick Jr., the resolution notes that “the overwhelming majority of people who are in debt and

being pursued by debt collectors are not in debt by choice; but due to circumstances such as unexpected job loss, divorce or other marital problems, and serious illness.” Many black neighborhoods are more likely to have residents with debts in collection. The resolution further states that our neighborhoods also have double the number of debt judgments compared to White areas—regardless of income levels. “Unfair, abusive, and deceptive debt collection practices are hurting consumers and as a result, court judgments are entered against people for debts they do not legally owe”, said Sen. McKissick. “The NBCSL resolution affirms the need for strong consumer protections at the state and federal level. This is critically important as abusive debt collection practices frequently target not only African-American communities, but seniors and military families as well.” In calling for state legislatures to adopt initiatives requiring more detailed and accurate information and documentation in debt collection actions, the resolution also notes and supports CFPB’s efforts to promulgate a federal rule to address debt collection abuses. Consumer advocates agree — a call for continued and coordinated support from both states and federal regulators is needed before consumers can find financial relief. Charlene Crowell is the communications deputy director with the Center for Responsible Lending.


community

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2017

Page B-5

Koby Boynton, Melvindale High School senior, commits to Notre Dame By Patreice A. Massey The cafeteria at Melvindale High School was buzzing with excitement as friends and family of senior Koby Boynton and his teammate, Tre’Shon Alexander, got together to celebrate a defining moment in their lives. “This is national signing day and we are proud to announce that we have two students, Tre’Shon Alexander and Koby Boynton, who are signing to Notre Dame College. We are extremely proud of them,” said John O’Neill, athletic director for Melvindale Schools. “They’ve worked really hard not only on the field but in the classroom. I can definitely say we are also glad to see someone like Koby Boynton who has made great strides to be here at this point in his academic career.”

kids by myself. It was hard but it was fun. We were taken care of by the Lord,” said Koby’s father, Kippriol Boynton. “I try to instill the importance of education, good character and good decision-making abilities into my children. Boynton signing a commitment to accept a scholarship to attend Notre Dame College represents what their mother and I stood for.” Pamela Boynton was dedicated to her children’s academic careers, as older brother Malik recalled. “If we didn’t come home with homework, she would make up assignments,” he said. “She would write down problems on paper. She used to make up story problems, multiple-choice problems. I used to hate it.”

Koby Boynton is no stranger to hard work and challenging times. He and his four siblings were raised by a single father after their mother, Pamela Boynton, passed away.

All that extra work paid off when in 2014 Malik, a basketball, baseball and football star (also from Melvindale High School) received a scholarship to Austin Peay State University, where he is currently on the honor roll. “I am very fortunate to have both of my sons receiving scholarships to attend col-

“It wasn’t easy raising four

lege. I know their mom is beaming with pride,” said Kippriol Boynton. “By going to college, my sons have the opportunity to be whatever they want to be and that makes me proud as well. The magnitude of this moment is not lost on Boynton. He knows that he is very fortunate to be where he is, considering last season left him with an injury that sidelined him at the tail end of the season. “It was tough after my injury. My recruitment process slowed down a little,” he said. “But I kept talking to coaches, I kept working and eventually I met with a coach from Notre Dame who told me he believed in me and felt I could be an asset to the school.” Boynton received a four-year scholarship to Notre Dame and is looking forward to receiving a full dose of collegiate life. He is most interested in getting the fresh perspective that college offers. “I’m looking forward to interacting with different types of people with more mature mindsets, said Boynton. “I’ve had my knucklehead phase, so now I’m ready to buck-

le down and get to work.” That “knucklehead” phase is something Boynton’s football coach, Jason Carriveau, can attest to. “Koby was a handful at times, but he was dealing with the loss of his mother and that’s tough,” said Carriveau. “He was just like most young men — a work in progress. But with the support of the faculty and his family, I am confident he will stay on the right track.” Boynton won’t be alone on this journey as his teammate, Tre’Shon Alexander, also signed a four-year commitment to Notre Dame and looks forward to continuing a friendship that started when they were kids. “Koby and I grew up together and have played football since we were eight years old, so to start that young and then play together in high school and go to college and possibly be roommates, that’s crazy. But it’ll be good to have someone there with me that can relate.” Carriveau wants to be sure to let Notre Dame know exactly what they’re getting with Koby Boynton. “Koby is a caring and compassionate guy with a big heart. He’s fun to be around. He’s a team player who’s enthusiastic and he will bring excitement and passion into everything he does,” said Carriveau.

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community

February 15-21, 2016

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

COLLEAGUE SPOTLIGHT

COMERICA IN THE COMMUNITY

Comerica Bank and Junior Achievement help students prepare for the future

Comerica Bank returns as sponsor of Free Prix Day at the 2017 Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix

Comerica Bank recently partnered with Junior Achievement (JA) to host a special day for students at JA Finance Park to teach them life skills. JA Finance Park is a virtual community where students can put into practice the budgeting and finance skills they’ve learned. Among the important lessons learned by students that day were how to run a household, managing a monthly budget and buying a house. The program taught students the budgeting and finance skills they will need to become financially-responsible adults. 

A Detroit Grand Prix tradition of “Free Prix Day” on Friday of race weekend that began 35 years ago will continue in 2017 thanks to Comerica Bank. Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix officials announced that Comerica Bank will return as the sponsor of Free Prix Day on Friday, June 2 as Detroit opens its doors to everyone for the first day of its three-day motorsports festival. All fans will be able to enter the Raceway at Belle Isle Park and tour the paddock area, known as the “locker room of motorsports,” on Comerica Bank Free Prix Day at no cost. This

Carlito Ulett, a senior auditor with ­ omerica Bank, helps students at JA Comerica Senior Auditor Scott Long and C Staff Auditor Zacki Khaled help teach Finance Park learn how to manage a budget. students life skills at JA Finance Park.

(Left to right) Christopher Ilitch, president and CEO of Ilitch Holdings Inc., recently gave Ralph Babb, chairman and CEO of ­Comerica Bank, and Michael Ritchie, Comerica’s Michigan market president, a preview of the new Little Caesars Arena, which will open in September. Comerica will be a landmark sponsor of the new arena.

Comerica colleague Lynnese James was among the first to try out the new Comerica ATM at the Coleman A. Young Municipal Center in downtown Detroit. Comerica has more than 600 ATMs nationwide – including seven in Detroit Police Department precincts and more than 300 in Michigan – providing convenient service for its customers.

marks the fifth consecutive year that Comerica Bank has provided fans the opportunity to experience the Grand Prix venue free of charge on Friday of race weekend with complimentary access to Belle Isle Park. It also extends the Free Prix Day tradition that began with the first Grand Prix on the streets of Detroit back in 1982. Comerica Bank Free Prix Day will feature on-track action from all four series participating at the 2017 Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix. The Verizon IndyCar Series will have two practice sessions in preparation for the Chevy Dual in Detroit while the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship will host practice and qualifying for its Saturday race at the Grand Prix. The Trans Am Series presented by Pirelli and the SPEED Energy Stadium SUPER Trucks presented by TRAXXAS will both have practice and qualifying sessions on Friday before their first races of the weekend on Saturday. Fans will also be able to experience everything the Grand Prix has to offer off the track as well on Comerica Bank Free Prix Day, including interactive displays and extreme sports demonstrations in the Meijer Fan Zone and live entertainment on the MotorCity Casino Hotel Entertainment Stage.

Page B-6

Ketra Lewis

Eighteen years ago Ketra Lewis started her career with Comerica Bank in the management trainee program after working in the mortgage industry. She was recruited by a Comerica employee at the time, and she was looking for a change. More than a decade later she has found a name for herself at Comerica. Lewis is a vice president and risk manager at Comerica, where she is responsible for providing regulatory and audit oversight for the bank’s government card portfolio. She acts as a liaison and resource between the auditors, regulators and the business unit and ensures the business unit has the proper documentation and oversight. With her steady promotions and the experiences she gained from her previous roles with the bank, Lewis’ career has come full circle. “Now I’m at the point in my career where I am using all of the skills I’ve learned through my journey at Comerica,” said Lewis. “I have done a complete 360 in my career and it’s really benefitted my ability to be a well-rounded employee for the bank.”

Ketra Lewis

Her greatest professional achievement is earning her Certified Regulatory Compliance Manager (CRCM) certification from the American Bankers Association. Lewis saw the 200-question exam as a challenge she wanted to tackle in order to continue advancing within the banking industry as a compliance professional. Lewis graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in corporate finance and is an active member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. whose mission is to be of service to all mankind. She is the director of Urban Financial Services Coalition Detroit chapter and is the current chair of the Comerica African American Network, an employee resource networking group. She regularly volunteers through the Comerica Cares volunteer program and her sorority, and has a personal passion for helping educate people and raising funds to support Alzheimer’s disease.

At the end of the school year, Ketra Lewis visited with two students that she tutored through the TutorMate online tutoring program for which she and other Comerica colleagues volunteer. What are your hobbies? “When I grew up I wanted to become a fashion designer. I spent time in New York and took art classes at Cass Technical High School; I really am a creative person. I like integrating that passion for fashion and creativity into my daily life by making jewelry and experimenting with makeup. I used to do women’s makeup for different occasions. I’d like to get back into that.”

Comerica Bank sponsored nine students from the Jalen Rose Academy at a recent Detroit Economic Club luncheon. Comerica colleagues Janice Tessier (left) and Patricia McCann (right) joined Tom Wilson, president and CEO of Olympia Entertainment and Ben Maibach III, vice chairman and chief community officer at Barton Malow and the Jalen Rose students prior to the luncheon, where they heard remarks from Wilson and Maibach. The luncheon also featured Detroit Red Wings players and coaches who shared their thoughts on their final season at Joe Louis Arena and their work toward their 26th consecutive postseason appearance and 12th Stanley Cup championship in 2016-17.

How did you get to where you are today?

(From left) Deborah Hardison-Hill joined Comerica colleague Jaunice Kellar and LaNetra Kellar for the Coalition On Temporary Shelter’s 18th annual Soup City event. The Mardi Gras-themed event raised money and awareness for COTS' commitment to eliminating poverty and achieving stable housing for all Detroiters.

Comerica Cares volunteers assisted with registration and served as hosts on event shuttles during the Children’s Hospital for Michigan Foundation’s Big Shots Little Stars after-glow event at the North American International Auto Show Charity Preview. Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation was one of eight children’s charities benefiting from the Charity Preview. Event proceeds will advance children’s health through community-based and hospital programs, medical research and education. Enjoying the 2017 Multicultural Media Luncheon with Cheryl Ajamu (right center) of the Ajamu Group were ­Comerica colleagues Charise Key, Stephanie ­Mitchell and ­Patricia ­Alexander.

Stephanie Mitchell, vice president and manager of Comerica’s Southfield Tower banking center, had an opportunity to meet actor Boris Kodjoe, the keynote speaker for the Multicultural Media Luncheon.

What are your goals for the future? “I see myself progressing into an upper management role at Comerica. I want to continue to prepare myself for that. Personally, I want to continue spending as much time with my husband of 15 years and my family as possible and continue to give back to the Detroit community.” For more information on how Comerica colleagues are giving back to our community, visit

www.facebook.com/Comerica.

2017

Detroit has long been known as a great jazz town. Celebrating its 17th season, Comerica Bank Java & Jazz continues the tradition of providing a monthly after work concert series that showcases some of Detroit’s finest creative talent.

Detroit Public Library’s 2017 Comerica Bank Java & Jazz: A Coffee House Series, celebrates its 17th season! Celebrating our 17th season, we invite you to come join us for this spectacular celebration from March through July at the Detroit Public Library’s Main Library. Performances are free and open to the public every third Tuesday of the month @ 6:00 p.m. Straight Ahead Tuesday, March 21, 6:00 p.m.

Diversity celebrated at 2017 Multicultural Media Luncheon

Comerica sponsored the 2017 Multicultural Media Luncheon in support of business diversity during the North American International Auto Show. Diversity is part of Comerica’s corporate culture and one of its key business drivers which has led to its recognition locally and nationally. Comerica earned several awards for diversity in 2016. BLACK ENTERPRISE Magazine included Comerica on its 2016 '50 Best Companies for Diversity' list and the bank also was recognized as one of The Minority Business News USA magazine’s 2016 Corporate 101 America's Most Admired Corporations for Supplier Diversity.

“I’ve always been open to trying new things. I know that in order to grow and advance one must take risks and try something different. I take the opportunities I’m offered and each role I’ve taken has shaped me in ways the previous position hadn’t. It’s important to always look forward to the future and the new challenges it will present. God, prayer, perseverance and the support of my mom and my husband has gotten me to where I am today.”

Sean Dobbins Tuesday, April 18, 6:00 p.m.

Straight Ahead

Ali Bey Quartet Tuesday, May 16, 6:00 p.m. Audrey Northington Tuesday, June 20, 6:00 p.m. The Affair Group Tuesday, July 18, 6:00 p.m.


BUSINESS

SECTION C

February 15-21, 2017

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In memory of aTRUE

DETROITER Michigan Chronicle and Press Reports

M

ike Ilitch, founder of Little Caesars Pizza, owner of the Detroit Tigers and Detroit Red Wings, chairman of Ilitch Holdings, and champion for Detroit, died Friday, Feb. 10, at a local hospital. He was 87. “My father was a once-in-a-generation entrepreneur, visionary and leader, setting the tone for our organization and our family,” said Christopher Ilitch, president and CEO of Ilitch Holdings, Inc. “He made such a positive impact in the world of sports, in business and in the community, and we will remember him for his unwavering commitment to his employees, his passion for Detroit, his generosity to others and his devotion to his family and friends. Together my family and the company celebrate the tremendous man he was, and we will continue to work hard to uphold his remarkable legacy. I’m honored to have had the opportunity to work with him to nurture and grow our businesses, but mostly, I’m grateful to have called him my

dad, and I know my siblings feel the same.” Ilitch was married to Marian Ilitch for 61 years. They have seven adult children Denise (Jim Scalici), Ron, Michael Jr. (Noelle), Lisa (Glenn Murray), Atanas (Patty), Christopher

See MIKE ILITCH Page C-2

in partnership with

#mcbacktoparadise

‘Jap’ and ‘Sunnie’ kept Paradise Valley poppin’ By Ken Coleman Andrew “Jap” Sneed and William Nathaniel “Sunnie” Wilson personified the entrepreneurial spirit of Paradise Valley. In 1941, Sneed opened Club 666, which was managed by Richard King and located on East Adams Street where Comerica Park sits today. Sneed, a black man who earned his nickname because his fair skin, his hooded eye lids, and his

PART THREE OF A FOUR PART BLACK HISTORY MONTH SERIES almond-shaped eyes, had previously managed Club Plantation until it closed in 1939. Known the Three Sixes, the club was considered the city’s most popular black and tan, a club where blacks and whites patronize.

William Nathaniel “Sunnie” Wilson personified the entrepreneurial spirit of Paradise Valley.

He arrived in Detroit in 1914 and quickly became one of the city’s leading black residents. Most of Detroit cultural activity during Sneed’s early years in Detroit was confined to Black Bottom and Paradise Valley. The Valley’s boundaries were considered Brush Street on the west, Vernor Highway on the north, Hast-

Performers at Club 666, owned by Andrew “Jap” Sneed. It was located where Comerica Park sits today.

See PARADISE VALLEY Page C-2


business

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2017

Mike Ilitch (Kelle), Carole, 22 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Ilitch was a native Detroiter, born in 1929 to Macedonian immigrants Sotir Ilitch and Sultana Tasseff Ilitch who came to the United States in 1924. He had one brother, Peter, who died in 2009. Ilitch was educated in Detroit where he attended Clinton Elementary, Post Intermediate and Cooley High School, where he was an All-City athlete in baseball and track. Upon graduation from high school in 1947, the Detroit Tigers offered him a minor league contract, but he decided instead to join the U.S. Marine Corps. He served from 1948 to 1952 at Parris Island, Quantico, and Pearl Harbor. After discharge from the Marines, the Tigers again offered Ilitch a minor league contract. This time he accepted, and he played shortstop in the minor league system for four seasons (1952-1955) making it to AAA and hitting over .300, until a knee injury ended his baseball career. He later worked as a doorto-door salesman until he and wife Marian saved enough money to open the first Little Caesars in Garden City, Michigan on May 8, 1959. That single mom and pop pizza shop grew

Page C-2

From page C-1 into the world’s largest carry-out pizza chain, with restaurants in 20 countries and territories throughout the world. Success in the pizza business enabled Ilitch to invest in other businesses in food, sports and entertainment. All businesses are headquartered in the Detroit metropolitan area.

numerous business, cultural, and philanthropic awards, including:

Today, Ilitch Holdings, Inc. provides professional services to the companies owned by Mike and/or Marian Ilitch. The Ilitch companies employ 23,000 full-time and parttime colleagues worldwide and posted revenues of $3.4 billion in 2016. The Ilitch companies include Ilitch Holdings, Little Caesars Pizza, Blue Line Foodservice Distribution, the Detroit Red Wings, the Detroit Tigers, Olympia Entertainment, Olympia Development, Little Caesars Pizza Kits Fundraising Program and Champion Foods. Marian Ilitch owns the MotorCity Casino Hotel.

• Michigan Sports Hall of Fame induction (2004)

True to Ilitch’s vision for a bustling downtown area, the Ilitch organization will continue its District Detroit project under the leadership of Christopher Ilitch. The District Detroit will include office, retail and residential spaces, as well as the new Little Caesars Arena. Ilitch was a strong be-

• The International Franchise Association Hall of Fame (2016) • SportsBusiness Journal’s “The Champions: Pioneers and Innovators in Sports Business (2014) • US Hockey Hall of Fame induction (2004)

Joe Louis Brown Bomber Jacket Award, the Distinguished Martin Luther King Jr. Community Service Award, the Shining Light Regional Cooperation Award and the Edward H. McNamara Goodfellow of the Year Award.

At Your Service

COMPUTERS

Sales & Service

• National Hockey League Hall of Fame (2003) • Ellis Island Medal of Honor (1997)

liever in giving back to the community. Among his many contributions to others, he established the Little Caesars Love Kitchen in 1985. With two trucks on the road to serve those in need, these restaurants on wheels have served more than three million people. Additionally, inspired by the story of a veteran returning to civilian life, Ilitch founded the Little Caesars Veterans Program in 2006. This program provides honorably discharged veterans with financial incentives and other support to help them open a franchise with Little Caesars. Further, Ilitch established the Little Caesars Ama-

In his hometown of Detroit, Ilitch has been honored for his efforts in teur Hockey Program in the community with the 1968, and it has provided opportunities for tens of AT YOUR SERVICE thousands of youngsters to play hockey over the years.

PLUMBER

Ilitch Charities and its affiliates, the Detroit Red Wings Foundation and the Detroit Tigers Foundation, have given more than $35 million in cash and in-kind contributions to deserving organizations across the community since 2005. Additionally, Mr. and Mrs. Ilitch have personally gifted nearly $50 million to Wayne State University, $40 million of which was dedicated to establish the new Mike Ilitch School of Business.

Paradise Valley

Ilitch

has

received

From page C-1

ings Street on the east, and Gratiot Avenue on the south.

Bottom and Paradise Valley. He died in 1975 at age 77.

In 1945, Club 666 suffered a fire that partially damaged the institution and killed a 26-year-old bartender named Curtis Roberts. It, however, was more than an entertainment venue. On October 30, 1942, the Inter-Racial War Bond Committee of the United States Treasury Department held a War Bond Rally to contribute to America’s World War II effort. By 1949, Club 666 had become Club Valley. Sneed moved to Los Angeles in the 1950s as urban renewal efforts were destroying portions of Black

As African Americans migrated north of Black Bottom and Paradise Valley along Brush, John R, Beaubien and Hastings, more entertainment venues opened. They included the Frolic Show Bar, Sunnie Wilson’s Forest Club on Hastings as well as the Gotham and Garfield hotels. They weren’t technically located in the Paradise Valley boundary, but were considered important cultural institutions owned or managed by blacks. Sunnie Wilson, a South Carolina

native and an Allen University student, arrived in Detroit in 1927. He bought out an existing lease of the Forest Club in 1941. The one-blocklong club was comprised of a bar, a banquet hall, a roller skating rink, and a bowling alley. It had been an indoor amusement park during the 1920s. In the 10 years that Wilson owned the club, he brought to the stage a who’s who of music, including Louis Jordan, T-Bone Walker, Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker and Woody Herman. Sunnie Wilson died at age 90 on March 14, 1999.

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UAW-FORD’s

Section C-3

February 15-21, 2017

Celebrating the power of thoughtful words Photos courtesy of Michael Joseph (photo of Semaj Hickman and father) and the family of Semaj Hickman.

Writing is a super, family affair for young author

Semaj S. Hickman logistics for a Highland Park supplier of Ford Motor Company and Lawrence Hickman, who works in logistics for Ford—Semaj has already published a book, “The Courageous Children.” “The Best of Young Detroit” hopes our community will seek out “The Courageous Children” and read it, so we will not give away any of the book here. However, we will share some of what was said during a recent conversation the “Best of Young Detroit” had with Semaj and her parents, during which time we also learned about big brother, Jaron Nelson. Following are some of the highlights: “Little Women” inspired you, but why exactly do you write? Semaj: “I write because I love to read and I find books really interesting. And writing is fun; it allows me to put my thoughts and feelings down on paper.” Describe your writing process, where does your writing take place? Semaj: “On my phone, I have an app that I use to write all of my stories. It allows me to write down ideas, and on another page it has projects, where I set down ideas that have really evolved.” We have learned that “The Courageous Children” is already in your school library. How does that make you feel? Semaj: “Knowing that my own personal book is in my library makes me more proud and thankful to have such amazing parents that have supported my writing.” February is African American History Month, a time when our youth learn about African Americans that have made great contributions to the world. How would you feel if years from now students are learning about you during African American History Month and reading your books? Semaj: “Knowing I can help inspire kids my age and younger, or even older kids is one of the reasons I like to write. I also like to make people happy and smile; being a role model would be amazing.” What would be your advice to other young students that may have big dreams that others feel are too large or

unrealistic to obtain? Semaj: “I would tell them not to listen to people who tell you that you can’t do something. If you set your mind to anything you can do it; I learned that from my parents. It’s all about dedication.” What would your advice be to other parents who wish to help their children pursue their dreams at a young age? Ronda Nelson: “I would say to always take the time out. We have to listen to our kids and get into their world. Parents get really busy, and sometimes we hear our children but we don’t always listen. In reality, we just have to take the time out to really listen to your children to find out what they want to do and how you can help them.” Lawrence Hickman: “Exposure is key. My advice would be to try to expose your children to as much as possible and accept their extra-curricular activities. Our children’s extra-curricular activities have become our hobbies too.” During our conversation, Lawrence Hickman, a proud member of UAW Local 600, also described how the encouraging hands of Semaj’s parents became “applauding hands” after the publication of “The Courageous Children,” which the “Best of Young Detroit” found available for purchase online through Amazon, iBooks, Barnes & Noble, Google Play Books and Kobo. With that said, the “Best of Young Detroit” would like to applaud Semaj and her parents for working beautifully together to show us the immense promise that lies in all of our youth.

Proud family and community moment: Already a published author, nine-year-old Semaj S. Hickman was as poised as can be with her father, Lawrence, during a UAW-Ford podcast interview conducted by Michael Joseph. By Scott Talley Special to the Michigan Chronicle Richard Wright yearned to do it from a young age. James Baldwin demonstrated a gift for it during his early school years. And Octavia Butler decided to make it her life’s work around the age of 10. As our community continues to study and reflect during African American History Month, there are many examples we can draw strength from where talented African American artists chose to become serious about writing at an early age and the world is better for it. With great courage, African American

writers have explored racism, abuse, violence, love and virtually every other theme under the sun. Given the importance of African American writers throughout our history in this country, the “Best of Young Detroit” was delighted to recently learn about a talented and engaging young lady who has chosen to pursue that rich tradition. The young lady’s name is Semaj S. Hickman and she is a nine-year-old fourth grader at Poupard Elementary School. After reading the novel “Little Women,” Semaj knew she wanted to write her own book. And with the encouragement of two loving parents—Ronda Nelson, who works in

Audre Lorde

Paul Lawrence Dunbar

Octavia Butler

Langston Hughes Countee Cullen

Gwendolyn Brooks

Richard Wright

James Baldwin


UAW-Ford’s Best of Young Detroit

Febrauary 15-21, 2017

Page C-4

“Best of Young Detroit” remembers Miller High School

Deadlines are approaching for SAT and ACT

Named after Sidney B. Miller, an attorney and businessman, Miller Intermediate School opened its doors in April of 1921. However, as African Americans came to Detroit and other Northern destinations in significant numbers during the “Great Migration,” the Detroit school board would later decide that Miller would be converted into a high school. And with that decision, Miller became Detroit’s first predominately African American high school.

The “Best of Young Detroit” would like to inform high school students and parents of remaining test dates and deadlines for the ACT and SAT.

During African American History Month, the “Best of Young Detroit” invites our community to recall the rich history of Miller, which served Charles Diggs as a high school from 1933 to 1957. In 1942, Charles Daly was appointed the first African American principal at Miller, and he lobbied hard for the hiring of more black teachers, and for a curriculum that would inspire African American students. Under Mr. Daly’s guidance, the school at 2322 DuBois, on Detroit’s lower east side, became one of the highest performing schools in the district, despite chronic underfunding.

Most admission departments at four-year colleges require that students submit SAT or ACT scores. The SAT has three major sections: math, reading and writing (which includes a written essay); and the ACT has four major sections: English, math, reading and science (and an optional essay section).

Zeline Richard

Most students take the SAT or ACT for the first time in the spring of junior year. Students who choose to take the SAT or ACT a second time typically do so in the fall of senior year. Following are remaining 2017 test dates with corresponding deadlines: ACT Test Dates & Deadlines

A tiny sampling of the distinguished alums that were groomed for greatness at Miller includes Olympic gold medalist Lorenzo Wright; former Harlem Globetrotter Charlie “Kingsnake” Primas, who helped pave the Eugene Lipscomb way for African Americans in professional basketball; Pro Bowl defensive lineman Eugene “Big Daddy” Lipscomb; Charles Diggs Jr., the first African American to represent Michigan in Congress; Ofield Dukes, an African American trailblazer in public relations, who was a media advisor to Vice President Hubert Humphrey; jazz legends Kenny Burrell and Yusef Lateef; and educational leaders that championed for later generations of Detroit students including Dr. Melvin Chapman and Zeline Richard.

Lorenzo Wright

Registration Deadline

April 8, 2017 June 10, 2017

Mar. 3, 2017 May 5, 2017 Registration Deadline

Tiaira Earnest, Mumford, scored 16 points in a 68-45 victory against East English Village in a PSL semifinal playoff game on Feb. 9. Chasidey Willis, Mumford scored 12 points against East English Village. Zamaria Polk, Mumford, scored 11 points against East English Village. Jayla Smith, East English Village, scored 23 points against Mumford. Alicia Norman, King, scored 23 points in a 56-47 victory against Renaissance in a PSL semifinal playoff game on Feb. 9. Nina Reynolds, Renaissance, scored 17 points against King. BOYS

Apr. 13, 2017

May 6, 2017

Apr. 7, 2017

Jun. 8, 2017

June 3, 2017

May 9. 2017

Jul. 12, 2017

Charlie Primas

Marcus Gibbs, Cass, scored 11 points in a 65-45 victory against Southeastern in a PSL first-round playoff game on Feb. 7.

Former King standout Williams still has scoring touch at Wayne State In 2015, Ja’Nae Williams was named Miss PSL for her outstanding play for the Martin Luther King Crusaders and legendary coach William Winfield. Today, Williams continues to shine on the basketball court as a member of the Wayne State University Warriors.

David DeJulius, East English Village, scored 23 points in a 102-64 victory against Cody in a PSL first-round playoff game on Feb. 7. Greg Elliot, East English Village, contributed 22 points against Cody.

John Massey Jr., King, registered 10 points and 10 rebounds in a 54-37 victory against Delta Prep in a PSL first-round playoff game on Feb. 7. Jesse Scarber, King, contributed 15 points against Delta Prep.

Antonio Green, Henry Ford, contributed 22 points against Denby.

Ron Hill, Pershing, scored 21 points against East English Village.

Deonte Ulmer, Henry Ford, contributed 16 points against Denby.

Dejuan Seal, Pershing, contributed 16 points against East English Village.

Ron Hill, Pershing, scored 22 points in an 82-65 victory against Frederick Douglass in a first-round PSL playoff game on Feb. 7. Dejuan Seal, Pershing, contributed 21 points against Frederick Douglass.

Leonard Silas, Cass, contributed 13 points and eight assists against Edison Academy.

Patrick Hatcher, Pershing, contributed 17 points against Frederick Douglass.

Jalen Tobias, Cass, contributed 13 points and seven rebounds against Edison Academy.

Jarnard Smith Jr., Frederick Douglass, scored 22 points against Pershing.

Pierre Mitchell and Gary Solomon, Edison Academy, each scored 18 points against Cass.

Loren Bowman, Western, scored 15 points in a 46-43 victory against Davis Aerospace in a first-round PSL playoff game on Feb. 7.

Devontaye Webb, Henry Ford, registered 23 points, four assists and five rebounds against DCP-NW.

Week in PSL

Kyle Jones, Cody, scored 25 against East English Village.

Greg Elliott, East English Village, contributed 29 points against Pershing.

Steve Pearson, DCP-NW, contributed 17 points and 12 rebounds against Henry Ford.

This

Tariq Shepherd, East English Village, contributed 18 points against Cody.

Devontaye Webb, Henry Ford, scored 25 points in a 94-62 victory against Denby in a PSL first-round playoff game on Feb. 7.

Kylan Shipp, Detroit Collegiate Prep at Northwestern (DCP-NW) registered 20 points and 11 rebounds in a 61-52 victory against Henry Ford in a quarterfinal PSL playoff game on Feb. 10.

Recently, the sophomore guard came off the bench to lead all Wayne State scorers with 14 points in a 79-60 road loss at Northern Michigan on Feb. 11. Williams and the Warriors return to action Thursday, Feb. 16 at Northwood.

Marcel Wilkins, Southeastern, scored 13 points against Cass.

David DeJulius, East English Village, scored 33 points in an 82-80 victory against Pershing in a quarterfinal PSL playoff game on Feb. 10.

Michael Green, Cass, registered 12 points and 12 rebounds in an 81-70 win against Edison Academy in a quarterfinal PSL playoff game on Feb. 10.

SAT Scores Available

March 11, 2017 Feb. 10, 2017

Ofield Dukes

GIRLS

Apr. 18, 2017 Jun. 20, 2017

For more information, please consult your high school.

Kenny Burrell

Following are some of the top performers during recent basketball games involving Detroit PSL teams:

ACT Scores Available

SAT Test Dates & Deadlines SAT Test Date

A lack of funding and limited facilities did not prevent the students and staff at Miller High School from striving for excellence, and because of that the school’s legacy can be inspiration to Detroit students and teachers today. Dr. Melvin Chapman

Yusef Lateef

ACT Test Date

Cameron Lamar and Steve Pearson, DCP-NW, each scored 18 points in a 67-65 victory against Osborn in a first-round PSL playoff game on Feb. 7. Armonee’ Felder, Osborn, scored 30 points against DCP-NW.

GIRLS Saturday, Feb. 18 Playoff Championship Game at the University of Detroit Mercy

Mumford vs. Martin Luther King (5 p.m.) (As this edition of the “Best of Young Detroit” was going to press, the semifinal round in the Boys PSL Basketball Tournament was beginning. The Boys Championship Game will be played 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 at the University of Detroit Mercy. Please come back to the “Best of Young Detroit” for updated coverage of the Boys and Girls PSL Basketball Tournaments.)

Your Feedback Matters The “Best of Young Detroit” welcomes feedback from our community. Please submit story suggestions and other comments to Scott Talley at stalleyassociates@gmail.com or 313-590-3686.


business

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2017

Page C-5

Ascension leader to chair Metro Detroit Heart Ball

DetroitAscension Michigan Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Janice Cosby has been selected by the American Heart Association to serve in the role of Chair of the Metro Detroit Heart Ball in 2017.

Powering prosperity for metro Detroit’s families starts with a connected home The Internet has made a dramatic impact on Americans’ productivity and quality of life. Whether used to search for a job, stay in touch with friends and family or complete an online education, the Internet powers connections that can Jim Murray change people’s lives for the better. Despite these benefits, many homes — in metro Detroit and across the country — continue to lack access to broadband services. Consider that one in three Americans do not have wired internet at home, according to data from the Pew Research Center. And according to NTIA, the top two reasons people give when asked why they do not have home Internet service is because they either don’t fully understand the relevance or they can’t afford service. Lack of home Internet service significantly impacts families with school-age children, since having an Internet connection at home provides students with extended learning opportunities beyond the school day. And at a time when 90 percent of college applications are submitted online, being connected to highspeed Internet is critical to unlocking the resources that help students continue down their educational and career pathways. All metro Detroit area youths deserve this opportunity. Fortunately, a committed group of community leaders, elected officials, nonprofit organizations and employers have come together to produce local solutions for closing the Internet access gap. “In today’s world, Internet access is

a necessity and far too many Detroit residents just simply can’t afford it,” said State Senator Ian Con­yers, Detroit. “AT&T and its Access initiative are making a significant difference in this community by providing afIan Conyers fordable access to the high-speed Internet connections upon which we all rely to stay connected.” AT&T is currently working with the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on ConnectHome — an initiative to help people in underserved communities better understand existing low-cost Internet options and navigate the application and qualification process. “We are always striving to improve connectivity in our communities and the Access from AT&T initiative is a huge part of that effort,” said Jim Murray, president of AT&T Michigan. “By providing affordable access to Internet services, we’re making it easier for thousands of people on limited budgets to connect to friends, family and work, which is crucial in today's society.” The groundswell of support from organizations all over the metro Detroit area makes it clear that the opportunities and economic prosperity that digital access helps create are essential, not just for individuals, but for the success of our entire community. And as we rapidly move toward a fully-connected future, it will require all of us to work together to ensure more metro Detroit area residents connect to the engine of progress so they can learn, find work and maximize their potential.

This will be the 30th year of the Metro Detroit Heart Ball, and the first time a woman has been asked to serve in this prestigious role. The 2017 Metro Detroit Heart Ball with take place on June 16, 2017 at the

Black History Month Tribute Dr. Tara Long Scott became the first female and African American to become chief of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery at St. John Providence Hospital Southfield and Novi, and served in that position for 10 years. She served as chairwoman of the Board of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, and is a fellow

Metro Detroit Heart Ball go directly to the AHA for cardiovascular research and heart health educational programs, locally and nationwide. During its 30-year history, the Detroit Heart Ball has hosted more than 12,000 attendees and raised more than $15 million dollars.

Janice Cosby Westin Book Cadillac in Detroit. Janice has been very active with the Go Red for Women initiative in southeast Michigan, serving as Chair of the Go Red Campaign and Luncheon. She serves on the AHA Southeast Michigan board and the AHA Midwest Regional Board. By serving as Metro Detroit Heart Ball Chair, she will be in a position to further elevate awareness and understanding of women’s heart issues, and help raise funds for national research and programs. The Metro Detroit Heart Ball is a premiere fundraising campaign sponsored by the Detroit Division of the American Heart Association. Proceeds from the

“I am so honored and proud to serve as the first female chair of the American Heart Association’s Heart Ball,” said Cosby. “The fight against heart disease is a personal passion of mine, (add comma) having served as Chair of Go Red for Women Detroit. And in the final analysis, my goal is gender - neutral both women and men need to know the importance of getting screened for high blood pressure and high cholesterol.” “We are so honored to work alongside Janice this year,” said Brittany Merritt, newly appointed Executive Director and Metro Vice President. “It’s so significant for Janice to be our first female Heart Ball chair as we continue to arm women with the resources and tools to positively impact their lives and the lives of their families.”

in the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, board certified by the American Board of Podiatric Surgery, a member of the American Podiatric Medical Association, and a member of the Michigan Podiatric Medical Association, Southeast Division. In 2005, then Governor Jennifer Gramholm appointed her to a six-year term, making her the first African American and the first female to serve on the statewide governing board. Submitted Bianca Hall

in partnership with

present

A celebration of the restoration of the new Paradise Valley Cultural and Entertainment District and the Michigan Chronicle’s move to that historical neighborhood, the 2017 Michigan Chronicle Journey to Empowerment tribute takes a looks back on the history of Black Bottom and the original Paradise Valley. The month-long showcase will pay homage to the district by highlighting known and unknown stories of historical moments, figures and events during the Paradise Valley/Black Bottom era from 1920-1950.

#mcbacktoparadise


business

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2017

Page C-5

Ascension leader to chair Metro Detroit Heart Ball

DetroitAscension Michigan Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Janice Cosby has been selected by the American Heart Association to serve in the role of Chair of the Metro Detroit Heart Ball in 2017.

Powering prosperity for metro Detroit’s families starts with a connected home The Internet has made a dramatic impact on Americans’ productivity and quality of life. Whether used to search for a job, stay in touch with friends and family or complete an online education, the Internet powers connections that can Jim Murray change people’s lives for the better. Despite these benefits, many homes — in metro Detroit and across the country — continue to lack access to broadband services. Consider that one in three Americans do not have wired internet at home, according to data from the Pew Research Center. And according to NTIA, the top two reasons people give when asked why they do not have home Internet service is because they either don’t fully understand the relevance or they can’t afford service. Lack of home Internet service significantly impacts families with school-age children, since having an Internet connection at home provides students with extended learning opportunities beyond the school day. And at a time when 90 percent of college applications are submitted online, being connected to highspeed Internet is critical to unlocking the resources that help students continue down their educational and career pathways. All metro Detroit area youths deserve this opportunity. Fortunately, a committed group of community leaders, elected officials, nonprofit organizations and employers have come together to produce local solutions for closing the Internet access gap. “In today’s world, Internet access is

a necessity and far too many Detroit residents just simply can’t afford it,” said State Senator Ian Con­yers, Detroit. “AT&T and its Access initiative are making a significant difference in this community by providing afIan Conyers fordable access to the high-speed Internet connections upon which we all rely to stay connected.” AT&T is currently working with the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on ConnectHome — an initiative to help people in underserved communities better understand existing low-cost Internet options and navigate the application and qualification process. “We are always striving to improve connectivity in our communities and the Access from AT&T initiative is a huge part of that effort,” said Jim Murray, president of AT&T Michigan. “By providing affordable access to Internet services, we’re making it easier for thousands of people on limited budgets to connect to friends, family and work, which is crucial in today's society.” The groundswell of support from organizations all over the metro Detroit area makes it clear that the opportunities and economic prosperity that digital access helps create are essential, not just for individuals, but for the success of our entire community. And as we rapidly move toward a fully-connected future, it will require all of us to work together to ensure more metro Detroit area residents connect to the engine of progress so they can learn, find work and maximize their potential.

This will be the 30th year of the Metro Detroit Heart Ball, and the first time a woman has been asked to serve in this prestigious role. The 2017 Metro Detroit Heart Ball with take place on June 16, 2017 at the Westin Book Cadillac in Detroit.

Black History Month Tribute Dr. Tara Long Scott became the first female and African American to become chief of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery at St. John Providence Hospital Southfield and Novi, and served in that position for 10 years. She served as chairwoman of the Board of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, and is a fellow

in the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, board certified by the American Board of Podiatric Surgery, a member of the American Podiatric Medical Association, and a member of the Michigan Podiatric Medical Association, Southeast Division. In 2005, then Governor Jennifer Gramholm appointed her to a six-year term, making her the first African American and the first female to serve on the statewide governing board. Submitted Bianca Hall

Janice Cosby Janice has been very active with the Go Red for Women initiative in southeast Michigan, serving as Chair of the Go Red Campaign and Luncheon. She serves on the AHA Southeast Michigan board and the AHA Midwest Regional Board. By serving as Metro Detroit Heart Ball Chair, she will be in a position to further elevate awareness and understanding of women’s heart issues, and help raise funds for national research and programs. The Metro Detroit Heart Ball is a premiere fundraising campaign sponsored by the Detroit Division of the American Heart Association. Proceeds from the Metro Detroit Heart Ball

go directly to the AHA for cardiovascular research and heart health educational programs, locally and nationwide. During its 30-year history, the Detroit Heart Ball has hosted more than 12,000 attendees and raised more than $15 million dollars. “I am so honored and proud to serve as the first female chair of the American Heart Association’s Heart Ball,” said Cosby. “The fight against heart disease is a personal passion of mine, (add comma) having served as Chair of Go Red for Women Detroit. And in the final analysis, my goal is gender - neutral both women and men need to know the importance of getting screened for high blood pressure and high cholesterol.” “We are so honored to work alongside Janice this year,” said Brittany Merritt, newly appointed Executive Director and Metro Vice President. “It’s so significant for Janice to be our first female Heart Ball chair as we continue to arm women with the resources and tools to positively impact their lives and the lives of their families.”

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A celebration of the restoration of the new Paradise Valley Cultural and Entertainment District and the Michigan Chronicle’s move to that historical neighborhood, the 2017 Michigan Chronicle Journey to Empowerment tribute takes a looks back on the history of Black Bottom and the original Paradise Valley. The month-long showcase will pay homage to the district by highlighting known and unknown stories of historical moments, figures and events during the Paradise Valley/Black Bottom era from 1920-1950.

#mcbacktoparadise


Page C-6 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • February 15-21, 2017

INDUCTION CEREMONY AND CELEBRATION Friday, February 24, 2017 6 PM – 9 PM

The Whittier Detroit 425 Burns Drive | Detroit, MI 48214

For tables, tickets, congratulatory ads and sponsorships, call the Michigan Chronicle today.

313-963-5522


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SECTION D

michiganchronicle.com

February 15-21, 2017

Reflections By Steve Holsey

What’s in a name? (sometimes a lot) Would the Miracles — later to become Smokey Robinson & the Miracles — have made it just as big with their original name, the Five Chimes? Maybe. Would the Chi-Lites have been as successful had they stuck with their first name, the Chanteurs? Perhaps. What about the Bee Gees as “the Rattlesnakes”? Could be. It is interesting to discover what the original names of famous groups were. In nearly every case, the new name was an improvement, and maybe in some cases even improved the group’s chances of success.

Destiny’s Child Destiny’s Child was Girl’s Tyme. Public Enemy was Spectrum City. The Fugees were Tranzlator Crew. The Spinners were the Domingoes. Kool & the Gang were the Jazziacs. The O’Jays were the Triumphs. Boyz II Men was Unique Attraction. Cameo was the New York City Players. Rufus — later Rufus featuring Chaka Khan — was Smoke. TLC was 2nd Nature. The Ohio Players were the Ohio Untouchables. The Main Ingredient was the Poets.

Cameo OutKast was Two Shades Deep. The Four Tops were the Four Aims. Maze — later known as Maze featuring Frankie Beverly and Frankie Beverly & Maze — started out as Raw Soul. KISS was called, believe it or not, “Wicked Lester.” Just as strange: Van Halen was “Rat Salad” and the Shir­ elles were “the Poquellos.”

By Steve Holsey

A

rtists like Al Jarreau, jazz vocalist supreme, come along once in a lifetime, and the fact that he shared his gift with us for so many years is something to be grateful for. He was the real thing at a time when so many successful artists are manufactured. We got our first taste of Al Jarreau in 1975 with the release of his album, “We Got By.” It was unlike anything heard before and word began to spread, thanks largely to airplay on jazz formatted radio stations such as Detroit’s WJZZ. Everyone knew that a new star had arrived, one who would be around for the long haul — over 40 years and it would have been much longer had he not passed on Feb. 12.

WHEN Father’s Day comes around, June 18, hardcore rap star and actor 50 Cent (Curtis Jackson) probably shouldn’t expect much from his son, Marquise Jackson. As you may have heard, Marquise recordMarquise Jackson ed a song titled “Different” in which he addresses the serious issues he has with his father.

The title cut on that debut album featured several examples of Jarreau’s unique wordplay as a songwriter. Only he could come up with lyrics like this:

When discussing the long-developing situation, the younger Jackson said, “It completely went south when I was probably like 10 or 11. He wasn’t around enough. It dwindled down as time went on and certain events happened. I can’t tell you when our last conversation was.”

He was born Alwin Lopez Jarreau in that Midwestern city on March 12, 1940. His father was a minister and his mother a church pianist. With his parents and his five siblings, he performed at church concerts and benefits.

On a lighter note, had to smile when reading that the legendary Diahann Carroll had admitted that she is vain, including appearance, but not so much so as to believe that clothes make the person. Still, she acknowledged that shopping, which she does more than the average senior, is her favorite pastime — and, she said, no one will ever make her “feel guilty” about that. JERRY LATTISAW, brother of former R&B singer Stacy Lattisaw (she now sings gospel) has a problem with the recent New Edition miniseries — the suggestion that Johnny Gill and Lattisaw broke up because her Johnny Gill and Stacy mother did not approve of Lattisaw Gill because of his dark skin. He says that is absurd. On the professional side, Johnny Gill and Stacy Lattisaw had a No. 1 hit with “Where Do We Go From Here” (1989) and a Top 10 hit with “Perfect

See Reflections Page D-2

“You see, we kept on walking and talking, hawking, ooing, cooing, wooing, loving, tugging, hugging, rubbing, sugging, fugging, laying, praying, swaying, letting, fretting, begetting, lying, flying, trying, sighing…” Al Jarreau made Milwaukee even more famous.

While in college, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology, Jarreau was a member of a group called the Indigos. He continued his education at the University of Iowa, earning a master’s degree in vocational rehabilitation. But the desire and need to sing was always there, and while working as a rehabilitation counselor in San Franciso, he sang with a jazz trio led by George Duke.

By 1968, Jarreau had decided to make singing a full-time occupation. With his partner, guitarist Julio Martinez, he secured bookings at several of the most popular clubs in Los Angeles. There was also television exposure on such programs as those of Mike Douglas, Merv Griffin, David Frost and Dinah Shore as well as “The Tonight Show” starring Johnny Carson. Eventually, he became a solo act.

the Rainbow.” The honor was for Best Jazz Vocal Performance.

Right from the start, Jarreau made a commitment to always give his audiences his absolute best.

Jarreau, who was also known for his ability to scat, in the tradition of Ella Fitzgerald, Jon Hendricks and Betty Carter, was one of the many stars assembled in 1985 to record “We are the World” as USA For Africa.

“I want to give the audience the whole package that includes something fresh. It’s not fun resting on your laurels,” he said. “What I try to get beyond is playing music at people and, instead, play music with people because audience members are part of the experience. What they say with their body language, what they say in their eyes, what they sing with me. It’s an ‘us’ and there’s a communication that’s like church.” Jarreau won the first of his seven Grammy Awards for the 1977 twodisc live-in-concert album “Look to

Right from the start, Jarreau made a commitment to always give his audiences his absolute best.

However, he reached a commercial peak in 1981 with the album titled “Breakin’ Away,” featuring the national Top 10 single “We’re in This Love Together” that introduced him to a whole new audience. He also enjoyed Top 10 success with “Mornin’” (1983), “Boogie Down” (1983) and “So Good” (1988).

To the surprise of his fans, program directors and retailers, Al Jarreau decided to take a break from recording in the 1990s. “I was still touring,” he said. “In fact, I toured more than I ever had, so I kept in touch with my audience. I got my symphony program under way, and I performed in the Broadway production of ‘Grease.’ I was busier than ever. I was shopping for a record deal and was letting people know that there was a new album coming. I was just waiting for the right label.” (He had been with Warner Bros.) It seems odd that Jarreau would have appeared in “Grease,” the famous 1950s teen musical, but that was an important new experience. He was with the show in 1996, portraying Teen Angel, a role made famous by Frankie Avalon in the film version of “Grease.” Another landmark was receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2001. One of Jarreau’s philosophies was, “Once you discover that you can, then you must. It’s not easy. You have to take direct steps, make a decided effort, and you really have to count your blessings.” Al Jarreau was a blessing to the music world.


entertainment

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

February 15-21, 2017 Page D-2

Carl Payne brings his comedic genius to Detroit in ‘Married But Single Too’

By AJ Williams

thing to do while in the city? How do you feel about the development upgrades that have occurred?

While couples like Mary J. Blige and her longtime husband, Kendu Isaacs, and Keshia Knight Pulliam and Ed Hartwell deal with bitter drama-filled, divorces, relationship controversy remains headline news as an increasing number of people look for answers to lifelong questions regarding love, marriage, and the single life.

CP: My favorite things to do when I come to Detroit are to visit Fishbone’s, Flood’s and the many different great food places Detroit has to offer. Awesome. I’m glad about the upgrades that are finally happening in the city. It’s about time the city got back to what it used to be with regard to the energy, life, and economy. For a minute there I thought that there were only two seasons in Detroit, winter and construction.

One writer, director, and producer, Je’Caryous Johnson, continues to show audiences across the country real-life reflections of their own relationships and those they know on the theatrical stage.

MC: What upcoming projects do you have?

Johnson’s newest stage play, “Married But Single Too,” is the fiery sequel to his last production, “Married But Single.”

that I play and I look at each performance as if it’s my first and my last performance.

The Michigan Chronicle spoke with Carl Payne, who plays Pimpin’ Pete.

MC: What should the audience expect from your character and the stage play?

Carl Payne: I think it’s because I’m able to bring a level of integrity and commitment to each character

CP: The audience can expect to laugh their heads off, and more of the same consistency in elevating every character, including this character, to new heights. MC: You’ve visited Detroit several times. What is your favorite

The tour kicks off in Detroit, playing at Music Hall on Tuesday, Feb. 14 and continuing on Thursday, Feb. 16, to Sunday, Feb. 19. For more information or tickets visit jecaryous.com.

Reflections Combination” (1984). Blue Ivy Carter, the 5-year-old daughter of Beyoncé Knowles Carter and Shawn (Jay Z) Carter, will have her own line of products — clothes, fragrances, hair care, mobile devices and more! THROUGH the years, Aretha Franklin has made her share of make-yous c r a t c h - y o u rhead statements, but the legendary songstress hit the nail on the head when she noted that “the Aretha Franklin intimidating factor keeps men from making romantic overtures” to highly successful women. I’m sure it applies even more to black men.

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From page D-1 later became judges, if men were intimidated by them, shied away, were afraid to ask them out. Her only-half-joking response was, “Shy away? They run!” Franklin, by the way, has a right to stop doing concerts, as has been announced, and begin taking it easy. She’s been at it for something like 60 years. But then again, on many occasions she has announced things that never happened, so this could be just one more…or maybe not. We’ll see. She and Luther Vandross — who wrote and produced two of her biggest hits, “Jump to It” and “Get it Right” — had plenty of serious professional/personal clashes. Nevertheless, he identified Franklin, Diana Ross and Dionne Warwick as his “holy trinity of divas.” BETCHA DIDN’T KNOW…that at one point in the 1950s, there was a local dance show called “Detroit Bandstand,” closely patterned after “American Bandstand,” and in the 1960s an all-black show called

“Club Mellow.” MEMORIES: “Please Return Your Love to Me” (the Temptations), “Out of Sight” (James Brown), “Only the Strong Survive” (Jerry Butler), “I Am Love” (Jennifer Holliday), “Get the Cream off the Top” (Eddie Kendricks), “Lovely Day” (Bill Withers), “If You Leave Me Now” (Chicago), “Darling Baby” (the Elgins), “1-2-3” (Len Barry), “Every Little Bit Hurts” (Brenda Holloway). BLESSINGS to Danton Wilson, Janice Wilson, Donnie Simpson, Cliff Russell, Michael J. Powell, Mark McMorris, Larry Buford, Carolyn Crawford, Larry Demps and Jasmine DuBois. WORDS OF THE WEEK, from an anonymous source: “Solitude and loneliness are two different things. Being alone by choice negates loneliness.”

Call (313) 963-5522

Let the music play! Steve Holsey can be reached at svh517@aol.com and PO Box 02843, Detroit, MI 48202.

MICHIGAN CHRONICLE (DETROIT)

MR

I recall asking one of the lovely Lloyd twins, Leona and Leonia, who were attorneys at the time and

PICKS 207 927 243 801 247

#9

Michigan Chronicle: You have become a go-to staple in stage plays over the years. How do you continue to be in demand and keep your performances fresh?

CP: I directed my first feature film last summer called “Misguided Behavior” it’s due out this summer, and it stars Clifton Powell, Towanda Braxton and introduces my son, Malek Payne, along with the group Mindless Behavior whose lead singer, Elijah Johnson, is from Detroit.

37

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LEGENDARY PICTURES AND UNIVERSAL PICTURES PRESENT A LEGENDARY PICTURES/ATLAS ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION A FILM BY ZHANG YIMOU MATT DAMON “THE GREAT WALL” JING TIAN PEDRO PASCAL WILLEM DAFOE AND ANDY LAU VISUAL EFFECTS COSTUME MUSIC COBY RAMIN DJAWADI PRODUCERS ERIC HEDAYAT ER YONG ALEX HEDLUND SUPERVISOR PHIL BRENNAN DESIGNER MAYES C. RUBEO PRODUCTION DIRECTORS OF EDITORS MARY JO MARKEY ACE CRAIG WOOD ACE DESIGNER JOHN MYHRE PHOTOGRAPHY STUART DRYBURGH ASC ZHAO XIAODING PRODUCED EXECUTIVE BY THOMAS TULL p.g.a. PRODUCERS JILLIAN SHARE ALEX GARTNER E. BENNETT WALSH LA PEIKANG ZHANG ZHAO CHARLES ROVEN p.g.a.SCREENPLAY JON JASHNI p.g.a. PETER LOEHR p.g.a. STORYBY MAX BROOKS AND EDWARD ZWI C K & MARSHALL HERSKOVITZ DIRECTED BY CARLO BERNARD & DOUG MIRO AND TONY GILROY BY ZHANG YIMOU A UNIVERSAL RELEASE © 2016 UNIVERSAL STUDIOS IMAX® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF IMAX CORPORATION.

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praise connect

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

Rev. Dr. Audry Turner hosts Inaugural Suicide Intervention and Prevention Seminar Recover and discover better living. On average, one person dies by suicide approximately every 6.5 hours in the state of Michigan.

ily members may also attend.

Rev. Dr. Audry Turner, pastoral counselor, psychotherapist and pastor of Nehemiah Baptist Church, will host the “Closing & Opening Doors to Suicide Intervention & Prevention Seminar and Brunch” on Sunday, March 5, from 11 a.m. to 1p.m. at 13100 Puritan, Detroit.

Rev. Dr. Audry Turner

Youth experiencing bullying in school or online social media and anyone suffering or battling with suicide tenden-

cies are invited to break bread and learn ways to cope and how to avoid the triggers that may lead to suicide. Parents and fam-

Agape Jurisdiction Ministers’ and Workers’ Meeting to convene February 24-26 The annual Ministers’ And Workers’ Meeting of the Southwest Michigan Agape Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction Church of God in Christ will convene Friday, February 24, 2017 with its morning Women’s Day services. Supervisor Loretta Hogan Whitsett will lead the women in prayer, workshops and worship services. Friday evening will feature a powerful worship and evangelistic service, as the jurisdictional prelate, Bishop Isaac King Jr., and all the delegates of Agape convene at its headquarters located at 30101 Parkwood Street in Inkster. Dr. Leonard Lovett will be the special guest at this year’s meeting.

Loretta Hogan Whitsett

Saturday, February 25 will start with a multi-class Sunday school session. The Pastors and Elders Council concludes the morning and afternoon activities. Saturday evening will feature the youth of Agape, going forth in ministry. The eveningworship will start at 7:00 pm. Official Day is Sunday, February 26. This service will commence at Isaac King, Jr. 4:00 p.m. at Bailey Cathedral COGIC 7045 Curtis, Avenue, Detroit. Bishop Isaac King, Jr. will deliver his Christ-centered message. The COGIC theme is “In This Changing World, Let Us Hold on to Our Unchanging Faith” (Col 1:9-23; Jude 3, 4; 2 Tim. 3: 1-17; I Cor. 15:58). The pre-musical precedes the meeting on Sunday, February 19, at 4 pm at the headquarters location. For additional information, call 734 722-3060.

Carter Metropolitan CME presents ‘Man-Up for God’s Sake’ The Ministry to Men of Carter Metropolitan CME Church invites you to “Man-Up for God’s Sake,” Sunday, February 19, 2017, 10:45 a.m., Men’s Day. The community is invited to come hear the dynamic speaker, Rev. Dr. Eric W. Moore, senior pastor of Tree of Life Bible Fellowship Church. Pastor Moore is a native Detroiter, graduate of Michigan State, MBA; University of Michigan, MBS; Dallas Theological Seminary; PhD.; Western Theological Seminary, Portland, Oregon. Currently, Pastor Moore is a professor at Moody Theological Seminary. He is the son of Charley C. Moore, longtime leader with the Boys Scouts of America and Evelyn Moore, an active member and district lay president in the CME church.

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Suicide: Michigan 2016 Facts & Figures, lists suicide as the second leading cause of death for ages 10 – 34; 4th leading cause of death for ages 35-54 and 8th for ages 55-64 and 18th for ages 65 and older. Over twice as many people in Michigan die by suicide than by homicide. The total deaths to suicide in Michigan reflect a total of 27,895 years of potential life lost before age 65. See the attached chart for additional facts. Pastor Turner has been in private practice as a family counselor since 1997. She has a master’s degree in pastoral counseling and a Doctorate of Ministry. She has served

as board member/trainer for COBAP, a substance abuse treatment and prevention program, and currently serves as chaplin for the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club of Michigan. “We will continue our efforts to reach out beyond the walls of the church to do God’s work and save lives. Attendance will gauge the demand to continue the series,” said Rev. Dr. Turner.

February 15-21, 2017 Page D-3

Sharon Renea Brown Services for Sharon Renea Brown were held on Saturday, Jan. 14, at New Bethel Baptist Church with Rev. Frank Knolton officiating. Mrs. Brown passed away on Jan. 2, 2017. Sharon Renea Brown, affectionately known as “Big Baby,” was born on April 30, 1969 to Elvira Hardy and David Brown. After living in the South for a short while, the family moved to Detroit. She graduated from Kettering High School in 1987. She furthered her education in nursing and worked for Jewish Family Services. Her love for cooking led to the creation of a successful catering and decorating business. She was also a community activist.

Professional counselors will be in attendance to offer ongoing help for those seeking further assistance.

Cherishing the memory of Sharon Renea Brown are her son, Larry; grandchildren, Ly’Dell and Isyss; her mother, Elvira Hardy; three brothers, Eric Brown, Jeffrey Ingram and Derrick Ingram; two sisters, Shafari and Shakenya; and many other relatives and friends.

RSVP to pastorturner@ gmail.com is encouraged to reserve a seat for the seminar and/or brunch. For more information call Nehemiah Baptist Church at 313.218.8437.

Swanson Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Interment took place at Gethsemane Cemetery.

Brenda Joyce Sampson Brenda Joyce Sampson was born October 15, 1950 in Augusta, Georgia to George Edward Burnett and Mary Elizabeth Burnett (both preceded her in death). She earned her wings on Sunday, February 12, 2017. She was preceded in death by two siblings Johnny Edward Burnett and George Edward Burnett. She confessed Christ at an early age and loved attending church with her children while in Detroit. She was united in holy matrimony to the love of her life, Roosevelt Sampson, Jr. They shared the joy of raising five children. Brenda loved to spend time with her family, shop with her daughters and play cards. She was especially good at 5,000 rummy and loved to play poker with family. Brenda stepped beyond the sight of our vision, touched the hand of God and engraved her name on the everlasting tablet of life on Sunday, February 12, 2017. She leaves to cherish her memories, her loving husband, Roosevelt, five children, Kenneth Wade Burnett (Consuella), Marvin Lorenzo Burnett, Lawanda Ann Sampson, Cassandra Parker (Donald) and E’Lois Thomas (Charles); three stepchildren, Kevin Sampson, Priscilla Ann Daniels and Kimberlyn Cannon; Eighteen Grandchildren, Eshante L. Dandridge, Dionte W. Dandridge (Ebone), Keisha L. Finley-Ford(Jason), Tina S. Burnett, DeMonte S. Dandridge , MeDonte L. Dandridge, Kenneth W. Burnett Jr., Kenneth W. Burnett Jr., Dennis Horton, LaTraya Burnett, Marvin Burnett, Jr., LaTara Burnett, Dawan Antonio Sampson, Lavonte Roosevelt Sampson, Derrall Hill, Jr., Doneisha Parker, Charles Thomas III and Isaiah Thomas; six siblings Linda Burnett-Johnson (Luke), Chevonne Head (David), Debra Burnett-Wider (Michael), Melvin Burnett, Melody Burnett-Wise (Anthony); her goddaughter, Dominique Renee Carter (Bashavis) and a host of great grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Her celebration of life will be held at a viewing on Thursday, February 16, 2017 from 4 to 8 pm at Clora Funeral Home. The funeral takes place Friday, February 17, 2017 at 11 am, with the homegoing at 10 am at Second Ebenezer Church.

Matthew Holyfield, Sr. Services for Matthew Holyfield, Sr. were held on Friday, Jan. 13, at The Spiritual Israel Church & Its Army with elders Hawthorne Smith and Dennis Swilley officiating. Mr. Holyfield passed away on Jan. 3, 2017. Matthew Holyfield, Sr. was born to Gertrude and Clifton Holyfield, Sr. on Feb. 24, 1937 in White Plains, Alabama. He moved to Michigan in 1954 and graduated from Roosevelt High School in Dearborn Heights. He and his first wife, Rita Peola Williams, had three daughters, Denise, Vanessa and Diane. He and second wife, Thelma Mae, had two sons, Matthew, Jr. and Terrence. In addition, her son, Darnell Turner, was raised in love. Mr. Holyfield over the years worked for Ford Motor Company, General Motors, Frito-Lay, Kmart and Masco Fencing Company. He was active in the church and loved barbequing, fishing and watching football, baseball and Westerns. The memory of Matthew Holyfield, Sr. is being cherished by his children, Denise R. Colbert, Vanessa L. Holyfield, Diane T. Harris and Matthew Holyfield, Jr.; three brothers, Larry, Willie and William; five sisters, Mary, Brenda, Wanda, Carolina and Angela; and many other relatives and friends.

Swanson Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Karlina Ann Temple On Thursday, Jan. 5, services for Karlina Ann Temple were held at Northwestern Christian Church with Rev. Eugene James officiating. Mrs. Temple passed away on Dec. 27, 2016. Karlina Deratha Ann Singleton was born on May 16, 1949 in Detroit to Euan David and Rose Mary Singleton, the second of eight children. She attended Detroit Public Schools and graduated from Mackenzie High School. She and Charles Junior Temple were married and had three children, Mary, Mignon and Charles.

Rev. Dr. Eric W. Moore

Mrs. Temple, who was dedicated to f a m i l y , church and community, enjoyed cooking and sewing.

Carter Metropolitan CME Church is located at 1510-12 W. Grand Blvd. at the corner of W. Warren.

Karlina Ann Temple’s memory is being cherished by her husband, Charles; children, Mary Bernice, Mignon Joyce and Charles Junior; and many other relatives and friends.

Rev. Dr. Twana A. Harris is the pastor. Charley Moore, Men’s Day chairperson, and Ulysses Freeman, president of Ministry to Men would like for men in the community to work together, pray together, worship together and they encourage all men to “Man-Up for God’s Sake.” For more information,call (313) ­895-6744.

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Swanson Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Interment took place at Detroit Memorial ParkWest.

The Power of Prayer

Education outside of the classroom Part 2

By Dorma McGruder Character is what we are when we are alone. Those we admire are not perfect, but make hard character choices to become better. Patience teaches us to wait until God’s time lines up with ours before we make a major move. Planning forces us to reduce to paper the dreams we share on the telephone, social media and at the restaurant. If we can’t write it down, we have work to do. While being patient and building character, what is the plan? What do we have in our hand right now to use? Critical thinking makes us examine not only what we are doing but why it will or will not work and who will benefit. If we don’t believe and have an undying faith in our future,

we might as well not even start. Believing that it will happen is an absolute requirement because prayer and faith are the only places God works. Targeted Action means we don’t become productive by scattered movements. We have to put targeted actions in place., consistently. God teaches this through seasons, sunrise, sunset, birth, growth, life and even death. We have to find our actions and do them consistently. Prayer helps us. God does not hand us any of these educational aspects. He gives us instances in life, to birth, create and develop them. We make ourselves better by applying the Power of Prayer make our lives better. www.dormamcgruder.com dorma@dormamcgruder.com 313-282-3382

1919-2015

Get your health checked and satisfy your shopping needs at the same location

Board of Christian Social Concerns Annual Entrepreneurs Marketplace and DMC Health Fair Sunday, Feb. 26 12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Second Baptist Church of Detroit 441 Monroe, Detroit, MI 48226 Rev. Kevin M. Turman, Senior Pastor

Validated Parking: Parking Structure corner of Brush & Lafayette, across from Atheneum Hotel (Validation Codes given at the church)


Classified OBITUARIES

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Dr. Herbert A. Tabor, Sr.

DETROIT WATER AND SEWERAGE DEPARTMENT

Dr. Herbert A. Tabor, of Las Vegas, Nevada, a retired educator from Detroit, completed his life’s journey on Dec. 3, 2016 at the age of 87. Mr. Tabor was born on May 13, 1929 in Detroit, the youngest of the four children of Norman J. and Fannie L. Tabor. He was preceded in death by two brothers, Rev. Willis Tabor and Norman Tabor; a sister, F. Lois Ice; and a son, Herbert Jr. Mr. Tabor was educated in the Detroit Public Schools, graduating from Northwestern High School. He earned a BA from Paine College in Augusta, Georgia. He served two years in the U.S. Army, after which he earned an MS and Ed.D. from Wayne State University. He was a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. Herbert A. Tabor, Sr. is survived by his wife and closest companion of 30 years, Thelma Roundtree-Tabor; three sons from a previous marriage (Marlene Allen Green), Michael and Kevin of Portland, Oregon, and Rodney of Detroit; a stepson, Stefan Waits, Sr.; a stepdaughter, Kimberly Mitchell (Louis) of Detroit; nine grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends. A memorial service will be held on May 11 at 1100 Hrs. at The Mountain View SDA Church in Las Vegas. Interment and military honors will take place at the Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Boulder City, Nevada.

PERSONAL SERVICES MRS. LINN

BORN GIFTED READER The 7th Daughter without asking you a single word. I will tell you what you want to know. Tell your present, past and future. Tell you who your friends and enemies are. Why you’re so unlucky. If your loved one is true or false.I will advise you all problems of life, such as love, marriage, business and health, etc. Why suffer, you can be free from all troubles. I guarantee Sucess where others failed. I am superior to any other reader you have seen. Don’t let distance keep you away from Health and Happiness. Hrs. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Daily and Sunday.

No Mail Answered 2742 Monroe St., Toledo, Ohio 1-419-248-2145 1-419-248-2145

ANNOUNCEMENTS

REQUEST FOR QUOTES The Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation (SMART) is soliciting Request For Quotes (RFQ) for Purchase of Dell Desktop Computers and Laptops, Control No. 17-2339. RFQ document maybe obtained beginning February 15, 2017 from www.mitn.info. RFQs are due by 3:00 PM ET, Thursday, March 2, 2017.

REQUEST FOR QUOTE The Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation (SMART) is soliciting Request for Quotes (RFQ) for Printing of Public Timetables, Control No. 17-2354. RFQ document may be obtained beginning February 15, 2017 from www.mitn.info. RFQ’s are due Thursday, March 2, 2017 by 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

NOTICE

PUBLIC HEARING – BUDGET For fiscal year 2017-18 Notice is hereby given that the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department will hold a Public Hearing Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 2:00 p.m. at the Water Board Building, 735 Randolph, Detroit, Michigan.

CITY OF HIGHLAND PARK

2017 March Board of Review Current Year Appeals, Poverty Exemptions & Mistakes

Tuesday, March7, 2017

Board Members Organizational Meeting 9 a.m. (Pursuant of Michigan Open Meeting act, Public Act No. 267 of 1976 as amended)

Monday, March 13, 2017 Tuesday, March 14, 2017 Wednesday, March 15, 2017

10 a.m. – 4 p.m. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. 3 p.m. – 9 p.m.

City Hall 1st Floor Conference Room Robert B. Blackwell Municipal Building 12050 Woodward Ave. Highland Park, Mi. 48203

PLEASE CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT Call (313) 252-0050, ext. 252, to make the appointment

*Poverty Exemption Application MUST be submitted with all attachments, (failure results in denial of Exemption) and a Board of Review Petition by March 10, 2017 to City Treasurer’s Office.*

Detroit Transportation Corporation NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING All Citizens are advised that the Detroit Transportation Corporation (DTC) has prepared an application for State of Michigan financial assistance for fiscal year 2018 as required under Act 51 of the Public Acts of 1951, as amended, and for federal assistance as required under the federal transit laws, as amended. The DTC is requesting estimated total capital funding through the following sources: Section 5307 for DTC Infrastructure and Equipment Upgrades $452,000; Section 5337 DTC Infrastructure and Equipment Upgrades, $1,377,920; Section 5310 DTC Infrastructure and Equipment Upgrades,$440,625 and (MI) Act 51 Operating Assistance, $5,100,000. Notice of these federal funds has been previously published in the Transportation Improvement Plan prepared by SEMCOG. The DTC ensures that the level and quality of transportation service is provided without regard to race, color, or national origin in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. For more information regarding our Title VI obligations or to file a complaint, please contact the DTC at the address listed below. The proposed application is on file at the DTC and may be reviewed from Wednesday, February 15, 2017, through Wednesday, March 15, 2017 between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Written comments or requests regarding the application and/or written requests for a public hearing to review the application must be received by Thursday, March 30, 2017. If a hearing is requested, notice of the scheduled date, time and location will be provided at least 10 days in advance. Submittals should be sent to Mr. Oliver Lindsay, Grant Manager, Detroit Transportation Corporation, 535 Griswold Street, Suite 400, Detroit, MI 48226 or 313-224-2160. Barring any changes made in response to the written comments, this document will become final.

PUBLIC BIDS Star International Academy Consortium is seeking public bids for E-rate: TECHNOLOGY SERVICES by 1:00 pm on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 You may view the RFP at: http://www.starpsa.org/rfp Or Contact Rami Hamadeh (313) 724-8994 x.111

Request for Proposal

The Detroit-Wayne Joint Building Authority owner/operator of the Coleman A. Young Municipal Center (CAYMC) is seeking proposals from interested firms to provide the following services: • Janitorial Supplies (Cleaning Supplies, Paper Towel, Toilet Paper, equipment, etc.) • Exterior Landscaping

.

The CAYMC is a 745,000 square foot office building located in the heart of downtown Detroit.

ATTENTION WBE/MBE CONTRACTORS The City of Port Huron and the Port Huron Neighborhood Housing Corporation is compiling a list of licensed contracting businesses that are minority or female owned and located within the St. Clair County area. Contractors or firms must be appropriately licensed according to the State of Michigan. Contractors that have had at least a minimum of one day lead training are needed. All areas of contracting work are requested. This listing will be retained for bid notification purposes and upon request by housing rehabilitation participants. Information packets may be obtained by calling the Community Development Office @ 810-984-9736 or FAX: 810-984-5384.

February 15 - 21, 2017

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

Mandatory site walkthrough’s will be held on the 13th floor in Erma Henderson Auditorium located in CAYMC on Friday, February 17th, 2017 at the follows times: • Exterior Landscaping -12:30 pm • Janitorial Supplies -1: 30 pm Detailed Request for Proposal may be obtained by appearing in person at: The Coleman A. Young Municipal Center 2 Woodward Avenue, Suite 1316 Detroit, Michigan 48226 Interested firms must submit (4) four sealed bid copies no later than Friday, March 3rd, 2017 at 12:00 Noon Public opening to follow To: Detroit -Wayne Joint Building Authority Coleman A. Young Municipal Center 2 Woodward Avenue, Suite 1316 Detroit, MI. 48226 Attention: Mike Kennedy, Property Manager

Published Every Wednesday

Page D-4

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

SOFTWARE DEVELOPER

EASTSIDE NON-PROFIT SEEKING THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS:

Agrisight, Inc. (Ann Arbor, MI) F/T position. Software Developer - Data Science. resp for resrch, dev, design & test proprietary prod offerings & suite of decision support tools; req Bachelor’s or equiv in spec fields + spec skills. Visit farmlogs.com or send resume to: jobs@farmlogs.com. Principals only. EOE.

Executive Director with Bachelors degree/ Masters preferred in Human Services; Behavioral Health or 10 years in senior management. Pay $50-65,000) Candidate submit resumes only to admin@operationgetdown.org

FIRE FIGHTER City of Westland is now accepting applications for Fire Fighter. Applicants must be a citizen of the United States (Birth Certificate or Naturalization Papers required at time of application). At least 21 years of age, or 19 years of age with U.S. military experience; high school diploma or GED (presented with application); valid driver’s license (required at time of application); Fire Fighter I and II certification valid MI EMT-P license at time of hire. Applicants must pass the Conference of Western Wayne Firefighter Testing Program written and physical agility with a minimum score of 70%. Proof of above requirements must be submitted with application. Applications must be retrieved from the office of the Westland City Clerk at Westland City Hall 36300 Warren Road, Westland, MI now through April 21, 2017. Applications will not be mailed. Applications must be postmarked or received in the City Clerk’s Office not later than 4:00 p.m. on Friday, April 21, 2017. Applications received after deadline will not be considered. Seeking

ASSISTANT DEAN FOR MEDICAL SCHOOL ADMISSIONSI AT OAKLAND UNIVERSITY School of Medicine

Reporting to the Associate Dean for Medical Education, has overarching responsibility for leading and managing all operational aspects of the MD admissions process, from initial outreach to matriculation for the Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine. Designs, implements, maintains and evaluates all programs, policies and systems that support student admissions. Minimum Qualifications: Master’s degree I relevant field. Five years’ experience in professional school admissions with experience in medical school admissions. Knowledge of the rules of confidentiality pertaining to student records (FERPA, Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act). Salary is commensurate with experience. Refer to online posting for additional qualifications and requirements. First consideration will be given to those who apply by February 23, 2017. Must apply on line to: https://jobs.oakland.edu Researcher  

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Identify  &analyze   strategic  opportunities  to  improve  GM’s   profitability  in  global  purchasing  &supply  chain   org.  Extract,  clean,  reshape  data  in  Excel,   Access,  Tableau,  &R.  Model  &analyze   complex,  dynamic  &stochastic  systems  using   math  modeling,  statistical  anlys,  optimization   (Linear/Mixed  Integer  Programming),   simulation  &computer  programming.  Write   &present  reports  to  Logistics/Supply  Chain   Groups.  Use  statistical  methods  such  as  multi   linear  regression  in  R  &Excel  to  model   relationship  between  transportation  variables.   Dvlp  optimal  shipping  policy  for  large   suppliers,  analyzing  in  R  &Excel  the  cost   models  of  logistics  transportation  modes   (truck,  rail,  intermodal).  Use  Prateo  anlys  to   prioritize  top  saving  opportunities  to  switch   current  transportation  mode.  Dvlp  optimal   shipping  frequency  policy  for  small  suppliers,   analyzing  tradeoff  between  inventory,  delivery   frequency  &transportation  modes  in  R.   Master,  Industrial  Engrg  or  Industrial   &Operations  Engrg.  2  mos  exp  Logistics  or   Analytics  Intern,  Business  Intelligence  Analyst   or  related,  analyzing  risk  of  inbound/outbound   logistics,  &exp  using  statistical  methods  such   as  multi  linear  regression  in  R  &Excel  to   model  relationship  between  variables.  Mail   resume  to  Alicia  Scott-­Wears,  GM  Global   Mobility,  300  Renaissance  Center,  MC:  482-­ C32-­D44,  Detroit,  MI  48265,  Ref#29742.

Regulatory and Type Approval/Certification Engineer-South America Regulatory and Type Approval/Certification Engineer-South America, Warren, MI, General Motors. Prepare &execute regulatory compliance plans according to GM Vehicle Dvlpmt Process to allow GMNA vehicles to be sold in 10 South America markets where GM has ops. Define &execute specific safety, emissions, fuel economy, noise &cmpt performance tests for each S.A. country based on anlys &understanding of technical reg &compliance reqmts. Ensure regulatory compliance of GMNA vehicles with Brazil CONTRAN, CONAMA &INMETRO; Ecuador INEM, &various Argentinian, Chilean &Colombian safety &environmental regs issued by respective ministries of transport &environment. Work with in-country regulatory teams to identify &implement compliance alternatives for South America markets to allow GMNA to optimize resources by using tests &documentation dvlpd &prepared for major markets such as U.S. FMVSS &UNECE safety regs, &US EPA &CARB emission standards &test procedures. Prepare &sign on behalf of General Motors Company the regulatory SoC &all other specific country certification docs requested by the authorities in each South American country in order to authorize selling motor vehicles in their territories. Master, Mechanical or Electrical Engrg, or Engrg Mgmt. 12 mos exp as Regulatory, Certification &/or Homologation Engineer or related, working with in-country regulatory teams to identify &implement compliance alternatives for South America markets such as Colombia &Ecuador or Brazil to allow GM to optimize resources by using tests &documentation dvlpd &prepared for major markets such as FMVSS, UNECE safety regs, &US EPA &CARB emission standards &test procedures. Mail resume to Alicia Scott-Wears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#3343.

SCHOOL LEAD Charter Schools. As the authorizer’s primary liaison for a portfolio of charter public schools, the school lead assists the Center in educating and supporting school boards to govern effectively and strategically in order to ensure the school’s academic performance, organizational viability and compliance with the charter contract and applicable law. Required: Bachelor’s degree, three years of experience, preferably in urban public schools. For a complete list of requirements and to apply on-line please visit www.jobs.cmich.edu. CMU is an AA/EO institution, providing equal opportunity to all persons, including minorities, females, veterans, and individuals with disabilities (see www.cmich.edu/ocrie).

RESEARCH ASSITANT Wayne State University has an available position of Research Assistant in Detroit, MI. Position requires a Master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering or Statistics. Position also requires: 1) One graduate course in linear mixed models; 2) One graduate course in database management systems; & 3) One graduate course or one peer-reviewed publication in which individual performed data analysis using R or SAS. Job duties: Perform bioinformatics data analysis for perinatology research. Use knowledge of data management systems to assemble & prepare data sets for statistical analysis. Perform data analysis using R & SAS software. Conduct longitudinal data analysis using linear mixed effects models. Describe statistical analysis methods & results for peer-reviewed publications. Qualified candidates should apply through the WSU Online Hiring System for posting # 042491 at https://jobs.wayne.edu. Thermal Vehicle Systems Engineer Thermal Vehicle Systems Engineer, Warren, MI, General Motors. Plan, assure timely &high qlty integration of &execute midsize truck &full size commercial van Thermal Systems (pwt cooling systems incldg charger coolers, fan motors, radiators, electrical pumps, ducting, pipes, &valves, &HVAC systems incldg HVAC units, condensers, compressors, pipes, &valves) &lead SMT on vehicle arch programs. Present vehicle program status (&issues to Joint Thermal Group Core PDT, &significant issues (systems packaging &integration, performance targets incldg cabin comfort &engine/transmission reqmts for coolant &oil flow, temperature &pressure) to Executive Director. Use DFSS, Red X, &Desg for Customer Value methodologies with using VisMockup for parts visualization &anlys, E2 for work orders control, TcSE for vehicle sys specs, ELB for imperatives control, Tracker GART for Warranty Anlys, &Compass for customer verbatim anlys. Master, Mechanical Engineering, Automotive &Manufacturing Engrg, or Engrg Management. 6 mos exp as Engineer, planning &assuring timely &high qlty integration of psgr vehicle Thermal Systems (pwt cooling systems incldg charger coolers, fan motors, radiators, electrical pumps, &valves, &HVAC systems incldg HVAC units, condensers, &compressors) &lead SMT on vehicle arch program. Mail resume to Alicia Scott-Wears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#1977.

Senior Dimensional System Engineer Senior Dimensional System Engineer, Warren, MI, General Motors. Perform dimensional integration of chassis sys incldg chassis structure, suspension, steering, wheel &tire, pwt mount &braking sub-systems, through variation mgmt of product desgs &mfg processes to achieve vehicle dimensional reqmts. Perform chassis structure desg &interface review incldg pwt to chassis structure &chassis sys to body, suspension control arm &stabilizer bar to chassis structure, steering gear to chassis structure, using 3DCS. Use UG &VisMockup, follow ASME 14.5-2009 standard, &internal GD&T Addendum 2012, to dvlp EGD&T for component &sub-assy, &release in Teamcenter. Perform vehicle alignment variation control, apply virtual variation anlys model, optimizing vehicle front module (front chassis structure &McPherson suspension) &rear module (rear chassis structure &multilink suspension) alignment strategy, eliminating or reducing major potential variation such as suspension spring rate, control arm to knuckle ball joint positional tolerance to ensure all the vehicle alignment parameters such as Camber, Caster &Toe angle meet VTS. Master, Mechanical Engineering, Automotive Engrg, or Integrated Vehicle System Engrg. 6 mos as Engineer performing chassis sys integration incldg chassis structure through variation mgmt of product desgs &manufacturing processes to achieve vehicle dimensional requirements, using UG &VisMockup, following ASME 14.52009 standard, &releasing them in engineering data mgmt sys. Mail resume to Alicia Scott-Wears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#60576.

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Global CO2  Strategist  

Senior Safety     Performance  Engineer  

Tax Attorney

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Plan,   develop,  &assure  proper  implementation   &monitor  regional/global  (U.S.,  Korea,   KSA,  &Australia)  Fuel  Economy  (FE)  &   GHG  compliance  strategy  &CO2   workgroups.  Build  compliance  calculator   with  portfolio  business  plan  based  on  key   reg  parameters  incldg  FE  &CO2  based  on   regs.  Dvlp,  plan  &assure  timely   implementation  of  business  plans  to   confirm  the  status  of  plan  of  record   &identify  change  required  items.  Lead   energy,  portfolio  planning,  long  term   forecasting,  &public  policy  anlys,  to   accurately  forecast  regional  GHG   compliance  &clean  vehicle  regs,  incldg  off   cycle/air  conditioning  efficiency/AC   refrigerant/flexible  fuel  vehicles  credits,   &ensure  dvlpmt  of  AC17  &future  test   procedures  to  gauge  A/C  technology   benefits.  Dvlp  compliance  strategy  with  GM   CO2  technology  insertion  plan  as  applied   to  regional  apps.  Create  GHG  calculator   &update.  Analyze  sensitivity  regarding   portfolio,  regulatory,  program  team   &powertrain  proposals.  Lead  regional   public  policy  representatives  in  GHG   regulatory  advocacy.  Master,  Mechanical   Engineering,  Automotive  Engrg  or  related.   12  mos  exp  as  Engineer  dvlpg  energy,   portfolio  planning,  long  term  forecasting,   &public  policy  anlys,  to  forecast  regional   (such  as  Korea  &KSA)  FE  &GHG   compliance.  Mail  resume  to  Alicia  Scott-­ Wears,  GM  Global  Mobility,  300   Renaissance  Center,  MC:482-­C32-­D44,   Detroit,  MI  48265,  Ref#26460.    

Senior Business Architect

General Motors, Detroit, MI. Provide business and technology anlys of Global Connected Customer Experience org’s current and future state of business capabilities, cloud computing/vehicle technologies, customer needs, and create gap reports and strategic roadmaps/risk analyses supporting urban mobility, autonomous vehicles, connected vehicles, V2V, V2I, ride/car sharing, infotainment/telematics, electric vehicle arch, and fleet mgmt. Use Quantrix multidimensional modeling tool and model vehicle data connectivity, annual usage and cost of carrier ntwk. Apply BIZBOK Business Arch principles and create capabilities, value streams and information maps used to reduce redundancy, increase operational efficiency and provide clear communication between business and technical teams. Dvlp Quantrix models for data modeling needs, incldg customizations using Groovy scripting language. Bachelor, Computer Science, Mathematics or Information Technology. 6 mos exp as Solution Architect providing enterprise value stream anlys of infotainment/telematics org’s current and future state of business capabilities, cloud computing/vehicle technologies, customer needs, and creating gap reports and strategic roadmaps/risk analyses. Mail resume to Alicia Scott-Wears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#21092.  

Senior Business Architect

General Motors, Detroit, MI. Provide business and technology anlys of Global Connected Customer Experience org’s current and future state of business capabilities, cloud computing/vehicle technologies, customer needs, and create gap reports and strategic roadmaps/risk analyses supporting urban mobility, autonomous vehicles, connected vehicles, V2V, V2I, ride/car sharing, infotainment/telematics, electric vehicle arch, and fleet mgmt. Use Quantrix multidimensional modeling tool and model vehicle data connectivity, annual usage and cost of carrier ntwk. Apply BIZBOK Business Arch principles and create capabilities, value streams and information maps used to reduce redundancy, increase operational efficiency and provide clear communication between business and technical teams. Dvlp Quantrix models for data modeling needs, incldg customizations using Groovy scripting language. Bachelor, Computer Science, Mathematics or Information Technology. 6 mos exp as Solution Architect providing enterprise value stream anlys of infotainment/telematics org’s current and future state of business capabilities, cloud computing/vehicle technologies, customer needs, and creating gap reports and strategic roadmaps/risk analyses. Mail resume to Alicia Scott-Wears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#21092.      

February 15 - 21, 2017

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Senior Release  Engineer  II  

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Evaluate   engrg  designs  &results,  &assure  high  qlty   design,  engrg  &integration  of  psgr  car/SUV   exterior  plastic  cmpts  (such  as  fascias,   spoilers,  appliques,  moldings,  &rocker   panels)  &approve  designs  of  injection   molded  tools  (incldg  checking  fixtures)   &plastic  painting  technologies,  applying   engrg  principles  such  as  DOE,  DFSS,   DFMEA,  DFM/DFA,  Mold  Flow,  Six  Sigma,   &DRBTR,  to  dvlp  &design  cmpts  for   vehicle  programs.  Lead  &coordinate   Product  Dvlpmt  Team.  Coach  &lead   creation  of  Class  A  surface  designs  in   math  data  using  UG  NX,  Team  Center,   &GD&T  tool.  Review  &interpret  FEA  &CAE   results  to  improve  design  cmpts  &ensure   cmpt,  along  with  full  vehicle  compliance   with  U.S.  FMVSS,  U.S.  NCAP,  &export   reqmts  such  as  Euro  NCAP  &China  NCAP   Pedestrian  Protection,  &IIHS   recommendations.  Coach  &lead  suppliers   to  ensure  timely  execution  of  program   deliverables.  Bachelor,  Mechanical,   Mechatronic,  or  Electromechanical  Engrg.   24  mos  exp  as  Engineer,  evaluating  engrg   designs  &results,  &assuring  high  qlty   design  &integration  of  psgr  vehicle  exterior   plastic  cmpts  such  as  fascias  &spoilers,   approving  designs  of  injection  molded  tools   (incldg  checking  fixtures)  &plastic  painting   technologies,  applying  DFSS,  DFMEA,   Mold  Flow,  &DRBTR  to  successfully  dvlp   &design  cmpts  for  vehicle  programs.  Mail   resume  to  Alicia  Scott-­Wears,  GM  Global   Mobility,  300  Renaissance  Center,   MC:482-­C32-­D44,  Detroit,  MI  48265,   Ref#1980.

General Motors, Detroit, MI. Ensure &provide timely tax, indirect tax (such as VAT/Sales in Use), &related regulatory counsel on telecom, urban mobility incldg autonomous vehicle, ride &car sharing, &infotainment &telematics matters to Global Connected Customer Experience (GCCX) org on proposed transactions, reviewing contracts, evaluating &resolving tax controversies, negotiating settlements with tax authorities such as IRS &FCC. Advise on tax matters, incldg planning initiatives, audit defense, negotiations with tax authorities, &transfer pricing contingencies. Master, Law in Taxation. 12 mos exp as Tax Attorney or Tax Consultant, providing tax &regulatory counsel to multinational telecom, telematics, or related industry orgs on proposed transactions, reviewing contracts, evaluating &resolving tax controversies, negotiating settlements with IRS tax authorities. Any active State License to practice law required. Mail resume to Alicia Scott-Wears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#41984.

Warren, MI,  General  Motors  Company.   Assure  that  passenger  vehicles  meet&/or   exceed  FMVSS.  201U  Occupant   Protection  in  Interior  Impact  -­  Upper   Portion  standards  incldg,  but  not  ltd  to,   reqmts  for  vehicle  upper  interior   components,  incldg,  but  not  ltd  to,  pillars,   side  rails,  roof  headers  &the  roof,  &upper   interior  head  protection  criteria.  Use  LS-­ Dyna,  Primer  &Animator  to  perform,   evaluate  &assure  strict  compliance  with   201U  in  prototype  &production  vehicles  in   lab,  identifying  target  points  (AP1,  URBP,   URFC),  setting  location  of  free  motion   head,  &launch  test  &measure   accelerations,  calculate  “head  injury   criteria”  (HICd),  change  vehicle  design   &content  to  assure  proper   countermeasures  are  added  (such  as   energy  absorbing  materials),  optimize   vehicle  content  based  on  CAE  models   &devlpmt  tests,  &create/sign  off  on  NHSTA   Safety  Compliance  Reports.  Master,   Mechanical  Engineering  or  related.  1  yr   exp  as  Safety  Performance  Engineer  in  job   offered  or  related.  Mail  resume  to  Alicia   Scott-­Wears,  GM  Global  Mobility,  300   Renaissance  Center,  Mail  Code  482-­C32-­ D44,  Detroit,  MI  48265,  Ref#20864.  

General Motors,  Detroit,  MI.  Formulate   &recommend  Auto  Finance  risk  mgmt   policies  to  ensure  financing  support  for   core  automotive  business.  Dvlp  &operate   Monte  Carlo  value-­at-­risk  models  to   measure  &quantify  risk  from  FX,   commodities  &interest  rates.  Dvlp  best   sources  of  capital  in  various  market   conditions  incldg  stressed,  normal,   hyperinflation  &recession  scenarios.   Recommend  the  mix  of  unsecured  debt,   secured  debt,  credit  facilities  &equity  for   growing  balance  sheet  of  captive  financing   arm  in  next  decade.  Evaluate  global   currency  risks  in  global  markets  &impact   on  sources  of  financing  &net  income.   Evaluate  FX  hedging  policy  to  minimize   risks  from  currency  movements.  Evaluate   financing  alternatives  in  global  markets   based  on  expected  interest  rate  &FX   movements  (e.g.  EUR,  GBP,  USD,  CAD,   MXN,  Yen,  &RMB),  &dvlp  best  in  class   hedging  policies.  Evaluate  use  of  currency   swaps  &interest  rate  swaps  to  mitigate   against  negative  currency  movements.   Master,  Business  Administration  or   Finance.  12  mos  exp  as  Financial  Analyst,   evaluating  global  currency  risks  in  global   markets  &impact  on  sources  of  financing,   dvlping  Monte  Carlo  value-­at-­risk  models   to  quantify  risk  from  FX,  commodities   &interest  rates,  &evaluating  currency/   interest  rate  swaps  to  mitigate  against   negative  currency  movements.  Mail   resume  to  Alicia  Scott-­Wears,  GM  Global   Mobility,  300  Renaissance  Center,  Mail   Code  482-­C32-­D44,  Detroit,  MI  48265,   Ref#555.    

Compartment Integration Design Engineer

Warren, MI, General Motors. Engr, define, package, &ensure high qlty integration of local/global psgr car &truck front end compartments, incldg engine compartment, engine cooling sys, chassis/brake systems, using UG &Vis Mockup. Use UG NX to evaluate hood styled surface to Underhood cmpts required clearance for pedestrian head impact &to create tire envelope supporting chassis reqmts for clearance to ground &tire-to-body relationships. Coordinate Front Compartment Integration Team meetings (pwt, chassis, body, electrical, exterior &HVAC engrs) to integrate their parts efficiently to achieve the necessary space &function. Assure ground clearance reqmts for psgr car &truck Classification to meet U.S. NHTSA CAFE standards. Bachelor, Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics Engrg, or Control &Automation Engrg. 12 mos exp as Engineer defining, packaging &integrating car &truck front end compartments, incldg engine, engine cooling sys, &chassis systems using UG &Vis Mockup, assuring ground clearance reqmts for vehicle classification to meet CAFE standards. Mail resume to Alicia Scott-Wears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#1827.  

Treasury Analyst

General Motors, Detroit, MI. Support Regional Treasury Centers with setting up &continually improving ZBA &automatic sweeping configurations with global cash pools. Configure processing of SWIFT messages such as MT101, MT940, MT92 &BAI message formats in WallStreet System. Verify with Treasury Accounting Team &Treasury IT Development Team on new accounts mapped in SAP. Document &configure unique identifiers for BTIRs in WSS for automatic assigning of cash flow types to each transaction in CMM considering strict currency controls &dvlpg banking regs, &responsiveness to emerging market reqmts allowing or inhibiting new globally used treasury practices such as cash mgmt &accounting mgmt. Bachelor, Banking or Finance. 24 mos exp as Treasury Analyst, Corporate Treasurer or related, verifying with teams on new accounts being mapped in SAP, documenting &configuring migration of BTIRs, with implementation considering strict currency controls &dvlpg banking regs, &responsiveness to emerging market reqmts allowing or inhibiting globally used treasury practices such as cash &accounting mgmt. Mail resume to Alicia Scott-Wears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#3654.

  Driveline  System  Design  Engineer  

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Engr,  design   &dvlp  the  driveline  systems  incldg  Rear   Differential  Module  (RDM),  propeller  shaft,   drive  shaft  &Front  Drive  Unit  (FDU)  for   future  passenger  cars  &sport  utility   vehicles  in  compliance  with  vehicle   durability,  Ride  &Handling  (R&H),  Noise   &Vibration  (N&V),  &crash  performance   reqmts,  &sub-­sys  reqmts  (strength,  quality,   mass,  cost),  for  N.A.,  European  &China   markets.  Establish  driveline  system   strategy  such  as  Rear/Front/Two/Four   Wheel  Drive,  open  differential,  limited  slip   differential,  electric  limited  slip  differential   apps  based  on  discussion  with  Global  Sub   System  Leader  Team,  BOM  Family  Owner   &program  team.  Evaluate  transmit  torque   capacity  from  pwt  to  each  wheel  satisfying   vehicle  reqmts  balanced  R&H,  N&V,  fuel   economy,  &duty  cycle.  Dvlp  &report   Architecture  Content  Summary  &Visual  Bill   of  Material  to  show  vehicle  variants   modification  level  from  donor  vehicle.   Bachelor,  Mechanical  or  Automotive   Engineering.  6  mos  exp  as  Driveline   Design  Engineer  or  Driveline  Engineer,   engrg  passenger  car/SUV  driveline  sys   incldg  RDM,  propeller  shaft,  drive  shaft   &FDU,  or  related,  in  compliance  with   vehicle  durability,  R&H,  N&V,  crash   performance,  &duty  cycle  reqmts  for  N.A.,   European,  &China  markets.  Mail  resume  to   Alicia  Scott-­Wears,  GM  Global  Mobility,   300  Renaissance  Center,  Mail  Code  482-­ C32-­D44,  Detroit,  MI  48265,  Ref#3823.    

 

Human Resources Data Analyst

General Motors, Detroit, MI. Plan, strategize, &ensure timely &robust implementation of integrated global HR Master Data Mgmt definitions, processes, policies, &standards incldg comprehensive data dictionary with global HR, Finance &IT &own the data element update process, incldg work to ensure one global data definition regardless of sys of record. Establish Oracle PeopleSoft DG, MDM &DQM processes for General Motors globally to ensure qlty, integrity &security of people data in HR systems. Establish the standards &procedures for people data life cycle mgmt – CRUD standards to ensure data is recorded, stored, shared, extracted &retired from HR systems in a consistent manner. Transform raw data into insightful information for critical decision making via interactive data visualization tools such as Tableau &MS Power BI, Access &Excel Macro programming. Run data qlty scans &conduct data profiling using tools such as Cognos &SQL in VDD. Conduct UAT &SIT &provide sign off. Master, Business Administration, Human Resources, Computer or Social Sciences or related. Will accept a bachelor’s or foreign equivalent degree, in Business Administration, Human Resources, Computer or Social Sciences or related, followed by at least 5 yrs progressive exp in the specialty, in lieu of the required education &exp. Will also accept any equally suitable combination of education, training, and/or exp which would qualify an applicant to perform the job offered. The required exp must include 36 mos as Human Resources Manager, HR Business Partner, Deputy HR Manager, or related, establishing standards &procedures for people data life cycle mgmt CRUD standards to ensure data is recorded, stored, shared, extracted &retired from HR systems in a consistent manner, &managing or driving strategic HR Technology initiatives, global sys deployments &upgrades. Mail resume to Alicia Scott-Wears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#605–1333.

 

Senior Treasury  Analyst  

February National Heart Disease Awareness Month

Applied Operations     Research  Professional    

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Research  and   apply  meta-­heuristic  simulation-­ optimization  techniques  and  algorithms  to   optimize  non-­linear  non-­quasi-­concave   objective  functions  comprising  decision   variables  reflecting  customer  preferences.   Minimize  GM’s  global  finished  goods   inventory  while  maximizing  customer   service  level.  Design  optimal  supplier  ntwk   for  raw  material  replenishment  considering   multi-­sourcing  supply  and  lateral   transshipments  across  GM  dealerships.   Optimize  finished  goods  transportation  and   distribution  to  multiple  capacitated   dealerships  while  minimizing  backorder   cost  incurred  by  customer  waiting  time.   Solve  underlying  non-­linear  integer   programming  model  of  finished  goods   distribution  to  multiple  dealerships  with   capacity  and  demand  constraints  and  solve   models  using  IBM  ILOG  CPLEX   Optimization  Studio,  Gurobi  Optimizer,  or   self-­dvlpd  efficient  optimization  heuristics.   Improve  current  optimization  models   written  in  C++  to  prepare  for  next   generation  linear  and  non-­linear   optimization  soft  platforms.  PhD,   Operations  Research,  Operations   Management,  Industrial  Engineering  or   Management  Science.  3  mos  exp  as   Graduate  Research  Assistant  or  as   Researcher  applying  meta-­heuristic   simulation-­optimization  algorithms  to   optimize  non-­linear  non-­quasi-­concave   objective  functions.  Mail  resume  to  Alicia   Scott-­Wears,  GM  Global  Mobility,  300   Renaissance  Center,  MC:482-­C32-­D44,   Detroit,  MI  48265,  Ref#31373.    

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Responsible for development of new customer specific custom products. Analyze high frequency signals & Touch sensors, develop circuitry to resolve high frequency application issues, & design analog & digital solutions. Use CAD tools to design electrical schematics & PCB assemblies. Generate BOMs (Bill of Materials) for electrical designs. Release electrical designs into the Corporate PLM system. Lead DFM with Manufacturing. Use DFMEA, Fault Tree, Fishbone and DMAIC processes. Author specifications. Assure that the solution provided meets automotive quality & safety standards & evaluate designs for robustness by developing test methods, performing tests, & communicating test results.

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Position is in Southfield, MI. Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. Knowledge of computational analysis with sensor business applications as evidenced by at least 6 months experience or study.

February National Glaucoma Awareness Awareness Month

Send resumes to: Helen Despotopoulos Methode Electronics 7401 W. Wilson Ave. Chicago, IL 60706

CAE Engineer – Senior Warren, MI, General Motors. Conduct dimensional variation anlys of future car/truck programs to enable data-driven decision making through creation of 3D variation simulation models. Create statistical simulations of full vehicles, combining math data, GD&T, assy processing, &mfg data using 3DCS &provide key inputs to Dimensional Mgmt &Product Engrg teams. Perform Design of Experiments to optimize datum attachment strategies &tolerances for components. Analyze dimensional performance of full vehicle chassis alignment, powertrain loading, vehicle to powertrain integration, interior (IP, door inners, consoles, seat systems, A/B/C/D pillars, &trim), body in white exteriors incldg fender, hoods, sunroof modules, &liftgates, &vehicle &component fit &finish, Design for Mfg &Assy, &clearance issues to prevent interference, &improve performance. Provide anlys of Dimensional Tolerances Specs such as hood to fender gaps &flushness, deck lid to body side interfaces, door to fender gap &flush, interior end caps to door inner panels, &recommend robust designs to meet GM global vehicle reqmts &standards. Master, Mechanical Engrg, Automotive Engrg or related. 36 mos exp as Lead Engineer, CAE Engineer, Information Technology Analyst, Consultant or Engineer. Will accept bachelor’s or foreign equivalent degree, in Mechanical Engrg, Automotive Engrg or related, followed by at least 5 yrs progressive exp in the specialty, in lieu of required education &exp. Will also accept any equally suitable combination of education, training, &/or experience which would qualify an applicant to perform job offered. Required exp must include 36 mos conducting dimensional variation anlys of future psgr vehicle programs to enable data-driven decision making through creation of 3D variation simulation models, creating statistical simulations of full vehicle or powertrain, combining math data, GD&T, assy processing, &mfg data using 3DCS. Mail resume to Alicia ScottWears, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-D44, Detroit, MI 48265, Ref#2954.

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You’re never too young or too old to have “firsts.”

Whether it’s first grade at 5. Or first time college student at 65. They have a lot of firsts ahead of them. That’s the power of Real Possibilities. Visit aarp.org/blackcommunity

Real Possibilities is a trademark of AARP®

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This Black History Month, we celebrate the firsts at any age.

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