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Debate: Is multitasking actually helpful?

October 29, 2015

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Senses of Land Art Exhibit

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Student Org. Concrete Canoe

Photo by Dan Schudlich


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Thursday, October 29

NEWS

Michigan Tech Lode

Mu Beta Psi Hosts Benefit Dinner

Hannah Ramsby Lode Writer Michigan Tech’s Mu Beta Psi hosted a chili dinner Saturday October 24 at St. Albert Catholic Church. More people than expected made it out to the dinner with all of the proceeds going towards the Calumet High School band program.

Mu Beta Psi is a national honorary musical fraternity. It is a co-ed service organization that does volunteer work on campus and within the Houghton community. “We really try to do service for music organizations both on campus and in the community,” says Mu Beta Psi vice president Kate Bauer. “So we’ve been doing different kinds of either breakfasts or dinners as fundraisers.” The organization has done pancake

breakfasts and spaghetti dinners in the past. “We’re still trying to figure out the best food,” Bauer remarks, on why they chose to do a chili dinner this year. The goal of the dinner was to raise money for the Calumet High School band to help with everyday costs that come with operating a school band program. “Bands always need money,” says Bauer. “At a lot of schools, music becomes a lower priority, so this way they can use the money if they need instrument repairs or if they need new sheet music. Those are expenses that a lot of people don’t always think about, but they’re really expensive and since music and art aren’t as recognized, it really helps to have a little extra money to spend.” The organization had a goal to raise $100 on Saturday night and exceeded it with a total $260 raised by the end of the night. Mu Beta Psi states its service goals on their website (zeta.mubetapsi.org). “Mu Beta Psi is dedicated to serving our musical community. As members of the music organizations and Michigan Tech, we give back to them by offering our time and services. We host concerts, gift scholarships, feed bands, move equipment, usher concerts, organize libraries, and so much more for the music programs at MTU, local high schools, The Calumet Theatre, and more!” While the organization’s fundraising events usually go toward local music programs, their service efforts don’t just stop there. Some other work that Mu Beta Psi has done in the community includes serving guests and cleaning up at the Calumet’s Theater Club Indigo, cleaning a stretch of US-41 south of Houghton

with MDOT Adopt-a-Highway, crocheting scarfs, hats, and other winter items for the New Beginnings Mission, and cleaning a park in Hancock on Make a Difference Day.

“At a lot of schools, music becomes a lower priority... they need instrument repairs or... new sheet music” Those are expenses that a lot of people don’t always think about...” - Kate Bauer Mu Beta Psi awards the John MacInnes Student Scholarship every spring to a student involved in the musical community at Michigan Tech. The money for the scholarship is raised during a concert that takes place during Winter Carnival called Jazz Night on the Town. The concert is held at the Orpheum Theater in Hancock and usually consists of student ensembles and a performance by Northern Standard Time. Students who wish to become involved with Mu Beta Psi can visit their website at zeta.mubetapsi.org.

Mu Beta Psi members take donations (Top picture). Local community members sit down for the Chili Benefit Dinner (bottom). Photos courtesy of Hannah Kowalewski


Michigan Tech Lode

NEWS

Thursday, October 29

Student Org. Spotlight: The Concrete Canoe Team

Evan Mayer Lode Writer Since 1970, there has been a student organization on Michigan Tech’s campus that has been performing a feat many would think is physically impossible, yet the Concrete Canoe team still manages to create floating canoes out of solid concrete. The latest canoe that the team is constructing will be taken to a regional competition in April, where it will be judged in four categories. These competitions are: races, design paper, presentation and display components such as the canoe, canoe stand and display table. The team that places first at this regional competition will then get a bid to the national competition in June. The ultimate goal of the Concrete Canoe team every year is to go to

nationals. They have been extremely successful in achieving this goal in the

The Team’s Motto: Friendship, recruitment, innovation, compliance, and knowledge (FRICK). past, as they have gone 12 of the 13 years they have been in competition. They placed 11th last year at nationals, but have finished as high as third in 2012. The team has additional goals for

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The Concrete Canoe team surrounding their latest creation.

Photo Courtesy of Kathrine Cipriano

this year, which are highlighted in the acronym they developed: “FRICK.” The letters stand for friendship, recruitment, innovation, compliance, and knowledge. The team is hoping that by sticking to these five goals, they can place in the top five at nationals this year. This year’s national championship will take place in Tyler, Texas from June 9-11. Although they do not compete until April, the project lasts the full school year. They meet several times a week to ensure that they are on schedule. The weekly team meeting takes place every Wednesday in Dillman 320 at 7 p.m. There is also paddling practice on Tuesday and Thursdays from 5 -7 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m.- 1 p.m. The team currently consists of 30 members from a wide array of majors. They are always looking to expand and

welcome anyone who is interested in attending their meetings. The team is very flexible about working with members. It doesn’t matter whether an individual wants to be a part of all the committees, to see how everything comes together, or if that person only has time to serve on a committee or two. The team will accept all the help it can get. Kathrine Cipriano, the senior captain of the team, thinks that it’s important to have team members from a wide variety of backgrounds. “The best part about concrete canoe is that no matter what your grade or major, you can have a large impact on the team. There are close to 20 different committee head positions ranging from paddling and aesthetics to concrete mix and hull design. Continued on page 5


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Thursday, October 29

NEWS

Michigan Tech Lode

Research Spotlight: Damaged Proteins and Cancer

Jon Jaehnig Lode Writer This week’s research spotlight highlights the undergraduate research opportunities in the lab of Professor Martin Thompson of the Michigan Tech Chemistry Department. Thompson’s lab, which employs one postdoctoral researcher, two PhD candidates, one masters student and two undergraduate researchers, is focused on two interrelated projects involving damaged proteins that lead to the development of cancer. One of these proteins, Polybromo-1, can target chromatin, which is involved in the packaging of DNA. While it is known that this protein is responsible for damaged protein sequences that cause cancers, including breast cancer, exactly how this happens has, so far, been what Thompson called a “black box.” “You know there’s a lot of things leading to this, and you know there’s a lot of consequences, but what’s happening in the middle?” he explained. This question has so far been unanswered largely due to an inability to isolate the protein, which

makes it difficult to study its expression. A graduate student in Thompson’s lab was able to clone the protein from a yeast strain over the summer, allowing the lab to mutate

There are always “a bunch of crazy ideas” waiting to be explored. - Dr. Thompson the protein to replicate the cause of these complications. This will hopefully allow them to see what goes on in that black box and how its mis-expression can lead to health complications. The other side of this project is an indepth study of DNA structure, specifically nucleotides, to determine where the harmful protein may be bonding to DNA strands to

cause cancer. “In breast cancer, the chunk of the protein that recognises DNA is absent. We want to take real cancer examples of these mutations and see what they’re actually doing by studying their binding,” Thompson explained. In addition to simplifying the research process, researchers in Thompson’s lab have had some success with reconstituting damaged DNA. Both of these projects have yielded information that is being organized and prepared for publication. The creation of unique gene sequences done in the lab may also be patented, which would offer the lab valuable leverage as the research continues. However, Thompson expressed some uncertainty on possible implications of patenting a new process involving natural genetic material. “I would be unwilling to patent people’s genes, so I would be okay if that one wouldn’t fly.” Thompson said that there are always opportunities in the department for research and recommends that students interested in pursuing research set up an appointment during his office hours. “It’s good to know your professors, and it’s good to have these

discussions anyway…it’s not like ‘only ask if you’re going to do it’, if you’re on the fence, say you’re on the fence, if you want to get in the lab, say you want to get in the lab.” Even though there may be plenty of opportunities available, Thompson does not recommend pursuing research solely as a resume builder. “[Research] isn’t the kind of thing that you do so you can put it on your resume. Cleaning up garbage on the side of the road might be a good way to put something on your resume,” he said. “Research is a commitment” and best not pursued outside of genuine interest. On the other hand, Thompson said that doing undergraduate research, even as a first year student, can be invaluable, even if you might not be curing cancer yet. As Thompson put it, “The fascinating part for undergrads, even if they’re not doing these experiments is that… just to hear, and expose yourself to the discussion is educational. I think that’s where a lot of problem solving comes from, is not just being in the lab, but being around other people trying to solve problems.” There are other less-involving projects going on in the lab and always “a bunch of crazy ideas” waiting to be explored.

Winter Campus Overnight Parking Effective: November 1, 2014 – April 30, 2015 To allow for snow removal, parking is prohibited on campus between 2:00AM and 7:00AM, from November 1 through April 30, except as follows: 1. In designated parking areas for occupants of University Housing. 2. Employees working on an assigned shift and parking in assigned overnight parking spaces. 3. Anyone issued a special overnight parking permit by Public Safety & Police Services or Transportation Services.

This regulation is in effect regardless of the amount of snow on the ground. VEHICLES VIOLATING THIS REGULATION WILL BE TICKETED AND MAY BE TOWED AT THE OWNER’S EXPENSE.

Any questions regarding the winter campus overnight parking regulation? – Contact Public Safety & Police Services at 487-2216 or Transportation Services at 487-1441.


NEWS

Michigan Tech Lode

iPhone Evolved

5 Student Org. Spotlight

Thursday, October 29

Aaron Kostrzewa Lode Writer

While there’s great debate over the greatest smartphone today, there’s no denying that the original iPhone that debuted in 2007 revolutionized the cell phone industry. Back in the day when Blackberry phones dominated the market, Apple Inc. developed a new phone that fundamentally changed the way we approached mobile devices. Since the company made its name selling mp3 players, it came as a big surprise to the public that they were going to introduce a phone. Steve Jobs, Apple’s former CEO, gave the iPhone an incredible

“We are unveiling three new products in one device and we’re going to call it iPhone.” -Steve Jobs (2007) name to live up to with one of his famous keynote presentations. He began this monumental day with some shocking words. “Today, we’re introducing three revolutionary products. The first one is a widescreen iPod with touch controls. The second is a revolutionary mobile phone. And the third is a breakthrough Internet communications device.” Jobs got the audience’s attention with this bold statement, but Jobs was playing with his audience. “We are not introducing three new products, we are unveiling three new products in one device and we’re going

Continued from page 3

Latest iPhone models. 6s Plus on the right, 6s on the left.

to call it iPhone.” From that moment on, the iPhone was a hit and has consistently been the best-selling phone of all time. Year after year Apple makes revolutionary advances in the device. They engineer every aspect of the product to perfection. From the packaging, to the appearance of the device and the user interface, no detail is overlooked. Perhaps that is why consumers made such a big deal about the iPhone 6 Plus after its initial release. #bendgate was started shortly after the release of Apple’s flagship devices when some users found that their iPhone tended to bend when a small amount of force was applied. Social media exploded when they thought this fluke was Apple’s coup de grâce. However, it was a fairly trivial issue considering very few users had trouble with their phones bending. According to cultofmac.com, Apple reported only nine customers claiming about the issue. Despite the occasional error, Apple cranks out quality devices and raises the standard with each iteration of the iPhone. Apple has a trend of revamping the design in their phones every two

Michigan Tech Lode

Courtesy of http://assets-jpcust.jwpsrv.com/

years and in the intermediate years they introduce an “s” model. The “s” stand for speed, and these are the devices where Apple has debuted their latest technology. In 2010, they introduced the iPhone 4s where the virtual assistant, Siri, made her debut. For the iPhone 5s, Apple featured a cutting edge fingerprint scanner to the device. Now, with their latest release of the iPhone 6s, they’ve taken mobile technology to a new dimension with 3D Touch. Users are now able to perform different functions based on how hard they tap the screen. In addition, the newest phone has a 4K capable camera, lightning fast processor, 2 GB of RAM, and a 5 megapixel front-facing camera. With each year, our smartphones give our computers a run for their money and the 6s is a perfect example. When Steve Jobs died in 2011, many people thought Apple’s reign would end. While Jobs was the backbone of the company, he hired on great people to work alongside him. And as we can see today, they’re doing just fine and still producing incredible technology.

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The committee positions provide leadership experience, and as a team member, you can help with whichever committees you want,” Cipriano said. Another notable aspect of the club is that members are not required to pay dues to join and do not need to pay for travel expenses. Instead, the team has been successful in fundraising for all their activities. “If you are looking for a great way to make friends and add some impressive leadership experience to your resume, concrete canoe is the club for you. The team works very hard year-round to uphold its reputation as a national competitor. That said, any concrete canoe member would tell you that some of their closest friendships formed when they joined the team,” Cipriano said. Logan Pickruhn, a fourth-year student, said, “I joined the team out of curiosity that sparked when I saw the canoe in the DOW when I toured the college and was hooked immediately. I stuck around because of the good people on the team and our success nationally; it gives me a chance to take a long weekend in the summer to go see a new part of the country, like Clemson or historic Johnstown.” Regardless of the members’ reasons for joining, the Concrete Canoe club continues to grow and succeed in representing the Huskies across the country. If you’re interested in finding out more about the club please contact senior captain Kathrine Cipriano at krcipria@mtu.edu.

Opinions expressed in the Lode are not necessarily those of the student body, faculty, staff or administration of Michigan Technological University or the Michigan Tech Lode. The Lode is designed, written and edited by Michigan Tech students. The paper is printed every Tuesday during fall and spring semesters. The Lode is available free of charge at drop-off sites around campus and in the surrounding community. To the best of its ability, The Lode subscribes to the Code of Ethics of the Society of Professional

Journalists. The Lode is funded in part by the Michigan Tech Student Activity Fee. 1. lodeads@mtu.edu for submitting ads to the Lode. 2. lodesubmit@mtu.edu for submitting articles and letters to the editor. Work submitted to the Lode should be submitted with the understanding that it may be printed by the Lode and/or posted to the Online Lode, www. mtulode.com. The Lode reserves the right to edit submissions for length, clarity and potentially libelous material. Submissions should not exceed 500 words.


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Thursday, October 29

PULSE

Michigan Tech Lode

Make a Difference Day Feature Film: Fight Club Sumit Bongir

Davy McLeod

Lode Writer

Lode Writer

The first rule for the cult classic “Fight Club,” directed by David Fincher, is not to talk about it. Well critics and audiences everywhere couldn’t help but rave when this film first lit up the big screen in 1999. The movie is based on a novel by Chuck Plahniuk, published three years prior in 1996. The story is centered on a nameless, office drone insomniac, played by Edward Norton, and a smooth talking salesman named Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt). Norton narrates the film as his character’s inner monologue, and after losing all his fulfilling possessions and meticulously picked out material goods in a gas explosion within his apartment, he starts to spiral. Running into Durden at a bar, the pair decide to try a new form of meditation; fighting one another. Without boxing gloves or restraint, Durden asks Norton’s character to punch him as hard as he physically can. He does, and soon after, the two are duking it out

in the bar’s parking lot. Other men gather to watch, and even ask to be included. The revolutionary form of therapy caught on quick, and soon a fight club could be found in bar basements all over after closing time. Durden’s actual agenda is complex and radical though, involving some serious anarchist plots and other chaotic crimes that cause confusion in the public. Norton’s character hesitates to follow Durden blindly into the abyss, and the line between the two becomes blurred. Especially when Marla Singer (played by Helena Bonham Carter) shows up and complicates an already rickety relationship between the two protagonists. Fincher respectfully retold this mindbending story with smart cinematography and a cutthroat cast. The plot has twists that will cause whiplash if not watched carefully, and the scenes pull no punches in their delivery.

While the rain was playing hide and seek outside, there was a huge assemblage of enthusiastic students in the MUB Commons early last Saturday morning. The students had gathered to check in for the Make A Difference Day volunteering activities organized by the Student Activities department of Michigan Tech. Make A Difference Day, a USA TODAY initiative, is the nation’s largest day of community service held on the fourth Saturday of October and has been running for more than 20 years. Jessie Stapleton, Assistant Director of Student Activities, organized the event. “The Student Activities office sends out emails to some local agencies looking for projects that need to be accomplished, and we also reach out to local community members to see if they need assistance,” she said. This year there were 109 organizations, including a variety of student organizations and housing and residential life groups, contributing a total student strength of 497

towards 57 projects at various locations. “We had students that chopped wood, students that raked leaves, students that built a house, students that cleared the trails for the Keweenaw Nordic Ski Club, students gardening and planting for the Houghton beautification committee, students painting benches and organizing books and lots of other activities,” Stapleton said. The organizers received many thank you calls from various people, especially from the City of Hancock, for which they are thankful to the strong student base that helped execute this event. They even received an email about a blog post (http://keweenawnordicskiclub.blogspot. com/2015/10/sigma-phi-epsilon-madedifference.html) that was published to thank the volunteers who helped open a new section on the St. Urho’s trail. If you are one of those that missed this opportunity and would like to come forward next time, look no further; Student Activities is looking for people who are interested in signing up for their community volunteer email list which can be found at www.involvement.mtu.edu/ organization/community-service.


Michigan Tech Lode

PULSE

Thursday, October 29

Senses of Land art exhibit Shelby Sebring Lode Writer

Whether from Houghton, downstate, the Northeast, or another continent, no one can deny the beauty of the Keeweenaw peninsula. Unfortunately, we may take the landscape for granted, as we see it every day. Some artists, however, use their talents to express land’s powerful effect on us, though we may not even realize it. The Senses of Land exhibit, on display at the Rosza Center until November 13, features works by distinguished local artists. The pieces, which vary from poetry to photographs to perfumes, were all crafted to show the importance of place in everyday life. Sage Dawson, who teaches in the Department of Fine Arts at St. Louis University, is especially interested in where people live and how dwellings, spaces, and land affect people. She uses the hair of deceased loved ones in her work, as featured in some of her pieces in the Rosza. As shown in one of her paintings, a map showing the expansion and destruction of a city, the hair is intended to link the

person to a special place as a kind of memorial. Also on display are the poems of David Ebenbach, who has been published several times. Ebenbach relocated many times during his childhood and throughout his life and is still searching to find a true home, which is reflected in his poetry. His work is centered around a question he constantly asks himself: “Is this home? If not, where is home – and how do I get there?” Cathleen Faubert takes a more tactile approach to connecting with land and creates organic perfumes to explore the role of scent in arts. Interested in locations, landscapes, and nature, Faubert sees scents as a sort of language which can allow humans to communicate with their surroundings. “Fragrance has the instantaneous and invisible power to penetrate consciousness,” Faubert says. She believes scent in particular will begin to play a more prominent role in performing arts, as it will add another dimension to the performance. Photographer Allen Morris, an associate lecturer at the University of WisconsinMilwaukee, uses his art as an instrument

Senses of Land Exhibit at the Rosza.

to examine how humans connect emotionally with their environment. He describes his photo series “In Search Of,” or ISO, as his own “personal seeking of stability and a relationship between my

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Photo by Shelby Sebring

location and myself.” His photos feature whirling landscapes with a solitary grounded image in the center, to represent each of us searching for permanence in our hectic lives.

Studying Abroad: the experience of a lifetime Marlo Jayne Journalism Student Studying abroad is an opportunity that many college students dream of. Luckily, it is also an opportunity that is offered by most universities. Whether for a month in the summer, a semester or an entire year, students have a vast number of international universities to choose from. When considering whether they should study abroad, many students are apprehensive. Living in a different country for months at a time can seem overwhelming. Nevertheless, students who have studied abroad in the past are quick to reassure their peers that the opportunity has more pros than cons. A common misconception about studying abroad is that you will be faced with a language barrier. Dylan Miller, senior business major at Tech, and Audrey Laurila, senior speech pathology major at Central Michigan University, both participated in summer study-abroad programs in England. Both said that they did not face any language barriers, even though they met a lot of people who did not speak English. Kristy Ewing, a Tech alumna, said that

she didn’t face any language barriers while studying abroad in Costa Rica. She said, “I was usually in a group with anywhere from five to 10 other students who were

“I learned so much and grew as a person during my experience.” -Audrey Laurila studying abroad, so we managed to get through all communication battles together.” Another concern that students have about studying abroad is whether or not they will get homesick. Ewing agreed that this was a concern for her before she left for Costa Rica, but she surprised herself. “I thought for sure I would (get homesick), but I definitely did not,” she said. “I was entirely too busy enjoying myself too much to even think about missing home.” Miller added that being able to stay in contact with family and friends over Skype made the experience easier. When asked what was the biggest lesson

they learned about themselves while living in a foreign country, Ewing and Laurila had similar answers. “I learned a lot about how truly independent I could be,” said Ewing. “Up until that point in my life, I felt like I was quite a homebody, but I learned that I loved being far away from home by myself.” Laurila said, “I learned that I’m capable of so much. I never thought I would’ve been able to do some of the things I did while I was [in England]. I was definitely pushed outside of my comfort zone and had to learn to embrace it.” Miller, Laurila and Ewing all said that they would definitely encourage others to study abroad. Miller said, “It is an amazing experience that you can only get while you’re in college.” And Laurila said, “I think everyone should study abroad. I learned so much and grew as a person during my experience.” Ewing added that as a current high school teacher, she is always sharing her study-abroad experience with her students. She encourages them to take advantage of the opportunity if they are presented with it. She even referred to her experience in Costa Rica as “life changing.” If the stories told by previous study-

abroad students aren’t enough to convince you to take advantage of the opportunity, the University of California Merced conducted research on the benefits of having a study-abroad experience on your résumé, and the findings are impressive. According to this study, 97 percent of study-abroad students find employment within 12 months of graduation. Starting salaries of graduates who have studied abroad are, on average, 25 percent higher than those of students who have not studied abroad. If you are a Michigan Tech student and are interested in a study-abroad experience, you can attend an information session in the International Programs and Services Office, located in Room 200 of the Administration Building. Sessions are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays, but you can stop in anytime. Study-Abroad Coordinator Vienna Chapin said, “There is always someone available in the office to discuss studyabroad options. Not only is there a fulltime study-abroad coordinator, but there are also student workers trained in all of our study-abroad programs.” For more information, email Chapin at studyabroad@mtu.edu or visit the IPS webpage at mtu.edu/international.


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Thursday, October 29

COMICS

“After meeting with a few of the subjects, the IRB actually recommended that you stop stressing out so much about safety guidelines.” Comic courtesy of XKCD

CLASSIFIEDS WRITERS WANTED: Currently we are hiring writers for all sections of the Lode. See your work in the newspaper! Please contact The Michigan Tech Lode at lodesubmit-l@mtu.edu or by calling 906-487-2404.

HOUSE FOR RENT: Houghton, very nice 2-bedroom apartment. HEAT INCLUDED. 501 W. Houghton Ave. Spacious rooms, carpet, canal view, appliances, on-site parking. Non-smoking. 1-2 persons. $600/mo.

Nice of that dude to tell us so, though.

Call 906-482-1437 AD SALES: Currently we are hiring ad salespeople for the Lode. See your work in the newspaper! Please contact The Michigan Tech Lode at lodesubmit-l@mtu.edu or by calling 906-487-2404. E-mail lodeads@mtu.edu for information about placing a classified ad. I call being an expert on my birthday!

Michigan Tech Lode


PUZZLES

Puzzles Edited by Will Shortz

HALLOWEEN COSTUMES

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Puzzles Online: Today’s puzzle and more than 9,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). For the daily puzzle commentary: nytimes.com/wordplay. Mobile crosswords: nytimes.com/mxword

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ACROSS

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Thursday, October 29

Debate:

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OPINION

Michigan Tech Lode

Is multitasking a good thing, or are we lying to ourselves?

Pro: Andrea Spencer

ROUND 1

Lode Writer

Multitasking is how our world works. Ask any professional and they will tell you how crucial this skill is. From big businesses, to parenting, to juggling school and athletics, there will always be more things to do than time to do them in. That’s why multitasking is so great. While sitting in class I can be taking notes and responding to emails; while at dinner I can be eating and doing homework. In fact, with the busy and heavily involved society we live in, the one way to thrive and receive recognition is to be a multitasker. People admire those who are doing more than what is thought to be possible, and that comes from being able to use your time wisely and take advantage of opportunities to ‘hit two birds with one stone,’ as they say.

It is not possible to focus on more than one task at once. It is a known fact that many pedestrian casualties are a result of texting while walking. It is not possible to concentrate on walking while texting and vice versa. The fact of the matter is our brains are not structured to do multiple tasks at once. Sure, you may be able to respond to emails while taking notes. However, only taking notes without any other task results in better understanding of the material because our brain is fully engaged with the material being taught. Studies show it is more efficient to study one subject at a time instead of jumping back-and-forth between subjects. What does this tell us? This tells us that the brain performs much better when we focus on one task at a time.

ROUND 2

?

Shan Amarnani

Our brains cannot do two complex tasks, this is true, but they can do two tasks at a time. Sometimes, this may even help us listen to and remember a lecture. Sitting in the same chair, taking the same monotonous notes, and listening to the same professor explain the same subject is not how we learn. Psychological studies prove we remember things for their new-ness. So, if a student were to pair a new simple task such as drawing or playing a game, as long as it doesn’t steal all of our attention, with every lecture our brains could connect that activity with what we are hearing. Students still need to be listening to the lecture, but I find that if I am mindlessly doodling or copying a poem I can actually focus on and remember the lecture better. Even physical activities such as walking or touching a certain part of your body while listening to learning material can make connections in your brain that help you to recall the information. Multitasking doesn’t have to be doing a reasearch paper and a lab at the same time. It can be simple.

Many people believe multitasking to be much more productive and efficient than just focusing on one task. This is a false belief and fortunately science can prove this. Scientists have determined that the brain does not have enough connections to be doing two complex tasks at the same time. An example is taking notes while listening to a lecture. Personally, I am unable to focus on a lecture when I’m taking notes and vice versa and I’m sure many students have the same problem. Do we copy notes or listen to the professor? Constantly switching between the two can significantly affect the learning process. Another example would be listening to music while doing homework. It is simply not possible to solve math problems while listening to music. Sure, we may have music playing in the background but we are not actively listening to it while solving math problems. Note that “hearing” and “listening” are not the same thing.

ROUND 3

Opinion Editor

Con:

It’s not hard to prove that our attention spans are decreasing, and every college student feels that. Trying to study for a test? Better check your phone instead of finishing that practice problem. Some statistics say that our average attention span is 8.25 seconds. This is pulled from various observations, such as how the average office worker checks their email about 30 times every hour. There is no way they have to check that many times, they may want to be on top of their work, but a conclusion can be drawn from this. Our brains are used to things pulling our attention away from the task at hand. If we can use homework or other duties as our distractions instead of other less-important work, we will be putting time to good use. There is little point in forcing an unreasonable amount of focus on an activity, instead, switch between two activities that will balance each other out.

The previous argument states that our brains simply cannot focus on a single activity for an extended period of time. Yes, we do need to take short breaks in between intensive activities be it physical or mental. This is, however, completely different from multitasking. Multitasking is the act of “simultaneously” doing more than one task at a time. Switching between tasks as a way of taking a break from the first task might work for some. However, there is a more effective technique called the “Pomodoro technique.” Basically how the pomodoro technique works is you dedicate 25 minutes of your time focusing on a single task whether it be studying for an exam or writing a paper. After 25 minutes, you take a five-minute break in between to do whatever it is you usually do (check emails, check facebook, respond to text messages, etc.) then resume the same task for 25 minutes then take another five-minute break. This process is repeated until the third break. On the third break, instead of getting five minutes, you get 15 minutes.


Michigan Tech Lode

OPINION

Thursday, October 29

Winter weather preparation tips Amy Joy Patterson Lode Writer

street shoes. Wearing the same pair of snow boots each day can get monotonous, so most students take advantage of breaks from the blizzard by wearing a pair of sneakers. That being said, Houghton weather is unpredictable, and often surprises us in the most obnoxious ways. To avoid soaking sneakers and frozen socks, apply a waterproofing product to the outside of your shoes. Even the most sudden of snowstorms will not ruin your day. 5. Stock up on long underwear When it comes to protecting ourselves from winter weather, the most neglected body part is the thighs. A pair of jeans will not be enough to keep bone-chilling winds and teeth-rattling temperatures out. At the same time, snow pants are clunky, inconvenient, and unattractive, which naturally deters college students from wearing multiple layers on their legs. Long underwear is the solution to this dilemma. They protect thighs from icy gales without detracting from style. Additionally, they can be worn in a dorm room without freaking out your roommate. They are the ultimate item for maximum comfort. It is time to grow out our winter coats, Huskies. November fast approaches. Do not put off your preparations - in Houghton, you never know when winter will officially begin.

of a voodoo cult which was infamous for their attempts to resurrect thralls. Today, zombies are seen as a horror monster. Monsters have traditionally been used to characterize a fear held by society. Slenderman is a perfect example of this. His lanky appearance resembles a shadow at dusk, and he always appears at night. These factors allow him to play on a person’s fear of the dark. While the fear zombies portray has changed over time, they, being former humans, have always represented the fear of other people in some form. The zombie’s first entrance into pop culture was during the Cold War. While sluggish, they proved to be an unstoppable force. Their ceaseless quest for the flesh of the living, undeterred by terrain obstacles and most weaponry, represented the idea of communism. Communism was thought to be an incurable ailment in which those afflicted would mindlessly try to convert others into one of them, much like zombies did. Zombies tapped into the popular fear of communism in an era of high tensions. Once the tensions of the Cold War eased, the zombie craze died out for a bit. It wasn’t until the early 2000s that they re-entered the pop culture spotlight. This was because the fear of other people once again became relevant; the early

2000s sparked the beginning of the global terrorism scare. These new zombies are different- instead of the slow-spreading, plague-like nature, these monsters were fast and powerful, sporting the full physical capabilities of humans. They characterized the sudden and unpredictable tragedy of the destruction of the Twin Towers. “Dawn of the Dead,” a 2004 film, is often accredited with the re-popularization of zombies. After this film, zombies appeared everywhere. Art and literature exploded with the zombie craze to the point that it created its own genre. Books, games and everything in between were flooded with the zombie apocalypse genre. Even Michigan Tech features a Humans Versus Zombies club. The genre has acquired many notable awards and produced myriad classic films, such as “Zombieland,” which have become a tradition to watch in many households. “The Walking Dead” is one of the most popular television shows airing at the moment, and its spin-off video game of the same title won the Game of the Year award for 2012. If you don’t believe the zombie apocalypse is already here, look at the art and literature of the world. Zombies are everywhere, and no one is safe from their cultural invasion.

Fleshing out zombies Joseph Pietrzyk Lode Writer

The zombie apocalypse theorizes a bleak end to society. With a large portion of the population being turned into undead and the other half fighting each other for scarce resources, it’s odd that it’s such a hot topic in pop culture. Zombies and the zombie apocalypse were popularized as a symbol of the communist infiltration of society; now they’ve infiltrated every facet of our culture. Zombies aren’t anything new. The reanimation of the dead has been a cornerstone of both religion and culture for millennia. It’s hard to pinpoint an exact origin of zombies, due to the fact that they’ve existed in some form in a variety of cultures around the world. For example, El Día de Muertos is a Spanish holiday celebrating the dead. It’s believed that on this day the dead come back to visit the living. The dead rejoining the world of the living is not unpopular in religion, either. The origin of the word “zombie,” however, is a lot easier to track down. It’s believed to have originated in West Africa from the Kongo words “nzambi” (god) and “zumbi” (flesh). The word was popularized when the western world was exposed to the writings

Aric Rhodes

LODE

ing

ZONE

Well before our time came to leave the nest and begin our college careers, we all knew about the challenges associated with attending Michigan Tech. Those of us who toured campus prior to move-in weekend observed a dearth of dining and entertainment venues, an alarming lack of parking options and a strangely limited airport. None of these were issues that brought us angst nor the problems that left us haunted. Oh, no. There was something far more sinister looming ahead. What truly tested our sisu was the bitter, howling, unforgiving winter. Here are a few tips to make your winter a little less woeful. 1. Go to Goodwill When it comes to winter preparations, the most expensive aspect by far will be in the purchase of boots and coats. Many students find that their textbooks for the semester are less expensive than their winter gear -- a realization that is both depressing and annoying. However, this massive expensive can be largely avoided by purchasing used goods. Sure, a pair of old boots that once held someone else’s feet or a coat that once covered someone else’s body can be a turnoff, but in all likelihood, neither will

ever come into contact with your skin. Used goods can provide the exact same comforts as new goods for a fraction of the cost. 2. Invest in accessories Head, ears, hands, feet, face: these are the parts of the body that need the most coverage to prevent frostbite and to maintain a comfortable internal temperature. The majority of students do not wear a face mask during the winter, but believe me, for two weeks in January, you will be glad to have purchased one. A hat that covers the ears is an absolute necessity. Waterproof gloves will be your best friend. Wool socks will be your saving grace. Have multiples of each so that you never have to go a day without. 3. Buy reusable hand warmers Reusable hand warmers are a great choice for those who intend to participate in recreational winter activities, such as broomball, skiing, or sculpture-making. They only last about half an hour, but they can provide serious relief for numb fingers and achy joints. To recharge them, one needs only to boil them for a few minutes. Then, they are ready to go again! Pop them in your gloves for winter sports without the pain. 4. Waterproof your shoes There will invariably be days when the sidewalks are plowed, it is not snowing, and you would like to wear regular old

Un

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We’ve all felt overwhelmed at some time or another. Whether by classes, work or just life in general, everything has a way of pacing itself in the worst possible way sometimes. Exams come at the same time that you’re supposed to do registration for a student org, your work gives you a double shift when you’ve been trying to spend time with your family. There isn’t anything that you can do when this happens, since you’re generally given these responsibilities and don’t have much choice in the matter. It can be crushing; the sheer amount of things a given student may be expected to do today. One might be juggling demanding classes, multiple jobs, the general bureaucracy of adulthood, and more all while trying to stuff a social life into the mix to get the necessary networking experience. What makes this juggle worse is that each element often demands, or even expects, full attention and devotion of time. Worksites frown on doing homework during company time, an understandable if stressful policy. Yet, this juggle is necessary. From family circumstances to simple sickness, anything can make one fall behind. Lose their place in the juggle and drop what they were doing to devote full time toward a single task. While the immediate effects of this are obvious, the far-reaching implications are more subtle. This doesn’t just add more things to juggle as one tries to regain their place in the fray, but it continues to add more at the rate that was nearly impossible to maintain earlier. Once you fall behind, it just gets harder and harder to keep up, let alone get ahead. The solution to this paradox is, unfortunately, a pyrrhic victory at best. Occasionally, though, any victory is necessary no matter how small. Sometimes you need to let a few things drop. Ask for help, and let others know about your situation. Don’t waste your valuable time on overly daunting tasks, at least at first. Instead do a few smaller tasks, this builds confidence and momentum as it takes things out of the juggle.


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SPORTS

Thursday, October 29

# the By

s r e b m nu Days until the men’s basketball season begins, with a game against the Finlandia Lions.

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Current ranking of the men’s hockey team by uscho.com.

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Days until the women’s basketball season begins, with a game against Michigan State.

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Games have won by the women’s volleyball team this season, the most recent against Ohio Dominican.

Women’s Cross Country took eighth place in last weekend’s GLIAC championship, hosted by Wayne State University.

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Men’s Cross Country took fifth place in last weekend’s GLIAC championship, hosted by Wayne State University.

Michigan Tech Lode

Cross Country GLIAC Championships Davy McLeod Lode Writer On Oct. 24 in Detroit Michigan, Tech’s cross country teams placed well in the GLIAC Championships. The meet, hosted by Wayne State University, saw Tech’s men finish fifth and women place eighth overall. The men were among the top third of the 15 teams in the competition, while women made the upper half of 17 total squads. “I’m really happy with the way everybody ran today,” said Joe Haggenmiller, the coach at Tech. “The guys ran outstanding against a deep field, and the gals performed maybe even above where we thought they might be coming in.” Jason Saliga crossed the eight kilometer course in just a second past 25

minutes, and earned All-GLIAC Second Team for his placement in fifteenth. Out

“The guys ran outstanding against a deep field, and the gals performed maybe even above where we thought they might be coming in.” -Joe Haggenmiller of 145 runners, each of the five scoring Tech runners were in the top 50. Kyle

Hanson owned a time of 25:37, which put him in twenty-eighth place, his best race so far this season. Daniel Byrne came in at 25:52, thirty-eighth place. Eric Parsell was forty-second with a time of 26:02, and Matt Pahl was just behind at 26:09 earning forty-sixth place. Andrea Lee set the pace for the women finishing the six kilometer course in 23:10, making the twenty-fourth spot. Sophia Farquhar was thirty-ninth at 23:32, and Liz Bloch took fifty-sixth with her 24:01 time. Sonja Hedblom (70th, 24:30) and Noelle Savage (79th, 24:48) rounded out the Huskies top five scorers. Carolyn Lucca was just one spot and three seconds shy of Savage. Grand Valley State won both GLIAC Championships—the women for the 15th straight year and the Laker men for the 14th consecutive time. Next up for the Michigan Tech cross country teams is the NCAA Midwest Regional at Evansville, Ind., on Nov. 7.

Soccer snags two weekend wins Utkarsh Mishra Lode Writer Michigan Tech’s women’s soccer team experienced back-to-back victories at the home field, where they defeated Northwood University on Friday and Saginaw Valley State University on Sunday. Both of the contests were quite similar to each other in terms of scoresheet with the final scores of 2-1, but were a bit different in terms of the match timeline. The match on Friday against Northwood almost concluded in the first half, in which Madeline Faust scored the first goal of the match in 19th minute of first half. In reply to Tech’s first goal, Sara Lamphere of Northwood scored the goal on the 20th minute for her team. Lexi Herrewig notched the game-winning goal in the 42nd minute. Jacqueline Mielke slotted a ball through the defense, and Herrewig ran onto it and ripped a shot into the far side netting for her team-leading 11th goal of the season. The second half of the match was scoreless, but there were several chances for Tech to extend their lead including a shot by Haley Crites in the 61st minute that was saved by a NU defender at the goal line. This resulted in the final score of 2-1. Tech took 18 shots in the match whereas Northwood managed just four shots. The foul count was more for Tech than Northwood, where Tech committed

Photo courtesy of MTU Athletics

five fouls in response to just three from their opponent. Tech players were found offsides five times in the match whereas their opponent was found offsides once. The match on Sunday was a thriller in which Saginaw Valley lost while looking for an equalizer in the second half of the match. Tech opened scoring less than seven minutes into the game when Mielke blasted a left-footed shot from 25 yards away over the goalkeeper. It was her ninth goal of the season. The Huskies sustained pressure the entire first half with the wind at their backs. Herrewig added to the lead with a corner kick in the 30th minute. She bent her shot to hit the crossbar and drop into the goal for her team-leading 12th marker of the campaign. In response to Tech’s two goals in first half, Saginaw Valley managed to score

only one goal from a penalty kick in the 71st minute of the game. Michigan Tech created several scoring opportunities in the second half; but none were better than Demario’s shot in the 74th minute from the top of the box that sailed just wide. Michigan Tech had six fouls on the board after the match while their opponent had five. The only offside of the match came from Saginaw Valley. “We played a beautiful first half,” said Tech Coach Michelle Jacob. “We possessed the ball and tackled well. The second half was a battle, but we got the job done.” The match on Sunday was the last match at home for Tech in this season, and the team will wrap up its 2015 regular season schedule at Northern Michigan this Saturday (Oct. 31).


Michigan Tech Lode

SPORTS

Thursday, October 29

Hockey splits weekend wins with Northern Michigan Michael Jarasz Lode Writer

After dropping the series opener in Marquette Friday night, the Michigan Tech Huskies rebounded quickly and came out with speed and poise beating the Wildcats 3-1 at home Saturday night before a sellout crowd. “I thought we got off to a much better start than last night and we played a much better game, we played with more urgency, more compete, we skated better. I wouldn’t say this was a must win game this early in the year, but it was a very important win and a character win for our team,” said Head Coach Mel Pearson. With the Huskies first three conference games of the season happening on the road, they came into Saturday’s matchup with a 1-2 WCHA record. The Huskies came out firing on all cylinders in the first period. Despite having placed 17 shots on the Northern goal, the Wildcats were the first to strike on their fourth shot, when a poor changeover led to Northern’s only goal of the night. “We were happy, we felt we played a better period than any of the three we played on Friday night. We stuck with our game plan, and it worked,” said Tyler Heinonen about the locker room atmosphere following the first frame. The Huskies came back out in the middle period with determination. Coming off of a penalty kill, Mark Auk shot the puck in from the point, where a waiting Heinonen was there to bat the puck past Northern goaltender, Atte Tolvanen, to tie the game up at 1:26. The Huskies continued to work the zone and ended up on back-toback power plays after an excellent scoring opportunity by Max Vallis. The second goal came when Shane Hanna quickly passed the puck up to Vallis, Vallis fired a deep shot in where Joel L’Esperance was waiting to stuff the rebound into the breadbasket at 5:02. Nearly 30 seconds into the second powerplay, a quick pass-back to the point off the faceoff led to Matt Roy ripping a shot toward the goal where Mason Balcklock deflected the shot into the net for his first career goal.

After losing assistant captain Mike Neville to an upper body injury, when he crashed into the net in the first period, the Huskies played the rest of the game with only three centers. “I don’t like those nets that stay in place like that” said Pearson. “He lost an edge and went in hard, it could be something as short as a week or as long as six weeks.” Tolvanen played a very good game in goal for the Wildcats, stopping 43 shots in the night. Northern Michigan coach Walt Kyle commented, “It could have been a lot worse if Tolvanen wouldn’t have been good. We didn’t get enough out of some of our guys. They (MTU) kept us under heavy forecheck pressure tonight and they got a couple of power-play goals.” The Huskies (2-2-0 Overall; 2-20 WCHA) continue WCHA play at home this weekend (Oct. 30-31) when they take on the Ferris State Bulldogs again after splitting the series in Big Rapids two weekends ago. The games will begin at 7:07 p.m. at the John MacInnes Student Ice Arena, Tickets are available online or

“We were happy, we felt we played a better period than any of the three we played on Friday night. We stuck with our game plan, and it worked.” - Tyler Heinonen the SDC Ticket office. If by chance you can’t make the game it can also be heard on Mix 93.1 FM or Pasty. net.

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Sidelines Basketball season approaches The end of October is drawing near, and with it comes the start of our men’s and women’s basketball seasons. The men’s team kicks off their season on Nov. 11 with an exhibition game against the Finlandia Lions. The next week, on Nov. 19, they will kick off their season with a home game, hosting the University of Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs. The Nov. 19 game will be the fourth game of the Bulldog’s season. As for Tech’s women’s team, their first game will be Nov. 8, an exhibition game at Michigan State’s court against the Spartans. This will also be the Spartans first game, setting expectations for both teams high as they battle for their first win of the season.

Tech hockey to play Ferris Tomorrow is the kick-off game in a two-part series for the hockey team as they take on Ferris State at the John MacInnes Student Ice Arena. The Huskies have already played against Ferris, amounting to one win and one loss. The tension in the arena is sure to be high as the Huskies play the Bulldogs. With Mitch’s Misfits and our lively pep band to cheer on the team, we are in good shape to see two fantastic games. Ferris State is just one spot ahead of Michigan Tech in the WCHA rankings, and the results of these two games could easily change that.

Keweenaw Climbing Competition

An intense scramble for the puck in last weekend’s NMU home game. Photo courtesy of MTU Athletics

Saturday, Nov. 14, Michigan Tech hosts another climbing competition. Held in the SDC multi-purpose gym, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., there will be food and prizes given to participants. Registration is $10 before the competition, or $15 at the door. You can email climb@mtu.edu for more information or visit https://goo.gl/ ZRcDv4.


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Thursday, October 29

SPORTS

Michigan Tech Lode

Team of the week: Men’s Hockey Libbi Rogan Lode Writer

Houghton, Michigan is the birthplace of professional hockey. It seems only fitting that the college located in Houghton would have an outstanding hockey team. And the MTU Huskies sure do fit the bill. Hockey season is picking up to full swing, with aggressive opponents such as Minnesota State lurking in the future, who they lost to last season. During their incredible 2014-15 season, our Huskies went 29-2-2. (29 wins, two losses, and two ties). They went almost all the way in the NCAA tournament, but lost in overtime during their final game against St. Cloud State. Spirits are definitely rising high for this season of Huskies hockey. With last year’s season still fresh in our memories, everyone is looking toward the team in hopes of a repeat. So far this year the Huskies have won four out of six games. They started this season strong with back-to-back wins against Laurentian, showing their coordinated skills as a team. Freshman player Brett Boeing scored two goals in the first Laurentian game, with the rest of the team also making impressive achievements. There have been some great statistics in

The Hockey team played aggresively during their last home game against NMU.

Photo courtesy of MTU Athlietcs

their first few games of the season, such as making three out of six power plays during their opening game with opponent Ferris State on Oct. 16. Michigan Tech is currently ranked No. 18 in the USCHO conference, with chances to improve tomorrow as they go head-to-head with Ferris State, for the second time this season. There are many outstanding players on

the team this year, both newcomers and returning players. For example, senior goalie Jamie Phillips has done very well in the first few games. He has a 93.1 save percentage. If he can keep this percentage up, he’ll be in the same boat as many of the best all-time NHL goalies. The top scorers so far are two seniors, Malcolm Gould and Alex Petan, and junior Tyler Heinonen. All three are re-

turning forwards. These and many other players, like top assist players Boeing and sophomore Mark Auk show a lot of potential for the future in the season. Although they have lost two games, the Huskies have put forth tremendous effort, with the ability to bounce forward this season. They have played great games, fallen short only twice and still have a handful of wins and a talented roster to work with this season. The stats show that the team is taking the shots and doing what needs to be done defensively, but sometimes things just don’t work out in their favor. One of the games lost was to NMU, a rival of Tech, during a two-games series. Although they lost one of the games, the Huskies did rack up a win at home against the Wildcats. Sometimes fans can make all the difference and change the entire mood of a game. With Mitch’s Misfits and the lively Pep Band to boost morale, home games show the love and support fans have for their team. Go out and support your Huskies! The Huskies are coached by Mel Pearson and assisted by Joe Shawhan and Gary Shuchuk. This is Pearson’s fifth year with the Huskies. Their next game is tomorrow, Oct. 30, a home game against Ferris State.

No. 3 Ferris Holds Off No. 16 Tech 24-14

Michigan Tech Athletics Press Release

BIG RAPIDS, Mich. — Michigan Tech’s defense held Ferris State 21 points and 180 yards below its season averages, but it wasn’t enough for the 16th-ranked Huskies to get a win at the No. 3 Bulldogs today. The hosts took a 17-14 halftime lead and held on for a 24-14 victory at Top Taggart Field. Tech forced four turnovers, held the football for nearly 34 minutes and stopped FSU on downs twice inside the five-yard line in the fourth quarter to stay in the game. The margin Ferris had—thanks in large part to two big first-half plays—proved too much for the Huskies to overcome against a stout defense on a windy, rainy day. The Bulldogs (7-0, 7-0 GLIAC) scored on a 71-yard punt return three minutes into the game and again on a 70-yard pass play early in the second quarter. Sandwiched in between were a 28-yard FSU field goal and a one-yard touchdown run by Tech’s Alex Sherbinow. Tech (5-2, 5-2 GLIAC), trailing 17-7, forced turnovers on each of Ferris’ next

The Huskies football defense holding back Ferris State on Saturday.

Photo courtesy of MTU Athlietcs

three possessions. The first was an interception by Nick Brajak, setting up the Huskies on the FSU 29. Five plays later, Sherbinow plowed into the endzone again from a yard out to pull his squad within 17-14. The other two turnovers were fumbles—one at midfield and the other at the Tech 38. The Huskies couldn’t convert on either, leaving the margin three at halftime. Tech tried to take a shot at a big play to start the second half, but Brandon

Cowie’s throw was picked off. Ferris marched 57 yards for a 24-14 advantage with 11:14 remaining in the third quarter. Neither team would score again. Tech netted just 59 yards of offense in the second half and punted on five straight possessions. Cowie was knocked out of the game with a late hit on the sideline in the fourth quarter. With backup quarterback Isaiah Hackney banged up on a special teams play, Jake Brown came in and

played the final two series under center. Brown had the Huskies driving in the final two minutes, but had a pass picked off to end the Huskies’ threat. “I thought we played as well as we could play defensively,” said Tech coach Tom Kearly. “When you take away the punt return TD, we held an explosive offense to just 17 points. “We did very little offensively in the second half, and just didn’t play well enough to beat a good football team.” Total offense favored the hosts by a 361-273 margin. Tech limited FSU’s Harlon Hill Award-winning quarterback Jason Vander Laan to 179 yards passing and forced him to turn it over three times. Ben Tauchen had a team-leading 16 tackles plus a forced fumble. Cowie, who entered as the nation’s leader in completion rate (73 percent), went 7-of-19 for 88 yards. He also rushed 17 times for 70 yards. Brown finished 2-of-10 throwing for 41 yards in his first collegiate QB action. Michigan Tech, after playing back-toback games against top-20 ranked teams on the road, will return home for its final regular season home game next Saturday (Oct. 31). The Huskies host Tiffin at 1 p.m. at Sherman Field.


SPORTS

Michigan Tech Lode

Thursday, October 29

15

Volleyball crushes Tiffin and Ohio Dominican Utkarsh Mishra Lode Writer Michigan Tech’s women’s volleyball is in outstanding form. Their performance last weekend was exceptionally well. Tech defeated Tiffin University on Friday at the Gilmore Center and Ohio Dominican University on Saturday in Alumni Hall. Both victories had same final scores of 3-1 and both opponents proved to be tough competitors to Michigan Tech. Tech’s aggressive play and organized teamwork was enough to thrash both of the teams with a good margin. The match on Friday at Tiffin was a tough contest in which Tech defeated Tiffin University with 23-25, 25-15, 26-24, 24-20. Stephanie Dietrich and Lauren Emmert had 13 kills each and Jacqueline Aird made 18 digs. After falling to the Dragons in the opening set, the Huskies got on a roll and won the next three frames to clinch the match. Tech earned a 25-15 second-set victory with a .203 hitting accuracy as a team. The Black and Gold next trailed in the stanza and a kill by Emmert finished it off. Michigan Tech worked overtime en route to a third-set win. Tiffin rallied late to pull even at 24-24, but back- toback kills by Aubrey Ficek gave Tech a 26-24 win. The Huskies secured the match victory in the fourth frame by taking the set 24-20. The match on Saturday turned out to

Mariah Sherman winds up for a kill during last weekend’s Ohio Dominican road game.

be very interesting for the Tech fans. The team defeated Ohio Dominican University with 25-19, 25-19, 18-25, 25-21. In this game Mariah Sherman, Ficek, Emmert and Dietrich had double-digit kills and Jacqueline Aird had 31 digs. The Huskies stormed to back-toback set victories to open the contest, winning both frames by identical 25-19 scores. The Huskies hit .270 and .381 as a team in sets one and two, respec-

tively. Ohio Dominican bounced back, winning the third set, but Michigan Tech closed out the match with a 25-21 win in the fourth stanza. The win boosts Tech’s record to 12-5 away from Houghton, including a 3-2 mark in GLIAC matches. “Our offense was particularly strong today,” said head coach Matt Jennings after the Ohio Dominican game. “Credit to Rachel Pohlod for spreading the ball

Photo courtesy of MTU Athletics

around. Jackie was outstanding again and led our backcourt defense on a day where we struggled to block a strong offensive attack from ODU.” Michigan Tech (17-6 overall; 8-3 GLIAC) is back in Houghton this weekend to open a three-game home stand. Tech plays Ferris State tomorrow (Oct. 30) and Grand Valley this Saturday (Oct. 31) before an anticipated game with Northern Michigan on Nov. 3.

Varsity Events Schedule: October 29th - November 4th Volleyball

Thursday, 29

Friday, 30 Vs. Ferris State, 5:00 p.m. **

Saturday, 31 Sunday, 1 Vs. Grand Valley State, 4:00 p.m.**

Vs. Ferris State, 7:07 p.m. **

Vs. Ferris State, 7:07 p.m. **

Cross Country

Hockey

Soccer

@ Northern Michigan, 12:00 p.m. **

Football

Vs. Tiffin, 1:00 p.m. **

Monday, 2

Home Game

Tuesday, 3 Vs. Northern Michigan, 7:00 p.m. **

** Conference Match

Wednesday, 4


Upcoming

Events October 29 - November 4 Murder Mystery

Thursday, Oct. 29

8 - 10 p.m.

MUB Ballroom A

You will be given a super-secret identity and compete in a live-action game of Clue for some fantastic campus swag. Dust off your magnifying glasses, clean your trench coats, and leave the pipes at home. But remember, nothing is as it seems. Get there fast ‘cause space is limited! Brought to you by Memorial Union Board.

Chris Bathgate Live Recording Show (w/ Misty Lyn)

Friday, Oct. 30

8:30 p.m. Orpheum Theater, Hancock

The Orpheum is thrilled to present Chris Bathgate for a very special LIVE RECORDING show! This recording will be used for an upcoming album from Chris, so be sure to come out and be immortalized on this record! And if that’s not enough, we will be treated to an opening set with Misty Lyn! Tickets are available now directly from Studio Pizza/Orpheum Theater! Advanced tickets are on sale for $12 for adults and $10 for students and seniors ($15 and $12, respectively, on the day of the show). Chris is one of the greatest voices in Michigan Folk Music, sometimes he is thought of as Gothic Folk for his signature dark and spare sound. Music starts around 8:30, doors open around 7:30, or after sound check. See you then!

GSG Halloween Party

Friday Oct. 30 6 - 9 p.m.

GLRC 202

The Graduate Student Government would like to invite all graduate students to come and experience one of the most popular holidays in the US, Halloween! There will be games, dancing, food, and fun! To top it all off, there will be a costume contest, so make sure to come up with a creative outfit!

Hocus Pocus

Saturday, Oct. 31 12 - 1 p.m.

Fisher 135 75004

Come reminisce with us this Halloween season by stopping by to watch Hocus Pocus! After three centuries, three witch sisters are resurrected in Salem Massachusetts on Halloween night, and it is up to two teenagers, a young girl and an immortal cat to put an end to the witches’ reign of terror once and for all. Tickets are $3, and Concessions are $1. Hocus Pocus brought to you by FilmBoard.

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Profile for Michigan Tech Lode

10/29/2015  

The October 29, 2015 issue of the Michigan Tech Lode

10/29/2015  

The October 29, 2015 issue of the Michigan Tech Lode

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