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Debate: Is reading worth the time investment?

April 7, 2015

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Academic calendar changes considered

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Inaugural snoccer tournament held at Tech

Photo by Colton Wesoloski


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NEWS

Tuesday, April 7

The world at a glance

True problem deeper than hunger pangs

RAND SILVERS

SYLVANA FINKBEINER

Editor in Chief

Lode Writer

Kenya Kenya suffered its most lethal terror attack since 1998 on Thursday, when masked gunmen marched onto the campus of Garissa University College and killed 148 people. At least 60 others were wounded. The gunmen targeted Christians, forcing terrified students to recite verses from the Quran as proof of Muslim faith. It took Kenyan police more than eight hours to respond to the situation, due to logistical difficulties. Once specially trained operatives were allowed to move in, the gunmen were killed within half an hour. Their bullet-riddled corpses were paraded in the aftermath. The gunmen were associated with al Qaeda affiliate al-Shabaab, based out of neighboring Somalia. The group has made repeated threats against the Kenyan government after they sent troops into Somalia to help restore order in 2011. Kenyan police say that 312 people were been killed by al-Shabaab attacks in Kenya from 2012-14. Kenya is the largest source of foreign recruits for al-Shabaab, and has a large Somali-Kenyan population. These groups have faced abuse from authorities in the past, including unwarranted imprisonment and harassment. Last year, several people died after a large group of Somali-Kenyans were rounded up and detained in a stadium for several days. There is real concern among security agencies and independent analysts that Kenya is becoming a home for jihadist militants. One of the gunmen was identified posthumously as the son of an important government official, raising fears about the prospect of homegrown terrorists in the country. Authorities, however, claim that this attack was organized by an al-Shabaab leader named Mohammed Mohamud, who has been responsible for a number of crossborder raids including a bus attack that killed 22 people in November. Kenyan security forces have put out a reward for information leading to his capture of over $200,000.

Michigan Tech Lode

Thanks to the work of Tech faculty and students, the voice of more than 250 hungry MTU students have been uncovered. Sasha Teymorian of MTU Graduate Student Government [GSG] presented these students are suffering from food insecurity at the University Senate meeting last Wednesday. Her presentation discussed the results from the two week Food Insecurity survey distributed late January to the Tech students via email. The questionnaire aimed to gather data representing the current situation regarding access Tech students have to food. Over 1,000 students responded. Undergraduate students composed a large portion of the data contributing to 79 percent of the responses. The majority of the data was collected among the first through fourth years with consistent response rates, while only about half as many 5th year and above responses. The results also revealed the main factor

“26 percent of respondents reported that they have skipped meals when hungry due to insufficient funds. Over 90 percent reported they have financial obligations that take priority over purchasing food.” that has been preventing students from eating comfortably: finances. In the survey, 26 percent of respondents reported that they have skipped meals when hungry due to insufficient funds. Over 90 percent reported they have financial obligations that take priority over purchasing food. The Food Insecurities Task Force, which includes representatives from Undergraduate Student Government [USG] and GSG are also examining other monetary data, such as the victim’s financial support from family for food, income, and frequency of skipping meals. As revealed by the survey, the majority of victims turn to the Canterbury House first and then the St. Albert’s Church. “In order to understand what the Food

Graphics courtesy of Michigan Tech

Insecurities Task Force could do next, we wanted to be able to identify what it is about these places that makes feel comfortable going,” said Teymorian. What they discovered is that students like their confidentiality guaranteed when asking for help. “[Students] wanted to keep their anonymity, and did not want to see other students or faculty they knew,” said Teymorian. She also presented that the submissions demonstrated that students felt welcomed by Canterbury House and St. Al’s Church, which were readily accessible. The Canterbury House cooks free meals every Wednesday at 6 PM for anyone who cares to join. The cook reports 60 students per week utilize the free meals offered. Either Sister Allen or Father Ben are usually there offering food and emotional

support. There is a free meal following the fireside chat at 6:15 PM, as well. “Some student who do not have cars find it difficult to visit banks like St. Vincents in Hancock and Western UP Food Bank… which are hurting for healthy food options. Things like peanut butter, bread, tuna, and green beans tend to fly off the shelves,” said Teymorian. The National Association of College and University Food Services [NACUFS], which assesses college dining services and provides their members with resources to upgrade their services and products to students, has recognized hunger among students as a nationally growing problem. Other colleges and universities have also been taking action to reduce food scarcity Continued on page 5


Michigan Tech Lode

NEWS

Tuesday, April 7

Academic calendar changes considered Potential changes focused around student attendance at Career Fair EVAN MAYER Lode Writer Over the past few weeks, Undergraduate Student Government [USG], Career Services, and other organizations on Michigan Technological University’s campus have been asking the student body to complete a survey that deals with making some changes to the academic calendar. The changes proposed in the survey were developed by a committee earlier this year that included Dean of Students Bonnie Gorman, University Senator Charles Wallace, Associate Registrar Mike Johnson, and representatives of the Graduate and Undergraduate Student Governments. Among these possible changes were adding a Reading Day or extra day of study on the Monday of exams week. The main interest ended up being in tweaks that could be made to Career Fair so that every student that wants to attend has the option to. These possible adjustments including moving the Spring Semester Career Fair to earlier in the term, giving students a half day off classes on that day, moving it from it’s traditional Tuesday to Wednesday or Saturday, and making a university policy that would prohibit teachers having exams the day of the event. The reasoning for moving the Career Fair from a Tuesday to Wednesday or Saturday is that Tuesdays are typically when students have labs, which are difficult to make-up if a student misses class for the Career Fair. Wednesdays are days when

lectures are typically held, which are easier to make up outside of class. Stephen Patchin, director of Career Services, said that Saturdays are unrealistic for the Career Fair, because companies travel during the week and have their weekends off so fewer companies would come if the Career Fair were moved. The reasoning for moving the Fair to earlier in the term is because companies typically have a set number of jobs and internships available that they offer to students at all the career fairs they visit. The later a school’s career fair is in the term, the fewer openings a company will still have. Another idea that was voted on was that K-Day would be moved to Saturday and the half-day that is usually used for that event would instead occur on the day of Career Fair. A total of 1,503 undergraduate and graduate students ended up taking the survey. The initial feedback showed some interesting trends. Of the respondents, 77 percent said they went to at least one Career Fair this school year. A slight increase of 87 percent of respondents said they would be more likely to attend if they had no classes after noon. This suggests that roughly 10 percent of students would benefit from having a half-day, because it appears that some students may not have attended the Career Fair this year due to class or having an exam the day of. On the other hand, 40 percent of respondents did not allow classes to prevent them from getting a job or internship, as these students skipped a class to go. This number suggests that

distraction is already happening in the classrooms with students skipping on the day of Career Fairs. The question about potentially have the Monday off of finals week was relatively close as 54.5 percent were in favor of having an extra day of studying. Daniel LaForest, a developer of the survey, presented the results of the survey to the Senate on April 1. The University Senate is moving towards making a policy about no exams on Career Fair day, which will at come into effect at the earliest in the fall of 2016. They are also considering moving the half-day from K- Day to the Career Fair. The potential of having a Reading Day is going to be researched more before it is entertained before the Senate. “We started off rethinking the calendar and ended up with what can we do to get more people the opportunity to get to the Career Fair,” LaForest said. Getting students jobs is one of the main goals of a university though and giving students a better opportunity to get those jobs appears to be the likely outcome of this survey.

“We started off rethinking the calendar and ended up with what can we do to get more people the opportunity to get to the Career Fair.” -Daniel LaForest

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The Spring Series continues STEPH VAN HANDEL Lode Writer Career Services hosted its second Lunch-n-Learn event this past Wednesday and Thursday, April 1 and 2. Julia Way of Career Services hosted the event and this session was entitled “Why Be on LinkedIn.” Way’s discussion highlighted the importance of using LinkedIn for a successful job search, as well as tips on how to create a LinkedIn profile that will stand out to employers and recruiters. A complete and effective LinkedIn profile will allow employers to search for you and will clearly communicate the potential employee’s skills, background and past experiences. Additionally, LinkedIn provides a “Summary” section that allows the job seeker to make a statement that will allow recruiters to see personality from the potential employee. The most important piece of advice to take from Way’s presentation is to clearly identify yourself and what you are looking for in a job. “Do not be afraid to add documents such as schematics, resumes, technical reports, etc. to show employers what you are doing,” said Way. “They [employers] want to see evidence of what you are doing.” As a reminder, Career Services will be hosting their final Lunch-n-Learn on April 15 and 16 from 12:10 to 12:50 PM at the Career Services Center in Administration Building, Room 220. This event will discuss ways to succeed in an internship or co-op. Finally, students may meet with Career Advisors for one-on-one assistance with cover letters, resumes, interview skills, company correspondences, and much more! Students may schedule 30-minute appointments from 10:00 to 12:00 PM on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, or students may attend the walk-in hours, Monday-Thursday, 1 to 6 PM for 15-minute appointments.

Husky Amateur Wargaming EVAN MAYER Lode Writer Miniature wargaming, which first became popular in Prussia in the nineteenth century, is a strategy type game that involves a 4’ by 6’ board with modeled terrain and a variety of miniature figurines that are assigned different point values. Two people then attempt to outfox each other in a simulate battle through

different moves in an attempt to defeat their opponent’s army, kind of like chess. The game, which can involve using different armies from different points in history, has gathered a following at Michigan Technological University by the student organization known as Husky Amateur Wargaming. The club’s initial beginnings occurred when now graduate of Michigan Tech Seth Hanson taught Andrew Harmon the ropes of the game a few years ago. The duo then

looked to find a club at school where they could find others to play at their newfound game. When no such club was found, they both decided that there should be one so they worked to create the organization, which finally took off last year. Wargaming is not exactly designed for those just looking to dabble. When a typical game can go as long as five hours, it’s something of a time commitment. Serious wargamers also have to have the

funds to pay for the hobby as building up an army and getting certain pieces are both key parts that add fun to the game according to Harmon. The club recently organized a tournament among its own members, but it has not yet competed in any other big tournaments. The members are constantly looking for other tournaments and opponents to test their abilities outside of the university though. Continued on page 5


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Tuesday, April 7

Transportation Services food drive SUZANNAH LENZ Lode Writer This spring, Michigan Tech Transportation Services will be hosting a “Drive Away Hunger” food drive to benefit the food pantry of St. Vincent DePaul located across the bridge in Hancock. The food drive kicks off on Monday April 13, 2015 and will be accepting donations through Friday, May 1, 2015. As winter comes to an end, The Resurrection Conference Food Pantry has indicated that their shelves are becoming bare and are in need of restocking. While donations of any and all types of nonperishables food items will be accepted during the food drive, the food pantry is in great need for some certain items. The pantry is in particular need of canned soup, chili, and bean, canned vegetables, tuna, and other canned meats, cereals, peanut butter, and granola bars. Both the food pantry of St. Vincent DePaul and Transportation Service ask that no food items with glass containers be donated. Students, staff, and community members interested in donating nonperishable food items need only to visit Michigan Tech Transportation Services, located in room 100 of the Administration building, to drop off their donations. All donations must be made during regular business hours, Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. If you have any questions about the “Drive Away Hunger” food drive, feel free to contact Transportation Services at 906-4871441. For every donation made to the “Drive Away Hunger” food drive, the student, staff member or faculty member making the donation will receive a chance to win a variety of prizes. Transportation Services will be giving away numerous parking passes for the upcoming year, as well as prizes for those non-driving and non-parking donors, such as a round of golf and other Michigan Tech items. Michigan Tech Transportation Services is very excited that the food collected during their spring food drive will stay within the Houghton-Hancock community and will be used to “help feed a hungry neighbor”. They ask that we all take the time to look through our cupboards and donate what we can. Their goal is to help ensure that no one in the community goes hungry.

Provost Michigan Tech Lode NEWS SO YOU THINK YOU CAN

BRUCE SEELY

RAND SILVERS Editor in Chief

With Dr. Max Seel returning to the classroom, Michigan Tech has launched its search for a new Provost. The Provost is the chief academic officer of the university, responsible for strategic plans to develop Tech’s academic programs in the classroom and the laboratory. While the ultimate decision will be made by the selection committee, students, faculty and staff and invited to attend weekly open forums for each of the semi-finalist candidates and provide their feedback online at mtu.edu/ provostsearch. In case you miss the forums, the Lode will be writing review of each candidate the week of their forum.

“This kind of change has been done, and it can happen. We have a quality group of people who are more prepared than any in history to see it happen.” -Bruce Seely Dr. Bruce Seely is a historian of technology by education, and there is a certain dry, dusty air as he begins his presentation. The meager audience, a handful of graduate students and half as many reporters, seems more appropriately sized for one of the numerous photos in the presentation of Tech’s campus in its young years, before the massive expansion of the ‘50s and ‘60s. But Seely, it soon becomes clear, is not as stereotypically bookish as a first appearance might suggest. While the 16 pages of publications and proceedings listed in his curriculum vita showcase his academic abilities, it takes hearing him in person to understand the vision that experience has given him. Rather than being stuck in the past, Seely takes the lessons learned from the past and applies them to a very future-oriented set of priorities. Chief among Seely’s concerns is supporting a new generation of faculty here at the university. “At a time when few other universities were hiring, we were,” said Seely. “Close to two-thirds of the faculty in the College of Science and Arts are new in the last seven to nine years. They need support be successful.” In his slides, Seely describes good faculty as the foundation of the university, and his

role as Provost as to facilitate the efforts of faculty who want to build strong units. Seely also emphasized his strong commitment to the University Strategic Plan, which calls for a massive expansion in the number of grad students at Tech and an increasing focus on research. Rough estimates put together by current Provost Dr. Max Seel indicate that achieving the goals laid out over the next 20 years will require about $1.8 million in additional funding each year, and attracting 75 additional grad students to the university each year. One area of concern Seely addressed in his presentation is a demographic shift that Tech is facing. Over the next ten years, the population of graduating high-schoolers in the upper Midwest, Tech’s main draw for recruitment, is projected to decline significantly. Seely believes that the best way for Tech to compete for a larger proportion of this shrinking pool of students is by building on its strengths as a residential campus. In surveys, Alumni Relations has found that Tech alum look at the winters, the rural environment and the distance from downstate as some of their fondest memories of the campus. On the other hand, when Admissions asks accepted students who chose not to attend why they did so, they cite these same factors. In his discussion of these challenges and opportunities, Seely consistently referred back to past Presidents and other figures in Tech’s history, noting the parallelism in the expansion of the University from a mining school into a engineering college, from an engineering college into a technical university, and now from a technical university into a research university. “This kind of change has been done, and it can happen,” said Seely. “We have a quality group of people who are more prepared than any in history to see it happen.” At the open forum, Seely cut his presentation short to have extra time for a question and answer session with the assembled students, which was largely focused on the difficulty of graduate students and even faculty in finding funding to support their research. Seely pointed to his experience at the National Science Foundation, where he was responsible for making decisions regarding which proposals received grants. Seely also emphasized the importance of preparing graduate students with skills necessary for the working world, as many will not find work in academia. Even those who do find positions in laboratories need to build grant-writing and team management

Photo courtesy of Michigan Tech

Fast Facts

Current position:

Dean, College of Sciences and Arts, Michigan Tech

Educational background: Ph.D in History of Technology, University of Delaware

At Tech since: 1986 Notable quote:

“Technology is not the automatic answer for every problem in education. We need to have a goal that is fundamentally educational, rather than training.” skills, as simply being able to carry about research isn’t enough anymore. In broad terms, Seely emphasized the importance of building the residential campus environment, and maintaining the quality of undergraduate education while building the graduate and research infrastructure. “Often, undergraduate students are the most enthusiastic people in our labs,” said Seely. “They’re exposed to new academic opportunities, and they bring that enthusiasm back into the classroom, which then encourages more of their classmates to get involved in research. Its a cycle that helps everyone.” Seely concluded by identifying his top priorities as the need for investment to build the graduate school and continuing efforts to increase gender and racial diversity among the student body.


NEWS

Michigan Tech Lode

Tuesday, April 7

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Library book sale for students JON JAEHNIG Lode Writer The J. Robert Van Pelt and John and Ruanne Opie library is a daily destination for most Michigan Tech students, especially commuter students who use the computers, printers, study rooms, and other amenities. Many of these tools, including the cameras, recorders, laptops and calculators available for checkout at the front desk are funded by a group called “The Friends of the Van Pelt Library.” The Friends have also have been involved on campus in other ways, including giving

students snacks and drinks during Winter Carnival. While the group has regular meetings for important decisions “most of the time we’re just fundraising,” said Chairman Amy Hughes. “Everyone knows us from the book sale.” The group also collects the art on the walls in the library, and recently funded $4,000 to an Archive internship programme. “A good percentage of our budget is from book revenues, and we do get donations too, from alumni and friends”, Eloise Haller, a board member, explained. The Friends of the Library is a fairly diverse group, which, according to Hughes, “consists of community members, as well

as faculty and staff ”, and, as the Friends Secretary Mary Marchaterre pointed out, “Student representatives as well. We have USG and GSG representatives.” As students may or may not be aware, “gently used” books can be purchased year round from the shelf by the checkout desk on the first floor of the library, which is also a good place to find publications by the Friends. Many more books will be available from the special book sale in the Memorial Union Building ballroom. The sale will be open to the public Wednesday from 10 AM to 4 PM in the Memorial Union Ballroom with a special bag sale during the last hour. “A lot of times you might luck out in

finding a really recent textbook, and there’s a $100 textbook for $2 but you have to hunt, pick and be fast,” said Hughes. While friends have special access to the sale this evening from 5PM to 7PM, students wishing to gain access to the sale can become members at the door by paying a $15 dollar membership fee, which will also give them access to other perks of membership, including the organisation’s newsletter. Anyone interested in becoming a Friend of the Van Pelt Library, or learning more about the group can find information from their bookcase in the Library Lobby, or go to their quicklink on the library website mtu.edu/library.

True problem deeper than hunger pangs Continued from page 2

on their campus. The Michigan State Food Bank has been in place since 1993 to provide students who do not have meal plans with free healthy food. Central Michigan University has a student organization dedicated to maintaining a garden of fresh vegetables for the community. The support continues with nearly all Michigan Colleges providing outside help. As for local response, The Task Force plans to do weekly Lode articles that says where a person can go for help at which

times, updated contacts for ride offers, and articles expressing easy recipe ideas for low costs. “We are working with dining services in order to find the best way to provide free meal passes and swipes while maintaining confidentiality...and have been telling people to donate to local food banks…. We are exploring the option of a campus food pantry but there are many things that come into this outside of just a location on campus,” said Teymorian. As for the future, the Task Force will

continue to meet and discuss these options and hopes to implement solutions soon. In the meantime, They encourage those suffering to take advantage of institutions around campus for food and rides to local food banks.

Husky Amateur Wargaming Continued from page 3

The organization has set up a booth at K-Day and some other events to try and both recruit new members and teach others about their hobbies, but due to the club’s uniqueness growth has been slow. The group currently sits at ten dedicated members. The organization holds their meetings every Saturday starting at noon in Fisher 129 and go for as long as they feel like

playing. “If a person is interested this is the best time to find out what the organization is all about, because it offers an opportunity to either watch a game or borrow one of the current member’s armies and try it out for themselves,” said Harmon. If coordinating a battle, like Robert E. Lee or George Patton, sounds like a skill set that you either possess or would like

Michigan Tech Lode

to develop, the Husky Amateur Wa r g a m i n g organization can introduce you to the game that can help you achieve that dream and have some fun achieving it.

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PULSE

Tuesday, April 7

A voice for the voiceless JANE KIRBY Pulse Editor A large fire can burn down an entire forest, but within a few weeks, life reemerges. When children are victims of abuse, their lives are burned, their views of the world are distorted, and their trust is shattered. The narrative doesn’t have to stop there: Beth Jukuri says that healing can come not only through traditional therapy, but through art. Jukuri is a U.P. native currently residing in Chassel. She has been making quilts since the late 1990s, but in 2004, she realized something that would change her life forever: she had been abused as a child by her father. Finding these lost experiences broke her. Instead of foregoing everything she enjoyed, Jukuri began using quilting as an outlet for her emotions. Those quilts became evidence of the “growth of [her] inner self-esteem through fabric.” She wanted to be the “voice for the voiceless,” empowering others who feel powerless. Women in New Directions, or WiND, a social group organized by Jukuri, gathers adult women twice a month to do something creative. This Thursday, April 9th, she is hosting an event for women on campus. Come to MUB Ballroom B from 6 to 7:30 pm to make a weathergram, free of charge. These crafts have a verse written on them about a sudden personal insight and then are hung outside throughout an entire season so they can “weather.” The members of the Women’s Programming Committee planned the evening. Beth Jukuri encourages people to take up art because it “allows you to own your individuality” instead of running away from it. Her website, w w w. i mp e r fe c tl a d y. t y p e p a d . co m , contains pictures of some of her quilts and links to helpful websites for the abused.

Michigan Tech Lode

Diving into April with mindfulness JANE KIRBY Pulse Editor The last few weeks of the school year are upon us here at Michigan Tech, and with them comes the inevitable tornado of stress due to final projects, final exams, final grades, and for some, graduation and finding a job to achieve financial stability. Attending a reputable university like Michigan Tech that is home to some of the brightest and most capable students in the country means more than being highly regarded when being considered for internships, co-ops and full time employment. It also means that this is a school of students who put their noses to the grind to get things done, and sometimes forget to breathe. Because the academics are known to be rigorous and challenging, great deals of stress often result among students, especially when the semesters draw to a close with finals and future plans looming on the horizon. Looking to change the way students are living with stress in their lives, the Health and Wellness Program is taking initiative and spreading the word about what it means to be mindful in these situations. By offering a series of events throughout April for students, Health and Wellness is looking to be proactive and make sure that students have the opportunity to learn about mindfulness before the stress of finals and graduation sets in for good. Whitney Boroski, Michigan Tech’s Health and Wellness Coordinator, explains her definition of mindfulness as “being aware of what’s around you and what you’re feeling, and knowing how to deal with it.” Specifically, Boroski is striving to make sure that Michigan Tech students know how to recognize stress, what stress is doing to them, how to cope with stress, and ultimately lead a balanced life. Everyone has a different strategy when it comes to dealing with stress. Some may choose to sweat it out at the gym or on the trails while others prefer to sit down and relax or even do yoga or another form of meditation. Health and Wellness is aware that everyone deals with it differently, which is why they are hosting a variety of events before finals week that are free for students. All community fitness programs will be free during the week of April 20 for those who have one of 300 “Stress Free Finals Week” flyers. Flyers will be distributed during the week of the 13th at locations including the Student Activities Office in the MUB, at the Outdoor Recreation and Wellness Center, at the Wellness table during Spring Fling, and

Poster courtesy of Michigan Tech Wellness

via Resident Assistants in the residence halls. This is a first come, first serve basis, so visit one of these locations to get your flyer next week! If sweating the stress out isn’t your thing, Health and Wellness is also offering Dog Therapy tomorrow in the Outdoor Recreation and Wellness Center, as well as every day during the week of April 20th from 2 to 4PM. Leave your stress at the library for a little bit and spend some time petting with or playing tug of war with a furry friend. On Thursday, April 23rd at 7PM in the Wads Annex, Wellness will be hosting a meditation session complete with yoga and essential oils. Finally, every week in April there will be 20 minute meditation practice

sessions available for those who would like to “unplug,” and give their eyes and brains a break from the computer and phone screens and instead put their minds at ease with mindfulness. The next session will be on Thursday, April 9th in MUB Ballroom B1 from 12-12:20 and another one from 12:40 to 1. As Boroski says, “stress is a part of life. Here at Wellness we want to teach students to be mindful, and how to cope with life things.” For more information on what it means to be mindful and how to deal with stress during the waning weeks of the semester, keep an eye out for Wellness flyers around campus or feel free to stop by the Outdoor Recreation and Wellness Center.


PULSE

Michigan Tech Lode

Tuesday, April 7

7

SIS 11th Annual Bra Show ALEXANDRIA VAN DUZER Lode Writer

This past Saturday, April 4th, was the Society of Intellectual Sister’s 11th Annual Bra Show. The show is put on every year to raise awareness for breast cancer. The show is given a theme, this year’s was Rave, and students and organizations around campus are invited to participate in decorating bras that fit the theme. Then, at the show, the bras are worn by male volunteers who take the bras for a spin down the catwalk. Talking with the President of SIS, Anza Mitchell, she explained that the purpose of the bra show was to provide, “A party

with a purpose.” She says that “It originally started with SIS and SAAM (Society for African American Men) getting together and it just evolved. We start out with an educational portion, which can get pretty heavy, and lighten it up afterwards with the bra show.” Even the models get into it. Ryan Van Landschoot mentioned that “It’s a lot of fun. The message is awesome, it’s a good fundraiser, and the girls get a kick out of it.” SIS raises money from the show through donations at the door and through the designed bras, which are displayed, and attendees can put money towards their favorite one. In the previous year SIS was able to donate $2000 dollars to the

“It’s a lot of fun. The message is awesome, it’s a good fundraiser, and the girls get a kick out of it.” -Ryan Van Landschoot

“[The purpose of the bra show was to provide] A party with a purpose.” -Anza Mitchell National Breast Cancer Foundation. The event takes a long time to plan, almost a year. The room has to be reserved, a guest speaker has to be contacted, a theme constructed, advertisements needs be designed, and a whole list of other things. A big part is getting designers to design bras. This semester there were three different workshops available. Talking with some of the designers after the show they exclaimed that, “There was definitely a lot of glitter involved. We wanted to participate because it’s for a good cause, it’s a no judgement zone, and you get a good laugh out of it.” During the show the MCs Neil Johnson and Roger Guillory kept the audience’s spirits up. After sitting down

Summery coconut chicken and mango salsa recipe JANE KIRBY Pulse Editor Spring has been slowly but surely creeping its way out of the melting snow banks that are turning to sand here in Houghton. Some may be getting stir crazy, dreaming of days spent on a beach by the lake or hiking new terrain in the area as the temperatures stay hovering around freezing outside in this sunny yet cold tease of springtime. To beat the antsy feelings of wanting to go for a run in the sun but not digging the cold and wind, I decided to alleviate the anxiousness with a summery dinner. Personally, the season of chili, heavy meals and comfort food was great, but I’m ready for fresh fruit and vegetables from the farmer’s market and burgers and brats sizzling on the grill outside. I found a recipe for coconut breaded chicken with homemade mango salsa on Pinterest, and thought that it sounded perfect in every way. Luckily, chicken was relatively inexpensive, as were ripe mangoes and a majority of the rest of the ingredients. The chicken is breaded in a coconut, flour, seasoned breading, then sauteed to perfection in a bit of oil for a perfectly moist, sweet result that is only glorified by the salsa.

Cutting the mango was a bit of a challenge, but with the help of YouTube I was able to conquer it with no problem. After cubing the mangoes, half a red onion was added, as well as some lime juice, salt, cilantro, and a diced jalapeño. Simple, fresh ingredients tasted like summer to me. Adding some asparagus and rice and red beans to the mix, and it made the perfect dinner for someone who feels like Mother Nature is being a real tease. Even though it’s slow going, the temperatures will rise, the sun will keep shining, the sand will be washed away in the rain, and the summer vibes will be upon us soon. Get in the mood with some coconut chicken and mango salsa and it will be all good. For the full recipe, visit Lovely Little Kitchen’s blog at http://lovelylittlekitchen.com/coconut-crustedchicken-mango-salsa/.

“To beat the antsy feelings of wanting to go for a run in the sun but not digging the cold and wind, I decided to alleviate the anxiousness with a summery dinner.”

and getting refreshments a short clip was played called “Her Shining Light”, about Jill, a women who battled breast cancer, and how she stayed positive and true to herself. The message was that every women should feel beautiful no matter her scars. Then we heard from the guest speaker, Cassandra Bryant. She provided a powerful message, that “breast cancer doesn’t have to be the end for you. Take it one day at a time and keep living your life.” SIS’s bra show is full of educational moments, but doesn’t bog the audience down with relentless fact and figures or sad stories. The event is a good way to raise awareness, donate to charity, and have a good time.


8

COMICS

Tuesday, April 7 Airplane Message

Michigan Tech Lode Toot

Comic courtesy of XKCD

‘PHARAOH IRY-HOR, FROM THE 3100s BC, IS THE FIRST HUMAN WHOSE NAME WE KNOW.’ Comic courtesy of XKCD

‘This is also one of only five identified situations in which a vuvuzela is actually appropriate.’

CLASSIFIEDS

Rose

HOUGHTON VERY NICE 2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS, 17867 CANAL ROAD & 501 W HOUGHTON AVE. SPACIOUS ROOMS, CARPET, CANAL VIEW, APPLIANCES, ON-SITE PARKING. NO PETS. NONSMOKING. $600 - $675 MO. CALL: (906) 482-1437 ‘Now you will never know.’

CLOSEST APARTMENTS TO CAMPUS!

Comic courtesy of A Softer World

Cadbury Eggs

BLANCHE APARTMENTS. Located directly across from MTU Library. 4 bedroom, 2 bath for 4 students for 2015-2016 school year. Leave message with info for callback. View at houghton4rent.com Call: 906-482-7744 Comic courtesy of XKCD

MINI FRIDGE FOR SALE. Wishing that you had purchased a fridge before coming to college? Now is your chance to purchase a fully functional fridge for only $50. Please contact The Michigan Tech Lode at lodesubmit@mtu.edu or by calling 906-487-2404. E-mail lodeads@mtu.edu for information about placing a classified ad.

‘When they moved production from New Zealand to the UK and switched from the runny white centers to the thick, frosting-like filling, it got way harder to cook them scrambled.’

Morse Code

Comic courtesy of XKCD

‘Oh, because Facebook has worked out SO WELL for everyone.’


PUZZLES

Michigan Tech Lode Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

5 1

2 5

9

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6 9

2 7

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Last Solution... PuzzleWeek’s 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

6 8

7 2

8

Crossword Last week’s solution

4

5 6

Rules: Fill in the grid so that each row, column and 3x3 block contains 1-9 exactly once.

5

7

3

Sudoku

1

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9

Tuesday, April 7

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Mon Apr 6 02:06:05 2015 GMT. Enjoy!

No. 0405 THE CAPTAIN GOES DOWN WITH THE SHIP BY TOM MCCOY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

AC ROSS

1 White’s partner 6 Religious journey 9 Queen’s attendant 12 Treasonous groups

46 When repeated, classic song with the lyric “Sayin’ we gotta go, yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah” 47 Bully, at times

18 Home of Faa’a International Airport

49 Begin’s opposite? 51 Word of regret

19 Kindle, e.g.

55 One who aims to hit singles? 57 Quarters of a Quarter Pounder 58 Walk quietly 59 Keepers of appointments, for short 61 Deficit, informally

21 Union union 22 Asian wild ass 23 1/100 of a peseta 24 With formal properness 25 Some Halloween decorations 26 Kit ____ bar 28 “Leave!”

53 “So what?”

62 Went (for) 63 Scoundrel 65 Baseball V.I.P.s

29 Book that needs to be 67 Gist read word for word? 68 Crucial 30 Picking up strength, 69 Ayatollah’s speech for short? 71 Afflicts 31 Sony video recorder 73 Hist. or Eng. 33 Relatively recent 35 Postal abbr.

RELEASE DATE: 4/12/2015

36 101, say 37 Corporate department

75 Flee 78 Ne’er-do-wells 79 In good ____ 81 Twilight, poetically 84 It could go either way

95 Explorer Meriwether 8 With 18-Down, structure that gets ____ less stable with time 96 ____-breath 97 Japanese 94-Across 100 Claymation dog 102 Helpful household pets 104 Cut (off) 105 Appraises 108 Some 99-Down 110 ____ Period (part of Japanese history) 111 ____ regni 112 Go by 113 Lightly pound 115 Coming or going, say

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

94 See 97-Across

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31 Flora and fauna 32 Deceives

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34 Dampens

120 Yellow-and-white flowers

37 Affix carelessly

121 Prefix with system

40 Cooperated with

122 Letters in the Greek spelling of “Parthenon”

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44 Game center?

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9 Deuce preceder, maybe

1

102 108

103

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111 115

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123

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64 Words before a date

77 Classic roadsters

95 Schlemiels

66 Is out

78 “One … two … three …,” in a gym

98 Louse’s place, in

69 Point of sharpest vision

80 On the left, for short

106 “A Clockwork Orange” protagonist

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107 Unbelievable, say

a Louse”

109 Talking during a movie, e.g.

70 Golden ____

82 Get together

72 Cut (off)

83 Many a fed. holiday

74 Told

85 British Invasion band

75 Metaphorical example from poetry

87 Kind of ceiling

102 Fearsome birds

91 Much-vilified food

103 Welcome, perhaps

76 As well as

93 Some fingerprints

105 Ixnay

99 See 108-Across 101 Watch over

111 ____ League 114 Michigan rival, for short 116 Post-Civil War Reconstruction, e.g.

E T Y P E S L E E T S W E E K D A Y S


Tuesday, April 7

OPINION

Pro: KASSIA PRYSTALSKI

?

ROUND 1

Lode Writer

Most people think of fiction or reading for fun as important for children, but we grow older, we take on more responsibilities and we tend to put reading aside as something foolish. I think that dismissing the importance of fiction is foolish. Although they’re entertaining, stories are also a really eloquent and nonthreatening way to express ideologies. Fiction allows us to take a step back from the reality of our day-to-day lives and explore ideas without the consequences that would come with them in the real world. It’s a safe way to look at things from someone else’s point of view. It’s hard to get past differences in world views in the real world without the help of fiction to really put you in the headspace of others while also to allowing you the chance to put it down.

There’s a reason reading becomes less popular in adults: time. Movies offer the same escape from reality that books do, but are much less time consuming. For example, the average human reads at about 250 words per minute, meaning the Harry Potter series would take about 4,334 minutes [or over 72 hours] to read. Compare that to the time it takes to watch the film series, which have a combined runtime of 1,178 minutes [about 19 hours]. Sure reading speed can be improved with practice, but studies show that the ultimate limiting factor in reading speed is actually the movement of the eyes from word to word, meaning there’s only so much that can be improved. There are tools out there such as Spritz to improve reading speed, but when it comes down to it reading will still require a massive amount of free time to actually finish any book, and similar entertainment value can come from movies.

ROUND 3

Michigan Tech Lode

Is reading worth the time investment?

ROUND 2

Debate:

10

Reading allows you to practice and increase focus and concentration. In our lives, being able to multi-task is important and nearly never-ending, but it isn’t everything. Watching video games or movies with friends is a great way to relax, but it’s not a focused thing. You’re watching, you’re talking, you’re eating… you’re not entirely focused on the movie itself. All of those are nice things, but getting immersed in a book lets you shut out the rest of the world, take your time, and focus on something. The ability to focus helps improve memory function, gain control of your thoughts, and many other things that are useful everyday skills. In a movie, there isn’t as much freedom to pause and contemplate things as there is with books.

Con: JOESPH PIETRZYK Lode Writer

Fiction can be a nice temporary escape from reality for adults, but this step back from the real world is both not essential and not only found in books. There are tons of more accessible ways to take a break from real life, such as video games, music, movies, or even online videos. All of these are becoming increasingly popular; you can find them anywhere, and their overall quality is improving over time. These sources of entertainment are also frequently used as a medium to express ideas and point of view, and they also have more tools to portray these ideas as they’re not limited to only using words. If anything, the sound and visuals leaves less up to imagination and provides more insight on the author’s original meaning.

Certainly movies and television are able to tell a story in a great amount of detail in a much smaller amount of time, and while they’re getting better over time, they are still much less immersive. While these forms of entertainment can describe a story very specifically, they can’t do as good of a job of putting yourself in the shoes of protagonist. In a movie, you’re always watching what’s happening to other people, not living through them yourself. It’s hard to portray the inner monologue of a character in these mediums. The only way to try to understand what life is like for that person is to be very empathetic from the get-go, or to be similar enough to the character that it’s not really broadening your horizons at all.

Books may offer complete immersion of the mind, but movies can also be incredibly immersive. Between 3D and surround sound, the proper setup can provide an experience quite unlike any other. This helps to develop beneficial qualities other than focus. Emotions are intensified when seeing a picture versus just imagining it. Facial expressions are more easily recognized and we learn more quickly what information is being conveyed. Watching a screen takes less energy, and free time is meant to be relaxing. Sometimes reading a book only makes a headache worse. Reading isn’t the right choice for everyone, and that’s okay.


Michigan Tech Lode

OPINION

The world of dreams

KENDALL BELOPAVLOVICH Lode Writer

easier. Reoccurring dreams are often a measure of personal growth. While the dreams have a common theme, they tend to change over time when closely examined. It may be small details but as the dream progresses and you notice things shifting, it is a sign that your personal growth and experience is also shifting. Rather than repressing your dreams, it is helpful to contemplate them. When you wake up feeling sad, confused or even angry from a particular dream, it could mean something on a deeper level. Your subconscious is trying to tell you that something in your life needs your attention. Even general curiosity about the things you see in your dreams can lead to a greater understanding of yourself. Just as taking care of your physical health is important, so too is your mental and emotional health. The next time you dream about something upsetting or confusing, look into it. You may find that there is more to the dream than what you see, because dreams convey how you think, and feel.

Musicals find a home on the stage of the ages ANDREA SPENCER Lode Writer In response to Tech’s premiere of The Producers this Thursday, the topic of this article is musicals. People have been known to sing and dance out tales since about the third century, but who’s saying that people didn’t indulge in them earlier? There is no concrete answer to when the first musical appeared, because this type of communication is so natural to humans. Watching a play evokes empathy within the audience, and when we watch a happy performance, we feel happy. Feeling empathy is good for many reasons, including the fact that a lack of empathy characterises psychopaths. Greek and Roman culture preserved the musical, and while doing so, they also created other common forms of stage performances. Before sound systems, the Romans attached metal chips called sabilla to the bottom of their shoes to make their dances more audible. The performances are traditionally classified into two groups- tragedy and

comedy. Tragic plays are characterized by serious and irreversible conflicts, commonly a death. Comedies, on the other hand, are characterized by disorder, sexual humor, and a general sense of playfulness. A third category, tragicomedy, is often used when a serious play ends happily. By the 1700’s, opera’s were the dominant form of musical performance. The operetta evolved as a sub-category, which included lighter material and a shorter performance. From this sub-category came what some consider to be the first English musical by modern standards. Making it’s debut in 1866 in New York, The Black Crook is a tale of how evil Count Wolfenstein makes a deal with a master of black magic to snare the beautiful Amina’s fiance and steal her away for himself. Fortunately, the Fairy Queen of the Golden Realm helps out to save the day. Overall, the musical was an astounding five and a half hours long and and ran 474 shows. Modern musicals are now evolving even further and making the move from stage to screen. Titles such as Into The Woods, The Last Five Years, Les Miserables and Rio have all been hits. Little known to

some is the age of these musicals, ranging from 1985 to 2001, with Into the Woods and Les Miserables being the oldest. New visual and sound effects can now offer the audience a very realistic experience, even in three dimensions. The well-beloved stage performances of the musical will stay around for many years to come but the horizons are opening for the future of musicals. Stage props are becoming more and more advanced, including mechanical puppets and remote-controlled scenery. Some say that too much technology will distract the audience, but it seems to only add to the enchantment. Rather than decline due to competing entertainment markets, musicals are being produced at an increasing rate. From 2000 to 2004, 26 musicals were written or first performed each year and from 2005-2009, the average jumped to 43 musicals per year. Already in 2015, four musicals have made their debut. Rather in-style is the classic musical, and there is an endless wealth of them to view. They will forever be in our culture and I highly recommend taking the time to see one more often.

Un

11

Jane Kirby

LODE

ing

ZONE

Dreams have often been a significant part of life in many cultures. From early Egyptian society, to the glory days of the Greek, dreams have held importance in many different ways. Dreams could offer guidance and give advice, as they were seen as messages from the Divine. Many rituals were conducted to interpret and receive dreams, such as the Egyptian ‘dream bed’, and the Greek’s shrined oracle. Since these ancient times, people’s perceptions of what dreams mean and what role they play in life have shifted and changed. Today, there are scientific theories that seek to explain the reasons of how dreams are generated. Through all of these ideas and studies, it’s easy to become confused or scared about what you experience in the dream world. If you’ve ever dreamed of snakes and woke up to wonder why, a little research goes a long way. Snakes have often

been a sacred symbol involved in many cultures, with different interpretations in each. According to the Hindu, snakes are a symbol of fertility, whereas the Greek god of healing, Asclepius, carried a rod that was entwined with a snake. Today, many people fear and despise snakes, seeing them as evil and dangerous. While dreaming of a snake may be a sign of good things to come, you must also take into account your own feelings about them. For example, if you are fearful of snakes and find one in your dreams, it may have a negative message. You could be stressed or angry about a particular thing, which translates to the snake invading your dreams. If you tame or destroy the snake, it could mean that you are able to overcome the stress or problem you are facing. While some dreams may make absolutely no sense, it’s important to listen what your subconscious is trying to tell you. When you are in tune with your thoughts and feelings, as opposed to ignoring them, decoding your dreams becomes much

Tuesday, April 7

Everyone has a favorite animal. From giraffes to otters, bald eagles and more, there are so many creatures out there for us to admire and love, even if we’ve never seen one before. One of my all time favorite animals is the manatee. Manatees are the cows of the sea, slowly meandering around the Gulf of Mexico and beyond, chomping on a variety of over 60 plants found in both freshwater and salt water. Weighing up to a ton, they are known to be solitary creatures who swim an average speed of four miles per hour. When they feel like it, or need to escape danger, they have been known to have bursts of speed up to 20 miles per hour. Personally, I find manatees adorable and goofy. They remind me a lot of Eeyore from Winnie the Pooh, sort of dopey and slow moving, yet they have a special charm about them. When I went to Florida this past January for a few days with my mom, we were lucky enough to see a mother manatee with her calf in a local marina on Sanibel Island. Both of us were so ecstatic, our boat guide even laughed at us as we squealed and took pictures of their noses poking out of the water to get some air. That was definitely a highlight of the trip, aside from seeing a shark right off the shore, but that’s another story. Moral of the story is that everyone has a favorite animal or two. I like manatees for their dopiness and laid back nature. Plus, seeing one with her baby in Florida was something I’ll never forget, so manatees will always have a place in my heart. If you’re looking for something to brighten your Tuesday, I suggest looking up funny manatee videos on YouTube and you’ll fall in love with them as well.


12

SPORTS

Tuesday, April 7

# the By

s r e b m nu

10-11.75

The new school pole vault mark set by Erika Poli at the UWWhitewater Rex Foster Invitational

2

Times Mel Pearson has been named Coach of the Year in his four years at Michigan Tech

1

Place earned by the men’s track team at the St. Norbert Invitational

0.7

4

Tech runners in the top five of the men’s 3000 meter race at the St. Norbert Invitational

20

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Jamie Dompier

ELLIE FURMANSKI Sports Editor The Michigan Tech Track and Field teams were at it again last weekend, competing in back-to-back meets in Wisconsin. On Thursday, April 2, the team was in De Pere, Wis., at the St. Norbert Invitational, and Friday the teams competed in Whitewater, Wis., at the Rex Foster Invitational at UWWhitewater. After six school records fell the previous weekend at the Viking Olympics, Jamie Dompier set the seventh school record of the 2015 outdoor track

Straight weeks Tech Hockey was in the top-11 of the USCHO polls

season on Thursday at the St. Norbert Invitational. She actually reset her own mark in the 200 meter dash with a time of 25.65. Dompier placed first in the event, running 0.7 seconds faster than the second place finisher. At the same meet, she also ran to a fourth place finish in the 100 meter dash with a time of 12.72. At the Rex Foster Invitational on Friday, the sophomore continued her strong performance with a second place finish in the 200. She notched the old mark with a finish time of 25.78. Michigan Tech Track and Field will have athletes competing this weekend at both the St. Benedict/St. John’s Invitational in Collegeville, Minn., and the UWPlatteville Invitational in Platteville, Wis.

Photo courtesy of Michigan Tech Athletics

Physical education courses still available JOHN REYNOLDS Lode Writer

Seconds by which Jamie Dompier beat her own school record in the 200 meter dash with a time of 25.65

Michigan Tech Lode

Michigan Tech offers a wide variety of physical education opportunities for students to register for, and the benefits of these courses are both short term and long term. With registration upon us and availability dwindling every day, now is the time to maximize your chances of getting into the PE course you have been looking for.

“Availability and interest go hand in hand when picking a course.” -Craig Pellizzaro Tech offers courses for the student looking to get into better shape and courses for the casual athlete looking to improve their game or just enjoy an activity. Intermediate weight training has spots open for people who want to learn the finer techniques of lifting weights. Beginning

bowling at The Mine Shaft is offered to expose students to the sport of bowling. Registering quickly is important as spots fill up quickly, but there are still plenty of options, particularly for the intermediate student athlete. One of the new additions to the PE curriculum is the intramural course where students can participate in 14 IM activities in a semester to satisfy their PE credit. There are many intramural offerings that can be taken throughout the semester, from badminton to table tennis or basketball. Sometimes students end up taking something that they wouldn’t usually take but end up learning a new lifelong activity. “Availability and interest go hand in hand when picking a course,” said Craig Pellizzaro, Director of Intramurals and Physical Education. “I was surprised I liked intermediate aerobics as much as I did, so surprised I signed up for water aerobics next semester,” said Dan Bragg. The PE department is always looking to offer new experiences for the students of Tech. When a new idea comes up, it can take a little while to get it going, but the department does try to get ideas from their students. This could even include

offerings in junction with the Outdoor Adventure Program, but there hasn’t been anything in a little while. The PE credits offer a lot of advantages

“I was surprised I liked intermediate aerobics as much as I did, so surprised I signed up for water aerobics next semester.” -Dan Bragg to the students of Tech. “They can get you active, which is good for your health, especially considering the weather in Houghton and the strenuous classes Tech students take,” said Pellizzaro. It can be better to get the PE credits out of the way early, but people are encouraged to take the PE courses at any time in their Tech career. Register today to potentially find a lifelong activity or to enhance your skills at something you already know you love.


Michigan Tech Lode

SPORTS

Tuesday, April 7

13

Tech Cheerleading competes Sidelines at Laker Cheer Classic Gear swap

The young squad claimed third place during this competitive event ELLIE FURMANSKI Sports Editor On March 29, the Michigan Tech Competitive Cheer team competed at the Laker Cheer Classic hosted by Grand Valley State in Grand Rapids, Mich. Fifteen members of the 20-member squad made it to the competition, the team’s one and only competition of the year. The team kicked off the weekend at an open gymnastics gym in Grand Rapids to practice some last minute passes and stunts that Saturday afternoon. Spirits were high as the team anxiously awaited Sunday’s competition, what the team had been working so hard for all year long. The day of competition began with hair and makeup for the girls followed by a couple hours of warming up at the event. During final warmups, squad member Tyler Kuyper noted, “The team hit every stunt, and excitement and nerves ran high.” Michigan Tech competed against Grand Valley and Aquinas College in the coed college division. Their routine was exactly two minutes and 30 seconds long with

Intramural deadlines

The cheer team poses during their cheer competition at Grand Valley University this past weekend.

squad members continuously stunting or tumbling throughout the performance. The team hit all their group stunts

“The Michigan Tech team […] is a young team that will go back next year with new skills and a great routine.” -Tyler Kuyper

Photo courtesy of Tim Brandt

perfectly, but there were a few hiccups with various individual stunts. Overall, however, the team felt like the routine went over very well. Nearly nailing the routine was a great accomplishment for the squad, especially because they were able to successfully execute some new stunts which have never been done before

Continued on page 14

MTU Track triumphs at weekend meets MACKENZIE PLETCHER Lode Writer The Huskies toured Wisconsin this past weekend, dominating in both the men’s and women’s track and field events in De Pere as well as Whitewater. Thursday’s meet was the St. Norbert Invitational held in De Pere, and the Rex Foster Invitational was held in Whitewater on Friday. The Huskies had a fantastic weekend with the men’s team placing first and third and the women’s placing third and fifth, respectively. At the St. Norbert Invitational, the

Looking to get rid of some old gear or maybe swap it out for something new? A gear swap will be held at Houghton High School Multi-Purpose Room this Saturday, April 11 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Gear drop off will times will be held on Friday, April 10 from 5:00 to 7:30 p.m. and on Saturday, April 11 from 9:00 to 9:45 a.m. Gear includes bikes, skis, snowboards, kayaks, racks, camping and climbing equipment and more. A 15 percent commission will be charged on all sales with a $50 maximum commission per item. The sale will benefit the Copper Country Ski Tigers Nordic Race Team. There will also be summer storage wax for cross country skis ($10) as well as downhill skis and snowboards ($15). Call 906-487-6072 with questions or for more information.

women found success as Lauren Raiford ran a 59.16 in the 400 meter race, placing second overall in the event. Jamie Dompier led the competition as she placed first in the 200 meter dash, resetting her own record and winning by seven-tenths of a second. As for the 800 meter run, freshman Liz Bloch finished second in the race with an impressive time of 2:23. The women ended the day with a

third place finish overall. The men placed first in the invitational, dominating in more than solely the track events. Pole-vaulters Jake Wiedemeier, Jake Jurkowski and Maxwell Ketterer all placed first through third, respectively, with vaults between 13 and 11.25 feet. Kyle Petermann conquered the discus throw 154-11 to win the gold in the event. In the 400 meter, the Huskies had two Continued on page 14

“The Huskies had a fantastic weekend with the men’s team placing first and third and the women’s placing third and fifth, respectively.”

The registration period for spring volleyball 2’s will expire today, April 7, at 5 p.m. Friday, April 10 will mark the date of the volleyball 2’s tournament. The final intramural event of the spring 2015 season will be the tennis doubles tournament. Registration ends this Wednesday, April 8 at 5 p.m., and the tournament will take place this weekend, April 10 and 11. Don’t miss out on your last chance to participate in intramurals!

Doghouse Classic The Doghouse Classic is a 3-on3 basketball tournament which was established at Michigan Tech 25 years ago. The last tournament took place in 2007, but the tradition is being reestablished this year on April 18. The tournament, hosted by Michigan Tech Recreation, fosters a friendly yet competitive environment for basketball. The cost is $80 per team, and each team is allowed four players. The deadline to register is Friday, April 10. The registration form, which can be found at www. michigantechrecreation.com, can be brought to the SDC Manager’s Office (next to the SDC Ticket Office) Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. or mailed to the following address: Michigan Tech Recreation 1400 Townsend Drive SDC Room 142 Houghton, MI 49931


14

SPORTS

Tuesday, April 7

MTU Track triumphs at weekend meets Continued from page 13

runners place in the top three with Jevon Maddox placing first and Isaac Pringle placing third. The Huskies continued to finish with great results during the second day of races in Whitewater, Wis., at the Rex Foster Invitational. Dompier placed second in the 200 meter with a time of 25.78 seconds. Erika Poli lived up to her name in the women’s pole vault to place first overall. Noelle Savage took home the gold in the 10,000 meter with a time of 41:51. The women placed fifth out of eight at the end of the day. Runners such as Shane McGrath led the men’s team to success with a first place finish in the 400 meter hurdles. Ryan Mattson continued Husky domination in the 10,000 meter with a time of 34:17, placing first overall in his event. Antwon Curtis scored an impressive time in the 100 meter dash of 10.99 to win him second. The men took third out of eight for the day. The Huskies will be back on the road this upcoming Saturday to face off against many other colleges in the CSB/SJU Invitational held in Collegeville, Minn., as well as the UWPlatteville Invitational. As the GLIAC Championships close in, the MTU Track and Field team seems more ready than ever to take home first this year.

“As the GLIAC Championships close in, the MTU Track and Field team seems more ready than ever to take home first this year.”

Michigan Tech Lode

Ex-captain signs to NHL franchise The future looks bright for this Hanock, Mich., native and his hockey career IAN HATZILIAS Lode Writer Former captain of the Michigan Tech Hockey Huskies and Hobey Baker nominee Tanner Kero has signed a two-year contract with the Chicago Blackhawks of the NHL. The 2015 WCHA scoring leader has since reported to Rockford, Ill., to play for the Ice Hogs, the Blackhawks’ AHL affiliate. The now Blackhawks prospect has the

opportunity to play on NHL ice with the likes of Patrick Kane and Jonathon Toews on a Blackhawks team that has won the Stanley Cup twice in the last five seasons and is poised to make another legitimate run this year as well. Unlike some revered prospects of other NHL clubs, Kero has a unique situation with Chicago. Since the ‘Hawks are so close to the NHL salary cap, it is possible that the team’s management may shed some weight from their deep lineup in order to remain safely under the salary cap, potentially

Pearson named Coach of the Year IAN HATZILIAS Lode Writer Several of Michigan Tech’s hockey players have been praised for their dedication to the game and on-ice performance this season, and now Coach Pearson has been recognized for his efforts from behind the bench. College Hockey News has named Mel Pearson the College Hockey News Coach of the Year after a breakout season of 29

wins, a tie for third place in program history, and a berth to the NCAA Tournament for the first time in 34 years. After fading away from the college hockey limelight in the 1980s and being tossed around left and right by the rest of the NCAA for years, Coach Pearson and his staff have realized the revival of college hockey in Houghton that the program has sought for so long. The stands are fuller and the fans are much louder than before. It did not happen overnight, however. Through Pearson’s first three years, the team still struggled, although they shone

Tech Cheerleading competes at Michigan Tech. After all of the teams were done performing, everyone gathered out on the competition mat while the scores were tallied. The Huskies received third place, falling just one point shy behind Aquinas. “Overall, the weekend was a blast,” noted Kuyper. “The support from parents was overwhelming, and we are thankful for it.” Michigan Tech Cheer has been a growing organization over the past few years. Senior member and president of

Men’s Tennis Track and Field

Wednesday, 8

Thursday, 9

the organization Catrina Lesko explained, “This is my fourth year on the cheer team, and when I first started, cheerleading was a varsity sport. Over the years we became a student org. We even spent a year in limbo not knowing what we were.” To go from being “in limbo” to having a competitive squad is a testament to the dedication of the members of the organization. They have continued to grow with year-round practices and performances at varsity basketball and

Friday, 10

with greatness at times. The consistency has been getting better over the seasons, and it continues to improve. So now it seems that Pearson’s coaching philosophy has come into fruition, he has established himself as more than competent and he has a squad of players that believe in his ability to lead them to victory. There are no guarantees in this world, but if Pearson’s system is what is really working for this historic program, then it can be said almost surely that this team is in good hands for many years to come.

Continued from page 2

Varsity Events Schedule: April 7 - 13 Tuesday, 7

improving his chances of being called up to dress for the team in the future. It is also likely that Kero will participate in the 2015 Blackhawks Prospect Camp, an opportunity for him to prove himself and for the club to assess his strengths and weaknesses. There is always room for improvement, especially in the professional leagues where the game changes entirely. Things could not be looking better for the Hancock, Mich., native as this is likely the most pivotal point in his young hockey career.

football games. The squad will put a cap on the 201415 season with one last performance at the Bluffs Senior Home in addition to stunting at this year’s Spring Fling. Looking back, it has been a year of growth, and the team certainly learned a lot from their competition experience. As Kuyper put it, “The Michigan Tech team […] is a young team that will go back next year with new skills and a great routine.”

Home Game ** Conference Match Saturday, 11

Sunday, 12

@ Lake Superior State, 10:00 a.m.** @ CSB/SJU Invitational & UW-Platteville Invitational

@ CSB/SJU Invitational & UW-Platteville Invitational

Monday, 13


Michigan Tech Lode

SPORTS

Tuesday, April 7

15

Inaugural snoccer tournament held at Tech Teams were composed of five players, the winning team was the Snocc’em Boppers JOHN REYNOLDS Lode Writer

The Michigan Tech Student Foundation (MTSF) recently tried out a new sporting event for the students of Michigan Tech called “snoccer”. Snoccer is snow soccer played with an exercise ball, and it was done in favor of Oozeball, which is usually played this time of year. MTSF found success in their inaugural tournament and hope to make this a tradition for the Tech community. Oozeball has been moved to the fall due to issues with weather in the past. Volleyball games in frozen mud can get a little bit painful at times. “We wanted to come up with an event in the Tech spirit of snow and athleticism, so we came up with snow soccer,” said Libby Welton, president of the Michigan Tech Student Foundation. The inaugural year saw five teams participate in the round robin tournament. Teams were composed of five players, and the winning team was the Snocc’em Boppers. The winning team consisted of Colton Wesoloski, Alec Sauter, Nick Ramon, Will Larsen and Beccie Manshaem. The games started with about a foot of snow on the ground, which made it tough to run. “Sometimes we would hit a pocket of soft snow and face plant into the ground,” said Colton Wesoloski, a member of the tournament’s winning team. After the snow got packed down a little bit, it got easier to play and it was still an easy collision if someone ended up falling. Part of the success of this tournament came from contributions of other organizations on campus. University Images donated five $10 gift certificates as a prize for the winning team, and the Alumni Association provided hot chocolate for the players and the spectators. “We worked with University Images in the past with Oozeball, so we asked them for a donation and they were very generous,” said Welton. In the future there may be some changes to the format of the tournament to make it better. One consideration was making it a 4-on-4 match rather than

The Michigan Tech Student Foundation (MTSF) recently introduced the new sporting event called “snoccer” for Michigan Tech students. After seeing success this past weekend, MTSF hopes to make it another Tech tradition.

Photos by Colton Wesoloski

3-on-3 because of the players getting tired. It may also be held a little sooner to guarantee there will be snow left. If it remains a success there may also be a Winter Carnival tournament, but there

might need to be more interest first. MTSF’s motto of “Students Helping Students” is very true, and it continues with the events they set up and the scholarships they provide. The $20

entrance fee for the snoccer tournament went towards these scholarships. Hopefully they will continue this unique tournament and establish a new Tech tradition.


Upcoming

Events April 7 - 13 Relaxation-Wellness

Tuesday, April 7. 6 p.m. MUB Alumni Lounge A

The end of the semester is approaching, which that means final papers and projects and final exams are on everyone’s mind. If you’re looking for some relaxation time, come out to the MUB Alumni Lounge A today, April 7, at 6 p.m. Wellness will show you how to use essential oils and other techniques to build your stress free tool box for finals week. Wear comfy clothes and bring a yoga mat if you have one. Oils will be provided.

Carnival for a Cure-MTU Relay for Life

Saturday, April 11.

11 a.m.

SDC

Relay for Life is back at MTU celebrating the cancer fighters and survivors, or perhaps lost loved ones, in our lives and fighting back carnival style. The event will kick off at 11 a.m. this Saturday, April 11 at the SDC, and activities, games and fundraising will take place throughout the day. Things to look forward to include inflatables, carnival games, rock climbing, a scavenger hunt and a euchre tournament. All proceeds will benefit the American Cancer Society. Email rfl@mtu.edu with questions.

Leave No Trace Trainer Course-OAP/Center for Outdoor Ethics

Saturday and Sunday, April 11 - 12. $100 The wilderness

Interested in spending the weekend in the wilderness? OAP and the Center for Outdoor Ethics are holding a two-day “Leave No Trace” course this Saturday and Sunday, April 11 and 12. The cost is $100. Only six spots are available, and participants will be accepted on a first come, first serve basis. Visit www.mtu.edu/student-activities/oapwellness/clinics-seminars/ to find the registration link. Email the Outdoor Adventure Program at oap@mtu.edu with additional questions.

“The Producers”-Tech Theatre

Thursday, Friday and Saturday, April 9 - 11. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa

The Michigan Tech Theatre presents the new Mel Brook’s musical “The Producers” April 9 through 11 at the Rozsa Center for the Performing Arts. What’s better than taboo topics like religion, race and sexual preference rolled into a musical comedy with, best of all, a happy ending? The show starts at 7:30 p.m. each night. The cost is $19 for adults, $6 for youth and free for Michigan Tech students.

Place your ad here! Special rates on events page advertising. Contact us at lodeads@mtu.edu or for more information call (906) 487-2404.

ASK TECH Kishor Mahajan “I would want to be Hulk because nobody messes around with the Hulk.”

Dapinder Singh “Batman of course. He has so many cool gadgets and cars and bikes.”

If given a chance, which superhero would you want to be and why? -Pratik Joshi

Siddharth Jadhav “I have always wanted to be Superman because nobody understands people better than him, not to mention the strength he possesses.”

Guarav Mahajan “I would also want to be Superman because he never hides his face behind a mask. He wants to be accepted for who he is!”

Profile for Michigan Tech Lode

04/07/2015  

The April 7, 2015 Issue of the Michigan Tech Lode

04/07/2015  

The April 7, 2015 Issue of the Michigan Tech Lode

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