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Dressing up or dressing down?

September 24, 2015

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Essentials for Career Fair

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Volleyball 10 - 0 after 3-0 win over Northwood

Photo by Maxwell Curtis


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NEWS

Tuesday, September 24

Michigan Tech Lode

Portage Lake Lift Bridge contruction to continue through winter HANNAH RAMSBY Lode Writer The ongoing Portage Lake Lift Bridge rehabilitation project moved into its new phase last Tuesday, Sept. 15. The construction has been underway since Dec. 2014 and the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) expects it to continue until mid April 2016. While the construction has been deemed necessary in keeping the bridge between Houghton and Hancock working efficiently and reliably, the disruption in traffic has been the cause of frustration among residents in the area, especially Michigan Tech students making the commute across the bridge every day. According to the MDOT website, “The Portage Lake Lift Bridge has a proven record of reliability. This preventative maintenance project will ensure the bridge remains in excellent operating condition.”

MDOT hired Zenith Tech Inc., a private structural engineering contracting company based in Waukesha, Wis. to carry out the project. Overall work includes the replacement of lift cables and balance chains, upgrades to the upper machinery room, new LED lighting, additional operational and security cameras, and spot painting. The current phase focuses on deck sealing, warning and barrier gate replacements, roadway level steel repairs, and operator house repair. According to MDOT, last winter’s construction consisted of several complete bridge closures, halting all traffic across the bridge for 10-11 hours at a time. The current phase will be limited to single-lane closures with some closures on one full side of the bridge. Fortunately, two-way traffic will still be maintained, but this is unlikely to make local residents any less frustrated. “The bridge work was a major

The Portage Lake Lift Bridge is a part of many students and faculty members daily commute.

Photo by Maxwell 75004Curtis

Continued on page 4

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NEWS

Michigan Tech Lode

Tuesday, September 24

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Sneak Peek: Michigan Tech Law Club PETER NOUHAN News Editor

The Fall 2015 Career Fair will be hosted on Tuesday, September 29 and is Michigan Tech’s largest career fair to date.

Photo courtesy of Career Services & UMC

Essential tips for Career Fair PETER NOUHAN News Editor The bi-annual Michigan Tech Career Fair is here again. The Career Fair, on Tuesday Sept. 29, will be providing students the opportunity to seek internships and coops from more than 350 prospective employers. The sheer number of options is likely to be intimidating, especially for any newcomers to Michigan Tech. That’s why we’ve put together the following checklist to guarantee that you’re well prepared and well organized for next week’s Fair.

1. Research what companies are attending, who they are looking to hire, and where their booths are located. This year students can take advantage of the new Michigan Tech Career Fair Plus app, accessible via the Apple/Android app stores, to streamline their Career Fair preparations. The app features a list of employers, a map to find their locations at the Fair, and an event calendar. You can “favorite” employers of particular interest and filter employers based on your degree and by co-op, full-time job or internship. Make sure to identify what companies you are interested in and think about why you

want to work for them. This will go a long way when talking with a recruiter.

2. Attend Career Education Events. Michigan Tech’s Career Services is offering resume reviews and mock interviews nearly every day leading up to Career Fair. You can reserve a time slot for interview appointments via the Michigan Tech Event Calendar. Students should also attend Industry Day events. These events help students choose a career path by helping to get them involved with peer-topeer networking. Steel Day, on Sept. 23, offered students the opportunity to meet with steel companies to see what it would be like to work in the steel industry. Steel Day featured an interactive event last night to show students how steel is made. Future Industry Days include: Mining Day (October 7), Leaders in Communication Day (October 20), and Railroad Day (October 20).

3. Attend Sessions

Employer

Info

Check the Michigan Tech Event Calendar to see which employers you can meet with before Career Fair. General Motors and Ford have events scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 27. John Deere, Bobcat, Caterpillar,

Dow Chemical, and the Department of Defense have events on Monday, Sept. 28. On Monday, students should also attend the Career Fair Cookout between 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Students can stop by between classes for some grilled hot dogs and burgers, and to network with company representatives who want to meet them before Tuesday’s Fair.

4. Additional Tips/Suggestions for Attending Career Fair Remember, this is a formal event. MTU Career Services offers the following suggestions for attending such an event: Try to get to the job fair as early as possible, plan on spending a few hours visiting the different companies, bring your schedule with you, look presentable and professional, don’t hesitate to walk right up to company representatives, introduce yourself with confidence, and remember to print off at least 20 copies of your resume. Even if students are not planning on seeking out a co-op or an internship in the following year, Career Fair is a wonderful opportunity for students to learn how to market themselves in a competitive workplace. According to Michigan Tech’s LinkedIn page, the MTU Career Fair is the fourth largest in the nation. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to see what the leading members of industry have to offer.

K-Day introduced students to many of the organizations and clubs that make Michigan Tech significantly more than just an academic institution. At the center of all of these festivities, the music, and the free food, were countless opportunities for students to discover what these organizations have to offer.

“Law Club has plenty to offer to people who are not going to law school.” One club in particular was selling something more than an invitation to join and participate. The Michigan Tech Law Club was drawing a consistent crowd of prospective voters, registering nearly 150 Michigan Tech students in under four hours. The club’s president, Jakob Williams, could be seen walking out into the fray of K-day activity encouraging students to fill out the one-page registration form and shouting, “Become a part of civic society and have your voice heard.” After the K-Day activities subsided, Williams was more than happy to share why he was so excited to be a leader of Law Club. Although Williams is considering a career in law, many of the club’s members are pursuing non-law majors such as environmental engineering and pre-med. “Law Club has plenty to offer to people who are not going to law school,” Williams said. The club is looking to promote political awareness in the Michigan Tech student population Continued on page 5


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NEWS

Tuesday, September 24

Portage Lake Lift Bridge construction Continued from page 2

annoyance,” said Michigan Tech junior Nic Schweikart in regards to the work that took place last winter. “I constantly found myself planning around the many delays and the sudden rise in traffic congestion. Sometimes there were 30 minute stops right as school got out, but there was nothing to do but sit and wait in Houghton. Also, a few nights they closed the bridge from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. This made enjoying a Friday night in Houghton impossible.” Schweikart lived in Hancock for both semesters last school year and has since relocated to Houghton. However frustrating the traffic backups have been, most students have been pretty understanding of the construction. “I do value the effort of MDOT and the many workers who brave the elements to get these projects done,” Schweikart said. Chase Elliott, a senior at Tech who has been living in Hancock for the last two years said. “[The construction] is necessary for the long-term use of the bridge. I think that under the conditions that exist in the location, that traffic was handled as best as possible […] given what work needed to be done.” In December, the project will move on to electrical repairs, allowing for regular traffic flows across the Portage Lake Lift Bridge. “Work on the electrical system for the lift motors will start, but that won’t be visible and it won’t disrupt traffic. However, there will be some traffic disruptions after the electrical work is done. [Zenith Tech Inc.] will have to test the lift span at the end of January or beginning of February, 2016. Those test lifts will require brief closures of the bridge to traffic. We’ll be alerting the public before the period when those closures start,” said MDOT Communications Representative Dan Weingarten. Marine traffic has also been limited during the project. Currently, the bridge makes hourly openings for pleasure craft (excluding the 8 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m. hours), yet still lifts on demand for commercial vessels. While the Portage Lake Lift Bridge construction continues through the winter and spring, the work is anticipated to cause less trouble for locals. Full closures are for the most part finished, though motorists are encouraged to continue to drive safely through the construction zone.

Michigan Tech Lode

Historical Article

Michigan Technological University EVAN MAYER Lode Writer In the late 1880s, the Copper Country had a problem. There were plenty of natural materials waiting to be extracted from the ground, but there was no education to equip the people of the area to harvest these materials efficiently. Jay Abel Hubbell recognized this problem and had the political connections to solve it. Hubbell had served in many capacities as a public servant, including district attorney of the Upper Peninsula, prosecuting attorney of Houghton County, and a U. S. Congressman for 10 years. Leaving Congress and being elected to the state Senate resulted in his biggest contribution to the Upper Peninsula: he convinced the state legislator to open the Michigan Mining School in order to train the miners. He even donated the land. Although the school only started with four faculty members and a mere 23 students in 1885, it quickly outgrew the second story of the Houghton Fire Hall. As a result, the first president Marshman E. Wadsworth, who also served as state geologist for most of his term, moved the college to its present location on Townsend Drive. It also outgrew its name as it was renamed the Michigan College of Mines in 1897. 1899 saw a math and physics professor, Fred Walter McNair, become the president of the college. McNair added several buildings to the campus, modified the academic programs, and consolidated the faculty. At one point, two academic buildings and a residence hall, the one that still bears his name, were named in honor of him. After leading the college through World War I, McNair remained president until his untimely death in a train wreck in 1924. After serving as state geologist for Wisconsin for almost the previous 20 years, William Otis Hotchkiss accepted the role of President following McNair’s tragic death. In Hotchkiss’s first few years, the school once again changed its name to the Michigan College of Mining and Technology. Hotchkiss furthermore added many of the most popular programs at the school today, including chemical, electrical, civil and mechanical engineering, as well as forestry. With the additions of these programs, the

Michigan Technological University first began as the Michigan Mining School to train miners in the Upper Peninsula.

Photo courtesy of Michigan Tech Archives

enrollment reached 600 for the first time. Like the rest of the country, the school struggled through the Great Depression. Money became very tight during this time, and many of the faculty, including President Hotchkiss himself, ended up taking pay cuts in order for the school to survive. By 1935, a new president Grover Cleveland Dillman would take over the helm. The civil engineer who had graduated from Michigan State University before eventually becoming the State Highway Commissioner had a big task ahead of him: during his 21-year tenure many new changes would came to the college and country in the aftermath of World War II. Some of Dillman’s lasting achievements to the college were the lands he added. These properties include the Portage Lake Golf Course and the ice rink in downtown Houghton. Dillman also managed to acquire the village of Alberta from the Ford Motor Company, which included a sawmill and 4,000 acres of forest. In addition, the college established a branch in Sault Ste. Marie, which helped push the school’s enrollment over 2,000 for the first time in 1948. The increase in enrollment was due in part to new programs being added, including engineering administration, physics and geological engineering. The Memorial Union Building is another one of Dillman’s lasting impacts on the school.

The sixth president of the college was Dr. John Robert Van Pelt. Wishing to obtain a mining degree, Van Pelt had attended the college in his early days. He had grown quite attached to the area, so when he was offered the job as president, he gladly returned in 1956. Van Pelt’s tenure saw many new buildings spring up around campus including Fisher Hall, Wadsworth Residence Hall, the CivilGeology Building and a new Library that was named in his honor. Many new academic programs were also added during Van Pelt’s tenure. These included biological sciences, geophysical engineering and medical technology. Van Pelt pushed for the revival of many of the PhD programs and increased the graduate programs by adding business administration, engineering mechanics, mathematics and nuclear engineering to the options. An aggressive research initiative dramatically increased the graduate students on campus. These changes saw the enrollment rise to 2,700 by 1963. A name change campaign was in place, however. Of those students, only 44 were in the mining program, so Michigan College of Mining and Technology no longer seemed appropriate. Additionally, the expanded programs that were offered encouraged the state of Michigan to upgrade the school from a college to a university. The former small-town mining school was about to reach its biggest milestone yet.


NEWS

Michigan Tech Lode

New catalyst yields more accurate PSA test UNIVERSITY MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Michigan Technological University Say you’ve been diagnosed with prostate cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer death in men. You opt for surgery to remove your prostate. Three months later, a prostate surface antigen (PSA) test shows no prostate cells in your body. Everyone rejoices. Until 18 months later, when another PSA test reveals that now prostate cells have reappeared. What happened? The first PSA test yielded what’s known as a false negative result. It did not detect the handful of cells that remained after surgery and later multiplied. Now a chemist at Michigan Technological University has made a discovery that could, among other things, slash the numbers of false negatives in PSA tests. Xiaohu Xia and his team, including researchers from Louisiana State University and the University of Texas at Dallas, have developed a new catalyst that could make lab tests like the PSA much more sensitive. And it may even speed up reactions that neutralize toxic industrial chemicals before they enter lakes and streams. A paper on the research, “Pd–Ir Core– Shell Nanocubes: A Type of Highly Efficient and Versatile Peroxidase Mimic,” (http:// pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsnano.5b0 3525?journalCode=ancac3) was published online Sept. 3 in ACS Nano. In addition to Xia, coauthors are graduate students

Jingtuo Zhang, Jiabin Liu and Haihang Ye and undergraduate Erin McKenzie of Michigan Tech; Moon J. Kim and Ning Lu of the University of Texas at Dallas; and Ye Xu and Kushal Ghale of Louisiana State University. The LSU team conducted theoretical calculations, and the UT Dallas team contributed high-resolution electron microscopy images. Peroxidase Mimic Their new catalyst mimics the action of similar biochemicals found in nature, called peroxidases. “In animals and plants, these peroxidases are important— for example, they get rid of hydrogen peroxide, which is harmful to the organism,” said Xia, an assistant professor of chemistry at Michigan Tech. In medicine, peroxidases have become powerful tools for accelerating chemical reactions in diagnostic tests; a peroxidase found in the horseradish root is commonly used in the standard PSA test. However, these natural peroxidases have drawbacks. They can be difficult to extract and purify. “And, they are made of protein, which isn’t very stable,” Xia explained. “At high temperatures, they cook, like meat.” “Moreover, their efficiency is just fair,” he added. “We wanted to develop a mimic peroxidase that was substantially more efficient than the natural peroxidase, which would lead to a more-sensitive PSA test.” Hundred-fold More Sensitive PSA Test Their new catalyst, made from nanoscale cubes of palladium coated with a few layers of iridium atoms, does just that. PSA tests Xia’s team conducted using the palladiumiridium catalyst were 110 times more sensitive than tests completed with the

Michigan Tech Lode

conventional peroxidase. “After surgery, it’s vital to detect a tiny amount of prostate antigen, because otherwise you can get a false negative and perhaps delay treatment for cancer,” said Xia. “Our ultimate goal is to further refine our system for use in clinical diagnostic laboratories.” Xia hopes that his mimic peroxidase will someday save lives through earlier detection of cancer and other maladies. He also plans to explore other applications, including how it compares with

“After surgery, it’s vital to detect a tiny amount of prostate antigen, because otherwise you can get a false negative and perhaps delay treatment for cancer.”

-Xiaohu Xia, Chemist at MTU

horseradish peroxidase in other catalytic reactions: breaking down toxic industrialwaste products like phenols into harmless substances. Finally, the team wants to better understand why its palladium-iridium catalyst works so well. “We know the iridium coating is the key,” Xia said. “We think it makes the surface sticky, so the chemical reagents bind to it better.

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5 Sneak Peek: Michigan Tech Law Club

Tuesday, September 24

Staff Writers - Drew Rutherford, Joseph Pietrzyk, Joel Smith, Peter Nouhan, Davy McLeod, Evan Mayer, Autumn Fitzpatrick, Hannah Ramsby Circulation - Avinaash Srivatsav, Minjun Wang Visuals Staff - Maxwell Curtis, Devin Miller, Gordon Griggs Copy Editors - Liz Bergh, Savannah de Luca

Continued from page 3

and to engage and educate future voters. This fall, the club will continue registering students and will provide an outlet for students to ask questions about the voting process in preparation for the 2016 presidential election. In the past, the club has traveled to law conferences sponsored by Law Schools Admissions Committee (LSAC) in Madison and Minneapolis to meet admissions officers and to gain a better sense of what law schools have to offer. This year the club hopes to travel to Washington D.C. to visit law schools and potentially meet with some of our nation’s lawmakers. Students interested in learning more about law club should contact Williams at jfwillia@mtu.edu.

“The club is looking to promote political awareness in the Michigan Tech student population and to engage and educate future voters.”

Opinions expressed in the Lode are not necessarily those of the student body, faculty, staff or administration of Michigan Technological University or the Michigan Tech Lode. The Lode is designed, written and edited by Michigan Tech students. The paper is printed every Tuesday during fall and spring semesters. The Lode is available free of charge at drop-off sites around campus and in the surrounding community. To the best of its ability, The Lode subscribes to the Code of Ethics of the Society of Professional

Journalists. The Lode is funded in part by the Michigan Tech Student Activity Fee. 1. lodeads@mtu.edu for submitting ads to the Lode. 2. lodesubmit@mtu.edu for submitting articles and letters to the editor. Work submitted to the Lode should be submitted with the understanding that it may be printed by the Lode and/or posted to the Online Lode, www. mtulode.com. The Lode reserves the right to edit submissions for length, clarity and potentially libelous material. Submissions should not exceed 500 words.


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Thursday, September 24

PULSE

Inside and Out DAVY MCLOUD Lode Writer Got voices in your head? According to Pete Docter and Ronaldo Del Carmen, directors of “Inside Out,” you sure do. In fact, there’s a handful of mini people representing emotion in the skulls of all the characters in this fresh Disney-Pixar story. “Inside Out” is an animated film that gives a unique perspective into the mind of an 11-year-old girl named Riley. Riley’s parents are moving the small

“Do you ever look at someone and wonder: what is going on inside their head?” - “Joy” from Inside Out

family of three from rural Minnesota to inner-city San Francisco. The move means a new house, new school and new friends, causing stress for both Riley and the busy little workers in her head.

Among them are Sadness, Anger, Disgust, Fear and Joy (the last voiced masterfully by Amy Poehler from “Parks and Rec”). Each of these characters emulate the emotion they’re named after, and play a crucial role in Riley’s development throughout her experiences in life. The movie does a wonderful job of showing the audience through Riley and her friends “upstairs,” that what happens to a person is not nearly as important as how they react. This lesson is essential to having a healthy state of mind. Surely, there is no better way to learn than through an excellent adventure from the makers of classics like “Toy Story,” ”WALL-E” and ”Monsters Inc.?” This recent addition to Pixar’s arsenal of endlessly cute creations is entertaining for all ages in the audience. Get ready to laugh with Joy, and cry with Sadness on a rollercoaster ride of feelings, tissues not included. Film Board will be screening “Inside Out” from Friday the Sept. 25 to Sunday the 27th, at various times in Fisher 135. Tickets are $3 and refreshments are available for $1. For more info and specific times visit filmboard.mtu.edu.

Michigan Tech Lode


Michigan Tech Lode

PULSE

Thursday, September 24

Flirtin’ with disaster: area music

AUTUMN FITZPATRICK Lode Writer

An inspiring man to many, Plato once said, “Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything”. It is vastly agreed upon that the impact music holds has importance: those who claim to be indifferent to music are few. Those of you from the city may feel that you have lost an opportunity to experience music in its most raw form: live. This could not be further from the truth here in the Keweenaw Peninsula. More often than not, music in the Keweenaw is quite interactive, but that is not to say that the big name bands don’t come here to do the work

for you. In fact, you could catch Molly Thatcher tonight (Thursday Sept. 24) at 7:30 p.m. at the Calumet Theater in Calumet. If the travel sways your potential to want to flirt with disaster with these whiskey men, remember that Calumet was once our potential state capital and that the Calumet Theater is known to be the best theater in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. It truly is an atmosphere you do not want to miss. If you are not able to make the drive, or are perhaps not a southern/hard rock fan, no worries, because you could also catch tonight’s americana/roots/ gypsy jazz band, Appleseed Collective, 8:30 p.m. at the Orpheum Theater in Hancock. If you are too busy Thursday, there are also high hopes for the weekend. A local band, Street Sweepers, will be playing at the Orpheum Theater. Also at the Orpheum

Theater on Oct. 12, you can come to support the Swedetown Creek community and attend Music Jam to support Maasto Bridge. Not one, but three artists will be playing, including: Keweenaw BrewGrass, RealTime jazz and Craic doing Irish and folk tunes. Tickets can be found on each theaters respective website, and for a much cheaper cost than the city. Looking for music on campus? Well, look everywhere around you, as the options are plenty. To begin, you could take private lessons, and you can earn credits for them! If lessons inspire you to think more seriously about music, you may want to look into the music minors the Michigan Tech offers, which can be found Michigan Tech’s website. If you find yourself taking this route, seriously consider checking out the National Honorary

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Musical Fraternity, Mu Beta Psi. Be sure to not let the title “Fraternity” deter you, female audience, from checking out Mu Beta Psi, as they are a coed Fraternity. If you are interested in music, just not as a career or “educationally structured” path, there are still many ways to be involved. For instance, the MTU pep band. While you can take pep band for credit, it is not required and you can pep band just for the pep of it. Campus Band, Jazz Lab Band, the Keweenaw Symphony, and the Superior Winds Symphony are also all viable options. Don’t play an instrument? Check out the Chamber Choir or Concert Choir. Feel the best you can do is recognize and share talent? While I am sure you are wrong, all are welcome to take radio slots at WMTU. The options truly are plentiful and enriching, but don’t take my word

Skate is Great DAVY MCLOUD Lode Writer Jessi Taylor stood behind the counter of Rhythm Bike & Board Co. the day before the annual Skate is Great competition. Taylor has taken over the organization of the contest in the past few years, but it has been around since 2003. Never though, has there been a bicycle motocross (BMX) section, which Taylor added in order to attract more competitors. “I know there are bikers around here,” Taylor said. “They’re just being stubborn.” Before the competition, there were only Above: Kody Nutting does a kickflip at Saturday’s competition. Nutting placed third in the four entries on two wheels, the rest were competition. Below: Noah Huntzinger pulls one of the moves that won him the “best trick” award in the BMX bracket Photos by Davy McLoud all skateboarders. With the trick war just 24 hours away, the threat of rain didn’t seem to dampen Taylor’s spirit. She was certain it would pan out; “There are a ton of prizes, and we always end up having fun.” Saturday, Sept. 19 was the day of the competition, and the weather held. Cotton ball clumps of clouds drifted through a sea of blue above the Lake Linden Skate Park, and plenty of tricksters, on both bikes and boards, were already warming up before the 1 p.m. start time. One of the sponsors, Sound & Motion, was parked off to the side and sent waves of bass into the arena. A few young kids got a friendly game going on scooters, and Taylor had them pick out prizes. The design of the competition is a bracket style tournament in which pairs go head to head, trick for trick, until there is only one rider left. A quick game of rock-paper-scissors decides who starts between the opponents, and then they

take turns trying to outdo each other. If a trick is failed by a rider, a letter is added to their tally; if they spell “skate” or “bike” for the BMX portion, they’re out. Kody Nutting and Bryan Lowney were the first pair of skaters, and they quickly set the tone. While one was tricking, the other was watching intently. They went back and forth, but Lowney couldn’t quite follow every trick Nutting demonstrated. “I have this repertoire of flatland tricks … but they get recycled throughout the years,” Lowney explained after bumping his fist to Nutting’s. He was just happy to be there, and the $3 entry fee is only improving the park. “The event directly supports the sport,” Lowney said. The skaters continued, and soon it was down to three from the dozen that began. They settled the dispute through a three-way game, and Austin Johnson ended up winning in the skater division as well as the best trick contest later that day. Nutting snuck into third, and Taylor gave prizes out to the runner-ups as well. Next, the BMX bracket started, and the tricks were more diverse. Riders called out their trick and which feature of the park they would use. The herd thinned, and Noah Huntzinger took first place with grace. He had a large bag of tricks, which aided him in winning best trick as well. The turnout was great, and no one left empty handed. All competition was friendly, and drew quite a crowd. Skate is Great is on an upswing thanks to Taylor’s recent addition of the BMX category, and the more the competition grows, the better the park will become.


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Thursday, September 24

COMICS

And when I think about it, a lot of “things I want to do” are just learning about and discussing new tools for tinkering Comic courtesy of XKCD with the chain.

CLASSIFIEDS WRITERS WANTED: Currently we are hiring writers for all sections of the Lode. See your work in the newspaper!

USIC of course standing for “Unified Sequences Invoking C.O.M.P.O.S.I.T.I.O.N.”

Please contact The Michigan Tech Lode at lodesubmit-l@mtu.edu or by calling 906-487-2404. OFF-CAMPUS DISTRIBUTOR WANTED: Currently we are hiring someone to deliver our papers to off-campus distribution sites. Please contact The Michigan Tech Lode at lodesubmit-l@mtu.edu or by calling 906-487-2404.

This is how you learn boundaries.

DESIGNER WANTED: Currently we are hiring assistant designers for the Lode. See your work in the newspaper! Please contact The Michigan Tech Lode at lodesubmit-l@mtu.edu or by calling 906-487-2404. E-mail lodeads-l@mtu.edu for information about placing a classified ad.

Seriously, this happens. **footnote: Thanks again to the Duke grads for this true-to-life comic idea.

Michigan Tech Lode


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Sudoku - Puzzles and Games - NYTimes.com

Sudoku — Medium

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Sudoku - Puzzles and Games - NYTimes.com

Sudoku — Easy

http://www.nytimes.com/crosswords/game/sudoku/medium

September 16, 2015

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KenKen How to Play KenKen http://www.nytimes.com/crosswords/game/sudoku/easy

A You must fill in the boxes in each row and column with the numbers from 1 to 4 (for a 4 ✕ 4 grid) or 5 (for a 5 ✕ 5 grid). Do not repeat a number in any row or column.

B The areas of the grid with dark outlines around them are called cages. At the top left of each cage is a target number and operation. In this example, the cage at the top left says “4+”. That means the two numbers that go in that cage must add (+) up to 4.

D Now let’s look for cages that have only one possible solution. Let’s try the “4+” cage toward the bottom right. What two different numbers from 1 to 4 have a sum of 4? The only answer is 1 + 3. In which box do we put the 1 and in which do we put the 3? Easy—there’s already a 3 in the far right column. So the 3 must go in the third column, and the 1 must go in the far-right column.

23 1 3 E You’ve almost finished the second-to-bottom row! What number is missing from the row? The 4 must go in the far left of that row. Write it in! Now what else can you figure out? C Look for any cages that are around just one box. The target number will have no math operation symbol. Simply write the target number in that cage. In the sample puzzle, find the onebox cages that say “2” and “3” and write those numbers in those boxes.

2 Joel Fagliano and Finn Vigeland / Edited by Will Shortz

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Michigan Tech Lode

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12

SPORTS

Thursday, September 24

# the By

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14

Kills were made by volleyball player Aubrey Ficek this past weekend against Northwood

16

Days until the Huskies take on Laurentian at the John MacInnes Student Ice Arena, on Oct. 9

8

Nick Brajak, Jaylyn WilliamsBoone and Ben Tauchen all made eight tackles against Saginaw Valley State this past Saturday, tying for team-high honors

15

Points were made by Vicky Quinde and Sandra Cvetanovic, during a doubles tennis match, for a victory against Saginaw Valley State

2

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Jackie Aird

MAXWELL CURTIS Design Editor Jackie Aird has been with the Michigan Tech Huskies Volleyball team since 2012, making her among the first recruits for coach Matt Jennings. It has paid off. Aird is now a senior on the team she joined three years ago. In that time she has been chasing history as Michigan Tech’s holder for most digs of all time. After gaining 491 digs just in 2014, breaking the single-season record set in 2003 by Kristin Klock, she has come back strong with 158 digs so far in the first 11 games of the season. This leaves her only 66 away from a record that was last broken from 2000-2004 by Kristin Klock of 1577 career digs. Last year, Aird was voted onto the Keweenaw Classic All-Tournament Team, placing herself among the

9

Men’s Hockey Team ranking in WCHA media poll released Monday

“All of our hard work is finally paying off, and we’re finally getting what we’ve been working so hard for. Everybody really want’s it.” - Jackie Aird absolute best within the conference. Without a doubt, Aird is an integral part of the volleyball team’s early success in the current season, helping them go undefeated in the first ten games, passing the 9-0 record set long ago. She is

Photo courtesy of Michigan Tech Athletics

working hard towards a successful senior year with her teammates on the Huskies as they look to continue dominating the season.

Press Release for MTU Huskies Football Huskies Pick Up First Win at Saginaw in 20 Years MICHIGAN TECH ATHLETICS

The current national ranking of Husky football, who also placed second in the GLIAC ranking

Michigan Tech Lode

Press Release David Walter and Alex Sherbinow scored two touchdowns apiece to lead Michigan Tech to a 35-21 victory at Saginaw Valley State today. It was the Huskies’ first win at SVSU since 1995. Despite winning by two touchdowns, Tech played from behind a majority of the first three quarters. Saginaw opened scoring with a 43-yard drive early in the first quarter. The Huskies answered with a 75-yard drive capped by Walter’s first TD reception. A miscommunication on the extra point left the Black and Gold trailing 7-6. Tech didn’t take its first lead until 3:46 remaining in the half. John Williams connected with Andrew Clark on a double-pass play for 51 yards to the SVSU three-yard line. Williams plowed into the endzone two plays later for the 13-7 advantage which his squad took into intermission. The Cardinals drove 70 yards on its first possession of the second half and

made the extra point for a 14-13 lead. The visitors marched right back 75 yards. Brandon Cowie passed to the fullback, Sherbinow, for a score and a 20-14 lead. SVSU answered again for a 21-20 lead with 3:26 remaining in the third quarter. Tech made it four touchdowns on four possessions for the offenses in the second half. Walter made a tough catch while crossing the goal line with a defender draped on his back. Cowie rushed for a two-point conversion and a 28-21 margin. Evan Mayer sacked and stripped the Saginaw quarterback on the first play of the next possession. He also recovered the fumble. Michigan Tech went threeand-out on offense, but came up with another takeaway minutes later as Paul Kuoppala intercepted a tipped pass at midfield. Sherbinow added the insurance score with 7:07 remaining. Tech’s defense held on downs in the red zone, and Cowie kneeled out the remaining clock. “This is a nice one to get,” said Tech coach Tom Kearly. “The team knew we hadn’t won here in 20 years, but they also

knew that these were different teams. “We made four or five mistakes today, but played pretty well overall. I’m not ready to say we’re a good football team yet, but we’re playing good football at times and I think we can get there.” Total offense was nearly identical, with the Huskies out-gaining the Cardinals 332-to-322. The Black and Gold had much better balance with 190 yards in the air and a season-high 142 on the ground. Saginaw had just 90 yards rushing. Williams ran for 84 yards on 18 carries. Cowie rushed for 42 yards in addition to completing 14-of-22 passes for 139 yards and three scores. Six different Tech players caught passes led by Clark’s 81 yards on just three receptions. Nick Brajak, Jaylyn Williams-Boone and Ben Tauchen all tied for team-high honors in tackles with eight. Michigan Tech, which is now 3-0 on the season, will return home to face archrival Northern Michigan next Saturday (Sept. 26). Kickoff for the 14th annual Miner’s Cup game is set for 7 p.m. at Sherman Field.


Michigan Tech Lode

SPORTS

Thursday, September 24

Volleyball 10-0 after win over Northwood Press Release for MTU Huskies

MICHIGAN TECH ATHLETICS Press Release Aubrey Ficek had a game-high 14 kills and Lauren Emmert hit .500 to help the Michigan Tech volleyball team to a straight-set victory over Northwood today (Sept. 19) at the SDC Gym. The win pushes Tech’s record to 10-0, setting the school’s all-time mark for consecutive victories to begin a season. The Huskies had significant production from numerous players in the lineup, including Jacqueline Aird, who had 12 digs, and Rachel Pohlod, who registered 34 assists - just one less than Northwood as a team. Tech opened the contest with a flurry and jumped out to a 10-1 lead in the first set. Northwood fought to within six points, but the Huskies scored six of the final 10 in the set to close out a 25-16 win. “It’s been a goal of ours to start strong in each set and match,” said head coach Matt Jennings. “We did that again today and that separation early allowed us to get the crowd and band behind us.” The Black and Gold rallied from an early deficit in the middle set, found its stride late and closed out a 25-21 victory. Ficek notched seven of her 14 kills in the set, including the clinching point. The third and final set saw Northwood again come out strong before the Huskies rallied. Tech climbed out of a 14-11 hole midway through by recording eight of nine points to take a 19-15 lead. Emmert converted on six of her seven attack attempts in the frame and three late kills - one each by Stephanie Dietrich, Ficek and Sylvie Rokosh - closed out the 25-23 win. “Northwood is a team that can score a lot of points and is quick to the outside,” said Jennings. “We wanted to make it

13

Sidelines Cross Country Michigan Tech Athletics Press Release. The Michigan Tech cross country teams competed at the Spartan Invitational Sept. 18, hosted by Michigan State at Forest Akers East Golf Course. A field of 35 collegiate teams including many NCAA Division I programs participated. The men’s team had a strong outing with the top five Huskies all among the top 100 in a field of 312 collegiate runners. Jason Saliga was the fastest Tech runner on the eightkilometer course. He took 42nd place with a time of 26:25. Daniel Byrne was 20 seconds and 15 places back in 57th. Eric Parsell posted a time of 26:53 for 64th position. Kyle Hanson and Daniel Kulas were 73rd and 85th with times of 27:07 and 27:16, respectively. Sophia Farquhar paced the women’s team on the six-kilometer course with a 23:29 time. She placed 44th among collegiate racers. Liz Bloch was 58th in a time of 23:53. Sonja Hedblom also entered the top 100 of the 270 entries by running a 24:40 for 84th. Carolyn Lucca (113th, 25:14) and Noelle Savage (120th, 25:22) rounded out Tech’s top five.

Men’s Tennis

Aubrey Ficek sets up for a kill in Friday night’s match against Northwood.

Photo by Maxwell Curtis

difficult for them to score points from the outside and I thought we did a good job of that. We had big performances from big people at key times.”

Michigan Tech is off until Tuesday (Sept. 22) when it travels to play UWParkside in a non-conference match.

“Northwood is a team that can score a lot of points and is quick to the outside. We wanted to make it difficult for them to score points from the outside and I thought we did a good job of that. We had big performances from big people at key times.”

- Matt Jennings

http://michigantechhuskies.com/sports/wvball/2015-16/releases/20150919qwscqw

Michigan Tech Athletics Press Release. GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. – Five members of the Michigan Tech men’s tennis team – Juan Felipe Chica, Robin Duhnsen, Nick Kremkow, Mario Neto and Built Yumuang – competed in the USTA/ITA Regional this weekend. Duhnsen advanced to the round of 16 in the A singles bracket, winning 7-5, 6-0 in his first match and 7-6, 7-6 (10-4) in his second before falling to the No. 1 overall seed in straight sets. Chica, who played in the B singles division, also made it to the round of 16 by earning a straight-set win in his opening match and a 6-3, 3-6, 12-10 victory in the round of 32. Michigan Tech’s doubles combo of Kremkow and Neto played their way into the quarterfinals of the B doubles bracket thanks to 8-4 and 8-6 wins in the first two rounds, respectively. The Michigan Tech men’s tennis team will head to Big Rapids, Mich., this weekend (Sept. 25-26) to compete in the Bulldog Invitational at Ferris State.


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Thursday, September 24

SPORTS

Michigan Tech Lode

What is Bo-taoshi?

JOEL SMITH Lode Writer Upon first glance, Bo-taoshi can be pretty confusing. Imagine being given a YouTube video with no context and no explanation. It starts out showing dozens of men wearing white shirts and dark pants with simple padded helmets standing in lines. After some choreographed bowing, clapping and shouting, they break from their formation to run a short distance away where they pick up a pole roughly 10 feet long with a two-foot-long rod sticking out of one end. They pick it up off the ground and raise it so the rod points straight up. The men crowd around this pole, facing it with their hands raised, almost as if praising it. Crowds of people watch in the background. Then four of the men climb on the shoulders of the others, holding on to the pole, while a fifth man climbs to the top, gripping the rod with his hands and crouching with his feet on the small lip of the pole. The men still on ground spread out slightly, turning away from the pole, lowering their arms until their hands are out in front, palms facing away, as though telling outsiders to halt. Then a gunshot goes off.

“The Japanese sport is called Bo-taoshi, which translates to ‘pole bring-down.’ It is played mostly by cadets of the National Defense Academy of Japan, but is also popular at many grade schools throughout the country.” Within moments, dozens of men dressed identically but with blue shirts and white pants came sprinting in, colliding with the men in white. They come from a single direction, but are soon on all sides, some running back and forth, most gathering in one particular

A game of Bo-taoshi is held in Japan. The blue team is attempting to capture the pole from the white team. Photo courtesy of http://www.wikimedia.org/

place. The men in white mostly stay as close to the pole as they could be, but some leave the group to push back or tackle the men in blue. The blue team rapidly gains a foothold, and several of them crouch down slightly, holding their backs perpendicular to the ground and packing together in a tight group. It only takes a second longer for several more men in blue to come running up, single file, and use the crouched men as stairs to jump up over the heads of the men in white while making a grab for the pole. The white team is soon overwhelmed as the man perched on top of the pole is pulled down, and members of the blue team climb up. The objective soon becomes apparent as the pole begins to tilt from the efforts of the blue team, and the crowds cheer louder and louder. Once the pole comes to a 30° angle with the ground, a whistle sounds, and the two teams break apart, the blue team raising their hands in victory and giving each other high-fives. All of this takes only three minutes to occur.

The Japanese sport is called Bo-taoshi, which translates to “pole bring-down.” It is played mostly by cadets of the National Defense Academy of Japan, but is also popular at many grade schools throughout the country. Two teams participate at a time; with each team is split into defenders and attackers, with 75 players in each section. There are actually two poles in each game, and the objective is to take down your enemy’s pole before they take down yours. While the game seems chaotic, and it often is, each player has a particular role, and they organize themselves based on which job they’re assigned. The attackers only have three positions. 1.) Springboard/scrum, consisting of the players who crouch down so teammates literally climb over their backs and get a height advantage over the defenders, allowing them easier access to the pole. 2.) Pole Attackers, who use the scrums to attack the pole directly. 3.) General Support Attackers, who

are free to roam around and distract or disrupt the defenders any way they can. The defenders have five positions. 1.) The Ninja is the single man who perches on top of the pole. His job is to shift his weight to help keep the pole balanced, and he is also free to kick away any attackers who get too close. 2.) Pole Supports are the ones at the base of the pole who push or pull on it to keep it upright. 3.) Barriers stand just outside of the Pole Supports and act as a human wall, keeping out attackers. 4.) Scrum Disablers have the specific role of breaking up the opponent’s attacking scrum formation. 5.) The Interference are the few who run around outside the formation, attempting to disrupt the attacker’s movements and slow them down. While entertaining to watch and good for a laugh, the dangerous nature of this sport as well as the large teams required mean it will likely never become widely popular, instead remaining an oddity brought to us by the Internet for a few


SPORTS

Michigan Tech Lode

Thursday, September 24

Soccer falls to Ashland 0-1

15

MICHIGAN TECH ATHLETICS Press Release HOUGHTON, Mich. — Michigan Tech held a 21-4 advantage in shots including a 10-3 disparity in shots on goal, but it was Ashland earning a 1-0 victory at Sherman Field in both teams’ GLIAC opener today. The lone goal of the game came in the 84th minute as a long pass was sent toward Tech’s goal from midfield. AU’s Morgan Brittengle won a foot race to the ball and chipped a shot over Huskies’ goalkeeper Jenna Phelps. Tech (3-2, 0-1 GLIAC) had plenty of opportunities to score in the game. Jacqueline Mielke got behind the defense in the 28th minute but hit the outside of the post. The hosts had a 11-2 advantage in shots at half. Rachel Wall made a great individual effort to beat the Eagles defense in the 52nd minute but fired a strong shot just high. Later in the half, Madeline Faust missed a drive from atop the 18-yard box wide left. “It’s disappointing,” said Tech coach Michelle Jacob. “Ashland clogged things up in the middle. We were out of sync and had a hard time making calm passes. “We took a lot more shots, but didn’t put one in and they did.” Ashland (4-0, 1-0 GLIAC) goalkeeper Courtney Barker made 10 saves in the game—four in the first half and six more after intermission. Phelps had two saves for the Huskies. Michigan Tech will have a week off before returning to action next Friday (Sept. 25) at Walsh.

Jacqueline Mielke moving the ball forward against Ashland in Friday night’s game.

Varsity Events Schedule: September 17 - 23 Women’s Volleyball Men’s Tennis

Thursday, 24

Friday, 25 Vs. Ashland, 7:00 p.m. **

Saturday, 26 Vs. Lake Erie @ 3:00 p.m. **

@ Bulldog Invitational

@ Bulldog Invitational

Football

Soccer

Sunday, 27

Vs. Northern Michigan, 7:00 p.m. ** @ Walsh, 5:00 p.m.**

@ Ohio Dominican, 12:00 p.m.**

Monday, 28

Photo by Maxwell Curtis

Home Game ** Conference Match Tuesday, 29 @ Northern Michigan, 7:00 p.m. **

Wednesday, 30


10

Thursday, September 24

OPINION

Michigan Tech Lode

?

Is dressing up worth the effort?

Pro: KASSIA PRYSTALSKI Editor in Chief

ROUND 2

With Career Fair looming over everyone’s heads, we’ve all been busy. Our resumes are up-to-date, our “elevator pitch” is practiced in front of a mirror until maybe it doesn’t sound so foolish, and we’ve done more practice interviews than even make sense anymore. But something that I, at least, put off thinking about until the last minute last year was finding an outfit. But actually dressing well, even in day-to-day life, is key. Obviously every event has its own dress code, and no matter your feelings on wardrobe, most people know better than to show up to Career Fair in pajama pants and an ill-fitting T-shirt. Why doesn’t it follow then, to show up to campus looking and feeling smart every day? Those few extra minutes buttoning up a shirt or choosing the right shoes can change the way the way that not only you, but your professors and colleagues see yourself.

Honestly, my “dress up” clothes are more comfortable than my other clothes. For a while, I actually had my coworkers greet me with surprise when I wasn’t wearing a dress. Especially in hot weather, nothing feels cooler and more carefree than a cute, past-the-knee dress. And for men, I’ve heard that wool pants are actually very breathable and comfy. I also think that, if I spent a few minutes making an outfit in the morning or the night before, it frees my mind for the rest of the things on my plate for the day. If I run into someone from a meeting, I don’t have that nagging thought at the back of my head: “Oh no! Is my hair a mess? Do they know this is the same shirt I wore yesterday?” etc. Dressing up is more about how you wear something rather than what you’re wearing.

ROUND 3

ROUND 1

Debate:

Dressing styles:

Surely dressing in uncomfortable clothing isn’t the only way to dress well. Like anything, it can be taken to extremes, but I still think the extra effort is worth it. When you meet new people (and on campus, that seems to be every day, no matter what you expect), you don’t want them to remember you as some “blah” person, or worse, as someone who looked like you just rolled out of bed. Our generation seems to be pushing heavily for a more casual society, but as long as we still need to get a foothold in the workplace, we need to be impressing our elders. Besides our elders, who is going to say they met their future spouse because he or she was the least dressed-up person in the room. Taking a few extra moments to step up your isn’t asking too much.

Con: ANDREA SPENCER Opinion Editor

Taking time to care about appearance isn’t a bad thing, and is by no means healthy to be overdone, but caring doesn’t equate to “fancier equals better”. Above all, being comfortable with your own skin and shirt choice will not only make your experience better, but everyone else’s as well. Of course sweatpants aren’t good for everyday, but somedays that’s the best thing to put on! Wearing something you won’t be yourself in does not make a good impression. In fact, it draws attention away from you and toward the relatively less important fabric on your body. Dressing down can sometimes work for your advantage.

I am sure I’m not the only one noticing that more fashionable clothes can either be uncomfortable or distracting. Trying to make the newest, hippest clothing comfortable seems to always end up in it becoming more revealing, and if it’s not that then there’s always a tag brushing your skin or an awkward fit. This applies to guys as much as to girls. There’s a reason suits are only for special occasions. The best part about developing society is that there are becoming fewer rules about appearance. It’s up to you to personalize your style, and if fancy isn’t for you, those who let you dress down are the one’s worth keeping around. The need to wear uncomfortable clothes is diminishing at a noticeably fast pace.

It’s easy to get carried away when looking nice. At first it becomes about looking your best, your brightest, becoming a person you take joy in being. Then as time progresses it can become about meeting social standards, appearing like you care about every detail, proving that you’re up-to-date and original. It can become a consuming effort and it can twist your view of who you want to be. Albeit a stretch, the effort put into dressing up can lead to forcing effort out of more important things. Balance is key, so at the least take a day every now and then to simply not care. Instead spend your time and efforts in carving out your identity, your personality. Nothing is as important as your potential, and don’t let how you look effect that.


Michigan Tech Lode

OPINION

Thursday, September 24

Gockenback: Do what you love ANDREA SPENCER Opinion Editor

Mathematical Sciences Dept. Chair Mark Gockenback

Photo courtesy of MTU Math Dept.

mathematics course a semester, but he also helps in advising students when he’s not busy keeping the whole department on its feet. He really tries to do it all. What got him to where he is? There’s

no better way to put it than in his own words, “I really love mathematics.” This is evident in the fact that he has obtained five different degrees, including a PhD in Computational and Applied Mathematics. Professor Gockenbach didn’t know what specific job he when he was an undergrad, so instead he relied on his interests. His career goal to continually learn and advance in the world of math has brought him to where he is today- and to some other neat places along the way. One of his past jobs took him to Malaysia, where he taught math for two years. Mark Gockenbach works hard to help the students who he comes into contact with here at Tech. He was the first professor I met as I went on a tour here and he helped me finalize my decision to attend this university. His advice to students, especially as Career Fair comes up, echos what the best advisors are saying. “Today’s world is competitive and it’s not good enough to just get good grades and be a good student.” Doing anything to set yourself apart is a crucial part of getting the job you want. Do what you love and take a moment to appreciate those who do likewise.

Insider Interview: KAENDALL BELOPAVLOVICH Sports Editor With Career Fair just around the corner, having insider knowledge on prestigious companies will be an upper hand in scoring an interview. The Oshkosh Corporation is a highly sought-after employer, and the candidate pool is consequently large. Oshkosh is known for their specialty vehicles and truck bodies, which they design and manufacture. “Oshkosh looks for all types of engineers. They are an industry company that design and build specialty trucks,” said Alfredo Soto, a Tech student who cooped with Oshkosh. On Aug. 25, Oshkosh unveiled their new $6.7 billion contract with the U.S. Army to design and manufacture 17,000 Joint Light Tactical Vehicles (JLTV). In the days leading up to Career Fair there are a plethora of activities and seminars that are designed to help students meet and interview with companies. There are mock interview appointments to help answer the tough questions, such as what is your best quality, and resume blitzes in which industry professionals offer 15 minutes of great advice to help strengthen students’ resumes. Soto also gave some great advice to pass on to other students. “If it wasn’t for [Michigan

Oshkosh Corp.

Tech’s] resume blitz and the companies coming to campus and me asking questions, […] I wouldn’t have been lucky. Go to their events and show interest, these companies will recognize and keep tabs on you.” He also mentioned that the company took interest in his resume because of the work he had put

“Go to [Oshkosh’s] events and show interest. These companies will keep tabs on you.” - Alfred Soto into making it. Soto worked for the Oshkosh Corporation this past summer. He used his background in electrical engineering to draft and build components of the JLTV, and applied his knowledge of building circuits and writing code for databases. The Oshkosh Corporation will be hosting an info session on Saturday, Sept. 26 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the MUB. Attending this

session will be crucial in gaining knowledge and insight into the company, as well as meeting some of the company professionals. As Soto said, showing interest in the companies and introducing yourself to them will allow the companies to recognize you. Companies are more likely to show interest in students who have prepared for interviews ahead of time by learning basic information about the company. To put yourself in a good position during Career Fair, a few general tips should be noted. First, when meeting with a company representative, greet them with a smile, make direct eye contact and offer a handshake. As nerve-wracking as this may be, showing confidence will attract the attention of representatives. Wear something that is both comfortable and professional will allow you to look your best and feel your best on an important day such as this. The Huffington Post suggests that you ask questions, talk about your goals and experience, and prepare your key points. Good luck to all students vying for an interview or job while attending this year’s fall Career Fair.

Un Kendall Belopavlovich

LODE

ing

ZONE

Here at Tech there are positions open in varying fields for those who have obtained their own scholarly degrees and training, but who still want to keep learning. From professor to graduate TA to department chair, these jobs are unique to the world of science and engineering. The people who hold these positions can move forward in their own educational development while helping others to do the same. They do not work in an industry or for a company; instead they fill a position that not many students consider when thinking of a job for themselves. Someone of interest to me personally is Professor Gockenbach, the Mathematical Sciences Department Chair for Michigan Tech. No one quite has a job like he does. He described his job as unpredictable, with a majority of his time spent attending to this or that gone wrong, as well as other administrative tasks. He has to make decisions regarding budget, hiring, teaching and advising, and he continues to write. He already has a list of 36 publications, the most recent titled

“Finite-Dimensional Linear Algebra”, published in 2010. His work week is a full 45 hours on campus plus time spent after hours and weekends. Not only does he try to take on the task of teaching at least one

11

Sports. The section of the newspaper you’ve skipped past because it has too much muscle. You’re afraid to read the articles for fear of not understanding the jock-style jargon. Every time the phrase “clean the glass” has appeared you’ve suddenly wondered if your mother is sending you subliminal messages. Don’t worry, it’s just the sports writers. Have no fear, the new sports section editor is here! It’s time to be excited about sports. So excited, that every time you’re eating a bowl of cereal and you happen to glance at the sports page title you slam the bowl on the floor and scream “touchdown!” Your unfortunate roommate might not understand this seemingly absurd behavior, but they don’t have to- this is sports! This will be a sports section that’ll feel so real you’ll be sweating after reading the football headliner. So real that you’ll even feel the need to tackle your friends when the Huskies bring home the big W. But not real enough to actually cause these strong emotions to erupt within your happy, Husky heart. We’re about to bring our game face and make some plays you’ve never seen before. With the newest draft picks, our team is sure to please. Stay tuned every week for a play-by-play of all things sporty, the scoreboard is about to get stacked in the sports section. So good readers of The Lode, please allow the sports section to bring forth the action-packed news you deserve. We’ll treat you better than your ex, we promise.


Upcoming

Events SEPTEMBER 24 - 30 Inside Out

Friday, Sept. 25 and Saturday, Sept. 26

5:30 p.m. , 8:30 p.m., and 11:30 p.m. Fisher 135

After young Riley is uprooted from her Midwest life and moved to San Francisco, her emotions – Joy, Fear, Anger, Disgust and Sadness – conflict on how best to navigate a new city, house, and school. Brought to you by FilmBoard.

Pavlis Honors College Open House

Sunday, Sept. 27 12 - 3 p.m. M&M 722

Join us to see how through passion and determination you can customize and expand your education through an array of experiential learning opportunities offered through the Pavlis Honors College.

A World Without Ice – Panel lecture and discussion

Saturday, Sept. 26 3 - 5 p.m. Forestry Building

Part science, part music, part art, the collaboration is a groundbreaking, multi-sensory experience that is thought provoking and compelling. Using photographs taken at both poles of our planet by Dr. Pollack and his team, an original composition written by Dr. Rush using whose patterns and structure are derived from 120 years of climate data, and an ice-melt actuated rhythm created by ten ice domes melting onto drums created by Dr. Gould, the exhibit creates a different space in which visitors can contemplate a warming planet.

First International Club potluck meeting

Saturday Sept. 26

6 p.m.

Hillside Place Kitchen

Everyone come in with a dish/dessert/drink! Usually we have dishes from more than four countries. E-board intro, go over upcoming big events, talk about our weekly language workshop and more. Also we will have time for all the attendants to talk to each other and share their differnt experiences while having awesome food from different countries. Hint for Americans: if you do not know what to bring, chicken pot pie, Rice Krispy treats, and desserts are always welcome. Feel free to bring different country’s dish if you would like.

16th Annual Drag Show

Saturday, Sept. 26 8 p.m. Rozsa Center

Come watch the likes of Joey Black, Cass Marie Domino, Tabitha Stevens, and others light up the stage for a night of wild and exciting entertainment! Tickets available at the Rozsa. “Meet the Queens” and amateur drag show Friday night starting at 6 p.m. in DHH Ballroom. All brought to you by Keweenaw Pride.

Sorority Recruitment Bid Night

Monday Sept. 28 9 p.m - 10 p.m. M&M U115

The final night of FSR; participating women will recieve their sorority bid! Brought to you by the Panhellenic Council.

2015 Fall Career Fair

Tuesday, Sept. 29 12 p.m. - 5 p.m. SDC

The Michigan Tech Career Fair is an excellent opportunity for students to network with hundreds of companies visiting our campus. Visit the SDC for a chance to meet with hundreds of industry representatives interested in helping you with the next phase in your career! View a list of registered companies at: career.mtu.edu/careerfair/fall2015/companies/ Brought to you by Student Events, Career Services, Offices and Services, Center for Diversity and Inclusion. See more information in the article on page 3.

Place your ad here! Special rates on events page advertising. Contact us at lodeads@mtu.edu or for more information call (906) 487-2404.

Profile for Michigan Tech Lode

09/24/2015  

The September 24th, 2015 issue of the Michigan Tech Lode

09/24/2015  

The September 24th, 2015 issue of the Michigan Tech Lode

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