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Diversity Facts 2012


Institutional Diversity www.diversity.mtu.edu The Office for Institutional Diversity reports to the president and has responsibility for leadership in advancing diversity at all levels of the University. The special assistant to the president for institutional diversity works collaboratively with the provost, deans, and academic units, and provides regular input to student affairs. The special assistant serves as the president’s liaison to a number of state and national organizations and corporations to increase visibility, funding, and knowledge—supporting the recruitment, retention, and success of a diverse faculty, staff, and student body. The development and implementation of academic and student affairs’ diversity plans, fundraising activities, and competitive proposals, including strategic diversity initiatives, are overseen by the Office for Institutional Diversity. The ongoing cultural climate study is directed through Institutional Diversity (www.diversity.mtu. edu/Reports.php). The University supports a broad approach to its diversity initiative, which can be viewed at www.diversity.mtu.edu or see A Comprehensive Approach to Diversity chart (next page). It is especially critical that our campus and community recognize, appreciate, and take full advantage of the value that diversity brings to learning, research, and personal and economic development. We invite you to join Michigan Tech in creating a diverse and inclusive university whose graduates are truly prepared intellectually, personally, and socially to create the future in a national and global society. Please contact Chris S. Anderson (csanders@mtu.edu or 906-487-2474), if you would like additional information.

2  Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012

Institutional Accountability An institution-wide challenge exists to effectively assess and evaluate our diversity efforts. We regularly measure retention and graduation rates of students and recruitment outcomes of diverse faculty, staff, and students. The success of faculty is also critical to ensuring that we meet our short- and long-term diversity goals. The charts and tables provided in this publication describe the longitudinal and current status of some of these measures. The University’s Strategic Plan dashboard (www.mtu.edu/stratplan) contains additional data. The National Science Foundation ADVANCE Program, Changing the Face at Michigan Tech, has resulted in extensive benchmarking and the establishment of tracking strategies for faculty recruitment and retention. The University regularly participates in national surveys and projects that help identify our challenges and strengths and provide comparative data and recommendations for improvement—e.g., the national Project to Assess Climate in Engineering (PACE) funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and conducted by the Center for Workforce Development at the University of Washington. The 2005 Climate Survey provided a baseline from which change can be measured. The 2010–11 follow-up Climate Survey and ongoing Climate Study will result in new recommendations, highlight accomplishments, and inform diversity plan strategies for academic units and student affairs. A third Climate Survey will be implemented in fall 2015.


A Comprehensive Approach to Diversity

Institutional Support

Society of African American Men (SAAM)

Academic Diversity Strategic Plans and Annual Reviews

Society of Intellectual Sisters (SIS) Society of Women Engineers (SWE)

Alumnae—Presidential Council of Alumnae (PCA)

Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE)

Corporate Advisory Board for Institutional Diversity

Wade McCree Program

Cultural Climate Study Dual Career Program Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Awardee Little Huskies Child Development Center Making Our Mark @ Michigan Tech website NSF ADVANCE Institution Out for Work Certification Services for Disabled Students Special Assistant to the President for Institutional Diversity University Diversity Framework/Strategic Plan Women in Science and Engineering (WISE)

Undergraduate and Graduate Groups

Michigan Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) National Action Council for Minorities In Engineering Scholars Program (NACME)

Women in Computer Science (WiCS)

Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF)

Women of Promise

SWE Dine with Industry

Pre-College Outreach

Academic and Other Education Programs

Michigan Tech/DAPCEP College Access Programs Engineering Scholars Program (ESP) Gear Up/College Day Get WISE Day NSF Math and Science Partnership/Michigan Teaching Excellence Program (MSP/MITEP) Women in Engineering (WIE) Pre-College Summer Academic Programs

Sample University/ Partner Programs 360° Partner Scholarship Program

African Student Organization (ASO)

Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program (DAPCEP)

American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES)

Detroit Compact

Keweenaw Pride (KP)

Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP)

Graduate Engineering for Minorities (GEM)

National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)

Grand Rapids Area Pre-College Engineering Program (GRAPCEP)

out in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (oSTEM)

King Chavez Parks Future Faculty Fellowships (KCP FFF)

Black History Month and Cultural Celebrations Diversity Education—Professional Development Diversity Minor Excelling the Student Experience of Learning (ExSEL) Hispanic Heritage Month and Cultural Celebrations KCP Michigan College/University Partnership (MICUP - Michigan Tech/LSAMP) KCP Visiting Women and Minority Lecturer/ Scholar Series (VWMLS) Native American History Month and Cultural Celebrations Parade of Nations Study Abroad Transfer Scholars Research Program World Cultures (required course) Women’s History Month and Cultural Celebrations

Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012  3


Student Academic and Personal Support Michigan Tech’s Center for Diversity and Inclusion provides support mechanisms for all students, enhancing their learning environment and offering personal and professional growth opportunities. The center focuses on mentoring and encouraging underrepresented student groups, including women, and sponsoring professional development programs to reinforce their success. The ExSEL (Excelling the Student Experience of Learning) program is a partnership between the University’s Schools and Colleges and the Dean of Students Office. Through course work, grade monitoring, and other support services, the program encourages success for first-generation and academically and economically disadvantaged students. The program promotes the use of campus resources such as the learning centers, academic advisors, and the Center for Diversity and Inclusion staff. ExSEL is part of COMPASS (Center for Orientation, Mentoring, Parents, and Academic Student Success), which provides additional support for students. Michigan Tech offers learning centers for math, writing, chemistry, computer science, physics, and more. The learning centers are staffed by students who have mastered the material. Both long- and short-term help is available. Students can maintain weekly appointments, use the learning centers on an “as needed” basis during walk-in hours, or they can take advantage of “team learning” with peers. Various surveys and statistics have shown that Michigan Tech students who use the learning centers achieve better grades. Michigan Tech remains committed to enrolling and graduating a greater percentage of underrepresented students, as well as improving graduation rates of all students. The Making Our Mark at Michigan Tech website provides testimonials that highlight the challenges and successes of our students and the programs and individuals who have impacted their lives. Visit www.hu.mtu.edu/ makingourmark.

Center for Diversity and Inclusion www.diversitycenter.mtu.edu

The Center for Diversity and Inclusion (CDI) at Michigan Tech is a resource for preparing and empowering socially conscious leaders who will create the future. The staff actively encourages the intellectual, social, and professional growth of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (GLBTQ) students; students of color; and women. Our programs focus on cultural awareness, community building, and student retention. Through a broad range of services, workshops, and events, students have the opportunity to   • engage in cross-cultural interactions and explore differences as well as similarities   • form new bonds and friendships   • recognize and celebrate the contributions of historically marginalized populations   • learn more about themselves

4  Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012

CDI provides both professional and personal advising for minority students by • mentoring students regarding their academic and personal needs • introducing students to academic, personal, and professional resources on and off campus • advising and assisting several student organizations • working closely with student chapters of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE), out in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (oSTEM), and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) to support their activities and assist them in meeting their goals • celebrating the graduation of minority students at the annual Hispanic/African American/Native American (HAANA) banquet • working closely with the Excelling the Student Experience of Learning (ExSEL) program staff to foster student success The Center for Diversity and Inclusion assists students in identifying sources of financial aid and personal development opportunities such as undergraduate research, internships, and co-op positions. The center is also a resource for academic departments and individuals, providing statistics and expertise in cultural diversity and outreach.

Graduate Student Services

CDI collaborates with Michigan Tech faculty and contacts from other minority-serving institutions to help identify and recruit students for the University’s master’s and doctoral programs. The King Chavez Parks Initiative Future Faculty Fellowship Program (KCP FFF), the Graduate Engineering for Minorities (GEM) Fellowships/Programs, and the Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP), coordinated through the Institutional Diversity and Graduate Program offices, provide fellowship and professional development opportunities for underrepresented graduate students.


Enrollment Michigan Tech actively recruits students throughout the academic year via on-campus events and residential summer academic youth programs. These programs have an underrepresented minority participant rate of approximately 40 percent and a female participation rate of 50 percent. Over 1,000 pre-college students participate in one- or multiple-week academic programs each summer. In addition, youth programs’ outreach and engagement staff and enrollment management staff collaborate with academic units and industry partners to design and deliver educational demonstrations and activities for students at their schools and at other off-site venues during the academic year. (Go to www.youthprograms.mtu.edu for additional outreach and Mind Trekkers program information.) Educators, many of whom work in schools with high-minority populations, also participate in Michigan Tech professional development programs (www.ed.mtu.edu). They serve as valuable partners to provide quality pre-college STEM education and as advocates for Michigan Tech (www.cls.mtu.edu). The University recruitment and marketing plan supports an aggressive effort to attract female and minority students. Outreach to students from groups that are underrepresented at Michigan Tech is an important component of the University’s diversity initiative.

Total Undergraduate and Graduate Enrollment History by Ethnic Group, 2000 to 2011 Year

Int’l

% of Total

African American

% of Total

Native American

% of Total

Asian American

% of Total

Hispanic

% of Total

White

% of Total

Multiethnic

% of Total

Undeclared

% of Total

Total Female

% of Total

Total Male

% of Total

Grand Total

2000

570

 9.0

129

2.0

50

0.8

73

1.2

49

0.8

5,328

84.1

21

0.3

116

1.8

1,660

26.2

4,676

73.8

6,336

2001

657

 9.9

149

2.3

44

0.7

85

1.3

58

0.9

5,361

81.1

33

0.5

223

3.4

1,705

25.8

4,905

74.2

6,610

2002

668

10.1

150

2.3

44

0.7

76

1.1

64

1.0

5,353

80.8

37

0.6

233

3.5

1,653

25.0

4,972

75.0

6,625

2003

693

10.6

133

2.0

55

0.8

83

1.3

74

1.1

5,268

80.2

37

0.6

222

3.4

1,638

25.0

4,927

75.0

6,565

2004

608

 9.3

128

2.0

58

0.9

74

1.1

86

1.3

5,329

81.5

33

0.5

224

3.4

1,557

23.8

4,983

76.2

6,540

2005

605

 9.3

118

1.8

52

0.8

73

1.1

97

1.5

5,298

81.4

43

0.7

224

3.4

1,523

23.4

4,987

76.6

6,510

2006

582

 8.9

125

1.9

58

0.9

78

1.2

88

1.3

5,321

81.2

43

0.7

255

3.9

1,576

24.1

4,974

75.9

6,550

2007

652

 9.6

123

1.8

63

0.9

74

1.1

78

1.2

5,388

79.7

71

1.1

309

4.6

1,658

24.5

5,100

75.5

6,758

2008

819

11.7

106

1.5

50

0.7

76

1.1

73

1.0

5,470

77.9

90

1.3

334

4.8

1,719

24.5

5,299

75.5

7,018

2009*

892

12.5

 95

1.3

45

0.6

81

1.1

110

1.5

5,450

76.2

52

0.7

423

5.9

1,780

24.9

5,368

75.1

7,148

2010*

991

14.2

103

1.5

44

0.6

81

1.2

110

1.6

5,262

75.4

71

1.0

314

4.5

1,809

25.9

5,167

74.1

6,976

2011*

1,023

14.5

102

1.5

47

0.7

80

1.1

114

1.6

5,324

75.7

80

1.1

264

3.8

1,839

26.1

5,195

73.9

7,034

*Reported using new federal methodology.   Note: Includes online learning.  

Undergraduate Enrollment of Underrepresented Minorities (URM)* Fall 1988 to Fall 2011 Fall

Number

Percent

Fall

Number

Graduate Enrollment of Underrepresented Minorities (URM)* Fall 2000 to Fall 2011 Nondegree

Percent

Master’s

Doctoral

Total

1988

 99

1.6

2000

218

3.8

Year

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

1989

128

2.1

2001

238

4.0

2000

 0

0.0

 6

1.5

 4

1.4

10

1.5

1990

140

2.3

2002

237

4.0

2001

 0

0.0

 8

2.1

 5

1.7

13

1.9

1991

173

2.7

2003

231

4.0

2002

 0

0.0

16

4.2

 5

1.5

21

3.0

 0

0.0

20

4.7

11

2.9

31

3.9

1992

194

3.1

2004

241

4.2

2003

1993

169

2.8

2005

230

4.1

2004

 1

0.1

18

4.1

13

3.3

31

3.7

1994

166

2.9

2006

231

4.1

2005

 3

0.3

24

5.0

13

3.1

37

4.1

1995

163

2.9

2007

235

4.0

2006

 1

0.1

24

4.9

16

3.8

40

4.4

 0

0.0

14

2.9

15

3.6

29

3.2 1.9

1996

167

3.0

2008

210

3.5

2007

1997

190

3.3

2009

225

3.8

2008

 0

0.0

 9

1.6

10

2.4

19

1998

203

3.6

2010

220

3.8

2009

 4

0.3

14

1.9

11

2.4

25

2.1

1999

221

3.9

2011

216

3.8

2010

 3

0.2

21

1.7

13

1.0

37

2.9

2011

 7

0.5

28

2.1

12

0.9

47

3.6

*URM includes American Indian/Alaskan Native, African American/Non-Hispanic, and Hispanic/Hispanic American. Note: Includes online learning.

*URM includes American Indian/Alaskan Native, African American/Non-Hispanic, and Hispanic/Hispanic American. Note: Includes online learning.

Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012  5


Enrollment by Level and Ethnicity, Fall 2011 Bachelor’s

Master’s

PhD

African American/ Non-Hispanic 1.4% Other 11.8%

Other 49.6%

American Indian/ Alaskan Native 0.7% Asian/ Asian American 0.9%

White/ Non‑Hispanic 83.5%

African American/ Non-Hispanic 0.9%

African American/ Non-Hispanic 0.6%

White/ Non‑Hispanic 44.6%

Hispanic/Hispanic American 1.6%

Other 61.1%

American Indian/ Alaskan Native 1.4%

Asian/Asian American 1.1% White/ Non‑Hispanic 35.5%

Asian/ Asian American 1.7%c

Hispanic/Hispanic American 1.3%

Hispanic/Hispanic American 2.0%

Select Multi-Ethnic Enrollment, Fall 2009 to Fall 2011 Year

White & Native American

White & Asian

White & African American

White & Pacific Islander

White, Native American, African American & Asian

White, Native American & African American

White, Native American & Asian

White, Asian & Pacific Islander

White, African American & Pacific Islander

White, Native American, African American, Asian & Pacific Islander

Native American & African American

African American & Asian

Asian & Pacific Islander

African American & Pacific Islander

Total

2009 2010

25

9

5

2

0

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

52

35

17

7

1

1

2

1

0

0

1

4

2

0

0

2011

71

33

19

10

1

1

3

1

1

0

0

5

3

2

1

80

Enrollment by Level and Residency, Fall 2011 Bachelor’s

International 44.3%

Domestic 92.7%

PhD

Master’s

International 7.6%

Domestic 55.7%

International 55.6%

Domestic 44.4%

Enrollment by Level and Gender, Fall 2011 Bachelor’s

Master’s

Female 25.1% Male 74.9%

6  Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012

Male

71.1%

PhD

Female 30.4%

Female 28.9% Male 69.6%


Enrollment History of Women, Fall 2000 through 2011 No College Designated

Undergraduate Students

Total

College of Engineering

College of Sciences and Arts

School of Technology

Year

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

2000

1,452

25.6

43

47.8

154

41.8

698

20.9

22

12.5

70

36.5

430

38.5

35

9.1

2001

1,488

25.1

36

46.8

164

40.7

707

21.5

87

16.5

57

35.2

411

38.1

26

6.4

2002

1,418

24.0

29

44.6

169

39.7

669

20.4

89

14.8

46

33.1

398

38.5

18

4.8

2003

1,372

23.8

50

59.5

158

36.6

615

18.8

61

15.0

44

37.6

427

40.1

17

4.3

2004

1,284

22.5

37

40.7

155

35.9

559

17.2

42

14.5

42

31.8

430

40.2

19

4.3

2005

1,228

21.9

60

55.0

164

38.7

505

15.4

 8

16.7

49

34.5

421

37.4

21

4.3

2006

1,275

22.6

49

43.0

170

40.2

519

16.3

 3

 9.7

51

33.6

461

38.7

22

4.1

2007

1,349

23.1

66

38.6

185

40.5

526

16.2

 4

14.8

57

31.7

492

38.3

19

4.0

2008

1,410

23.4

47

42.3

190

42.6

551

16.5

63

33.5

543

35.9

16

3.7

2009

1,463

24.6

55

51.4

196

44.1

595

17.6

59

33.0

544

38.8

14

3.3

2010

1,441

25.2

49

49.0

174

41.8

586

18.0

68

35.2

548

39.6

16

4.4

2011

1,455

25.4

640

19.2

550

40.1

No College Designated

Total

Graduate Students

School of Business and Economics

School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science

University Extended Programs

School of Business and Economics

College of Engineering

School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science

University Extended Programs

College of Sciences and Arts

School of Technology

Year

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

2000

208

31.0

 71

19.0

42

54.5

 95

43.4

2001

217

32.3

 1

33.3

 83

21.7

36

60.0

 97

42.9

2002

235

33.1

 5

71.4

 85

21.7

40

54.1

105

44.3

2003

266

33.3

 5

71.4

108

24.3

36

45.0

117

43.7

2004

273

32.9

3

50.0

15

41.7

108

23.7

40

46.5

107

43.1

2005

295

32.9

4

21.1

19

32.2

107

23.7

46

54.1

119

42.3

2006

301

32.9

11

35.5

17

36.2

119

24.7

40

52.6

114

40.6

2007

309

33.9

17

40.5

16

47.1

114

24.4

43

55.1

119

40.9

2008

309

31.4

24

35.3

14

41.2

122

22.8

39

52.0

110

40.3

2009

317

26.3

33

21.2

15

30.6

120

19.2

29

38.2

120

40.0

2010

368

29.3

34

40.5

21

40.4

144

20.1

37

45.1

132

41.1

2011

384

29.5

156

20.6

134

42.1

Enrollment by Gender and Select Ethnicities, Fall 2012* Undergraduate

Native American

African American

Hispanic/ Latino

Native American

Female

11

14

29

54

Female

1

Male

21

66

75

162

Male

3

Total

32

80

104

216

Total

4

23

Combined Graduate

African American

Hispanic/ Latino

Combined

9

8

18

14

13

30

21

48

* Preliminary Data.

Percentage of Women in Engineering, Fall 1998 to Fall 2011* Undergraduates

Graduates

Fall

Number

Percent

Fall

Number

Percent

1998

774

21.8

1998

 80

23.2

1999

741

21.7

1999

 77

21.0

2000

698

20.9

2000

 71

19.0

 83

21.7

2001

707

21.5

2001

2002

669

20.4

2002

 85

21.7

2003

615

18.8

2003

108

24.3

2004

559

17.2

2004

108

23.7

107

23.7

2005

505

15.4

2005

2006

519

16.3

2006

119

24.7

2007

526

16.2

2007

114

24.4

2008

551

16.5

2008

122

22.8

17.6

2009

120

19.2

2009

595

2010

586

18.0

2010

144

20.1

2011

640

19.2

2011

156

20.6

*Includes online learning.

Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012  7


Distribution of Underrepresented Minorities (URM)* and Women by College/School at Michigan Tech Fall 2011 First-Year Women

First-Year Minorities

School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science 3.5%

College of Sciences and Arts 26.4%

College of Sciences and Arts 32.3%

School of Technology 7.5% School of Business and Economics 3.8%

Undergraduate Minorities No College Designated 1.4%

School of Business and Economics 4.2%

College of Engineering 59.4%

College of Engineering 62.3%

Undergraduate Women

School of Business and Economics 11.6%

School of Technology 0.8%

School of Technology 10.6%

No College Designated 2.6%

College of Sciences and Arts 37.8%

College of Sciences and Arts 26.4%

School of Technology 0.7%

College of Engineering 46.8%

School of Business and Economics 10.7% School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science 4.2%

College of Engineering 44.0%

School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science 3.2%

Graduate Minorities

Graduate Women

No College Designated 8.1% College of Sciences and Arts 32.4%

College of Engineering 51.4%

No College Designated 9.2% School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science 10.1%

School of Business and Economics 8.1%

*URM includes American Indian/Alaskan Native, African American/Non-Hispanic, and Hispanic/Hispanic American. Note: Includes online learning.

8  Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012

College of Sciences and Arts 35.9%

College of Engineering 39.1%

School of Business and Economics 5.7%


First-to-Second Year Retention Rates Incoming Cohort, Fall 2011 by Gender 100 80

First-to-Second Year Retention Rates Incoming Cohort, Fall 2011 by Ethnicity

100

92.4% 83.8%

81.9%

87.2%

83.2%

100.0% 100.0%100.0% 95.0%

92.9%

93.8%

90.0%

85.7% 83.3%

80

91.3% 86.7%

86.2% 83.0%

83.2%

80.0%

85.7%

77.8% 74.1% 72.2% 68.8%

60

60

40

44.4%

40

20

Female

Overall

0

Six-Year Graduation Rates First-Time Bachelor’s Degree-Seeking Students Fall 2004 Cohort by Gender 80 70

74.8%

63.5%

65.7%

n-

No

n/

100.0% 100.0%

100.0% 100.0%

68.4%

87.5%

80

60

66.7%

50

60

40

72.2% 69.2% 66.5%

64.3% 58.3%

57.1%

68.4% 66.7% 65.7% 60.0% .%

55.3% 50.0%

30

40

20

36.8%

27.3%

20

10 Overall

0

Af ri

er

College of Engineering

ica

n

In

di

University

an Am /Ala sk er an ica Na n/ No tiv As e nia Hi n/ s pa As ni ia c n Am Hi e sp ric Pa an cifi an ic/ cI Hi s la sp nd an er ic Am er ica n M W u hi lti te r a /N cia on l -H isp an In ic te rn at io na No l tS up pl ie d Ov er al l

Female

ca n

Male

Am

0

ica er

n ca

Six-Year Graduation Rates First-Time Bachelor’s Degree-Seeking Students Fall 2004 Cohort by Ethnicity

100

77.7%

66.9%

Af ri

Am

er

ica

n

Am

In

di

an

/A la

sk

an

Male

As ia

0

Na tiv e Hi n/ s pa As ni ia c n Am Hi e sp ric Pa an cifi an ic/ cI Hi s la sp nd an er ic Am er ica n M W ul hi tir te ac /N ia on l -H isp an In ic te rn at io na No l tS up pl ie d Ov er al l

20

Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012  9


First- to Second-Year Retention Rates of Bachelor’s Degree-Seeking, First-Time First-Year Students; Incoming Cohort, Fall 2010 All Students

STEM Majors

Engineering (Standard)

Engineering (Effective)

URM*

77.8

81.1

70.0

60.0

International

76.3

79.3

81.5

81.5

Female

83.9

85.6

84.8

79.5

Male

83.1

83.8

85.0

81.5

All

83.3

84.2

85.0

81.2

*URM includes American Indian/Alaskan Native, African American/Non-Hispanic, and Hispanic/Hispanic American.

First- to Third-Year Retention Rates of Bachelor’s Degree-Seeking, First­-Time First-Year Students; Incoming Cohort, Fall 2009 Category

All Students

URM*

63.0

International

76.6

Female

77.4

Male

72.1

All

73.5

*URM includes American Indian/Alaskan Native, African American/Non-Hispanic, and Hispanic/Hispanic American. Includes those who graduated as retained.

First- to Second-Year Retention by Ethnicity Number First-Year Fall 2011

Number Retained Into Fall 2012

Three-Year Average Percentage (2010–12)

11

69

African American/Non-Hispanic

16

American Indian/Alaskan Native

10

8

80

Asian/Pacific Islander

11

10

91

Hispanic/Hispanic American

27

20

74

1,030

855

83

Ethnicity Not Supplied

15

13

87

International

32

30

94

Multiracial

20

19

95

White/Non-Hispanic

Six-Year Graduation Rates** of First-Time Bachelor’s Degree-Seeking Students; Cohort, Fall 2004 All Students

STEM Majors

Engineering

URM*

47.9

50.0

46.7

International

72.2

76.9

87.5

Female

74.8

76.5

77.7

Male

63.5

64.1

66.9

All

65.7

66.2

68.4

*URM includes American Indian/Alaskan Native, African American/Non-Hispanic, and Hispanic/Hispanic American. **Student right-to-know completion rate within 150 percent of normal time.

10  Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012


About the Data It is often difficult to compare Michigan Tech’s student graduation and retention rates to national norms. The methods by which these measures are calculated and the populations included in the term “Underrepresented Minorities (URM)” vary by institutions’ reporting statistics.

Degrees Awarded to Underrepresented Minorities (URM)* and Women by Level and College, 2010–11 Degree Level

College/School

Undergraduate Degrees**

School of Business and Economics College of Engineering School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science College of Sciences and Arts School of Technology Total

Master’s Degrees

School of Business and Economics College of Engineering School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science College of Sciences and Arts

96

URM* 5

Percent

Women

Percent

5.2

47

49.0

570

14

2.5

90

15.8

37

 0

 0.0

13

35.1

216

12

5.6

97

44.9

110

5

4.5

2

1.8

1,029

36

3.5

249

24.2

26

1

3.8

6

23.1

173

2

1.2

19

11.0

24

1

4.2

8

33.3

46

2

4.3

22

47.8

269

6

2.2

55

20.4

College of Engineering

34

0

0.0

9

26.5

College of Sciences and Arts

21

2

9.5

11

52.4

Total

55

2

3.6

2.0

36.4

Total Doctoral Degrees

Total

*URM includes American Indian/Alaskan Native, African American/Non-Hispanic, and Hispanic/Hispanic American. **Includes associate degrees.

Degrees Awarded to Underrepresented Minorities (URM)* and Women by Level and Discipline, College of Engineering, 2010–11 Degree Level

Discipline

Total

URM*

Bachelor’s Degrees**

Biomedical Engineering

  33

0

0.0

14

42.4

6

0

0.0

1

16.7

Civil Engineering

96

0

0.0

15

15.6

Chemical Engineering

66

2

3.0

16

24.2

Computer Engineering

36

0

0.0

0

0.0

Electrical Engineering

85

3

3.5

10

11.8

Environmental Engineering

26

0

0

9

34.6

8

0

0

3

37.5 26.1

Engineering

Percent

Women

Percent

At Michigan Tech, women are retained (87 percent first to second year) and graduate (75 percent) at a higher rate when compared to overall student populations (83 percent and 66 percent, respectively). Underrepresented minority (Hispanic/Latino, African American, and Native American) students are retained at a rate of approximately 74 percent. Graduation rates for URM are approximately 48 percent or 18 percent less than all students. When examined more closely, the data indicates that significant numbers of retained URM students migrate from engineering disciplines to the School of Business and Economics, the School of Technology, and some College of Sciences and Arts science programs. Nationally for URM enrolled at universities designated as selective*, the six-year graduation rate is 55 percent; and the first-year retention rate is approximately 74 percent. These institutions have much smaller STEM, especially engineering, programs so they offer more opportunity for internal transfer. The ongoing goal is to recruit greater numbers of talented underrepresented students to all of our undergraduate and graduate degree programs, increase retention and graduation rates to at least the same as our overall rates, and determine strategies that stop or mitigate the flow of URM students out of engineering. (Not selecting and/or leaving STEM fields is a national issue to which significant research is being directed.) Our programs are designed to address these issues using institutional and national research to support this work.

23

1

4.3

6

Mechanical Engineering

203

8

3.9

15

7.4

Total

582

14

2.4

89

15.3

Master’s Degrees

All Engineering Majors

173

2

1.2

19

11.0

In order to increase the pool of potential diverse students and faculty, the University partners with key community colleges and high schools and is an active member in GEM, WEPAN, SWE, NACME, and state organizations such as the King Chavez Parks Initiative, DAPCEP, and GRAPCEP. In addition, faculty are increasingly interested in including broader impact and education components to their external proposals. Strong partnerships with corporations are also important resources for the University. Building internal and external collaborations is critical to ensuring that Michigan Tech meets its diversity goals.

Doctoral Degrees

All Engineering Majors

34

0

0

9

26.5

* Center for Institutional Data Exchange and Analysis, June 2011.

Geological Engineering/Geology Materials Science and Engineering

*URM includes American Indian/Alaskan Native, African American/Non-Hispanic, and Hispanic/Hispanic American. **Includes associate degrees.

Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012  11


Faculty and Staff by Select Ethnicities Year 2005–06 through 2011–12 ============= Faculty ============= Year

Ethnicity

Tenured

Tenure Track

Nontenure Track

Staff

Total

2005-06

American Indian/Alaskan Native

1

1

11

13

African American/Non-Hispanic

2

1

5

8

Asian/Asian American/Pacific Islander

29

3

10

42

4

1

6

11

Total

35

4

3

32

74

American Indian/Alaskan Native

12

12

African American/Non-Hispanic

1

1

5

7

27

2

3

9

41

Hispanic/Hispanic American

2006-07

Asian/Asian American/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Hispanic American

2007-08

4

3

8

15

Total

32

2

7

34

75

American Indian/Alaskan Native

8

8

African American/Non-Hispanic

1

1

4

6

23

4

4

9

40

4

3

8

15

Asian/Asian American/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Hispanic American

2008-09

Multiracial

2

4

6

Total

28

8

6

33

75

American Indian/Alaskan Native

9

9

African American/Non-Hispanic

2

2

1

4

6

26

10

8

8

52

4

2

1

8

15

Asian/Asian American/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Hispanic American Multiracial

2009-10

1

3

3

7

Total

33

16

10

30

89

American Indian/Alaskan Native

9

9

African American/Non-Hispanic Asian/Asian American/Pacific Islander

2010-11

2

1

4

9

13

10

10

61 14

Hispanic/Hispanic American

3

4

2

5

Multiracial

1

5

6

Total

34

19

13

33

99

American Indian/Alaskan Native

6

6

2

2

2

6

12

32

17

7

11

67 14

African American/Non-Hispanic Asian/Asian American/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Hispanic American

2011-12

2 28

3

3

1

7

Multiracial

6

6

Total

37

22

10

36

105

American Indian/Alaskan Native

6

6

African American/Non-Hispanic Asian/Asian American/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Hispanic American

2

2

1

2

7

34

20

6

10

70 20

4

4

1

11

Multiracial

1

1

7

9

Total

40

27

9

36

112

Note: Includes US citizens and permanent residents. Non-US residents are excluded. 2009 and 2010 figures reported using new federal methodology. Note: Faculty figures include those faculty on sabbatical. Deans, associate deans, department chairs, executives, and professional staff with tenure are considered staff.

12  Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012


Faculty and Staff by Gender Year 2005–06 through 2011–12 ==================

Year

Gender

2005-06

Male

Tenured 183

Female

2006-07

Total

448

749

18

41

414

520

101

862

1,269

Male

181

54

69

489

793

48

17

48

461

574

Total

229

71

117

950

1,367

Male

167

72

67

495

801

47

24

60

478

609

Total

214

96

127

973

1,410

Male

172

69

76

487

804

46

25

57

491

619

Total

218

94

133

978

1,423

Male

166

78

75

490

809

49

36

60

502

647

Total

215

114

135

992

1,456

Male

170

83

80

487

820

49

40

48

510

647

Total

219

123

128

997

1,467

Male

171

90

72

507

840

47

46

59

522

674

218

136

131

1,029

1,514

Female

2011-12

Staff

76

Female

2010-11

60

47

Female

2009-10

Nontenure Track

58

230

Female

2008-09

Tenure Track

Total

Female

2007-08

Faculty ==================

Female Total

Note: Faculty figures include those faculty on sabbatical. Deans, associate deans, department chairs, executives, and professional staff with tenure are considered staff.

Tenured/Tenure Track Faculty by Gender, 2004–05 through 2011–12 Male Female

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

251

241

235

239

241

245

252

261

64

65

65

71

71

86

89

93

Total

315

306

300

310

312

331

341

354

Percent Female

20.3

21.2

21.7

22.9

22.8

26.0

26.1

26.3

Note: Figures include all tenured and tenure-track instructional and research faculty. Also includes those faculty on sabbatical or on unpaid leave of absence. Deans, associate deans, department chairs, executives, and professional staff with tenure are excluded.

Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012  13


Corporate Advisory Board Mission Michigan Tech’s Strategic Plan includes the goal of attracting and supporting a diverse, world-class faculty, staff, and student population. By promoting a diverse and multicultural community, the University hopes to create an active and rigorous discovery-based learning environment grounded in science, engineering, technology, sustainability, and the business of innovation. The Corporate Advisory Board for Institutional Diversity was established in 2000. Its mission is centered around educating, advising, advocating for, and helping to support the University’s various diversity initiatives. 3M Sue L. Korpela ’78

DTE Energy Sharon G. Pfeuffer

BECHTEL Communications Inc. Alan C. Parker ’91

Ford Motor Company Heidi A. Mueller ’93

Caterpillar Inc. Kahreem Hogan ’04

General Motors Corporation Robert J. Freimuth ’77

Michigan Tech Office for Institutional Diversity Chris S. Anderson—Facilitator

Chrysler Group LLC Shannon Knight ’99

Hewlett-Packard Company Steve Geary ’83

Nucor Jeff Rogers

Chrysler Group LLC Jennifer Shute

Integrys Energy Group Inc. Deanna L. Sweet ’89

Somat Engineering Inc. Kim M. LeBlanc

City of Houghton Scott MacInnes ’74

Integrys Energy Group Inc. Michele A. Forgette

State Farm Insurance Kelly Jepsen ’93

Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. Julie M. Elkington ’02

Kimberly-Clark Shannon Johnson ’80

State Wide Real Estate of Houghton Kevin P. Liimatta

Consumers Energy Cynthia Westerhof

Kohler Company Sheila M. Kaufman ’93

Thayer-Carver Inc. Terese Hunwick ’90

Dell Inc. Frank Krieber ’81

Michigan Tech Center for Diversity and Inclusion Shezwae Fleming

US Army RDECOM/TARDEC Derhun Sanders ’97

Dow Chemical Company Julie Babcock ’83 Dow Chemical Company Carrie M. Schaller ’87 Dow Corning Billy J. Huss ’83

Michigan Tech Corporate Partnerships Brent J. Burns ’03

Michigan Tech Materials Science and Engineering Mark Plichta

US Public Health Services/ Indian Health Services Sarah Willoughby ’02

Michigan Tech Enrollment Services John B. Lehman

Impact Statement The Advisory Board’s greatest impact is its regular, ongoing presence on campus. The Board routinely shares knowledge and experience with staff, faculty, students, and administrators and identifies ways in which their companies can support Michigan Tech’s commitment to diversity. The alliances that are built through the Board, as well as with the individual members, strengthen the University’s ability to provide quality educational experiences in engineering, science, and related fields both in the classroom and through research in a rich, multicultural, and inclusive campus. Maintaining a high level of support for scholarships, pre-college, and multicultural programs, as well as recognizing and encouraging the diversity-related work across campus, are priorities.

14  Michigan Technological University Diversity Facts 2012


Staff Listing Institutional Diversity Chris S. Anderson Special Assistant to the President for Institutional Diversity Email csanders@mtu.edu www.diversity.mtu.edu Phone 906-487-2474 Fax 906-487-4818 Center for Diversity and Inclusion Email diversitycenter@mtu.edu www.diversitycenter.mtu.edu Phone 906-487-2920 Shezwae M. Fleming Director Center for Diversity and Inclusion Email smflemin@mtu.edu Phone 906-487-3695 Kellie Raffaelli Assistant Director Email kraffael@mtu.edu Phone 906-487-2920 Madeline Mercado Voelker Assistant Director Email mmercado@mtu.edu Phone 906-487-2920 Renee Wells Assistant Director Email rrwells@mtu.edu Phone 906-487-2920

GLBTQ Renee Wells Assistant Director Email rrwells@mtu.edu Phone 906-487-2920

Services for Disabled Students Christy Oslund Coordinator, Disability Services Email cmoslund@mtu.edu Phone 906-487-1494

ExSEL Program Susan Liebau Director Email slliebau@mtu.edu www.exsel.mtu.edu Phone 906-487-1819

Center for Pre-College Outreach Steve Patchin Director Email shpatchi@mtu.edu www.multicultural.mtu.edu Phone 906-487-2219

Graduate School Jacqueline Huntoon Associate Provost Dean of the Graduate School Email jeh@mtu.edu www.mtu.edu/grad Phone 906-487-2327

Cody Kangas Assistant Director Email ckangas@mtu.edu Phone 906-487-2219

Diversity Minor Craig Waddell Associate Professor, Humanities Email cwaddell@mtu.edu www.hu.mtu.edu/hu_dept/ undergraduate/minors.php Phone 906-487-2920

Office of Institutional Equity Jill Hodges Director Email jhodges@mtu.edu www.admin.mtu.edu/aao Phone 906-487-3310

International Programs and Services Thy Yang Director Email thyy@mtu.edu www.mtu.edu/international Phone 906-487-2160

Karyn Detmer Coordinator, MICUP Email kjdetmer@mtu.edu Phone 906-487-2920

Michigan Technological University is an equal opportunity educational institution/equal opportunity employer.


Michigan Technological University has received a national Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) award from the magazine, INSIGHT into Diversity. The award cites Michigan Tech for “its outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion for the year 2012.�


Diversity Facts Report 2012