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Online: Photo Gallery

Inside January / February 2014 online issue:

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January / February 2014

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January / February 2014 Events Featured Future Events

Features and Departments

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Big 10 X-C Championships Headless Horseman Footlocker Midwest Footlocker Finals EMU Fall Classic Ann Arbor TC X-C Classic Fantasy 5K Grand Blanc Hot Chocolate Hightail it for Heroes NCAA D3 GL X-C Regionals NCAA D1 GL X-C Regionals NYC Marathon Weekend Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon • YMCA Santa Run

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Editor’s Notes: Torn

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Michigan Runner of the Year: Lisa Veneziano

By Scott Sullivan

By Charles Douglas McEwen

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Contributor of the Year: Greg Meyer

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Open Male Runner of the Year: Clint Verran

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Open Female Runner of the Year: Dot McMahan

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Running Shorts with Scott Hubbard

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Online: Michigan Running News

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By Anthony Targan

By Charles Douglas McEwen By Charles Douglas McEwen

Book Review: Marathon Man By Dave Foley

Masters Male Runner of the Year: Ian Forsyth By Ron Marinucci

Beyond the Chip: Grass Stains By Ian Forsyth Senior Female Runner of the Year: Wanda Handlin By Anthony Targan

Senior Male Runner of the Year: Ruben Henderson, Jr. By Ron Marinucci Winter Run Calls Out By Kacey Tulley Michigan Runner Race Series - 2014 Running with Tom Henderson

Scope Me Out By Bob Schwartz

Weekly email newsletter To join: email jennie@glsp.com

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

Vol. 35, No. 6

Event Calendar

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photography by Carter Sherline, and Victah Sailer

In This Issue

About the cover: Lisa Veneziano nears the finish line at the Shillelagh 4 Mile in Flushing. Photo by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios.

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At the Races 16

Albion 5K Kicks off Festival of Forks

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Holiday Hustle Warms Dexter on Frozen Night

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10th GR Marathon Sees Mart, Volunteers Give All By Michael Zuidema

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By Charles Douglas McEwen

Windy Big Bird Sees Winners Soar By Ron Marinucci

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Plymouth Rocks Wicked Halloween Run

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Deep Freeze Descends on Detroit’s Fifth Third Turkey Trot By Charles Douglas McEwen

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By Anthony Targan

First Kona Chocolate Run is Sweet Success By Anthony Targan

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Ann Arbor Turkey Trot Moves Downtown

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Wildlife Marathon Winner Sees Wildlife Firsthand By Charles Douglas McEwen

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By Tracey Cohen

Prep State Cross Meets are Joy Renewed By Scott Sullivan

Ageless Kurtis Makes Mark at Freep By Charles Douglas McEwen

Online: Video

• Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon • Don Kern: the Adventure Continues • Interview: Owen Anderson • Wicked Halloween Run • Scenes: MHSAA LP X-C Finals • Sochi Winter Olympic Games Preview Interviews • Big Bird Run

http://michiganrunner.tv http://youtube.com (search “glsp”) http://runningnetwork.com

• • • • •

NYC Marathon and 5K CSB Backroads Half Marathon Kona Chocolate Run Scenes: NCAA D1 X-C Champs Ann Arbor Thanksgiving Turkey Trot • 5/3 Turkey Trot • Jeff Galloway Interview • Doug Kurtis Interview

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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Editor’s Notes

Torn Art McCafferty artmccaf@glsp.com Scott Sullivan scott@glsp.com Editor

Jennie McCafferty jennie@glsp.com Associate Publisher

Dave Foley Mike Duff

Gary Morgan Jim Neff Bob Schwartz Bob Seif Nick Stanko Anthony Targan Kasey Tulley Cregg Weinmann Pamela Zinkosky Michael Zuidema Jamie Fallon Composer

Rose Zylstra

Social Media Editor

Editors Emeritus

Peter Draugalis Pamela Fender Sarah Greene Tony Handlin Heather Dyc Hanks Gary Morgan Victah Sailer Ted Swoboda Photo / Video

Carter Sherline

Senior Photographer

Paul Aufdemberge Desiree Davila Ian Forsyth Tom Henderson Scott Hubbard Herb Lindsay Laurel Park Robin Sarris Hallop Rachael Steil Columnists

Tracey Cohen Jeff Hollobaugh Dean Johnson Bill Kahn William Kalmar Dr. Edward H. Kozloff Doug Kurtis Grant Lofdahl Ron Marinucci Riley McLincha Charles D. McEwen

Cheryl Clark

Chief Financial Officer

© C. Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Publisher and Chief Executive Officer

By Scott Sullivan

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So I scheduled an operation, a process that’s suddenly grown familiar. None for 57 years until late 2012, when I smashed my left wrist playing basketball. This required two surgeries: one to put steel plates and pins in, the other to take them out. “Back again?” nurses said the second time. “Do you give out punch cards?” I asked. “Cut twice and the third one’s free?” I don’t like how this is trending. The meniscus tear came while running, which for me is like breathing. Mind and body? Use or lose them. I used the latter, at least, so much running on flat feet and a bunion it knocked my right foot and ankle more and more caddywampus. “How can you walk on that?” asked my doctor, pointing to the x-ray. “Walk? I’m trying to run.” Rules of logic and proportion hinted I should have shifted at this point to break it/fake it mode, but the body can be amazing. I adapted — plodding in pain — but that stressed the knee and everything else to compensate. I did not get a punch card either. We all die of living, but what’s hurry? No more running or basketball? Why not biking? MRSub0311_Sixth Vertical 2/6/11 9:52 PM Page 1 “You won’t break down as quickly,” said the doctor. “The best I can do is prolong my degeneration?”

dd to “Use it or lose it” the caution “Break it and you can’t fake it.” I write on the precipice of knee surgery. Should be simple: doctor opens right knee, reattaches meniscus, closes. Friends have offered to do it with Krazy Glue, saving money. I had hoped the cartilage was only strained and could self-heal. But it got no better. Friends’ clucks of sympathy turned into, “Get off your butt and do something.” The delight I took beating seniors to handicapped parking spots, scattering walker-using coots like bowling pins, paled after two months of repetition. Ever had an MRI? You lay with your back down, strapped to a table like Frankenstein’s monster, while they shove you inside a giant magnetic donut, which buzzes, beeps and shoots rays through your body’s beleaguered parts for an hour to confirm what you already knew: You fool, you tore your meniscus.

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need a real doctor, like TV’s Dr. Oz, who sends emails saying I can lose weight instantly without dieting and exercising by taking his newest miracle pill, Garcinia Cambogia extract. “One pill make you larger,” sang Jefferson Airplane in the song “White Rabbit” 50 years ago. Dr. Oz pills make you small. But the ones my doctor gives me don’t do anything at all. I want a new drug that makes me younger and better-looking. One that builds stamina, speed and strength, like professional athletes take to make millions, while erasing memory, if caught, of how those substances got inside me. Reality? What kind of cure is that? Don’t sweat what you can’t do, I tell myself. Focus on what you can, such as being a camera voyeur while other people run.

michiganrunner.tv

shot the Grand Rapids Marathon four days before my meniscus surgery and saw not one, but two 10-feet-tall guys on stilts clanking 26.2 miles to the finish. The leader was dressed like a scarecrow with extra-long-inseam pants that had spiders on them. “You’re only second in your division,” I told the next stilts guy. “He da man,” sighed Stilts Guy 2, as if he finished last in stilts marathons all the time. Just my luck: someone spiked my coffee with a hallucinogen, not a miracle drug that will turn back the clock and immunize me from me. - MR -


Michigan Runner of the Year

Lisa Veneziano By Charles Douglas McEwen

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n the past 25 years, Lisa Veneziano, 49, of Fenton has run dozens of races with her husband, Jay Owens. They usually finish within a couple minutes of each other — sometimes a couple seconds.

Veneziano remembers. “I was able out-kick her down the homestretch. It was a memorable race.” What goals does she have for next year? “To maintain my 5K time,” she says. “To improve my marathon time at Boston. Do three or four triathlons/duathlons, which I started about four years ago. And generally, to continue being competitive and finishing well in races 5K to the marathon.”

But they don’t usually run together side-by-side. And they don’t really help each other out. “When gun sounds, it’s every person for themselves,” Veneziano says.

Veneziano tries not to be a one-dimensional athlete.

“We toe the line at the start, then we say good luck,” Owens elaborates. “I would run with her, but she likes to run by herself. I think it keeps her more focused on her race.”

“I do a lot of cross-training, which keeps my workouts interesting and works various muscle groups,” she says. “I keep my mileage relatively low, so I am not injury prone. And I do a fair amount of races throughout the year, which keeps me motivated.

“We each run our own race,” Veneziano says. Owens usually beats her in the 5Ks. But anything over 10 miles, she runs away from him. And if Veneziano feels Owens creeping up on her at the end of race?

“I’m really honored to get this award again,” she says. “It’s humbling.” Veneziano ran nearly every race in the 2013 series — and ran them well, amassing 160 points. Among the women, open runner Dot McMahan finished closest with 110 points. Among masters women, Amy Wing and Dawn Miller each notched 45. Veneziano was first among state masters women in four of the seven series races she entered. She finished second in the Fifth Third River Bank Run 25K in 1:43:09, first in the Dexter-Ann Arbor Half Marathon in 1:27:15, and second in the Brian Diemer 5K in 18:21. She went on to take second overall at the Plymouth YMCA Father’s Day 10K in 39:54 and third overall in the Volkslaufe 20K in 1:24:17. She was first Michigan master in the Crim 10-mile in 1:02:58 and in the Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon in 3:08:55. “I had a solid year overall,” she says. “I was pleased with my times, placing and consistency.” Veneziano, who works at General Motors and is originally from Pennsylvania, will turn 50 next September. She plans to run past that milepost without glancing over her shoulder. 8

- MR -

Lisa Veneziano smiles for the camera at the Volkslaufe 20K.

“I don’t know if I can get close to my PR’s anymore (which include a 2:50:38 marathon),” she concedes. “But I think I can still be competitive for overall wins in races.” Last year was a good example. In August and September, she was women’s titlist in the Bauman 5K (18:30), Labor Day 30K (2:09:53), Mackinac Island 8 Mile (50:51), St. John’s Parrish Applefest 10K (38:51) and Diehl’s Ciderfest 4-Mile (25:33). She has won the Bauman race five of the last six years, but singled out the Applefest 10K as her most satisfying win last year. In it, she traded haymakers with fellow Fenton resident Kelsey Bragg, 23, for much of race.

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

“We went back and forth the whole way,” |

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© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

That competitive fire has helped Veneziano in the Michigan Runner race series. For the third year in a row, she has won the overall Michigan Runner of the Year award.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“There’s no way I’m letting him pass me!” she declares.

“I put a high priority on staying fit with both aerobic exercise and strength training. I really value the physical and mental benefits I get from working out daily, which is a long commitment for me.” she says.

Lisa Veneziano and her husband, Jay Owens, warm up before the Crim 10 Mile.


full page template_Full page 12/15/13 12:46 PM Page 1


Contributor of the Year

Greg Meyer By Anthony Targan

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Lindsay recalls the inscription Meyer wrote a few years ago on a photograph of them racing when they were in their 20s: “You always brought out the best in me.”  

hirty years ago, Grand Rapids native Greg Meyer was at the pinnacle of the running world. With marathon wins in Detroit (1980), Chicago (1982) and most notably Boston (1983, the last American man to do so), he accomplished something few runners could ever even dream of. Back in the day, Meyer set 10 American road running records in the 8K, 10K, 15K, 25K and 10mile, and world records in the 15K (1980 Gasparilla in Tampa, Fla.) and 10 miles (1981 Cherry Blossom in Washington, D.C.). 

Meyer cites several reasons why Michigan has been a great state for running. “First,” he says, “in the past 50 years we’ve had great high school coaches who loved the sport and passed that passion down to their runners. Michigan produced what I would call ‘blue collar’ runners: They just were willing to do the work ... we had that work ethic! We have nasty weather, so getting out the door was a decision, not something you took for granted. It toughened us as athletes. “Michigan is such a great place to run,” he continues, “because it’s a great place to live. Thanks to people like Fred Meijer, we have miles and miles of trails to ride bikes, walk or run on. We have quality

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hile the 1983 Boston Marathon was his pinnacle achievement, Meyer says, “Boston last year was very special in so many ways.”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Meyer deserves as much recognition for what he has done off the road as on it: He is one of our state’s best ambassadors running. For his work in support of races such as the Fifth Third River Bank Run, Crim and Brooksie Way, including recruiting elite runners to join their fields, he is recipient of this year’s Contributor award.

“I can agree and reply with, ‘He always brought out the best in me too,’” Lindsay says.

L. Brooks Patterson and Greg Meyer participate in the Brooksie Way 5K, 2010. events, not only in running but cycling and triathlons. “Our high schools produce talented runners, but also attract large numbers of kids just going out for running. We also have a strong family support culture here: Parents support the effort their kids put in. That is very important.”

H

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

erb Lindsay, a contemporary and competitor of Meyer’s for many years, shares memories about his friend.

“Greg was always active in talking with peers, race organizers and sponsors,” says Lindsay. “He was among the most vocal voices in the days of rapid change that ended under-the-table payments for races on the road, and opened the cash prize system that changed the sport and habits of post-collegiate runners.

Greg runs in a recent Crim 10 Mile. 10

“I’m impressed with how Greg stays connected with his sport by attending big meets and being part of summer training programs for young runners,” continues Lindsay. “His actions remind me of his father, Jay, when he attended summer races when Greg and I were high school runners. He builds rapport, shares freely of his knowledge and experience, and makes it fun to be part of the sport.”

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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He ran the entire race with his sons, Jay and Danny, recalling “the brothers have always been close, and I got to see that play out over the last few miles as Danny struggled to get to the finish line. He really didn’t train. It made me realize how close our family is despite being separated by thousands of miles.”

Their perfect day changed 12 minutes after they finished and the bombs went off. “My daughter Nicolle and our friend Kerry Foley had been working the finish line for the BAA,” Meyer remembers. “So having them with us and knowing they were safe was very important.” He recalls an emotional rollercoaster from the “initial anxiety of ‘What’s next?’ to anger over what had happened to the event we cherish, and finally to a sense of relief we were all OK and together. “We also, as we sat there just hours after the bombing, declared our intentions to return in 2014 in support of the race and those people injured. That feeling of coming back was immediate,” Meyer says. Of the many things he does to support state running, Meyer gets “the most satisfaction out of watching the high school runners I help in the off season. Great kids who love to run and only want to get better and succeed. They work hard, laugh a lot and luckily keep improving.” Worthy goals for any runner, to be sure. - MR -


Open Male Runner of the Year

Clint Verran By Charles Douglas McEwen

Before those surgeries, Verran had starred at Eastern Michigan University. He was one of the first runners to join up with the Hansons-Brooks Distance Project, owned by Kevin and Keith Hanson, when it debuted in 1999. With Hanson-Brooks, he has run PRs of 4:00 for the mile, 13:51 for 5K, 29:14 for 10K, 1:14:00 for the half marathon and 2:14:12 for the marathon. Right after he had microsurgery on his knee, Verran, a physical therapist for his own sports medicine clinic in Rochester Hills, wasn’t aiming for a 2:14 marathon. “It’s a brutal recovery process,” he said. “I was walking with a limp for a time. I didn’t want to have super-high expectations.”

one of the strongest runners in Michigan,” Russeau said. “It didn’t work. He broke me.” After 11 miles, Verran surged away to win handily in 1:07:50. “It was a massive surge,” said Russeau. “By the time I reacted, he was gone.” “I knew I had a gear he didn’t have,” Verran said. Verran won two other half-marathons, in addition to Dexter-Ann Arbor, during a three-week period last spring. He claimed Back to the Beach at hilly Stoney Creek Metro Park in 1:16:55 and the fast, flat Bayshore Half Marathon in 1:06:38. Verran also won three 10Ks hosted by the Kona Running Co.: the ShamRock ‘n’ Roll in 31:51, Aloha 10K in 33:08 and, most recently, the Wicked Halloween Run in 31:38. In the Michigan Runner of the Year Series, Verran earned 65 points, finishing ahead of runners-up Matt Fecht, Nathan Martin and Christo Landry.

Verran appears to have recuperated fully. At least, he left that impression with Alex Russeau after the two raced against each other in the Dexter-Ann Arbor Half Marathon.

In series races, he won Dexter-Ann Arbor, finished second among state men in the Meteor 10K in 30:50, third among state men in the Fifth Third River Bank 25K (1:19:21) and fifth among Michithird“Isquare template_third 7:35 PMgan Page men1 in the HealthPlus Crim 10-Mile (51:38). was pushing the pace, square hoping I12/15/13 could break

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

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uring 2009 and 2010, Clint Verran had hip and knee surgeries. “I didn’t know if I could come back from that,” said Verran, now 38. “It was demoralizing at times.”

Clint Verran won the Dexter Ann Arbor Half Marathon in 1:07:50. Verran raced with his friend and sometimesrival Ian Forsyth of Ann Arbor in the Meteor 10K. “I ran on Ian’s shoulder right to the end,” Verran said. “I wasn’t going to let him go — but I just couldn’t get around him.” Verran turned the tables a month later in the River Bank 25K, beating Forsyth by more than two minutes. “We’ve been running against each other since college,” Verran said of Forsyth. “He was at the University of Michigan and I was at Eastern. We were just across U.S. 23 from each other. I have a lot of respect for that guy.” Verran, who finished fifth in the 2004 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials, was on pace (1:09:10 through halfway) to qualify for his his fifth trials in the Fukuoka Marathon Dec. 1 in Japan, but faded and finished in 2:32:30. He still has time to run 2:18 or better before the 2016 trials. Mike Morgan, Verran’s Hansons-Brooks teammate and (with Landry) last year’s co-Male Open Runner of the Year, said Verran deserves this year’s award. “I’ve looked up to Clint since I came to the program,” said the 33-year-old Morgan. “He’s had a great career and it’s something he should be proud of.” Brendan Martin, another Hansons-Brooks star, agrees. “I thought 2013 was Clint’s best year since at least 2008,” said Martin. “It was great comeback after so many injuries.” - MR -

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Open Female Runner of the Year

Dot McMahan By Charles Douglas McEwen

McMahan, standing 5’6” and weighing 112 pounds, looked slim and sleek in her HansonsBrooks Distance Project race singlet and didn’t look in need of retirement. She still doesn’t. For the third straight year, McMahan, 37 now, has won Michigan Runner of the Year award among open females. She won three races in the 2013 Michigan Runner series, which gave her 120 points. Erin Heenan Moffett finished runner-up with 80.

American woman, behind former Olympic bronze medal winner Deena Kastor. “Dot did a great job in less-than-ideal conditions,” said Hansons-Brooks teammate Lavenna Kubatzky. “She’s an experienced runner who trains really smart. She knows how and where to push her limits.” “Dot was amazing!” said new Hansons-Brooks recruit Danielle Miller, 21. “She proves hard work can get you anywhere. “She’s the most talented girl-power girl I’ve ever met in my life,” added Miller. “She’s a phenomenal mother (to her four-year-old daughter) and gives the best advice about running. “Dot will text me after a bad race and say, ‘Keep your head up’ or ‘Stay strong.’ She’s really supportive.”

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

“I

’m creeping toward the end of my career and that motivates me to get a few more things accomplished,” said Dot McMahan after winning the 2012 Fifth Third Turkey Trot 10K in Detroit. “I’m 36 now. If I have four more years, that would be awesome.”

McMahan started the year the way she starts With a U.S. championship and top-20 world most races, fast and strong. In early February, she set marathon finish, McMahan crossed two more things a 5K PR of 16:27 indoors at a track meet in Pennoff her “to do” list in 2013 and didn’t look ready for Dot McMahan represented the US at sylvania. In March, she finished third at the Shamthe rocking chair. Not yet. the IAAF World Championships rock Shuffle 8K in Chicago in 26:39. A week later, third square template_third 12/7/13 11:57 AMMarathon Page 1 in Moscow. she won the Meteor 10K (an MR series race) in - MRsquare Dearborn in 34:36. McMahan ran one of her best races of the year at the Fifth Third River Bank Run, another series race and the USA 25K Championship. She finished second woman overall and U.S. titlist in 1:25:52, just seven seconds behind Ethiopian Chemtai Rionoukei. McMahan also blazed a fast time in winning the Volkslaufe 20K, with her 1:12:17 just a few seconds shy of Andrea Pomaransky’s course record. “I’m from a small farming community,” said McMahan after the run in Frankenmuth. “Running these back roads, past the big red barns, reminded of my younger days running in the countryside. The course allowed me to relax and click off the miles.” McMahan grew up running rural roads of Hilbert, Wisc. After graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, she focused on middle-distance races. (She has run 2:09.2 for 800 meters.) Since joining the Hanson-Brooks project more than a decade ago, McMahan has made longer distances a priority. On Aug. 10, she competed in the IAAF World Championship Marathon in Moscow, hoping to challenge the 2:31:48 PR she set in 2011 at Grandma’s Marathon. Fierce heat and high humidity prohibited that. McMahan finished 18th (her goal was to make the top 20) in 2:39:52. She was the second michiganrunner.net

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Running Shorts with Scott Hubbard Trivia: What do the initials in IAAF and IOC stand for?

Delayed Perspective. In September 2012, I went to a cross country meet at Huron MeadScott Hubbard ows Metro Park in Brighton, primarily to get reacquainted with an old Ann Arbor Huron High School teammate, Andy Campbell. We’d reconnected that summer and he’d told me his son, Craig, ran for AAH. Another long-time friend, Steve Angerman, also had a son, Nick, running for Ann Arbor Skyline, so I combined the visit to see both friends and their aspiring harriers. I hadn’t seen Andy in 42 years (except for about 10 seconds during the 1980 Detroit Free Press Marathon) since we had graduated from high school. He went off to Harvard and I went downriver to Eastern Michigan.

older and both stronger. Parents Andy and Steve filled me in on the respective team dynamics and how their sons were faring.

During a lull in the many races, Andy and I talked about our AAH team that won the ‘69 Class A Lower Peninsula Finals. We were as surprised as anyone and overjoyed when we learned we’d triumphed. This was before there were statewide rankings. We only knew about teams we ran against during the season. There’s something to be said for not knowing how good the opposition is. Thinking about how good others are is bad. Early in the ’69 season, we ran a big invitational at West Bloomfield, but I don’t recall how we did. Probably so-so. During the season we lost to conference foe Adrian in a dual meet and at the league meet. We also lost a close dual meet with our crosstown rivals Ann Arbor Pioneer, whose coach, Don Sleeman, like Kent, is still coaching after all these years. I knew all the guys on AAP’s team since we went to the same junior high school. I didn’t like losing as a team to them, but I’d won the race and was happy with that. I’d been our No. 1 man all year and looked forward to the regional where we’d meet AAP again.

Cross country is my favorite of all the running disciplines. It’s the sport I started with in high school, and the one I both enjoyed and had the most success in during my prep and college years. I rarely attend races just to watch, but was eager to make an exception that day.

During the week before regionals, I strained something in my groin. I ran the race conscious of the ache and backed off my normal effort. In the stretch to the finish, I tried kicking it in for redemption, but the ache became a severe pain and I limped to the line.

I found Andy right away, and during the meet we caught up on many things. Our former AAH track and field coach, Kent Overbey, was there that day and still coaching. We were on his first team in spring 1969.

We had a strong team effort nonetheless, beating AAP and winning the regional. I didn’t run a step for the week between that meet and the state finals, nursing my injury.

Adding to the fun, my brother Don came and caught one of the races. Kent has been quoted saying Don is the best runner he’s ever coached. When Don was voted into the AAH Hall of Fame and I followed a few years later, we made sure Kent was there as our guest.

At Huron Meadows, Andy asked me if I’d known, going into the finals, whether I’d be able to run effectively. I had to think some, as it had been 44 years ago.

I returned to Huron Meadows this past September to again catch up with my friends and watch cross country. Craig and Nick were a year

During the week, I answered, I could tell things were not improving. The ache was still there. It was better by race day, but I didn’t have much hope it would be 100 percent.

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As we warmed up in the rain, I could feel a catch in my stride — a bad sign. But I didn’t say anything to my teammates because I didn’t want to send negative signals on such a big day. I could tell 100 yards after the start, things weren’t good at all. “How’d you guys run so darn well?” I asked Andy. “Three of you were way up in the top 20 at the finish!” “Des (Ryan, our coach),” he replied, “told us during the week you might not be back to normal, so we’d need to up our game. Plus we were pretty good, so it wasn’t a surprise.” Yeah, we were good, but, man, did they up their game! Thus inspired, our top five rolled over the 2-mile course on Nov. 1 at the Washtenaw Country Club in Ypsilanti. Sophomore Karl Tsigdinos went from being our fifth man to first with a surprising, splendid 13th; junior Ed Fisher was 15th; senior Andy Campbell 18th; senior Adrian Newby 29th and junior Martin Hueter 45th. I trotted home in 80th, with fellow senior Carl Hueter right behind in 81st. We won the team title by 22 points. Afterward, my joy for the win won out over the disappointment I felt in failing to contribute. Or did I fail? Were the guys extra-focused on the task, knowing I might not be OK? I had just turned 17 and felt happiness and frustration. Speculating on how much we might have won by if I’d been healthy is just that, guesswork. Bottom line: I wasn’t and the guys ran outta-their-freakinggourds! It was a special day for our marvelous team of seven and Irish coach. Despite how my own season ended, it remains one of my favorite memories in the sport. Ours was the first AAH team to win a state title; the school was in its third year. It remains the only LPF cross country team title for Huron (with a runner-up spot in 2003). A school-wide assembly was held Monday after we won to celebrate the occasion. The skinny, uncool kids had come up big! We all proudly wore our letter sweaters, except breakthrough-man Karl who had just completed his first year. The school pitched in to get us specially-made letters that said “State Champs ‘69” along the bottom. Much later, I discovered a randomly-selected picture of our top seven and coach posing with our regional and LPF trophies in “Ann Arbor: a Pictorial History” by Marilyn Mclaughlin, published in 1995. The pic’s on page 182, if you want to look it up!

Answer: International Association of Athletics Federations and International Olympic Committee. - MR -

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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Book Review

‘Marathon Man’ Revisits Early Years of Running Boom By Dave Foley Marathon Man: My 26.2 Mile Journey from Unknown Grad Student to the Top of the Running World.” by Bill Rodgers and Matthew Shepatin. 2013. St. Martin’s Press. Thomas Dunne Books. 336 pp. $26.99 hardcover.

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n 1975 a then-unknown Bill Rodgers shocked the running world with his American recordsetting 2:09:55 win in the Boston Marathon. In “Marathon Man,” Rodgers, along with Matthew Shepatin, recounts Rodgers’ rise from a cigarette-smoking hospital orderly to become the dominant American and world marathoner from 1975 to ‘80, when he won the New York and Boston marathons four times each as well as the prestigious Fukuoka Marathon in Japan. Much of the book details Rodgers’ 1975 win in Boston, with flashbacks chronicling his life, beginning with his boyhood in the Boston area and later his days with college roommate Amby Burfoot, who became his mentor and helped Bill to see his potential as a runner. In following Rodgers as he progresses, and at times struggles, to find success as a runner, the reader learns what it was like to be a part of the early days of the running boom. It was a time when most experts felt high mileage was the key to success, so Rodgers and his running colleagues Frank Shorter, Jeff Galloway, Burfoot and Tom Fleming often logged 120- to 150-mile weeks. The book chronicles the experience of 1970s road racing when courses were often inaccurate, devoid of mile splits, and aid stations were haphazard at best. Those who have come to the sport late will learn about the Boston and New York marathons in the ‘70s, before they became mega-attractions, and see what it was like to be a runner before busi-

nesses discovered there was money to made marketing products for this group. As the book chronicles Rodgers’ career, we watch him having to deal with the Vietnam War as a conscientious objector, and his efforts to win respect as a runner in a time when running after one’s college years was an anomaly. Winning respect was hard. Winning money was impossible at that time. These were the days when amateur rules prevented payment or monetary prizes being offered to athletes; so race winners might be awarded a set of tires or a blender, but never cash. Rodgers, along with Shorter and other elites, led the efforts to change this. His successes at Boston and New York gave him international recognition, but Rodgers remained the same genuine, self-effacing individual, traits evident on the several occasions I was able to spend time with him. As then-Michigan Runner editor, I remember interviewing Bill in his hotel room in Grand Rapids during the 1980s on the day before he ran the Old Kent (now Fifth Third) River Bank Run. He was funny and relaxed. When he learned we were both born in 1947, he began interviewing me, asking how I was training now I was getting older. I told him I began paddling a canoe when injuries forced me to take a break from running, and he wanted to know all about that. That’s how Rodgers comes across in this book — an easygoing guy who is genuinely interested in others. You don’t have to be old or an elite runner to enjoy “Marathon Man.” It is a pleasure to read about someone like Bill Rodgers, who just loves to run and has a story to tell that anyone can appreciate. - MR -

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Masters Male Runner of the Year

Ian Forsyth

Forsyth, Michigan Runner’s 1997 overall Runner of the Year, also won masters honors last year. As in 2012, Forsyth didn’t target the MR series. Although “it was not an incentive, I did know I had a good chance to win,” he says. “I was curious how it was going.” Forsyth scored 100 points, outdistancing runners-up Eric Green and Hank Risley. “I didn’t run any other series races to try and pad the lead,” he notes. “I like to run the best races I can and change up the distances to keep it fresh.” In the MR series, he ran the Meteor 10K, Fifth Third River Bank Run 25K and Brian Diemer 5K. Forsyth won the Meteor outright in 30:50. His 1:24:42 was good for third master overall and first state master at the River Bank Run. At the Diemer, he was the first master and third overall in 14:54. “I’ve broken 15 (minutes) there for a lot of years in a row. Things will be different once I can’t do that anymore,” he says.

By Ron Marinucci in 30:03 on the track, a new Canadian masters record. In October, he ran 2:23:01 at the Chicago Marathon, a personal best by almost two minutes. That also made him the first master. Forsyth began running as a student in Ontario. “I have no idea why I decided to try out for track that year,” he remembers. “I’d never been exposed to the sport before.”

were only a few weeks of lower mileage because of minor injuries and illness. “My training is pretty basic and stays the same from year to year,” says Forsyth. “I generally train six or seven days and try to average about 70 miles per week for the year.” With the weeks of somewhat-lesser mileage “for injuries, sickness, etc., that means I run 70 to 80 (miles a week) generally. Some low weeks bring the average down. “I had a very good September before Chicago,” he continues. “I ran 90 miles for three weeks and the other week was 70 to rest a little for the Bridge Run (10 miles in Grand Rapids, where he finished second overall, first master in 51:00).

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“W

ith so many good runners in the state,” says 2013 Masters Men’s Runner of the Year Ian Forsyth, “it’s an honour to win the masters series.” Yes, “honour,” adds the Canadian-born 41-year-old.

“I generally stick to basic workouts. Twice a week I do some combination of hills, tempo, fartlek, progressive or track work.” Forsyth emphasizes different things from year to year, “depending on my general mood. I don’t think there’s a magic formula, just somehow getting in the hard work.

“This year I ran 10 races and nine went at least well enough for me to be happy,” he continues. “Only one race, the River Bank, was a disaster. One bad out of 10 is better than my norm. So I was satisfied with the year.”

As a prep runner, he was the Ontario provincial Ian Forsyth nears the finish at the 5/3 River champion in the 3000 meters and Bank Run. cross country. He was an All-American at the University of Michigan, running a leg of the 1995 NCAA champion distance relay team.

Forsyth was particularly pleased with two nonseries races, “my highlights for the year,” he saiys. At the Hillsdale Gina Relays, he ran the 10,000 meters

Although Forsyth was bothered by sacroiliac joint problems, “which were pretty debilitating,” in 2012, in 2013 he remained relatively healthy. There

Albion 5K

Albion 5K Kicks off Festival of Forks ALBION (9/20/13) — The Albion 5K Friday helped kick off the 47th annual Festival of the Forks, a two-day celebration of food, fun, shopping and music in downtown Albion. Eighty-seven runners followed a route down Superior Street past vendors and spectators before crossing the Kalamazoo River. “This is our second year organizing this fundraising event, and we had quite a few repeat runners,” said race director Dave Parham. “It’s a race with a great, family-friendly atmosphere.”

enjoy a spaghetti dinner, lobster bash, live music, pet and auto shows. Evans Kirwa finished first overall in 16:17. Next came Jacob Korir in 16:26. Aaron Usher took third in 17:12. The first and second women were were separated by only 26 seconds. Jenny Robinson triumphed in 20:01, followed by Josephine Weeden in 20:27. Next came Chris Vincent in 20:33. Winning masters titles were Weeden and Dan Dixon (17:37).

After finishing, runners could check out the celebration of local businesses and artists, plus

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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“I’ve found I run well or poorly doing any number of things. This year I was pretty much sticking to progressive runs on Wednesdays, hills on Saturdays and long runs on Sundays.” Grand Rapids is a favorite place to race for the Ann Arbor resident. Besides the River Bank Run, he cites the Irish Jig and Diemer 5Ks “on my list most years. Both always have a great field to run against. They boast fast, interesting courses through nice neighborhoods. There’s just a comfortable aura around these races that keeps me coming back. “The Jig has separate men’s and women’s races, which is fairly unique,” he continues. “Diemer has the best set of kids’ races I’ve seen anywhere. My daughters love to run there. They both have cake afterwards, which goes down surprisingly well after a race.” Forsyth is already looking forward to 2014, “through April” at least. On his out-of-state calendar are the Naples (Fla.) Half Marathon in January, the Cooper River Bridge 10K in Charleston, S.C., and the Boston Marathon, both in April. “I’m hoping to feel good enough to run the 5K at the big indoor meet at Grand Valley (State University) in February,” he says. And, of course, “I’m running the Irish Jig in March. “I have plans after that, but I’ll have to see how it goes.” Considering Forsyth’s performances in recent years, don’t be surprised if “it” goes well indeed. - MR -


Beyond the Chip

Grass Stains By Ian Forsyth Cloaked in setting sun, I sit Shadows struggle from brighter beginnings And stretch and wind through my eyes As darkness threatens, I see

younger sisters. Even the littlest gets her fill of frantic in-house scurrying, until inevitably crashing, tumbling and surfing to safety on a generallybloated diaper.

Across the field, she glides Fluid, lean motion, adjusting, adapting Grass, ball, intention, her poet’s eyes gleaming Love is alive and she plays soccer

Although they’ve occasionally encountered the exhilaration of courageous turnover from gun’s smoke to finishing relief, soccer retains steadfast dominance. They like to run but love to play.

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hen mullet battled rattail for style supremacy, extra-large tees draped over extra-small jeans and Duran Duran posterized pink bedrooms everywhere, I too was alive. My first misty breath forced, ripping a shotgun slapper, my first dirt chewed raspberry maniacally skidding through a slide tackle, my first rhythmic landing, launching the 3 and I was born anew. Upon entering this fantastical realm of skilled, passionate, unrelenting competition, I slammed the door behind and the latch dropped tight. My wife and I have four daughters. The first three, after meandering through multi-colored corridors in carefree search of their souls’ destination, have arrived. Each in turn has stepped into the sea of turf, never to return. Inside, outside, home, park, rough, easy, tears, smiles, the soccer ball constantly turns. Grievously disregarded for lack of years is our slippery smallest, who may as well wear the uniform for her accumulation of illicit time spent on the playing field, deftly jetting towards the untouchable. Our simplest requirement of each is that maximum, consistent effort be extended every time the laces are drawn. Players’, coaches’ and parents’ time need to be mutually beneficial; everybody works, everybody’s happy. From this principle they’ve begun to emerge, each creating her own ripple. The oldest has diligently worked to fill her Houdini bag of slight-of-foot ball fakes; the youngest fearlessly grapples with girls gargantuan in relation, and the middle fittingly filters a bit from both. Few moments have been more satisfying for me than experiencing our girls striving to grasp a game they love. Win or lose, working opponents or getting dominated, it doesn’t matter; they remain perpetually hungry. Digging through drills or clamped in battle, they have each proven to have zesty zip. Popping the ball outside and driving down the sideline or doggedly tracking down cross-field prey, they can all move when so inspired. This uncorked quickness has sparked a sprinkling of interest in middle school track for the eldest and occasional kids’ race for her

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n my lost days, washing a face on the boards, lofting a majestic corner or tenaciously swinging into the paint gave me singular pleasure. Practice was fantastically grueling and fatigue only served to charge me for game-day explosion. As our girls, I received nothing but joy from these unified sports; friends and codependents allied for the duration. I was also fortunate to benefit from a lightly-peppered step and soon dipped into the undulating world of

My eternal quest to push fitness past static seems a little simpler, focusing on effort rather than results. cross country, eventually leading to shimmering track’s hovering heat.

durance and strength; somewhat mono-dimensional and stale compared to prior experience. When the weekends came, prompting my adopted all-or-nothing race strategy, I was left a satisfied first-tofinish or feeling completely disgraced with any other result. This dichotomy of ending possibilities bore great pre-race stress, sometimes to the point of giving up on myself even before making the attempt. Now well advanced upon time’s next season, my sensibilities have shifted. No longer am I my own top priority, as most of my energy is spilt helping my wife paint blue skies to brighten our daughters’ aspirations. The leftover drops creak me out of bed in the morning, shuffling me to the corner to join same-spirited friends anonymously winding through the dark. Somehow, rising only moments after dropping for the night never loses its acidic kick; nor does mid-workout lose its numbing emptiness; but I now fear being spun awry without these ingrained sensations giving me anchor. Seeking to stay this side of hypocritical, I fixedly endeavor to adhere to my own advice, stressed upon our daughters. Believing that to deliver anything less than my utmost is unacceptable and anything more unattainable has given me appreciation of the process. My eternal quest to push fitness past static seems a little simpler, focusing on effort rather than results. Workouts and races retain their marrow-sucking tendencies, but knowing that giving what I’ve got is my greatest measure of success, grants me at least partial release from quantified-results bondage.

Training as developing distance runner soon proved significantly different. Gone were the tactile eleOur girls might say nothing beats burying a ball ments of intrigue enjoyed softening a puck on my far corner, and I wouldn’t be one to disagree. Alstick, dimpling a ball with my cleat or jostling for space though, after settling for years in the background, in the lane. Instead, I found myself in the variously-arracing to painful capacity, just might be catching up. duous practice of limitlessly trying and testing my en– IF AM Page 1 sixth horizontal template_sixth horizontal 12/14/12 10:08

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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Senior Female Runner of the Year

Wanda Handlin By Anthony Targan

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now,” she continues. “Tony, my family and friends have been very supportive. They have had more confidence in me than I have. I have been on the Complete Runners Team for the last two years and they have done nothing but encourage me the whole time.”

hat does it take to become a Senior Michigan Runner of the Year? I always assumed that to win the award, you’d have to start running in high school, earn a college scholarship and keep running competitively for years to build up the necessary strength, endurance and race savvy. Conventional wisdom, meet Wanda Handlin!

Handlin works as a waitress at Cracker Barrel and is on her feet all day. She appreciates that her “bosses have shown their full support, letting me have time off anytime I have needed it to do a race.”

To say Handlin comes from humble beginnings is an understatement. She was picking cotton at age five as the daughter of a sharecropper in Missouri; the farmer owned the land and the house her family lived in. Wanda had to buy her own school clothes and give her father 50 cents of every dollar she earned.

About a year ago, Tony brought up the subject of the Michigan Runner race series. “As usual, I was reluctant at first,” says Handlin. “Then decided I would be racing anyway, so I might as well give it a shot.

She did not run or compete athletically during her school years. As a young adult she had no time to run, not with raising three children and working full time.

“My favorite race of the series was the Cadillac 10K,” she continues. “It was a beautiful course, mostly along the water. It also came a week after the Crim, so I was ready for a nice flat course! I went there hoping to pick up a few points. but I did not expect to walk away with what I did. Loved it!”

“Tony, my husband, first got me into racing,” she remembers. “He talked me into doing the 8K noncompetitive walk at the Crim Festival of Races. That started me on the road as a competitive walker for four years.”

Photo by Tony Handlin

In 2004, Handlin took her first steps as an athlete.

Handlin overcame plantar fasciitis to run the Great Turtle Half Marathon on Mackinac Island, her least-favorite race. “I was not prepared for all those hills inside the island. Toughest half marathon I’ve ever done!” she says.

In 2008, Tony tried to talk Wanda into running a few races. “I told him I was not a runner,” she says, “but I don’t think he believed me. “I ran a couple races and decided I liked it better, so I have been running a little over five years

Wanda Handlin is on her way to winning the Cadillac Festival of Races 10K.

“My plan for next year is simply to stay healthy, keep running and, if God wills it, keep winning! One never knows what lies around the next bend!” - MR -

Holiday Hustle, Dexter

Holiday Hustle Warms Dexter on Frozen Night By Charles Douglas McEwen DEXTER (12/7/13) — On a night cold enough to make reindeer shiver, Bennett Prud’homme and Alexandria Dutcher brought serious heat to downtown Dexter. Prud’homme, 24, of South Lyon and Dutcher, 21, of Dexter won the Holiday Hustle 5K, which started and ended at Monument Park and was presented by Running Fit. Prud’homme finished second and Dutcher fourth here last year. This year, Prud’homme beat his nearest men’s rival by 47 seconds and Dutcher the women’s runner-up by 22 seconds. “I went out really hard,” said Prud’homme, who finished in 16:23, 11 seconds slower than last year. “But it’s about 20 degrees colder this year. I just

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wanted to get warmed up.”

ter one second later.

More than 1,200 runners, many dressed as Santa, the Grinch and assorted elves, braved the 20degree temperatures and biting wind to finish the 5K or 1-mile runs.

“We were together pretty much the whole way,” Porinsky said. “It was so cold no one really wanted to push the pace.”

“It’s a great race: lots of fun,” said Prud’homme, who ran in shorts and knee socks. “Everyone’s home for the holidays and having a blast out here.” The next four men finished within two seconds of each other. With an all-out sprint down the homestretch, Parker Snavely, 22, of Milford edged Nick Renberg, 20, of Saline. Both were timed in 17:10. Jarred Bratley, 17, of Andover finished fourth in 17:11, followed by Andrew Porinsky, 28, of Dex-

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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Dexter High School graduate Dutcher finished in 18:58, not far off her PR of 18:25. “I’m coming off a little bit of an injury, so it was a great race for me,” she said. Next came Josephine Weeden, 45, of Saline (19:20), Valerie Bathelmey, 22, of Ann Arbor (19:50), Jenny Harden, 33, of Saline (20:10) and Angie Markel, 38, of Dexter (20:18). For complete results, go to http://runholiday5k.com.

- MR -


In This Issue January / February 2014 Publisher and Chief Executive Officer

Art McCafferty artmccaf@glsp.com Scott Sullivan scott@glsp.com Editor

Jennie McCafferty jennie@glsp.com Associate Publisher

Dave Foley Mike Duff

Online: Photo Gallery

Gary Morgan Jim Neff Bob Schwartz Bob Seif Nick Stanko Anthony Targan Kasey Tulley Cregg Weinmann Pamela Zinkosky Michael Zuidema

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Big 10 Cross Country Championships

4

Footlocker Cross Country Championships

Jamie Fallon

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Headless Horseman

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Fantasy 5K

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Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

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NCAA D3 Great Lakes Cross Country Regionals

Chief Financial Officer

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NCAA D1 Great Lakes Cross Country Regionals

Great Lakes Sports

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EMU Fall Classic

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Ann Arbor Track Club Cross Country Classic

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NYRR Dash to the Finish

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ING New York City Marathon

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YMCA Santa Run

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Chocolate 5K

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Hightail it for Heroes

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Jingle Bell Run for Arthritis, Bloomfield Hills

Composer

Rose Zylstra

Social Media Editor

Editors Emeritus

Peter Draugalis Pamela Fender Sarah Greene Tony Handlin Heather Dyc Hanks Gary Morgan Victah Sailer Ted Swoboda Photo / Video

Carter Sherline

Senior Photographer

Paul Aufdemberge Desiree Davila Ian Forsyth Tom Henderson Scott Hubbard Herb Lindsay Laurel Park Robin Sarris Hallop Rachael Steil Columnists

Tracey Cohen Jeff Hollobaugh Dean Johnson Bill Kahn William Kalmar Dr. Edward H. Kozloff Doug Kurtis Grant Lofdahl Ron Marinucci Riley McLincha Charles D. McEwen

Cheryl Clark

Contributors

Publications, Inc. 4007 Carpenter Rd, #366 Ypsilanti, MI 48197 (734)507-0241 (734)434-4765 FAX info@glsp.com

a member of

Michigan Runner Š is published six times yearly for $17.00 per year by Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc., 4007 Carpenter Rd., #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197. Third Class Postage paid at Dearborn, MI and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send Address changes to Michigan Runner,4007 Carpenter Rd., #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197. All contents of this publication are copyrighted all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. All unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, and illustrations will not be returned unless accompanied by a properly addressed envelope, bearing sufficient postage; publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions of the writers are their own and do not necessarily reflect endorsement and/or views of the Michigan Runner. Address all editorial correspondence, subscriptions, and race information to: Michigan Runner, 4007 Carpenter Rd., #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197, (734) 5070241, FAX (734) 434-4765, info@glsp.com, www.glsp.com. Subscription rates: Continental U.S. $17.00 per year: Payable in U.S. funds. Single issue $3.00, back issues $5.00. Change of address: Send your magazine label and your new address to Michigan Runner, 4007 Carpenter Rd., #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197.

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Vol. 35, No. 6

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

About the cover: University of Michigan Freshman Erin Finn wins the individual Big 10 Cross Country Championship, Sunday, November 3, 2013 in West Lafayette, Indiana. Photo by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014


Big 10 Cross Country Championships, West Lafayette, Indiana, November 2, 2013

The Spartan’s Caleb Rhynard finished fourth.

Michigan women were second at Big 10’s: Megan Weschler (l), Shannon Osika, Erin Finn, Taylor Manett.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Spartan women captured the Big 10 Cross Country Championship. Runners are Rachele Schulist (bib 193), Shelby Jackson, Leah O’Connor (bib 187), Katie Landweir (bib 186).

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Michigan men finished second at the Big 10 Cross Country Championships.

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014

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Footlocker Cross Country Championships, San Diego, December 14, 2013

Lauren Brasure, Rockford, Rockford HS, 24th) 18:01

Kirsten Olling, Wheeler, Breckenridge HS, 31st) 18:02.

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Ryan Richardson, West Bloomfield, Waterford Mott HS, 21st) 15:22

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Forty boys and forty girls who qualified through one of four Footlocker Regionals, compete in San Diego’s Balboa Park. Pictured here is the girls start, 800 meters into the race. 4

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014

Grant Fisher traded leads several times with John Dressel of Washington state in the final mile.


Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014

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Headless Horseman, Howell, October 26, 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Runners start in the dark at the Headless Horseman 5K and 10K in Howell. 10K winner Eric Stuber stands out in red (bib 1290).

These costumed runners are easily seen in the dark. Among them are Nancy Frizzel (bib 220), Kim Merriman (bib 418) and Gary Smith (bib 585).

Fantasy 5K, Howell, November 29, 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Linda Shaw of Sylvania, Ohio, finished second in the 60-64 age group, 30:20. 6

Eventual winner Mike Anderson of Walled Lake, bib 16, takes the lead from the beginning and finished in 15:11.

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014


Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, October 20, 2013

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Ed Whitlock, age 82, set a single age marathon record, 3:41:58 -- breaking the record of 3:48:35, set by Ed Benham in 1989.

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Lanni Marchant set a new Canadian marathon record (2:28:00), breaking the 28 year old record set by Sylvia Ruegger (r) of 2:28:36. Marchant is a graduate of the Michigan State University Law School.

Elite runners are ready to start the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014

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NCAA D3 Great Lakes Cross Country Regionals, Grand Rapids, Nov. 16, 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Men’s winner, Paul Lewis of Albion, bib 15, is in this pack running down a steep hill. Wabash, 1st, & Calvin, 2nd, received automatic bids to the national championships; Manchester received an at-large bid.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Cassandra Vince, Calvin College, won the individual 6K title, 21:27.

The start of the women’s race. Calvin, 1st, and Oberlin, 2nd, received automatic bids to the national championships held at Hanover College in Indiana, November 23. The Hope College team received an at-large bid. 8

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014


NCAA D1 Great Lakes Cross Country Regionals, Madison, Wisconsin, Nov. 15, 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Eventual winner, John Mascari, bib 516, leads this pack. Caleb Rhynard, bib 589, competed as an individual at the national championships in Terre Haute, Indiana. Mason Ferlic, bib 569, led the Michigan men to first place and an automatic bid.

These Michigan women, Brooke Handler, bib 262, Taylor Manett, and Shanon Osika, bib 266, were on the winning team which received an automatic bid to the championships. Michigan State women received an at-large bid.

Eastern Michigan’s Victoria Voronko finished 14th and received an individual bid to the championships.

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014

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Š Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

EMU Fall Classic, Hudson Mills Metro Dexter, October 25, 2013


ropark,


EMU Fall Classic, Dexter, October 25, 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Eastern Michigan’s Grzegorz Kalinowski won the men’s race as the Eastern men swept the first four places. The 5K races were held at Hudson Mills Metropark.

Olympian Nicole Sifuentes won the women’s 5K by clocking 16:57.

Ann Arbor Track Club Cross Country Classic, Canton, October 26, 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Vibhav Alokam, age 7, finished third in the open mixed 2,000 meter run. 12

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Eddie Codrington, age 17, won the open mixed 5000 in 19:1`7.

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014

Sydney Anderson, age 11, finished 3rd in the open mixed 4,000 meter run.


New York Road Runners’ Dash to the Finish, New York City, November 2, 2013

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Sixteen Olympians ran the Dash to the Finish 5K the day before the New York City Marathon. Nick Willis edged Sam Chelenga for the men’s win.

Molly Huddle (l) set a course record in winning the Dash to the Finish 5K. Emily Infeld (center), and Shalane Flanagan (r) were second and third respectively.

ING New York City Marathon, New York City, November 3, 2013

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Runners go by a water stop on First Avenue. Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014

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Š Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

YMCA Santa Run, Flint, December 7, 2013


Chocolate 5K, Grand Blanc, November 23, 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Erin O’Mara, bib 321, runner-up among the women and Jeff Mitchell, bib 297, first master, start strong at the Chocolate 5K.

Hightail it for Heroes, Washington, Nov. 9, 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Jeff Stuart, bib 700, of Utica and a pack run by the water in the 5K on a beautiful day in Stony Creek Metropark. 16

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014

Cecily Lew is the 10K champion in 39:50.


Jingle Bell Run for Arthritis, Bloomfield Hills, December 14, 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Ryan Decook won the 5K in 19:03.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Jarred Batley, bib 2476, takes it out at the start of the 10K. Desi (Davila) Linden, bib 1828, was first to finish; Ryan Linden was next (first male) two seconds behind.

Marissa Dobry took the 5K women’s title.

A couple of small runners accompany Michelle Young to the 5K finish.

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2014

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Groundhog Day • Full Marathon • Half Marathon Groundhog Eve • Moonlight 1/6 Marathon Grand Rapids Gus vs. Punxsutawney Phil We've all heard of Punxsutawney Phil, the little furry guy in Pennsylvania who comes out, sees his shadow, and declares six more weeks of winter. Then there’s Augustus T. Groundhog, better know as Grand Rapids Gus. He’s Phil’s much more interesting cousin. Unlike Phil, who it seems can only see shadows, Gus has much better eye sight and can look at a calendar on February 2 and know that spring doesn’t start for six weeks. Gus suggested that instead of lamenting over six more weeks of winter, we should EMBRACE the cold and snow and do something fun. And so, the Groundhog Day Marathon was born.

Sunday, February 2, 2014 (616) 293-3145 info@groundhogmarathon.com http://www.groundhogmarathon.com


Senior Male Runner of the Year

Ruben Henderson By Ron Marinucci

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uben Henderson is no stranger to running awards and honors. He still holds the Saginaw Buena Vista High School two-mile race record, set more than 30 years ago. He ran cross country and track on a scholarship at Saginaw Valley State University, posting times such as 3:58 in the 1500, in the 15’s for the 5K and 32’s in the 10K. Even more impressive, he came back from serious injuries sustained in a car crash in 1984.

He varies his workouts. Henderson’s Facebook Timeline reveals lots of long runs with hills. But he notes two track workouts he likes also. “I do 40x200 meters: sprint, trot, sprint, trot — burst, recovery, burst, recovery,” he stated. “I start with 36 seconds (per 200) and work down to 28 seconds. I get a young guy to do that with me.” He also favors “20x400, with a 400 recovery. I start with 74 seconds and finish with 69, 68 seconds.”

In the past few years, Henderson has garnered masters awards and championships on state and national levels, including All-American status in the indoor mile and 3000-meter run.

“It was one of my missions for 2013,” he said of the honor. “I wanted to be the champ this year … and next year too.” Much of Henderson’s motivation came from an injury-plagued 2012. “I was hampered,” he said, “by hip flexor and ITB (iliotibial band) injuries. I wanted to bounce back.

Back to “serious” running for only five years, he still has the spark and goals. “I want to be more consistent, especially outdoors,” said Henderson. “I to win championships and break records.” Shillelaghwant 2014_Shillelagh Ad 12/4/13 3:51 PM Page 1

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

He has now added Michigan Runner magazine’s 2013 Senior Men’s Runner of the Year title to his résumé. In amassing 23 points, the 51-year-old was the first senior at the Fifth Third River Bank Run 25K (1:31:45) and Brian Diemer 5K (16:58). At the Crim 10-Mile, his 58:04 placed him third among Michigan masters and second in the senior (50-plus) division.

Henderson also competes for the Playmakers/New Balance cross country team. “We were third nationally at the club championship,” he remembered.

Don’t bet against him meeting them in 2014. - MR -

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

“I was following (the MR series),” he continued. “I tallied my points and remember thinking, ‘I might win it.’ Then, ‘I should have it.’” After starring at SVSU he didn’t run much, spending 20 years raising his family. In 2009, he became an assistant coach for East Kentwood High School’s girls’ track team. Working out with the team “reignited” him. Over the next four years, Henderson set state age-group records at several distances and completed four marathons, each in Boston-qualifying times. His two favorite races in 2013 were part of the MR series: “The River Bank Run, my first ever,” and “Crim, when I ran 58:00.” At the River Bank, “I ran the first seven miles at a 5:30 pace,” said Henderson. “I was running with a group of younger guys, trying to sneak up on (an age-group rival) ahead of me. “But the young guys kept talking loud. The old guy looked back, saw me and took off. I couldn’t catch him.” The Crim pitted Henderson against a friend from the past, Paul Aufdemberge. They had competed in college when Aufdemberge at Hillsdale.

Ruben Henderson, Jr. competes at the USATF Michigan Association Indoor Track & Field Championships, March 2012. “I almost got him,” said Henderson of the 10mile race. “Paul passed me at around mile six, said, ‘Hey, Ruben! How are you?’ and then blew by me.” Henderson targeted national masters races. At the USATF National Masters Track Meet in Olathe, Kan., he was third in the 5K, then won the 10K title the next day by more than a minute. On the third day he took the bronze in the 1500. “I waited too long to kick,” said Henderson, who finished two seconds off the pace.

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Noon Saturday, March 15, 2014 Register online at www.riverbendstriders.com Contact

He placed third in his age group at the USATF Masters 8K Championship in Williamsburg, Va. “I flew in the next day to Melbourne, Fla.,” said Henderson, “for the USATF Half Marathon Championship. I had no sleep.” Yet he won the 50-54 age-group gold medal.

michiganrunner.net

Shillelagh 4 Mile

Riverbend Striders (810) 487-0954 PO Box 233 Flushing, MI 48433

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon

10th GR Marathon Sees Mart, Volunteers Give All By Michael Zuidema GRAND RAPIDS (10/20/13) — Moments after crossing the finish line, David Mart seemed nonplussed about winning his second-straight Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon men’s title.

Kylen Cieslak won the women’s marathon title in 2:53:40, while Nick Liversedge (1:12:03) and Paige Boldt (1:21:29) claimed half-marathon crowns.

David Mart, bib 1, defended his marathon titltle against runner-up. Leo Foley.

Race director and founder Don Kern said the 10th annual event was the best one yet. “We’ve proven we know how to do this,” Kern said. “We can put on a quality event every year, which is what it’s all about. It just keeps getting better. “Ten years from now, we’ll still be going strong,” he continued. “We’re looking forward to future races and runners setting goals and making things happen.” Mart, who improved on his 2012 time of 2:27:55, led the entire marathon, but was pushed by Clarkston’s Leo Foley, who finished second in 2:30:51. Mart also battled cramps in the second half of the race, but credited the aid stations serving pickle juice for helping him push through to the finish.  “I was actually hoping to get 2:22:30-something,” the winner said. “I wanted to do the first half at a 5:30 pace and I was on target, maybe a little bit slow, but I thought, ‘That’s OK, I’ll make up for it.’ “I tried to up it to a 5:20 the second half, then thought the last three miles will be like 5:10, but I overestimated myself. I still tried to shoot for 5:20, but when I started cramping up it got difficult to do. “I got nervous around Mile 18 when they said

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the second-place guy was 27 seconds behind me. I thought, ‘This is all psychological. Just block out the fact he’s there and keep running the way you would.’” Cieslak, 25, a Livonia native who ran at Grand Valley State University and now lives in Chicago, knew exactly who her top challenger would be in the women’s marathon: her friend and training partner, Wendy Jaehn. Cieslak, who won the women’s half-marathon here in 2009, ran with her friend for the first seven miles before moving ahead and beating Jaehn by 23 seconds. “I just tried to keep her in my sights,” Jaehn said. “She’s always ahead of me. If I can keep up with her, I’m happy.” “This girl pushes me all the time in practice,” Cieslak said. “I ran the Chicago Marathon last year — that was my first one — then I ran Boston, but didn’t finish. I had medical problems at Mile 25. So I had to give the distance another go, and what better than the trails I used to train on in the summer at college?” Liversedge, 30, a Lowell native who ran at Hillsdale College, used a strong final push to beat

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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Stilt-walker Neil Stauter of Deerfield high five’s spectators at 10 miles.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

More than 4,000 people took part in the marathon, half marathon and relay on a cool and overcast Sunday. A storm passed through the night before, but the rain held off to give runners nearperfect conditions.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

“Emotionally I feel great, but physically I feel like crap. I just want to lie down,” Mart said with a sheepish smile. “The end there was probably the hardest sprint I’ve ever done. I’ve never had it where I had nothing left, and I really feel like I pushed it today.”

Photo by Scott Sullivan

The 24-year-old Zeeland resident appeared dejected as he grabbed water and yogurt and looked for his family in the crowd. His mood noticeably improved, however, once he learned he had set a course record of 2:26:41.

Kylen Cieslak won the women’s marathon title.

Jenison’s Jimi Minnema by 17 seconds for the half-marathon championship. He credited Mart with helping him get off to a strong start. “The lead marathoner had a perfect pace for me, so I ran with him for the first six miles or so,” Liversedge said. “He was just like clockwork. It was great not to go out too hard and just run an even pace. “Then Jimi started coming back,” Liversedge continued, “and I had to dig really deep. A lot harder than I wanted.” Boldt, meanwhile, felt like she had unfinished business in Grand Rapids. After finishing second last year, the 24-year-old Grand Rapids resident and former Ferris State University runner won the women’s half marathon by 4:06 over Jenison’s Lara Baatenburg. “I really wanted to win this year,” said Boldt. “I was trying to break 1:20 and didn’t quite get there, but the last four miles were kind of by myself. I ran with some guys for part of it and they were encouraging, so that was good. I just went out there and tried to set my pace.” - MR -


Big Bird Run, Roseville

Windy Big Bird Sees Winners Soar By Ron Marinucci ROSEVILLE (11/10/13) — Big Bird runners never know what Mother Nature will throw them. Over the last 35 years, the second Sunday of November has seen snowstorms, gales, downpours of rain, weather warm enough for t-shirts and shorts — and everything in between.

The three races — a 1-mile, 4K and 10K — attracted 634 entrants. Almost 300 ran the 10K and 250 the 4K. The courses haven’t changed much over the years — flat with many twists and turns on mostly-residential Roseville streets. The only hills are an out-and-back pedestrian overpass across I-696. Dozens of marshals, police and volunteers keep runners on track. Darrell McKee, 79, wore bib No. 35, having run all the Big Birds. He trained on these streets long ago while at Roseville High School. I ran with McKee for the first few miles and received a history lesson. Singling out a building housing an art business, he told me, “That used to be the police station. I was in there when I was 16.” Hmm … I thought. Had the statute of limitations expired? “Why?” I finally asked. “I was getting my driver’s license,” McKee replied with a grin. He survived the wind and plans to run next year’s Big Bird at age 80. Everett Ottoy, 16, blazed through the mile in 4:58, nearly a minute ahead of runner-up Todd Kelly (5:53). Both took about 10 minutes to catch their breaths, then ran the 4K. Ottoy finished fifth (14:27) and Kelly ninth (15:52, first master).

Jason Bruska (35:36) was third overall and the first male. Masters winners were Scott Fiske (fourth overall in 35:44) and Laura Shambliss (42:42, a repeat winner). © Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

This year’s Big Bird brought bright, sunny skies with mid-40s temperatures. But oh my, the wind was blowing!

“The bridge broke the course into segments,” said Connor, who added she appreciated the big birds (turkeys) awarded winners. She said she would share it with her teammates.

Two dozen turkeys were raffled as well as given to the race winners. Age-group champs in the 10K received windbreakers. Handsome plaques went to other top age-group finishers. Bill Kalmar walked away with a plaque and smile, not only because he was runner-up in his age group. The Kalmars had three generations at this year’s Big Bird: Joe, 16, in the 4K, and Kim and Bill in the 10K all joined big Bill in running. For complete results, go to http://runmichigan.com. sixth vertical template_sixth vertical 12/15/13 12:52 PM - MR -

Cory Connor, bib 237, caught Katie Kellner for the overall win. Tim Martin (13:14) won that race, followed by Dylan Reines (13:21). Shauna McNiff was third overall and set a new women’s course record in 13:30, beating Allison Cohn’s 13:42 old standard. Former 10K women’s champ and course recordholder Ella Willis returned to run the 4K and grab the masters title in 17:38. In the 10K, Hansons-Brooks teammates Cory Connor and Katie Kellner staged a race not decided until the last few yards. “She (Kellner) was right there all the time,” said Connor, who triumphed in 34:28. “I got her at the end.”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“She outkicked me,” said Kellner, who finished two seconds later. It was the first Michigan road race for both women, who joined the Rochester-based team in August. Connor, from Massachusetts, ran for the University of Maine and Kellner, from New Jersey, Cornell. “It was really fun,” Kellner said of the Big Bird. “It had a good course but was really windy. “We lost a few seconds at the start when we made the wrong turn with a bunch of high school runners,” she continued. “We warmed up on the course, I guess.”

Tim Martin, bib 689, won the 4K (13:14), followed by Dylan Reines (13:21).

Both women liked the overpass, which Kellner caused “unique.” michiganrunner.net

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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By Kacey Tulley

E

they came back up on me. I stayed calm and, in less than a half-mile, passed them and that was the last I saw them. I ran on by myself, finding my strength and peace.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

very January I look forward to the Witchy Wolf Run under the full moon in Omer, Mich. Last year I went there in great shape, having recruited many friends to join me tackling its 15 miles through the winter woods.

This is not a glamorous race with shiny medals to be won. There’s a shotgun start on the corner of a dark road in a town few people know, with runners whose faces are hidden in masks and whose names I seldom know.

With the flashing lights of the fire truck, which signals the last turn before the halfway point, I was having fun. I couldn’t see anyone in front of me but knew I was running strong and could still hang in there.

Kacey Tulley finished second at the Wildlife Marathon

It’s an adventure I do for me. I love a long, dark, frostsparkling road in moonlight. I don’t even mind getting lost, because eventually if you keep going, you get found — usually while finding yourself. I’ve run from this small-town Michigan corner enough to know the legend and never tire of hearing newcomers if there really are wolves in the woods. I like the guys who howl and kid who runs in only compression shorts. We gather in darkness with little crowd support, so we have to be good in our own heads. I think it’s a race created just for me. I get to test my strength against other athletes, yet be immensely private, stargaze, watch the moon play tricks on the snow-covered pines and follow my own path while following the path. I knew from the gun last year that the lead group would be beyond me, but there was a second group I wanted to stay close with. I fell a few strides off from them in the first miles, as I was burning up and questioning my clothing, lighting, fueling and sanity. What was I thinking? I wasn’t strong enough to keep this pace in these conditions.

I heard my name called out at the halfway point. A friend handed me a swig of not-frozen water and told me I wasn’t far off the lead group. I hadn’t really come to “compete,” but part of me always hears my Dad in my head: “Better to sweat stink and win than sweat stink and lose.” So I took off. I didn’t think I could catch that front group, but his words, tone and belief in me gave me what no Gu could. The second half of this course is an open road of shimmering snow I never can get enough of. There are stretches where the moon is my headlamp and stars represent intentions I am lifting. I run because I can, I am strong and somehow it makes sense of me. I work out problems and pray for those I can help in no other way. I hope they feel a blanket of comfort being wrapped around them as I run, they are warmed and strengthened. I ran fast, I ran strong, I ran prayerful, I ran groovy ... I crossed the finish with nothing left and told my friend, “I tried ... I never slowed down, but I couldn’t catch them.” Sometimes we put it all out there and fall short, but it’s OK. That’s where we’re meant to land.

Then I did what I do and settled in at about four miles. I passed the girls and three high school boys, then

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

Wicked Halloween Run, Plymouth

Plymouth Rocks Wicked Halloween Run By Anthony Targan PLYMOUTH (10/27/13) — I went to a Halloween party and a race broke out! So it seemed at the Wicked Halloween Run, Michigan’s largest Halloween race, where more than 5,000 runners filled Kellogg Park and the streets of downtown Plymouth. It would take several pages to catalog the many costumes represented, including the usual angels, devils, superheroes, witches, ghouls and fairies. Some of my favorites were a jellyfish (Marcia Pettit of Westland), a Wheaties box (William Pederson of Livonia), and Frankenstein and Bride, worn by Kevin and Alice Leshbrook of Howell.

Right before the 5K and 10K starts, the crowd was entertained by some cute little ghouls — I mean, girls — dressed as zombies, as members of the Piazza Dance Co. performed Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.”

Clint Verran claimed the 10K title while a small batman finished the Monster Mile.

In the 10K, Clint Verran of Lake Orion cited “perfect conditions” as he cruised to an easy victory in 31:38, beating his closest competitors — Rich Power (first master, 36:20) and Christopher Lucarelli (36:34) — by nearly five minutes. Stephanie Smith of Detroit, the women’s 10K winner in 38:18, loved all people on the course who were “dressed awesome in their Halloween costumes. “For the size of the race, there was good competition,” Smith continued, including Kristy Hill (40:48) and 14-year-old Katlyn Pizzo (40:49), who battled it out for second and third. Marie Halpin was the first female master in 42:46. In the 5K, Chris Woodring, 46, of Canton (18:29) held off Chris Lewicki of Plymouth by one second. Woodring, who was also the first master, said, “I heard him behind me the whole time.” Lewicki, 28, added, “I was trying to stay on his back the whole way and just couldn’t get him at the end.” Brian Jones was a close third in

- MR -

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© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Winter Run Calls Out

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18:38. Jessica Lypka, 14, of Novi was the women’s winner in 20:41, followed by Silver Lumsdaine (first female master in 20:53) and Riley Day (21:04). The Kona Running Co. has shown it knows how to organize races that attract thousands of runners of all ages and abilities. From finisher medals that are larger than most marathon medals I’ve received, to the Leslie Jordan designer long-sleeve ¼zip tech race shirts you’d actually want to wear in public, it’s no wonder Kona appeals to the masses. But the firm has not compromised race integrity in the process. Details such as USATF-certified courses, wave starts, pace groups (including special signs for first-time runners) and separate tents dedicated to award pick-up, post-race food and warming areas, display a level of organization usually reserved for big-city marathons. In 2014 Kona is introducing the Kona Grand Slam, a four-race series including the Kona St. Patrick’s Day Run, Kona Run, Wicked Halloween Run and Kona Chocolate Run, in addition to a new Novi Half Marathon, so stay tuned for more race-day fun. - MR -


Fifth Third Turkey Trot, Detroit

Deep Freeze Descends on Detroit’s Fifth Third Turkey Trot By Charles Douglas McEwen

The event, presented by the Parade Co., endured biting cold, a blustery wind and flurry that almost became a blizzard. Still, more than 22,000 runners and walkers came out for this Thanksgiving Day tradition. Hansons-Brooks Distance Project runners Robert Scribner, 28, Ethan Shaw, 23, and Mike Morgan, 33, led the way in the 10K. “I’m from Mississippi. This isn’t like Mississippi,” said Scribner of the weather. The same trio tore up last year’s 10K on a warmer day; Morgan triumphed in 30:39, with Scribner and Shaw timing 30:41. This year they had to deal with the course more gingerly. “It was slick but we were able to take it easy around the curves,” Scribner said. “The main thing was making sure we stayed on our feet.” Scribner won in 32:22. Shaw and Morgan both finished one second back. Pat Deighhan, 47, of Birmingham took the masters title in 36:29. Hansons-Brooks runner Neely Spence-Gracey, 23, who just got married, paced the women in 34:28. “ It was chilly out there,” she said. “But it was a great way to start Thanksgiving. I have lots of great memories from running turkey trots since I was little. It was cool to see so many runners out there. This was awesome for Detroit.” Danielle Miller, 21, of Clinton finished second among the women in 37:48. “It was a different course from last year,” she said. “I slipped on a corner. But I had a blast.” Tammy Nowik, 39, of Clarkston took third in 39:09.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

DETROIT (11/28/13) — How cold was it? All those human-sized turkeys who ran the 31st annual Fifth Third Turkey Trot wouldn’t be thawed out by dinner time. Nor would the costumed pilgrims, reindeer and superheroes who ran the race.

The stars align as the snow falls at the Fifth Third Turkey Trot 5K start: eventual winner, Erin Finn (bib no. 2359, Footlocker singlet) and Detroit legend Ella Willis (bib 2360, pink shoulder, orange & white gloves). Also identified are Benjamin Grissamon (bib no. 2398, orange cap) and Dominic Bruce (bib no 1994, Oxford CC). Fisher ran the 10K in 34:01, finishing at 7:30 a.m. Then he did the 5K, starting at 8:30, in 17:43. He captured the Drumstick Double with a combined time of 51:44.

Miller, runner-up in the 10K in 37:48, ran the 5K in 21:19. Her cumulative time of 59:07 made her women’s Drumstick Double champ.

Running behind the lead men for much of the 5K, University of Michigan star Erin Finn, 19, won the women’s race in 17:56.

“This is my seventh year doing it,” Miller said of the Turkey Trot. “It’s so much fun, it’s a tradition in my family.”

Rochester Hills 23-year-olds Corey Conner and The event also included a Mashed Potato Mile. Shanna McNiff tied for second, timing 19:20. Linda For complete results, go to http://gaultracemanagePrice, 45, of San Antonio, Tex., was the top masters ment.com. For more race information, visit woman in 23:01. http://theparade.org/turkeytrot. - MR sixth horizontal template_sixth horizontal 12/15/13 9:57 AM Page 1

Kathy Rink, 47, of Davidson, N.C. led the women masters in 42:06. Robert Fisher, 25, of Royal Oak won the Stuffing Strut 5K in 17:43, out-kicking Erik Potere, 22, of Howell (17:45) at the finish. Next came Bennett Prud’homme, 24, of South Lyon (17:50) and masters champ Ovidiu Olteanu, 43, of Commerce (17:48). “I was going for the victory,” Fisher said. “I didn’t care about the time. And my legs were tired from the 10K.”

michiganrunner.net

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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Ann Arbor Turkey Trot

Kona Chocolate Run, Plymouth

Ann Arbor Turkey Trot Moves Downtown, Draws Record Crowds

First Kona Chocolate Run is Sweet Success By Anthony Targan

By Tracey Cohen

Video frame by Jennie McCafferty

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

PLYMOUTH (11/17/13) — As someone who owns a shirt with the motto “Will Run for Beer,” I can understand that we all have different reasons for running. But I never could have imagined how a little chocolate could attract thousands of runners to Plymouth on a rainy mid-November morning.

“The guys really helped and were very friendly,” said Gryniewicz. “It was nice to run together. I was lucky they were ahead of me.”

Susi Cook of Farmington Hills was the second woman and first master in 19:09, followed by Michelle Urben (20:29).

In another second-place finish for the Foleys, Lee’s wife Leah overcame injury and illness to struggle to a 41:46 finish. She joked that she “didn’t want to lose to the dog” she chased for over five miles. Heather

The 1-mile race was mostly for kids, with Alexa Rybicki, 13, of Plymouth and Jackson Campbell, 9, of White Lake posting identical winning times of 6:34. And the chocolate party was for kids of all ages! - MR -

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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Falling snow greeted runners starting the 5K run. ANN ARBOR (11/28/13) — Three miles, hills, hot-chocolate aid stations and lightly-falling snow made a perfect start for Thanksgiving as nearly 3,000 runners ran through downtown to Michigan Stadium and back at the eighth annual Ann Arbor Turkey Trot. “The University of Michigan was a great partner,” said race director Ron Suffolk about this year’s change of venue. “We sort of outgrew that location. Plus, folks want to run in town!” Finisher Katie White said she liked the downhills and well-marked course. Although organizers chose to make this year’s trot noncompetitive, she appreciated the clock at the finish recording “my second-best ‘race’ time.”

ceived bells and festive hats. Little Trotters ages 13 and under were given medals at the finish. “It was perfect,” said Blake Fulton, 13. “The medal’s awesome!” Jeff Suffolk of Colorado, in town for the holidays and to support Good Boy’s race as he does each year, said the 2013 Trot “was my favorite yet.” Information on next year’s Ann Arbor Turkey Trot can be found at http://goodboyevents.com. - MR -

“We’re a competitive group,” said Suffolk, also founder of Good Boy Events. “But Thanksgiving Day’s all about fun. Folks just want to get out, run and enjoy themselves.” Veteran runner Jocelyn Anderson, dressed as a “Thanksgiving dinner,” received a pie for her efforts and affirmed Suffolk’s point. “There was no pressure. It was all about fun,” she said.

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Turkey Trotters re-

Photo by Tracey Cohen

Swarming like bees to honey, runners lined 5K runners Holly Rea and Jessica up around the block for the post-Kona Chocolate Hertenstein enjoy chocolate goodies. Run party at Kellogg Irvine of Ypsilanti (42:06) was the Park. They waited patiently to dip pret10K women masters winner. zels, marshmallows, Rice Krispie treats and other delicacies into warm founIn the 5K, Christopher Madziar tains of milk and dark chocolate. And of Essexville won in 16:21, a PR in his they washed it all down with hot cocoa first 3.1-mile race since high school with whipped cream. Yum! seven years ago. While the hot chocolate was the “I just ran as fast as I felt my legs raison d’etre for most runners, there could,” said Madziar. “I looked down were also three hotly-contested races and realized I was doing what I that morning. In the 10K, Eric Stuber wanted to do.” of Lansing (35:25) was first overall and first master, besting Lee Foley of Matt Disher of Ypsilanti finished a Clarkston (35:54) and Shaun Jordan close second in 16:26, followed by Ryan of Howell (37:21). Weisenberger of Pinkney (16:54). Thomas Heinlein of Ann Arbor (18:54) After running the first mile towas the male masters winner. gether in 5:33, Foley said, “I tried to hang with Eric, but he burned me Women’s 5K champ Kali Dent of pretty good in the second mile. I was Midland (17:13) said, “I love the athoping he would fall back a bit, but mosphere. Everybody from the 10K he didn’t. He stayed pretty much in was cheering for me. It’s great camacontrol the entire race.” raderie among all the runners. Sarah Gryniewicz of Grosse Pointe “I like the rain. Goes with the atWoods (38:18) ran her first 10K in a coumosphere. And I love chocolate, of ple years and hung with the faster men to course,” Dent said. pace her to an easy win.

Jocelyn Anderson ran, somehow, wearing her Thanksgiving table.


Wildlife Marathon, Concord

Wildlife Marathon Winner Sees Wildlife Firsthand By Charles Douglas McEwen CONCORD (10/13/13) — Justin Gillette ran away with his first Wildlife Marathon in 2010, setting a course-record 2:41:42 which still stands.

Gillette jumped out to huge lead, but struggled down the homestretch. “With a half mile to go, I looked over my shoulder and there he (Kevin Rook, 27, of Hickory Corners) was, right behind me,” Gillette said.

Marcy Sacks “I was gaining on him quickly, but I ran out of race,” Rook said. Gillette finished in 2:48:46, Rook 2:49:03. Top masters runner David Giammar, 41, of  Lansing finished third overall in 2:57:20. While running the Wildlife Marathon, Gillette did see wildlife. “Six or seven deer crossed right in front of me,” he said. “They just stood and watched me,” Marcy Sacks, 44, of Albion didn’t run into any wildlife, but she did enjoy the perfect weather and beauty of the course. “It’s so pretty,” said the women’s winner. “And it’s definitely challenging. It’s a local race for me. I live seven miles from here and I’ve never won a marathon overall. So I was really happy to run it.” Sacks finished in 3:17:17, well ahead of runnerup Kacey Tulley, 37, of Brighton (3:24:11) and third-place finisher Lorretta Tobolske-Horn, 42, of Reading (3:26:13). “The most fabulous thing is I had a bike escort. I’ve never had that before!” Sacks said. Rebecca Walter, 29, of Bloomington, Ind., enjoyed a bike escort from start to finish in the half marathon. “I’ve never outright won a race where I beat all the guys and women,” she said. “It’s a first.” Her 1:23:21 time shattered Rebecca Boggs’ 1:29:53 women’s course record set in 2011. Walter, a former University of Michigan star who is now an assistant cross country and track coach at Indiana University, led the race with Kyle Reif, 20, of Muskegon during the early going.

Next came the second overall male, Bill Goodwin, 44, of Canton in 1:32:57. Senior masters Mark Sigfrids, 60, of Kalamazoo (1:34:53) and Bob Moore, 61, of Berrien Springs (1:37:22) were the third and fourth men across the line.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“It was brutal,” he said. “I injured my foot in early August and had to take six weeks off. So I’ve only been training for the past two weeks. I thought this would be a fun test to see where my fitness is at — and found out it’s not there at all.”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

This year Gillette, of Goshen, Ind., had to battle to squeak out a win.

Two more masters women, Marie Halpin, 44, of Birmingham (1:32:37) and Dorsey Dobry, 45, of Franklin (1:32:38) followed them.  

Runners in the 5K made history. Aaron Usher, 35, of Mason won in 16:35, breaking Kevin Cataldo’s 16:52 record set last year. Laura Gillette, 28, of Goshen, Ind., sister-in-law of Justin, captured the women’s 5K in 19:14, besting Christine Vincent’s 20:13 mark set in 2011.   

Rebecca Walter

that she held her pace and I dropped off. Hats off to her! I’m happy with my time, but she killed me.” Reif, the first male finisher, was the second person across the finish line in 1:28:43, just 10 seconds ahead of hard-charging Josephine Weeden, 45, of Saline. The top masters runner in the race timed 1:28:53. 

Ray Roberts, 62, of Hillsdale (2:48:28) and Bernadine Hernden, 63, of Fraser (2:49:29) won the half marathon walk. Mathew Lewis, 12, of Trenton (34:57) and Janet Scott, 49, of Horton (34:18) were the 5K walk winners. All Wildlife Marathon proceeds went to the Friends of the Falling Waters Trail and local charities. For more information and complete results, go to http://wildlifemarathon.org. - MR -

2014 Michigan Runner Race Series Corktown Races, 5K, Detroit - March 16 Striders Saturday Classic, 10 Mile, Grandville - April 19 Burns Park Run 10K, Ann Arbor - May 4 Fifth Third River Bank Run 25K, Grand Rapids - May 10 Dexter Ann Arbor Half Marathon, Ann Arbor - June 1 Brian Diemer Family of Races 5K, Cutlerville - June 14 Volkslaufe 20K, Frankenmuth - July 4 Cherry Festival 15K, Traverse City - July 12 Crim Festival of Races, 10 Mile, Flint - August 23 Mackinac Island Road Race, 8 Mile, Mackinac Island - Sept. tbd Sault International Marathon, Sault Ste. Marie, MI - September 27 Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon - October tbd Wicked Halloween Run, 10K, Plymouth - October 26 For details, see facebook.com/pages/Michigan-Runner/413094780653

“I was with her for four miles,” Reif said. “After michiganrunner.net

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MHSAA LP Cross Country Finals, Brooklyn

Prep State Cross Meets are Joy Renewed By Scott Sullivan

Then you’re on the track grounds, where tens of thousands of empty bleacher seats watch the noncars while spectators sprint between course viewing points to catch what they can of one or more of eight races: four enrollment-based divisions for boys and girls. The fastest teens run just over 10 mph, propelled by their food-fuel, human bodies and years of training. That’s maybe 5 percent of what race cars do — and the speed you rivaled to hit the MIS “comfort station.” But if you are friends, coaches, parents and others who “get” what it is about human drive, you may have the time of your life. So it was on this soggy day.

Olling Rolling

Benzie, rarely far from the D3 cross boys and girls winner’s circle, added another team title to its trophy case in the guys’ race with 111 points, edging Stockbridge (129) on the strength of its fifth runner’s better finish.

This writer feels a personal bond toward Saugatuck, where he works as a newspaper editor and sees teens training daily on dunes and along the shores. This year’s boys claimed their first D4 title in school history thanks to exactly that dedication. After losing four seniors — two of whom finished among the top five in last year’s state meet — from their seven-member squad that placed third, the Indians got better. Junior Jacob Pettinga (third overall) and senior Clayton Springer (eighth) survived the soft turf to lead Saugatuck to 113 points, edging Mt. Pleasant Sacred Heart (121) and Concord (134).

Lansing Catholic junior Keenan Rebera, fourth in 2012, topped Mason County Central senior Chase Barnett, third last year, among individuals, striding smoothly away to prevail in 15:31. Barnett crossed next in 16:00.9.

D4 Champion Jesse Hersha

Defending D3 girls champ Gina Patterson had no problem finding Charlevoix junior Amber Way. Way, who finished fourth last year, raced shoulder-to-shoulder with her rival until Patterson, also a junior from Macomb Lutheran North, out-kicked her in the home stretch, 18:02.7 to 18:04.2.

D4 Champion Kirsten Olling

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

Top-ranked Shep|

D3 Champion Keenan Rebera

Eagles Tops on Land Want to talk “reloading”? Say hello to the D2 Grand Rapids Christian girls, who said goodbye to two-time individual champion Julia Bos this fall and still claimed their fourth team title since 2005 with 109 points. Did we mention the Eagles’ top-six runners are all underclassmen? Or that Spring Lake finished a far-distant second, 96 points behind?

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Patterson Finds Way

Olling’s Breckenridge team (with 136 points) finished second to Beal City (120), which came in just sixthranked but “ourdepthed” everyone, seeing its top five run-

26

Saugatuck Likes Soggy

Concord junior Jesse Hersha made up for his team’s near-miss by romping to his second-straight individual title, finishing in 15:49.2. East Jordan’s Josh Wojan took second in 16:33.6.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Breckenridge senior Kirsten Olling became the eighth four-time high school cross country champ in state history, claiming the girls’ small-school title in a Division 4 record time of 17:44.9. That was 27 seconds off her personal best, but almost a minute faster than runner-up Tess Fornari of Waterford Our City of the Lakes.

B.C. Adds Up

Photo by Scott Sullivan

This isn’t Brooklyn, N.Y. This is rural Michigan, where, if you make a pit stop at the Cement City gas station, you learn their bathroom tank’s full, go elsewhere. You could burst from the pre-race excitement, but the Speedway is only 5K away. Endure!

Olling, who has run a mile or more daily since eighth grade, is considering Michigan State, Notre Dame and Arizona State as college destinations. The recruiting victor will get a winner: a win-win match.

herd, clad in green-and-yellow Superman-style singlets, lived up to its billing in the team race, besting Benzie Central, 120 points to 186. The girls’ winning-stand celebration was vivid too.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

If you have to ask, you likely missed this year’s Michigan High School Athletic Association Lower Peninsula Cross Country Finals at Michigan International Speedway.

ners finish in 44th place overall or better.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

BROOKLYN (11/2/13) — Not everyone “gets” cross country. Why would close to 2,000 teenagers run themselves into exhaustion on muddy grounds of an auto race track on a clammy day in November?

D2 champion Kenzie Weiler (l) & Jackie Bredenberg

Cedar Springs junior Kenzie Weiler, second to Bos for the last two seasons, was challenged in her attempt to step up from bridesmaid. Detroit Country Day junior Jackie Bredenberg led her with only 30 meters left.

Amber Way (l) & D3 Champion Gina Patterson

michiganrunner.tv

Weiler reached deep to pass Bredenberg, winning the day’s closest rac,e 17:55.1 to 17:55.9. With the top six finishers here all juniors, look more stiff competition next year.


As teens, teams, fans and families headed home — some with medals and trophies, most only memories — we made our own way back from our 17thstraight finals thinking most kids we saw were not even born that first year.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Passing Cement City, we figured may be full of it, like the bathroom tank, but these meets renew something young in us every year. - MR -

D1 Champions Milford Fast Time for Sargeant

D2 Champion Austin Sargeant

Top-ranked St. Clair, with three runners in the top 17, withstood a challenge from the pack running of St. Joseph, winning with the day’s low team score of 106 points. St. Joe, whose team nickname is Bears, had 127.

Belf Off Shelf Northville, with four girls among the top 22, showed why it entered the large-school D1 race ranked No. 1, winning the Mustangs’ first-ever cross crown with 106 points.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Sargeant, 27th behind Mora last year, showed his heels to all comers this year, winning in 15:42.7. Senior Mason Van Dyke of Mason (no, the school isn’t named for him) claimed second in 15:48.5.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

What is it about Cedar Springs individuals? Junior Austin Sargeant joined Weiler and recent Red Hawk graduates Connor Mora (2012) and Landon Peacock (2005) on the D2 boys winners’ podium.

willed herself this season to do better. Did she! The Birmingham Seaholm junior, unbeaten against state runners all fall, went out with her sights on 2009 Foot Locker national champion Megan Goethals’ state-record 16:54.8 time.

sixth vertical template_sixth vertical 12/7/13 10:58 AM P Grant Fisher.

Brian Kettle & D1 Champion

It was not to be on a course that had been chewed up, after so many races, to soupy mud. But Belf posted the day’s fastest girls time, crossing in 17:31.1. Rockford senior Lauren Brasure finished next in 17:40.8.

D1 Champion Audrey Belf

Fisher King

Grant Fisher, who skipped last year’s state meet to compete the same day for Grand Blanc’s soccer team, decided before this season he’d choose cross this autumn. It turned out a wise decision. The light-footed Fisher pulled away from Milford senior and defending champ Brian Kettle to win in 15:13.7. Kettle, second in 15:31.7, wasted no time mourning — not after leading Milford to its its third-straight team crown and fifth in the last 10 years. The Mavericks edged top-ranked Waterford Mott, 165 points to 170.

Audrey Belf, who finished 33rd here last year, michiganrunner.net

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running fit template_running fit template 12/15/13 11:52 AM Page 1

July -/August 2013 Event Calendar January February 2014 Event Calendar Wed, 1/1/14 Wed, 1/1/14 Wed, 1/1/14

Commitment Day - Detroit 5KR Gazelle Sports’ John Daley Memorial One One Run 4.4MR/W, 2.2MR/W Hair of the Dog 5K Run/Walk 5KR/W

Farmington Kalamazoo Saugatuck

(888) 600-2298 commitmentday.com/detroit/ (269) 342-5996 gazellesports.com (616) 392-2282 gazellesports.com

Wed, 1/1/14 Wed, 1/1/14 Wed, 1/1/14

Ludington Resolution Run 5K New Year’s Eve Midnight Run - Flashmob 5K New Year’s Resolution Run

5KR 5KR 5KR, 1.5MR/W

Ludington Ann Arbor Lake Orion

ludington5k.com/resolution-run-5k/ (734) 678-5045 epicraces.com (248) 693-9742 downtownlakeorion.org

Wed, 1/1/14 Wed, 1/1/14 Thu, 1/2/14

Resolution 5K Sergeant Preston, Yukon King Run Hansons Beginners Walk/Run

5KR/W 6MR, 5KR/FW training

Lansing Muskegon Lake Orion

(989) 620-1674 (231) 206-5571 (248) 693-9900

runningfoundation.com sgtprestonrun.com hansons-running.com

Thu, 1/2/14 Fri, 1/3/14 Fri, 1/3/14

Hansons Tempo Run Michigan Indoor Track Series Michigan Indoor Track Series

training run track & field: distance classic, pv hs track & field

Royal Oak Warren Ann Arbor

(248) 616-9665

hansons-running.com mitstrack.org mitstrack.org

Sat, 1/4/14 Sat, 1/4/14 Sat, 1/4/14

Chili Chase for Charity Frozen Torch Snowshoe Race Livonia Park Run

10K, 5K XC ski, 2.5K snowshoe Houghton 10KR, 5KR Central Lake 5KR Livonia

Sat, 1/4/14 Sat, 1/4/14 Sat, 1/4/14

Michigan Cup Team Relay Michigan Indoor Track Series PR Fitness Group Run

5-7K team relay XC ski Grayling hs track & field Mt. Pleasant 20MR, 12MR, 10MR, 8MR, 6MR Ann Arbor

(989)348-9266 (313) 815-4513

hansonhills.org mitstrack.org prfitnessa2.com

Sat, 1/4/14 Sat, 1/4/14 Sat, 1/4/14

Reese Winter Road Race Series Warren Cold Rush Cold Run Yankee Springs Winter Challenge

10KR, 5KR/W 5KR/W, 1MFR 50MR, 50KR, 25KR, 10KR

Reese Warren Middleville

(989) 529-7904 (586) 268-8400 (616) 54001987

race-mrm.com cityofwarren.org yankeespringstrailrun.com

Tue, 1/7/14 Tue, 1/7/14 Thu, 1/9/14

Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays Michigan Indoor Track Series Barnelopet

Grosse Pointe Grand Rapids Hancock

(248) 693-9900

field: hj, sp, pv Kids XC ski

hansons-running.com mitstrack.org keweenawtrails.com

Thu, 1/9/14 Thu, 1/9/14 Thu, 1/9/14

Hansons Beginners Walk/Run Hansons Tempo Run Michigan Indoor Track Series

training training run hs track & field

Lake Orion Royal Oak Ann Arbor

(248) 693-9900 248-616-9665

hansons-running.com hansons-running.com mitstrack.org

Fri, 1/10/14 Sat, 1/11/14 Sat, 1/11/14

Michigan Indoor Track Series Bling in the New Year Fun Run Cross Countery Winter Trail Days

hs track & field 5KR XC Ski Cinic

Warren Royal Oak Thompsonville

616-895-3042 (248) 577-0800 (800) 968-7686

mitstrack.org gildasclubdetroit.org crystalmountain.com

Sat, 1/11/14 Sat, 1/11/14 Sat, 1/11/14

Flash Frozen 5K Fun Run/Walk Frozen Foot Race Frozen Watters Trail Run

5KR/W 5 MR 4MR

Monroe Traverse City Rochester Hills

Sat, 1/11/14 Sat, 1/11/14 Sat, 1/11/14

IDADARUN Lansing for Haiti 5K Livonia Park Run

8MR, 8M relay 5KR/W 5KR

Linden Lansing Livonia

Sat, 1/11/14 Sat, 1/11/14

Michigan Indoor Track Series Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field hs track & field

Allendale Saginaw

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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michiganrunner.tv

(231) 544-5915 (734) 642-6664

keweenawtrails.com www.hayowentha.org parkrun.us/livonia

(734) 735-3456 mysunbow.wix.com (231) 933-9242 events.bytepro.net/2014frozenfoot (248) 320-5705 jeffwatters.com (313) 806-0137 (517) 290-0769 (734) 642-6664

lansingforhaiti.com parkrun.us/livonia mitstrack.org mitstrack.org


January / February 2014 Event Calendar Sat, 1/11/14 Sat, 1/11/14 Sat, 1/11/14

Montrose Frozen Blueberry 5K PoHo Hot Cocoa 8K Run/ 5K Walk PR Fitness Group Run

5KR/W Montrose 8KR, 5KW, kids run Port Huron 20MR, 12MR, 10MR, 8MR, 6MR Ann Arbor

(248) 321-0148 (810) 824-3272 (313) 815-4513

blueberryrace.org elitefeetrunning.com prfitnessa2.com

Sat, 1/11/14 Sat, 1/11/14 Sun, 1/12/14

REI Frosty Freestyle Cross Country Ski Race SISU Ski Festival Dave’s 10 Mile Shoe Run

15K X-C Ski; 5K X-C Ski 42K/ 21K/ XC ski, kids XC ski 10 MR, 5KR

Brighton Ironwood Delta

(248) 535-9351 (715) 254-4104 (419) 704-8164

www.nordicskiracer.com sisuskifest.com davesraces.com

Tue, 1/14/14 Tue, 1/14/14 Thu, 1/16/14

Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays Michigan Indoor Track Series Hansons Beginners Walk/Run

Grosse Pointe Grand Rapids Lake Orion

(248) 693-9900

field: hj, sp, pv training

hansons-running.com mitstrack.org hansons-running.com

Thu, 1/16/14 Thu, 1/16/14 Fri, 1/17/14

Hansons Tempo Run Michigan Indoor Track Series Cote Dame Marie Loppet Kids Race

training run hs track & field kids XC races

Royal Oak Ann Arbor Grayling

248-616-9665

Sat, 1/18/14 Sat, 1/18/14

Arctic Blast Color Dash Auto Show Shuffle

5KR/W/snowshoe, 1KR 5KR/W

Ishpeming Detroit

Sat, 1/18/14 Sat, 1/18/14

Cote Dame Marie Loppet Freeze Your Fanny 5K Run/Walk

30K, 15K XC Ski 5KR/W, 1MR

Grayling Bay City

Sat, 1/18/14 Sat, 1/18/14 Sat, 1/18/14

Livonia Park Run Michigan Indoor Track Series OPC Indoor Triathlon

5KR track & field tri: 20minS/ 20minB/ 20minR

Livonia Hillsdale Rochester

Sat, 1/18/14 Sat, 1/18/14 Sat, 1/18/14

Portland Winter Run PR Fitness Group Run Tip Up Town 5K Run/Walk

Sat, 1/18/14 Sun, 1/19/14 Mon, 1/20/14

Sat, 1/18/14 Sat, 1/18/14

501 Running Club

Bigfoot Snowshoe Race

2-12MR, training

Ann Arbor

10K, 5K snowshoe races Traverse City

(248) 693-9900

(989) 348-9266

hansons-running.com mitstrack.org www.hansonhills.org

(734) 657-0214 runningfit501.com

(906) 486-1111 facebook.com/ArcticBlastColorDash (734) 341-5867 autoshowshuffle.com

(734) 929-9027 runsnow.com (888) 876-2196 (989) 832.2267

graylingnordic.com www.barc-mi.com

(734) 642-6664 (248) 608-0295

parkrun.us/livonia mitstrack.org opcseniorcenter.org

5KR/W Portland 20MR, 12MR, 10MR, 8MR, 6MR Ann Arbor 5KR Houghton Lake

(517) 526-2210 (313) 815-4513 (989) 389-0118

runningfoundation.com prfitnessa2.com houghtonlakechamber.net

Winter Wolf Run Dirty Herd Winter Classic Michigan Indoor Track Series

15MR, 2 person relay 4MR, 2MR track & field,

Omer Grand Rapids Ypsilanti

(989) 529-2906 (616) 940-9888

witchywolfrun.com gazellesports.com mitstrack.org

Mon, 1/20/14 Tue, 1/21/14 Thu, 1/23/14

Michigan Indoor Track Series Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays Hansons Beginners Walk/Run

track & field, training

East Lansing Grosse Pointe Lake Orion

Thu, 1/23/14 Thu, 1/23/14 Fri, 1/24/14

Hansons Tempo Run Michigan Indoor Track Series Michigan Indoor Track Series

training run hs track & field hs track & field

Royal Oak Ann Arbor Mt. Pleasant

248-616-9665

Sat, 1/25/14 Sat, 1/25/14

Freeze Your Franny Livonia Park Run

5KR/W 5KR

Shelby Twp. Livonia

(586) 850-6611 (734) 642-6664

freezeyourfranny.com parkrun.us/livonia

Sat, 1/25/14 Sat, 1/25/14 Sat, 1/25/14

Noquemanon Ski Marathon PR Fitness Group Run Snowmans Half Marathon

(888) 370-RACE (313) 815-4513 (989) 317-5889

noquemanon.com prfitnessa2.com michiganhalfseries.com

Sat, 1/25/14 Sun, 1/26/14 Sun, 1/26/14

The Frostbite Hansons Group Run Livonia’s Arctic Chill Indoor Triathlon

(231) 924-6045 (248) 693-9900 (734) 466-2900

www.fremontxc.com hansons-running.com www.ci.lovonia.mi.us

Sun, 1/26/14 Sun, 1/26/14 Tue, 1/28/14

Meridian Township Parks and Recreation Polar Bear 5KR/W Okemos Noquemanon Ski Race 12KXCSki, 24KSnowB; 12KSnowB, 10KSnowshoe Marquette Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays Grosse Pointe

(517) 853-4616 (888) 370-RACE (248) 693-9900

active.com noquemanon.com hansons-running.com

Wed, 1/29/14 Thu, 1/30/14 Thu, 1/30/14

Michigan indoor Track Series Hansons Beginners Walk/Run Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field training hs track & field

Ann Arbor Lake Orion Hillsdale

(248) 693-9900

mitstrack.org hansons-running.com mitstrack.org

Sat, 1/25/14

501 Running Club

2-12MR, training

Ann Arbor

50K, 24K, 12k XC Ski; 15M snowshoe Marquette 20MR, 12MR, 10MR, 8MR, 6MR Ann Arbor 13.1MR/W, 10KR/W, 5KR/W Mt. Pleasant 10KR, 5KR/W training Trtiathlon: 20min S/ B/ R

Fremont Lake Orion Livonia

(248) 693-9900 (248) 693-9900

mitstrack.org hansons-running.com hansons-running.com hansons-running.com mitstrack.org mitstrack.org

(734) 657-0214 runningfit501.com

Fri, 1/31/14

Sat, 2/1/14

Michigan Indoor Track Series

Sat, 2/1/14

501 Running Club

Betsie Bay Frozen 5K - February date TBD

2-12MR, training 5KR/W

Ann Arbor

Elberta & Frankfort

(734) 657-0214 runningfit501.com (231) 668-1010

onthegroundglobal.org

Sat, 2/1/14 Sat, 2/1/14 Sat, 2/1/14

Borgess Run Camp Frosty 5K & Merry Mile Groundhog Gallop

13 weeks training 5KR/W, 1MR/W 5KR/W, Kid’s Run

Kalamazoo Iron Mountain Jackson

(269) 345-1913 (906) 774-2256 (517) 784-5444

borgessruncamp.com dicsami.org runsignup.com

Sat, 2/1/14

Hot Chocolate Hustle

5KR/ 1MW

Adrian

(517) 263-2911

www.adriansef.com

hs track & field

michiganrunner.net

Allendale

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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Sat, 2/1/14 Sat, 2/1/14 Sat, 2/1/14

Iola Twilight Snowshoe Race Livonia Park Run Michigan Indoor Track Series

10K, 5K, kids snowshoe 5KR track & field

Sat, 2/1/14 Sat, 2/1/14 Sat, 2/1/14

Moonlight 1/6 Marathon on Groundhog Eve PR Fitness Group Run Reese Winter Road Race Series

Sat, 2/1/14 Sat, 2/1/14 Sat, 2/1/14

(715) 701-0360 (734) 642-6664

greatlakesendurance.com parkrun.us/livonia mitstrack.org

4.3 MR, snowshoe run Grand Rapids 20MR, 12MR, 10MR, 8MR, 6MR Ann Arbor 10KR, 5KR/W Reese

(616) 293-3145 (313) 815-4513 (989) 529-7904

groundhogmarathon.com prfitnessa2.com race-mrm.com

White Pine Stampede Winterlaufe YMCA Snowshoe Shuffle

40K, 20K, 10K XC Ski 8KR/W 5K snowshoe

Mancelona Frankenmuth Middleville

(231) 587-8812 (989) 860-3388 (616) 855-1982

whitepinestampede.org www.winterlaufe.org ymcasnowshoeshuffle.com

Sun, 2/2/14 Sun, 2/2/14

Groundhog Day Marathon Rock CF’s Groundhog Day 5K’ish

26.2MR, 13.1MR 5KR/W

Grand Rapids Grosse Ile

(616) 293-3145 (734) 341-5867

groundhogmarathon.com outruncf.com

Sun, 2/2/14 Sun, 2/2/14 Sun, 2/2/14

Super Bowl 5K Superbowl Shuffle Tutu Fun Run to Benefit Girls on the Run

5KR/W 4MR/W, 1MFR 2.2MR/W

Okemos Shelby Township Kalamazoo

(517) 702-0226 (586) 323-9683 (269) 491-2663

runningfoundation.com hansonsracemanagement.com girlsontherunkazoo.org

Tue, 2/4/14 Thu, 2/6/14 Thu, 2/6/14

Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays Hansons Beginners Walk/Run Hansons Tempo Run

training

Grosse Pointe Lake Orion Royal Oak

(248) 693-9900 (248) 693-9900 248-616-9665

Thu, 2/6/14 Fri, 2/7/14 Fri, 2/7/14

Michigan Indoor Track Series Michigan Indoor Track Series Rotary Winter Run

track & field - distance fest track: distance festival 5KR/W

Warren Saginaw Grand Haven

mitstrack.org mitstrack.org facebook.com/pages/Rotary-Winter-Run/

Sat, 2/8/14 Sat, 2/8/14 Sat, 2/8/14

5K Snowshoe Stomp Bumper Run Dragon Run

5K Snowshoe, kids snowshoe 6 MR 5KR/W

Thompsonville Shelby Township Howell

Sat, 2/8/14 Sat, 2/8/14 Sat, 2/8/14

Frostbite 5K 5KR/W Frosty Five Trail Run 5MR Grand Rapids Urban Adventure Race - Winter Edition 3 hr adventure

Vicksburg Adrian Belmont

Sat, 2/8/14 Sat, 2/8/14 Sat, 2/8/14

Livonia Park Run Maple Syrup Stampede Michigan Indoor Track Series

5KR 20K XC Ski, 7K XC Ski track & field

Livonia (734) 642-6664 St. Joseph Island, ON (705) 759-0626 Saginaw

Sat, 2/8/14 Sat, 2/8/14 Sat, 2/8/14

North American VASA PR Fitness Group Run Snap Fitness Snowball Family Fun Run

50K ski, 27K ski, 12K ski, 6K ski Traverse City 20MR, 12MR, 10MR, 8MR, 6MR Ann Arbor 5KR/W Ionia

(231) 938-4400 (313) 815-4513 (407) 529-9910

www.vasa.org prfitnessa2.com runsignup.com

Sat, 2/8/14 Sat, 2/8/14 Sun, 2/9/14

Sweetheart Run & Team Competition Winter Witch’s Hat Run Gran Travers Cross Country Classic

10KR, 5KR/W, Couple Teams 5KR/W 16K / 6K XC Ski classic

Flushing South Lyon Traverse City

(810) 487-0954 (248) 207-5135 (231) 938-4400

riverbendStriders.com slxc.com/witch nordicskiracer.com

Sun, 2/9/14 Sun, 2/9/14 Sun, 2/9/14

Junior VASA Kahtoola Michigan Mountain Run Riverview Winterfest Breakfast and 4 Mile Run

6K ski 8KR, 4KR 4 MR, 4x1M relay

Traverse City Clarkston Riverview

(231) 938-4400 (231) 233-4736 (313) 550-9336

www.vasa.org infiterrasports.com downriverrunners.org

Tue, 2/11/14 Tue, 2/11/14 Wed, 2/12/14

Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays Michigan Indoor Track Series Michigan Indoor Track Series

Grosse Pointe Grand Rapids Ann Arbor

(248) 693-9900

field: hj, sp, pv track & field

hansons-running.com mitstrack.org mitstrack.org

Thu, 2/13/14 Thu, 2/13/14 Thu, 2/13/14

Hansons Beginners Walk/Run Hansons Tempo Run Michigan Indoor Track Series

training

(248) 693-9900 248-616-9665

track & field

Lake Orion Royal Oak Hillsdale

hansons-running.com hansons-running.com mitstrack.org

Fri, 2/14/14 Sat, 2/15/14 Sat, 2/15/14

Michigan Indoor Track Series Bon Soo Lantern Ski Cupid’s Undie Run

track & field ski tour 1.2MR

Warren Sault St. Marie Detroit

(705) 759-0626 (586) 322-8612

mitstrack.org www.soofinnishnordic.com cupidsundierun.com

Sat, 2/15/14 Sat, 2/15/14 Sat, 2/15/14

Full Moon Advantage Winter Trail Race Hot Chocolate 5K Run & Walk IceCube Half Marathon

5KR/W 5KR/W 13.1MR, 10KR. 5KR

Williamston Burton Mt. Pleasant

(810) 513-3330 (989) 317-5889

runningfoundation.com hotchocolate5krun.com michiganhalfseries.com

Sat, 2/15/14 Sat, 2/15/14 Sat, 2/15/14

Livonia Park Run PR Fitness Group Run Spirit of Winter 5K Run/Walk

5KR Livonia 20MR, 12MR, 10MR, 8MR, 6MR Ann Arbor 5KR/W Bay City

(734) 642-6664 (313) 815-4513 (989) 832.2267

parkrun.us/livonia prfitnessa2.com barc-mi.com

Sat, 2/15/14 Sat, 2/15/14 Sat, 2/15/14

Tahquamenon Snowshoe Race USA Cross Country Championships Winter Blast 5K

20K, 10K, 5K, kids snowshoe 6KR, 8KR, 12KR 5KR/W

(715) 701-0360

greatlakesendurance.com usatf.org winterblastrun.com

Sun, 2/2/14

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Super 5K

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

5KR/W

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michiganrunner.tv

Iola, WI Livonia Saginaw

Novi

Paradise Boulder, CO Grandville

(734) 929-9027 runsuperbowl.com

hansons-running.com hansons-running.com hansons-running.com

(888) 968-7686 crystalmountain.com (248) 628-4036 or (248) 701-4036 (c) (810) 355-8459 facebook.com/DragonRunHowell (269) 569-08441 (517) 266-6344 (616) 460-9331

(616) 293-1862

signmeup.com runningwithes.com grUrbanAdventureRace.com parkrun.us/livonia www.soofinnishnordic.com mitstrack.org


January / February 2014 Event Calendar Sun, 2/16/14 Sun, 2/16/14 Sun, 2/16/14

Hanson Hills Classic Heart Throb 5K Howell Splash n’ Dash Indoor Tri

Tue, 2/18/14 Thu, 2/20/14 Thu, 2/20/14

Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays Hansons Beginners Walk/Run Hansons Tempo Run

training

Sat, 2/22/14 Sat, 2/22/14

Chili-Heart 5K Dash Down Division

5KR/W 5KR/W, 1/4MFR

Sat, 2/22/14 Sat, 2/22/14

12K XC Ski Grayling 5KR/W East Lansing triathlon: 20 minS/ 20 minB/ 20 minR Howell

Ann Arbor Track Club Open Mile

Grosse Pointe Lake Orion Royal Oak

1MR

Ann Arbor

Saint Clair Grand Rapids

hs track & field

(989) 348-9266 (248) 660-7390 (517) 546-0693

hansonhills.org runningfoundation.com howellrecreation.org

(248) 693-9900 (248) 693-9900 248-616-9665

hansons-running.com hansons-running.com hansons-running.com

(616) 588-7200

chiliheart5k.com dashdowndivision.com

(734) 642-6664

parkrun.us/livonia prfitnessa2.com

(734) 332-9129 aatrackclub.org/Events/

Sat, 2/22/14

Livonia Park Run

5KR

Sat, 2/22/14

Michigan Indoor Track Series - State Championship

Mount Pleasant

PR Fitness Group Run

20MR, 12MR, 10MR, 8MR, 6MR Ann Arbor

(313) 815-4513

mitstrack.org

Sun, 2/23/14 Sun, 2/23/14 Sun, 2/23/14

Glide ‘N Gorge Hansons Group Run Last Chance for Boston Marathon

6K XC ski tour Hancock training Lake Orion 26.2MR, 13.1MR, 10KR, 5KR, relay Dublin

(248) 693-9900 (614) 431-9134

keweenawnordic.org hansons-running.com premierraces.com

Tue, 2/25/14 Tue, 2/25/14 Thu, 2/27/14

Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays Hansons Beginners Walk/Run

training

Grosse Pointe Grosse Pointe Lake Orion

(248) 693-9900 (248) 693-9900 (248) 693-9900

hansons-running.com hansons-running.com hansons-running.com

Thu, 2/27/14 Fri, 2/28/14 Fri, 2/28/14

Hansons Tempo Run Big Ten Indoor Championships - Men & Women Mid American Conference Indoor Championships

Royal Oak Geneva, OH Kent, OH

248-616-9665

track & field meet track & field meet

hansons-running.com bigten.cstv.com mac-sports.com

Livonia

Featured Future Events Sat, 3/8/14 Sun, 3/9/14 Sat, 3/15/14

Lucky Leprechaun Shamrocks and Shenanigans Shillelagh Four Mile

5KR/W 5KR/W, kids’ run 4 MR/W, kids run

Utica Ann Arbor Flushing

(586) 243-9813 luckyleprechaunrace.com (734) 969-9027 runshamrocks.com (810) 487-0954 gaultracemanagement.com

Sat, 3/15/14 Sun, 3/16/14 Sun, 3/16/14

St. Patrick’s Day Leprechaun Races Kona St. Patrick’s Day Run St. Patrick’s Day Races

kids runs 10KR, 5KR/W, 1MFR 5KR/W

Bay City Plymouth Bay City

(989) 415-5593 (248) 345-6168 (989) 415-5593

Sun, 3/16/14 St. Patrick’s Parade Corktown Race Mon, 3/17/14 St. Patrick’s Day Pot O’ Gold Shuffle Sun, 3/30/14 Ann Arbor Marathon

5KR/W Detroit 4 MR/W, kids run Flint 26.2MR, 13.1MR, 5KR, 1MR Ann Arbor

barc-mi.com konastpatricksdayrun.com barc-mi.com

(248) 354-1177 corktownrace.com (810) 233-8851 potofgoldrun.com (734) 213-1033 theannarbormarathon.com

Tue, 4/1/14 Sat, 4/12/14 Sat, 4/26/14

April Fools Day Twinkie Run 5KR Martian Invasion of Races 26.2MR, 13.1MR, 10KR, 5KR, kids run Running Fit Trail Half Marathon 13.1MR

Ann Arbor Dearborn Pinckney

(734) 747-6952 (734) 929-9027 (734) 929-9027

aatrackclub.org martianmarathon.com trailmarathon.com

Sun, 4/27/14 Fri, 5/2/14 Sun, 5/4/14

Running Fit Trail Marathon Hightail to Ale 5K Run Burns Park Run

Pinckney Detroit Ann Arbor

(734) 929-9027 (734) 929-9027 (734) 945-8132

trailmarathon.com hightailtoale.com burnsparkrun.org

Sat, 5/10/14 Sat, 5/10/14 Sat, 5/10/14

Dances with Dirt - Gnaw Bone Ultras, 26.2MR, 13.1MR, 10KR, relay 5/3 River Bank Run / USA 25K Champs 25KR, 10KR, 5KR/W, teams Miles for Mankind 10KR/W, 5KR/W, 1MR/W

Nashville, IN Grand Rapids Northville

(734) 929-9027 (616) 771-1590 (734) 578-8439

danceswithdirt.com 53riverbankrun.com milesformankind.com

Sat, 5/10/14 Sat, 5/17/14 Sun, 5/18/14

Weekend Warrior Marathon 26.2, 13.1, 10M, 12K, 5K, Kids run Armada Midland Community Center’s Dow Run/Walk 10KR, 5KR/W, 1MR, kids run Midland Great Lakes Bay Marathon and 13.1 26.2, 13.1MR/W/Wheel Midland

Sun, 5/18/14 Sun, 5/18/14 Sat, 9/27/14

Rite Aid Cleveland Marathon & 10K 26.2 MR, 13.1 MR, 10KR Cleveland, OH (800) 467-3826 clevelandmarathon.com Stony Creek “Back to the Beach” Half & 5K 13.1MR, 10KR, 5KR/W Shelby Twp. backtothebeachraces.com Sault International Marathon 26.2MR, 13.1MR, 10KR, 5KR Sault Ste. Marie, MI (906) 632-3301 www.saultstemarie.org

50KR, 26.2MR, 5MR 5KR 10KR, 5KR, 1MFR

michiganrunner.net

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(586) 243-9813 weekendwarriormarathon.com (989) 832-7937 greatlakesgreatraces.com (989) 832-7937 greatlakesbaymarathon.com

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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© C. Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Running with Tom Henderson By Tom Henderson

W

inter hit early and hard in northern Michigan this fall. I was driving on black ice Nov. 11, with accidents all around. On Saturday, Nov. 23, lakeeffect snow blew in from Lake Michigan all day and night, which made for a glorious, beautiful start to the snowshoe running season the next day through the Pelizzari Natural Area at the base of Old Mission Peninsula. By then the wind had died and snow was balancing precariously on branches of pines and hardwoods. The nature area is a bit of a best-kept secret, with a parking right lot off the highway that runs down the middle of the peninsula. Hardly anyone’s ever there. Trails head off from the parking lot through a flat, grassy pasture before hitting steep hills in the forest that abuts the west arm of Grand Traverse Bay. We saw just three other people in our hour and a half there, with all three of our dogs expressing their delight at the first snowy run of the season, bounding around, racing at us with big smiles on their faces, scooping up mouthfuls of snow in full flight. An early start to winter means more time to try to get in shape for the upcoming snowshoe racing season, though there’s never enough time for me to actually feel like I got in shape for running on snowshoes up and down the hills of northwest Michigan. But there are silver linings in the cloud of exhaustion. Such as, since it’s impossible for me to actually run all the way up a hill, I don’t have to feel guilty for walking a spell and letting my heart rate get back to nonlethal levels. Another silver lining? The snow adds a layer of cushion, which is good for my two knees, my wife Kathleen’s two knees and and our Lab Maddie’s four knees. Also good for Harley, the huge 10-year-old shepherd/malamute we rescued from getting put down three years ago, and for Jade, another dog we adopted from our daughter a few years ago and who is still going strong, without a hint of arthritis, at 17. As my fitness has waned, training miles and racing times declined through the years, snowshoe racing has become a great way to be competitive. I don’t have to worry about getting slower, since I don’t have any fast snowshoe times to compare the slow me to the old me. Randy Step got me snowshoe racing eight to 10 years ago at his Bigfoot Snowshoe Race at the Timber Ridge Resort northeast of Traverse City. Since then, enough races have sprung up to make for a good season. The Bigfoot draws nearly 500 runners, but most of the other races draw fewer than 100. They also have hot food, good raffle prizes and an extra bit of cama32

raderie to go with the extra hard work of running with heavy things on your feet through deep snow. The Bigfoot race offers a 5K and 10K, with the latter serving as a regional qualifier for the national championships. To give you an idea of how harder running on snowshoes is, according to the website “there will be an elite corral option at the start for participants who expect to snowshoe sub-30 minutes in the 5K and sub-60 minutes in the 10K.” The races are on Jan. 18. For information, go to https://runningfitevents.webconnex.com/bigfoot14. The snowshoe season kicks off this year Jan. 4 with the seventh annual Frozen Torch races, your choice of a one-loop 5K or two-loop 10K, all on forest and pasture trails. This is a great event with amazing post-race food to reward you for surviving a killer course. The races start at 11 a.m. at Camp Hayo-WentHa, a sprawling YMCA compound along the northeast shore of Torch Lake. The first half of the loop seems to be an endless series of steep uphills, meaning a second half that is effortless and fast. After the 10Kers finish, you get rewarded with raffle prizes, salad, fantastic home-made chili and corn bread. Last year, organizers went head-to-head with the Frozen Foot Run on Old Mission Peninsula, one of the largest winter running races in northern Michigan. This year, following the advice of some inkstained wretch for MR, they have moved the date. If you’re a newbie to snowshoeing, the crowds at the Frozen Foot might intimidate you. Give this one a shot instead. For info, go to www.hayowentha.org/frozen-torch-snowshoerace.htm. At deadline time, the Grass River Shiver 5K and 10K near Bellaire were up in the air, with the new director trying to decide whether to hold them again or not. If it’s the same weekend as last year, it will be Jan. 25. The Grass River Natural Area is a wonderful collection of trails in deep forest along the Clam River. Last year’s races were held on a stunning day, deepblue sky in the morning after a heavy snowfall that presented a thick-but-pristine challenge and gorgeous views in every direction. One great touch was the refreshments after. Half a dozen area restaurants made hot soups and chowders, with a vote by runners to determine the winner. Another nice touch? The Grass River Natural Area is usually off-limits to dogs, but dispensation was made for the several dogs who showed up with their human buddies to run. (Here’s an irony: I ran a summer 5K there two years ago and was told they would let me run with the dog that day only, but dogs were otherwise prohibited because it was a nature area. They had these patronizing signs along the trails say-

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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ing that while everyone loves their dogs, the little animals of the nature area get scared by dogs, even ones on leashes, so to save our little friends the trauma; please leave your dogs at home. Near those signs were larger signs proclaiming: Beware during hunting season. All trails open to hunters. So, it was taboo to scare out little friends by having a dog on a leash, but it was OK during muzzle-loader deer season, bowand-arrow deer season, rifle deer season, turkey season and small game season to blast them to smithereens.) To confirm if there will be a race this year, email Haley Breniser at haley@grassriver.org or call (231) 533-8314, ext. 3091. One of the coolest snowshoe events to spring up in recent years is the Runaway Hen Snowshoe Scamper at the Brengman Brothers Vineyards at the southern end of the Leelanau Peninsula. You get your choice of a 2K or 5K, both of which come with serious ups and downs through rows of grapevines, with post-race goodies and a generous raffle in the tasting room. Speaking of tasting, if you need something more substantial than water to quench your thirst, try some wines. A tip if you go: ask if they have any of their balsamic vinegar left. It comes in a small bottle and is very expensive, but it’s the best balsamic I’ve ever had, by far. When I stopped by after the Harvest Stompede last September, they were temporarily sold out. At deadline time, the date for the Scamper was not yet set in stone but organizers were shooting for Feb. 1. Check at www.enduranceevolution.com/events/runaway-hen-snowshoe-scamper. Or call (231) 715-1406. The season wraps up at Camp Pet-O-Se-Ga east of Petoskey with a two-loop 5K on Feb. 22, followed by a feast that includes hot dogs, soup, chips, a variety of desserts and raffle prizes. For information, got to Camppetosega@emmetcounty.org.

~~

I

t’s little early, as I write this the Tuesday before Thanksgiving, to give advice for a great turkey trot next year, but advice it is, and I’m giving it.

One of my favorite small races ever is the Glen Lake High School Turkey Trot, a trail 5K that starts and finishes at the high school east of town. It’s for a good cause — raising money for the cross-country team — on what might be my favorite cross-country 5K course, and I’ve run a million of them. The race wasn’t held last year because of a conflict caused by the state football tournament, and I hadn’t seen anything about it being held this year. On Nov. 7, I couldn’t find any race for the coming weekend up north, where I spend most of my weekends, so I called Jeff Gaft, the manager of the Running Fit store by the airport in Traverse City.


Detroit Free Press / Talmer Bank Marathon

Ageless Kurtis Makes Mark at Freep By Charles Douglas McEwen DETROIT (10/20/13) — A record 27,379 runners, walkers, handcyclists and wheelers competed in the 36th annual Detroit Free Press/Talmer Bank marathon, marathon relay, half marathon and 5K.

Kurtis, who won this marathon six straight years from 1987 to 1992, this year ran his 200th sub-three-hour marathon, timing 2:59:03. “Only a minute to spare,” he said. “Without Dave Chomet, a former training partner of mine (who timed 2:58:39), I couldn’t have done it. He pushed me through mile 23. I was working hard, but without Dave there’s no way I could have done it today. I’m thrilled to do it in my hometown.” Zachary Ornelas, 22, of Ann Arbor, a University of Michigan student running his first marathon, won with a 2:20:09 clocking, the fastest anyone has run here since Kenyan David Cheruiyot blazed a 2:16:44 in 2008.  After dashing through the first 13.1 miles in 1:08:37, Ornelas appeared on track to breaking 2:20. But he ran into a headwind on Belle Isle, then something else.  “I’d heard about ‘the wall,’ but thought I’ve trained hard and I wouldn’t hit it,” Ornelas said. Wrong. “I hit it at about 22 or 23 miles,” he went on. “After that I slowed down. I kept thinking, ‘Come on, baby. Three miles to go.’” Ornelas gained strength from the huge crowd of spectators that included celebrities such as ice-dancing Olympians Meryl Davis and Charlie White. “I was dying, but the cheering inspired me,” Ornelas said.

“Hey, I’m glad you called. The Glen Lake Turkey Trot is back on,” said Gaft, who had first told me about the race several years ago. “Great,” I said. “When?” “Saturday.”

Dave Chomet (r) paces Doug Kurtis during the Detroit Free Press / Talmer Bank Marathon. Evan Gaynor, 25, of Perrysburg, Ohio, finished runner-up in 2:25:28. Arturs Bareikis, 27, of Crestwood, Ill., claimed third in 2:28:36. Lyubov Denisova, 42, a Moscow native training in New York, defended her women’s title in 2:44:50, almost two minutes faster than last year. Next came Eileen Brandes, 24, of Falmouth, Me., (3:08:47) and Amanda Kohlmeier, 29, of Detroit (3:09:13). Tom Davis, 35, of Fremont, Ind., paced the men’s handcyclists for the second-straight year in 1:18:4, while Grant Berthiaume, 51, of Tucson, Ariz., topped the wheelchairs for the fourth-straight year in 2:21:15. Playmakers Elite- New Balance won the marathon relay in 2:22:42.

There were about 50 of us. The course, as I said, is one of my favorites. You start on the football field and run on a dirt trail about a third of a mile before hitting a long, steep climb through deep forest of nearly half a mile, followed by a long, steep descent, then a flat stretch past the football field for lap No. 2. That uphill really works you, but then you get to fly down while recovering.

“What time?” “Ten.” “I’ll see you there.”

Post-race is great. The cross-country team members’ moms make baked goods the night before, and there’s a raffle of donated goods, including six big, fat frozen turkeys from the local market.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“When I was race director in 1999, we had 4,000 people total,” he said. “And we thought it was a big race then!”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

More than 4,000 ran the entire 26.2-mile distance. Of them, 51 finished in under three hours, including Doug Kurtis, 61, of Livonia.

Zachary Ornelas won his first marathon in 2:20:09.

Playmakers stars also dominated the half marathon, with Zachary Ripley, 25, of Grand Rapids (1:05:58) edging teammate Jedidiah Christiansen, 26, of Greensville, Pa., by a second. Both beat Nick Stanko’s 2010 course record of 1:06:16.  “He has done a 2:18 marathon,” Ripley said of Christiansen. “So he’s got a lot of strength and stamina. I usually stick to the shorter stuff. This is a long race for me.” Defending half marathon champ Jon Gries, 27, of Haslett finished third in 1:07:42.

Dorota Gruca, 42, a Poland native who trains in Las Cruces, N.M., won the women’s half in 1:18:29, followed by Kelly Gries, 26, of Haslett (1:22:25) and Kaye Starosciak, 40, of Canton, Ga. (1:22:57).  U.S.-only half marathon winners were Vlacheslav Shabunin, 44, of New York City (1:10:07) and Rayne Cockburn, 26, of Ann Arbor (1:34:45). Claiming the 5K were Alexander Ralston, 24, of Grand Rapids (16:07) and Erin Webster, 27, of Dearborn (17:59). For complete results, go to http://freepmarathon.com. - MR -

I’ve done the race three times. Three times I’ve won a turkey. They welcome dogs too, and four or five of them ran this year. The race director said he didn’t do much promotion this year because he wanted to take things slower following a year’s absence. But he plans to set up a website for the race next year and get it listed on calendars. If you’re looking for an early Thanksgivingthemed race, you won’t find a better one. - MR -


Scope Me Out By Bob Schwartz

I

can handle my own pain, as can most runners. But I have a weak stomach when it comes to witnessing the pain or injury of others.

Push through the latter stages of a marathon with a stress fracture in my ankle? Been there, done that. See my own blood-soaked socks from blisters run amok? Not an issue. Feel the blinding pain of a piece of my meniscus getting caught in my knee joint? That can now stoically be checked off my anatomical lowlights list. I’m a wee bit weaker when it’s someone else holding the pain barometer. Witnessing NFL quarterback Joe Theismann sustain an open fracture of his tibia and fibula on live television? I had nightmares for weeks and could barely look at my lower leg for the next year and a half.

The beauty of running is that we can, at times, modify a choice when we subsequently determine our aspirations might need to be toned down or moved up a bit. A 20-mile training run may end at 16 miles if we’re feeling extremely ill. Or, at some point during a race, we may choose to pick up our goal pace a little if we’re feeling super strong that day. The differences between conscious running choices and other choices involving things like, say, arthroscopic surgery, are we can often alter the former midstream. Not so easy to do with the latter when the doctor is about to insert small surgical instruments into your body. It’s not the best time to say, “On second thought ...”

It’s no different than it was choosing my event for high school track. I could have either gone with getting left in the dust in the 100-meter dash or, recognizing my limited natural sprinting ability, instead chosen the long-distance events to better my chances of winning. Sound strategy.

So when it came time for meniscus surgery, I was ready to handle it. It was, after all, my body and those types of things I could usually always stomach. I was even certain I could remain awake during the procedure and watch it on a monitor in the operating room without getting queasy and passing out. Well, choose again, Mr. Weak in the Knees.

All this dawned on me when the anesthesiologist entered my surgical prep room. I suddenly wondered whether I’d overestimated my earlier decision to be as alert as possible during the procedure and receive a spinal anesthetic. My earlier thinking had been, How many of us can actually raise our hand at having seen our meniscus, synovial tissue and articular cartilage all up there on the video screen? How many times would I get a chance for a front-row seat on the operating table to observe inside my knee joint? Not many, I hoped, so at that time I wanted to be one of the chosen view! But come game day, I went from my choice of

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As Shakespeare wrote, “The better part of valor is discretion.” In this case, it was the better part of pallor as well. I recognized my weaknesses and made a sensible choice based on those limitations.

When you haven’t trained sufficiently for a race, perhaps it’s not the greatest plan to set an overly-aggressive minutes-per-mile pace. There’s more than a solid likelihood you’re going to end up looking like a piece of road kill in shorts and a singlet.

Witness my wife undergo a cesarean section? My first recollection as a father was regaining consciousness in another room, sipping apple juice while a nurse asked, “Can you hear me?” Not quite how I envisioned the beginning of parenthood.

I thought I knew my abilities and limitations with respect to my surgery, but my experience in that arena was about the same as with bungee jumping naked in an ice storm. In other words, nonexistent.

The change in heart was my faint of heart. I’d actually felt nauseated after watching the nurse simply shave my knee area. Not exactly the most-invasive procedure to stomach, so if the sight of a bald patella made me break out in a cold sweat, then maybe hearing the sounds of my knee being operated on and viewing my insides on a monitor might not be the soundest choice I’d made.

As runners, we’re inclined to not set boundaries on ourselves, to consistently challenge our abilities and push the envelope. Those are all wonderful traits, but sometimes we need to recognize the reality of the situation.

Watching triathlon great Paula NewbyFraser collapse 200 feet from the finish line at the 1995 Hawaii Ironman and painfully struggle for 22 minutes before dragging herself across the finish line? I needed to rehydrate and lie down after viewing that one.

As runners, we’re confronted with choices all the time. There are the basic ones like are you getting out the door today and, if so, how far and fast? We encounter choices regarding what race pace we should shoot for and when we should begin our taper, and we choose between going with a minimalist shoe, fully-cushioned or something in between. We choose how many intervals to do and what kind of shape we’ll be in down the road as we choose between preregistering for the marathon or the half. We know ourselves best and try to make conscious choices based on our experience, abilities and limitations.

spinal anesthesia to being put to sleep with a general anesthetic faster than you can say, “See you in postop recovery, Doc.”

Michigan Runner - January / February 2014

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michiganrunner.tv

Similarly, if I acknowledge my limitations and know I’m likely to need an airsickness bag at the first sight of my medial collateral ligament on the video screen, well then, the best choice is to err on the side of caution. As in, unconsciousness can work quite well at times. Of course, as long as that’s your conscious choice. And with me it was. Now don’t get me wrong. At times, it’s necessary to work on improving inherent weaknesses or limitations. But at other times it’s necessary to recognize the reality of the moment. In recognizing my knee-viewing limitations, lights out equaled sights out. Good choice. Bob Schwartz is author of the best-selling humor book “I Run, Therefore I Am – NUTS!” and the new sequel, “I Run, Therefore I Am STILL Nuts!” Check out @RunningLaughs. - MR -


Michigan Runner, January / February 2014  

A bimonthly publication on Michigan running, road racing, cross country, track and field and Michigan runners. Features 18 page Photo Galler...

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