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THE MICHIGAN REVIEW The Journal of Campus Affairs at the University of Michigan

Inside Features

M A look into the history of religion at the Unversity of Michigan. 3

Campus

Regents vote to raise tuition 5.5% for the 2006-2007 school year. Only one regent opposes the hike. 3 Plans for development close to campus cave in after City Council gets caught calling a bluff. 3

Opinion

Returning home from reality and re-entering the bubble. Has the pursuit of diversity supplanted the pursuit of knowledge at the University? (GLWRULDOV3

R Amanda Nichols on Morgan Wilkins and those pesky illegals.

Adam Paul on Harvard’s decision to end early admissions. &ROXPQV3

Arts & Culture Reviewing season three of Arrested Development. 3

Has the reliance on self-esteem doomed our generation? Generation Me book review. 3

MR

9.20.06 | VOLUME XXV, ISSUE 2

The Deceptive Campaign Against the MCRI One United Michigan and the Center for the Education of Women team up to distort the facts about the MCRI and DIÂżUPDWLYHDFWLRQ

BY NICK CHEOLAS, ‘07

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INCE THE BIRTH OF THE MICHIGAN Civil Rights Initiative (MCRI) in early 2004, supporters of the effort to ban racial and gender preferences in the public sector have faced relentless attacks from a wellfunded opposition. For months, MCRI opponents have challenged everything from the petition signatures to the ballot language, accusing MCRI supporters of engaging in fraud and deception. But as it has become clear that voters will deterPLQHWKHIDWHRI DIÀUPDWLYHDFWLRQLQWKH voting booth this November, the opposition has shifted their focus. Ironically, it has been organizations such as One United Michigan – the principle group opposing the MCRI – that have resorted to scare tactics and distortions to further their interests. A recent report issued by Susan Kaufmann of the University of Michigan’s Center for the Education of Women appears prominently on the One United Michigan website, and is heavily touted among the anti-MCRI crowd. Entitled The Potential Impact of the Michigan Civil Rights Initiative on Employment, Education and Contracting, this report is a good example of the fear mongering employed by MCRI opponents, and a comprehensive look at the motives,

agenda, and arguments driving the antiMCRI crowd. In the report, Kaufmann examines the effects of Proposition 209 in California, an initiative similar to MCRI passed in 1996. Kaufmann and her anti-MCRI allies have gone to great lengths to conYLQFH0LFKLJDQGHUVWKDWWKHHQGRI DIĂ€Umative action would spell disaster for the state. Unfortunately, they do so by twisting facts, playing with language, and obscuring the central issue. The notion that the end of racial and gender preferences was a disaster for California is simply not supported by evidence. Kaufmann begins her report by arguing that the MCRI “appears to confer no additional civil rights,â€? and that “exist-

A look into the claims made by MCRI opponents reveals faulty logic, twisted language, and misleading “evidence.â€? ing state and civil rights laws seem to be clear and adequateâ€? to protect such rights. These are arguments frequently made by MCRI opponents. Although modeled – nearly verbatim – after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, those who oppose the measure have argued that the MCRI is deceptively named, and actually threatens civil rights. Mark Bernstein, Chairman of the Michigan Civil Rights Commission declared that the MCRI “is to civil rights what an ax is to a tree.â€? The Coalition WR 'HIHQG $IĂ€UPDWLYH $FWLRQ %\ $Q\ Means Necessary (BAMN) argued that

the MCRI would move us “backward toward more segregation and racism.â€? The One United Michigan website warns visitors not to “roll back progressâ€? for women and minorities. The absurdity of these claims is evident. First, while current laws may seem to be “clear and adequate,â€? racial discrimination in the name of “diversityâ€? remains legal. The MCRI would put an end to that caveat. Second, by declaring the MCRI a threat to civil rights, MCRI opponents have essentially declared the “clear and adequateâ€? civil rights legislation to be XVHOHVVZLWKRXWDIĂ€UPDWLYHDFWLRQ,I WKH MCRI, which bans racial preferences, can move us “backwardsâ€? in time, then these individuals actually believe the gains of the entire civil rights movement are contingent on racial preferences. Kaufman’s faulty logic is pervasive within the anti-MCRI establishment. Her examination of California’s post-209 experience clearly intends to convince the reader that Proposition 209 eliminated benign, legal, and vital programs, and thus, the same would happen in Michigan if the MCRI were to pass. The anti-MCRI forces have relied heavily on this premise, declaring the MCRI would put an end to everything from single-sex schools to breast cancer screening. To make her argument, Kaufmann bases her assessment on a 1997 statement issued by former California Governor Pete Wilson. In that statement, Wilson listed numerous statues and programs

See ‘MCRI,’ Page 6

9/11 On Campus: Five Years Later BY JANE COASTON, ‘09, AND KELLY CAVANAUGH, ‘10 EPTEMBER 11, 2001 WILL FOREVER BE characterized as the “major eventâ€? of our generation, but in today’s hectic world 9/11 has taken on numerous meanings to the public. To some individuals, 9/11 has become a traumatic personal experience and to others it has become a personal rendezvous with justice. The events of September 11th should command the attention and respect of all, but at the mention of 9/11 the thoughts that come to mind vary greatly from person to person. The underlying theme, however, on the topic, seems to be the war on terrorism. In an address to the public on Monday, September 11, 2006, President Bush called the war on terrorism “the calling of our generation.â€? No matter the opinion on the war, 9/11 should still elicit sympathy from peoples across the world. For those who were personally touched, September 11, UHVXUUHFWHGWKHIHDUDQGORVVIHOWĂ€YH\HDUVDJR5RE'DQ-

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iels, a sophomore and native New Yorker, couldn’t escape the destruction of that day. He remembered watching smoke rise above the city from the windows of his high school gym class. Family members were missing and friends with whom Rob grew up had found out that they had lost both parents. Rob’s immediate reaction was sympathy for lost life; only later did the terrorist implications affect his thinking. For Rob, the thought of using 9/11 to justify current foreign policy, including the war, seems absurd. Did we go to war for New York City, for the Ă€UHĂ€JKWHUVDQGSROLFHPHQ"´DEVROXWHO\QRWÂľ5REUHSOLHG This year, Michigan students commemorated the day in a YDULHW\RI ZD\V6WXGHQWVDQGIDFXOW\Ă€OOHG5DFNKDP$XGLWRULXP to hear Juan Cole, Professor of Modern Middle East and South Asian history, present a lecture entitled “Are We Winning

See ‘9/11,’ Page 7

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Letter from the Editor

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RWKRVHRI \RXZKRDUHQHZKHUHZHOFRPHDQGWRRXUUHWXUQLQJVWXGHQWVZHOFRPHEDFN7KLV\HDUWKH0LFKLJDQ5HYLHZLV celebrating its 25th year as the lone voice of intellectual conservative and libertarian opinion on campus. 7KH5HYLHZKDVDXQLTXHSRVLWLRQRQFDPSXV$VDELZHHNO\SXEOLFDWLRQZHDUHDEOHWRGHOYHLQWRJUHDWHUGHSWKLQRXUVWRULHV :KLOHZHGRQRWKLGHRXUSROLWLFDOOHDQLQJVWKHLVVXHVZHH[DPLQHDUHUHOHYDQWWRDOOFROOHJHVWXGHQWVUHJDUGOHVVRI LGHRORJ\:H¡OO DOZD\VRIIHUDJRRGGHDORI LQWHOOHFWXDOLVPEXWZHWU\WRWHPSHURXUSXEOLFDWLRQZLWKKXPRUDQGVDWLUH$WWKH5HYLHZZHVK\DZD\ from the name-calling and slogan-chanting that so often characterize political debate on such an active campus. <RX¡OOQRWLFHDIHZFKDQJHVLQWKLVLVVXHRI WKH5HYLHZDQGPDQ\PRUHDVWKH\HDUSURJUHVVHV:H¡YHUHWXUQHGWRRXUQHZVSDSHUVW\OHIURQWSDJHDQGZH¡OOEHLQFUHDVLQJWKHJUDSKLFDOFRQWHQWRI WKHSDSHUDVWKH\HDUSURJUHVVHV7KLV\HDUZH¡OOEHUXQQLQJ PRUHLQGHSWKIHDWXUHDUWLFOHVFRQWLQXLQJRXUIDFHRIIVZLWKWKH0LFKLJDQ'DLO\DQGPDNLQJDOORI RXUSLHFHVPRUHFDPSXVRULented. 7KLVLVVXHDOVRPDUNVWKHGHEXWRI RXU´$UWV &XOWXUH¾VHFWLRQ7KLVVHFWLRQZLOOLQFOXGHDZLGHDUUD\RI UHYLHZVDVZHOODV commentary on modern college culture. :HKRSH\RXHQMR\WKHFKDQJHVDQGDVDOZD\VZHOFRPH\RXUFRPSOLPHQWVDQGFULWLFLVPV Nick Cheolas Editor-in-Chief Michigan Review

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THE MICHIGAN REVIEW THE JOURNAL OF CAMPUS AFFAIRS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NICK CHEOLAS Editor-in-Chief MICHAEL Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;BRIEN Executive Editor ADAM PAUL Managing Editor AMANDA NICHOLS Layout Editor ASSISTANT EDITORS: KAREN BOORE, BRIAN BIGLIN ASSITANT TO THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: DWIGHT K. SCHRUTE

STAFF: Michael Balkin, Kelly Cavanaugh, Jenni Chelenyak, Rebecca Christy, Tom Church, Jane Coaston, Blake Emerson, Danny Harris, Ian Kay, Brian McNally, 1DWDOLH1HZWRQ'DQLHOOH3XWQDP Jonny Slemrod, Ryan Sloan, Zack Zucker EDITOR EMERITUS: James David Dickson

The Michigan Review is the independent, studentrun journal of conservative and libertarian opinion at the University of Michigan. We neither solicit nor accept monetary donations from the University. Contributions to The Michigan Review are taxdeductible under section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Service Code. The Michigan Review is not DIĂ&#x20AC;OLDWHG ZLWK DQ\ SROLWLFDO SDUW\ RU DQ\ XQLYHUVLW\ political group. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of the editorial board. Ergo, they are unequivocally correct and just. Signed articles, letters, and cartoons represent the opinions of the author, and not necessarily those of The Review. The Serpentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tooth shall represent the opinion of individual, anonymous contributors to The Review, and should not necessarily be taken as representative of The Reviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial stance. The opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily those of the advertisers, or of WKH8QLYHUVLW\RI 0LFKLJDQ:HZHOFRPHOHWWHUVDUticles, and comments about the journal. Please address all advertising, subscription inquiries, and donations to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Publisher,â&#x20AC;? c/o The Michigan Review:

7KH0LFKLJDQ5HYLHZ 911 N. University Avenue, Suite One Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1265

mrev@umich.edu www.michiganreview.com Copyright Š 2006, The Michigan Review, Inc. All rights reserved. The Michigan Review is a member of WKH&ROOHJLDWH1HWZRUN


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God and Man at Michigan

9.19.06

short in its relationship to religion, both John D. Rockefeller. World War II largely distracted students 7KH 6&$ ZDV VSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FDOO\ &KULVWLDQ from the SRA, and it faded quickly in academically and socially. This stands in +( 81,9(56,7< 2) 0,&+,- stark contrast to the tradition of strong LQRULJLQZLWKLWVHDUO\FKDUWHUVH[SOLFLWO\ WKHSRVWZDU SHULRG ZKHUHWKHH[SHFWDGAN LVQRWZLWKRXWDFHUWDLQUHSX- ERQGEHWZHHQ0LFKLJDQDQGUHOLJLRQ,Q professing an evangelical mission. But WLRQZDVWKDWWKH65$ZRXOGDGPLQLVWHU tation. Its storied the end, the University spends more time DVLWJUHZRYHUWKHGHFDGHVWRZDUGVWKH WR VWXGHQWVQRW DOUHDG\ GUDZQ LQ E\ DQ\ history and evolu- placating minority and special interest GDZQRI WKHWZHQWLHWKFHQWXU\LWVRXJKW major denomination. tion through al- groups than it does in service to the spiri- to try and encompass larger and larger (YHQWXDOO\ WKH 65$ ZRXOG EH UHPRVWWZRFHQWXULHV WXDOJURZWKRI LWVVWXGHQWV segments of the student population. In RUJDQL]HG LQWR WKH 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH RI  5HOLJLRXV has yielded many this process, it moderated its Christian $IIDLUV 25$  UHVSRQVLEOH WR WKH 9LFH positive attributes MICHIGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RELIGIOUS HISTORY mission, transforming from a group that President for Student Affairs. The ORA and advances, providing the necessary at- Most students pass by the front facade ministered to students to one that held ad- ZRXOGFRPHWRGHĂ&#x20AC;QHWKHJHQHUDOVWDQGWULEXWHV WR PDNH 0LFKLJDQ D ZRUOGFODVV of Angell Hall at least once a day, if visory seminars and published a hygienic SRLQW RI  WKH 8QLYHUVLW\ WRZDUGV UHOLJLRQ university. in years to come. The not more. But the But in the past half-century or so, inscription atop the 25$ ZRXOG FRQYHQH things have changed. While Michigan building seems a bit panels to study the KDVDOZD\VEHHQNQRZQIRULWVVRPHZKDW peculiar on the Uniissue, but its reports progressive tenor, several decades ago, versity of Michiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ZHUH SHUPHDWHG E\ 0LFKLJDQDQGLWVVXUURXQGLQJWRZQ$QQ campus, sticking out postmodernist and $UERULQWDQGHPZLWKWKHUHVWRI WKHQD- like a sore thumb multiculturalist senWLRQWRRNDWXUQWRZDUGVWKHOHIWVHQGLQJ to some and a beatiments. The ORA the historic trajectory of the university con of light to othregularly reported on off-track. the study of religion ers. The inscription, To this end, the climate of life here gleaned from Article in the curriculum, but RQFDPSXVWRGD\LVLQIXVHGZLWKWKDWSUR- ,,,RI WKH1RUWKZHVW consistently rejected gressive atmosphere. Commitment to â&#x20AC;&#x153;di- Ordinance, establishing an indereads, versityâ&#x20AC;? is a proving ground for campus â&#x20AC;&#x153;Religion, morality, pendent department leaders, and it is taboo to challenge any DQG NQRZOHGJH EHof religious studies. RI WKHDVVXPSWLRQVRI DZRPDQ¡VULJKWWR ing necessary to good In the early â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s, the FKRRVHWKHZHOIDUHVWDWHRUDQ\QXPEHU government and the 25$ZDVDJDLQGRZQThe front façade of Angell Hall is a hint at Michiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s distinctly of other treasured liberal doctrines. VL]HG LQWR WKH 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH happiness of manreligious history. $ORQJZLWKWKHVHFKDQJHVWKHUHKDYH kind, schools and the of Special Services been so many more in regards to the role means of education shall forever be en- manual for incoming freshmen. The SCA DQG3URJUDPVRI WKH2IĂ&#x20AC;FHRI WKH9LFH of religion on campus. Many students are couraged.â&#x20AC;? HYHQWXDOO\ ZRXOG H[SDQG DQG HVVHQWLDOO\ President for Student Services. A comXQDZDUHRI WKHULFKKLVWRU\WKDWUHOLJLRQ Of course, such a statement is so FROODSVHXQGHULWVRZQZHLJKW,QWKHHDUO\ SDQLRQ2IĂ&#x20AC;FHRI (WKLFVDQG5HOLJLRQZDV has had in university life. The University peculiar in contemporary life because 1920s, the University assumed control of HVWDEOLVKHGLQ3URJUDP)LOHVIURP of Michigan and organized religion have it expresses an idea that education is a 1HZEHUU\ DQG /DQH +DOOV DQG WRRN UH- WKH 2(5 VKRZHG DFFRPPRGDWLRQ WR a very special relationship in making UM means to an end: that is, faith, happiness, sponsibility for the activities of the SCA, nearly every religious or ethical cause, a ZKDWLWLVWRGD\DQG\HWOLWWOHNQRZOHGJH PRUDOLW\DORQJZLWKNQRZOHGJHDQGLWVDV- reforming and renaming the group into curious parallel to the demise of the SCA RI ZKDWWKDWKLVWRU\PHDQVH[LVWVWRGD\ VRFLDWHG IUXLWV 7R ZKDW GHJUHH WKRXJK the Student Religious Association. DQG65$7KHUHZDVIRFXVRQWKHUROHRI  ,QGHHG ZKHQ has this idea been excluded in the mod0HDQZKLOH RIIFDPSXV JURXSV LQ religion and politics in minority, ethnic, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no shock that conversations ern development of the University of FRPSHWLWLRQ ZLWK WKH 6&$ DQG 65$ and foreign communities. Some examabout religion Michigan? sprung up to minister to religious needs. ples include an October 1978 conference the University come up in The Cathocriticizing the relaAt its inception, the founders of UM has overlooked RIĂ&#x20AC;FLDO FRQOLF 1HZPDQ tionship of religion understood the service of education to that this coming texts, it more WKHYLUWXRXVOLIH7KH8QLYHUVLW\ZDVDF- Center and the and homosexualschool year often involves tually founded by Catholic and Presbyte- -HZLVK +LOOHO ity, a March 1992 celebrates the KRZ VWXGHQWV ULDQFOHUJ\PHQZKRKRSHGWKDWWKH8QL- chapter rose â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zionism is Apartheidâ&#x20AC;? lecture, and 150th anniversary of faith might YHUVLW\ ZRXOG QRW RQO\ EH KRVSLWDEOH WR into promiadopt less ornence at this a November 1991 religion, but that denominational Schools of organized thodox beliefs point. But the conference in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The of Theology might be established to religious activity to promote complement a Michigan education. Al- assumption of 3& )UDPH8SÂľ D on campus. â&#x20AC;&#x153; t o l e r a n c e â&#x20AC;? WKRXJKWKLVZDVQHYHUDFKLHYHGUHOLJLRQ the SCA into conservative reacof ideas or VWLOOSHUYDGHGVWXGHQWOLIHLQPDQ\ZD\VLQ the University, tion to the generally lifestyles that might be anathematic to the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early years. and the advent regular occurrence their religious beliefs. Student groups in the nineteenth of the SRA Lane Hall was built as a home for the of the type of forAs the University has drifted fur- century revolved around religion. The marked the PHU WZR HYHQWV Student Christian Association. WKHU OHIWZDUG RYHU WKH SDVW KDOIFHQWXU\ ODUJHVWDQGPRVWLPSRUWDQWZDVWKH6WX- end of an era described. The ofreligion has been increasingly pushed GHQW&KULVWLDQ$VVRFLDWLRQ 6&$ ZKLFK WKDWKDGEHHQIDGLQJIRUDZKLOHWKHHUD Ă&#x20AC;FHVZHUHDJDLQGRZQVL]HGLQDQG WR WKH PDUJLQV RI  VWXGHQW OLIH ZKHUHDV ZDVIRXQGHGLQWKHPLGVDQGDIĂ&#x20AC;OL- of traditional Christianity on campus. are staffed part-time, serving as a liaison only 50 years ago, the role of religion in DWHGZLWKWKHQDWLRQDO<0&$7KH6&$ 7KH65$ZDVVKRUWOLYHGDNLQGRI  to off-campus ministries. Today, religion VWXGHQW OLIH ZDV URXQGO\ FHOHEUDWHG LQ D ZDVRQHRI WKHPRVWSURPLQHQWVWXGHQW WUDQVLWLRQDO VWDJH EHWZHHQ WKH 6&$ DQG plays a relatively miniscule role in Univeryearlong jubilee. The story of religion at organizations, attracting vibrant student World War II. The SRA sponsored sev- sity life. the University of Michigan is not exactly LQYROYHPHQW,WVIXQFWLRQVZHUHVRSURP- HUDO ´)UHVKPDQ 5RXQGWDEOHVÂľ WKDW JDYH UCLAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual CIRP survey of inRQHRI KRVWLOLW\WRZDUGVFRPPXQLWLHVRI  LQHQW WKDW DIWHU FRQVWUXFWLQJ 1HZEHUU\ QHZ VWXGHQWV DQ RSSRUWXQLW\ WR GLVFXVV FRPLQJ IUHVKPHQ QDWLRQZLGH SURYLGHV faith by the academe; it is largely a story Hall as its headquarters, the SCA needed religion. It redistributed its budget to re- subsets of data about Michiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s student of atrophy on the part of students. That to expand several decades later, building OLJLRXV JURXSV WKDW PLJKW QRW RWKHUZLVH UHOLJLRXVSRSXODWLRQ7KH)DOOGDWD said, the University today largely falls /DQH +DOO ZLWK WKH KHOS RI  D JLIW IURP EHDEOHWRIXQGWKHLURZQDFWLYLWLHV%XW BY MICHAEL P. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;BRIEN, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08

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Feature Story

See â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Religion,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Page 9


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Editorials

THE MICHIGAN REVIEW

+(0,&+,*$15(9,(: is the independent, student-run journal of conservative and libertarian opinion at the University of Michigan. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of the Editorial Board. Ergo, they are unequivocally correct and just. Signed articles, letters, and cartoons represent the opinions of the author, and not QHFHVVDULO\WKRVHRI WKH5HYLHZ You can contact the Editorial Board at: mrev@umich.edu

Ę&#x201E;)URP6XLWH2QH

9.19.06

Real Change? How far Will the University go in its Pursuit of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diversityâ&#x20AC;??

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S STUDENTS RETURNED TO CAMPUS THIS YEAR, THEY WERE AMBUSHED WITH A PARTIC-

Ularly virulent and pervasive form of University â&#x20AC;&#x153;diversity.â&#x20AC;? Tie-die â&#x20AC;&#x153;promote GLYHUVLW\ÂľVKLUWVMRLQHGIRUFHVZLWKEOXH´([SHFW5HVSHFWÂľWRDOHUWQHZDQGUHWXUQLQJ VWXGHQWVRI WKH8QLYHUVLW\¡VSULRULWLHV(YHQWKLV\HDU¡VRIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOIRRWEDOOVKLUWVHHPingly omits any football-related information, instead praising â&#x20AC;&#x153;50 statesâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;80 FRXQWULHVÂľWKDWXQLWHWRIRUP´RQHYRLFHÂľ%HIRUHFODVVHVHYHQEHJDQVWXGHQWVZHUH invited to a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Day of Change,â&#x20AC;? and embarked on a crash-course in social activism, social justice, and diversity. Year by year, the sacred concept of â&#x20AC;&#x153;diversityâ&#x20AC;? has expanded its reach into the OLYHV RI  VWXGHQWV  )URP VSHFLDO ´PLQRULW\ ORXQJHVÂľ WR DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYH DFWLRQ WR WKH recent initiatives enacted by the administration to counter the â&#x20AC;&#x153;harshâ&#x20AC;? campus cliPDWHWKHQHHGIRUPDQ\WRDIĂ&#x20AC;UPDQGUHDIĂ&#x20AC;UPWKHLU´FRPPLWPHQWWRGLYHUVLW\ÂľKDV reached a fever pitch. Make no mistake, the concept of diversity â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the state or fact of possessing difference â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is certainly valuable and desirable. But the University, though its programs, DFWLRQVDQGLQLWLDWLYHVKDVUHGHĂ&#x20AC;QHGWKLVFRQFHSWWRWKHSRLQWZKHUH´GLYHUVLW\ÂľLV reduced to variations in skin tones. Minority lounges are not meant for conservatives ²DSROLWLFDOPLQRULW\$OWHUQDWLYH:HOFRPH:HHNLVQRWPHDQWIRU-HZLVKVWXGHQWV â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a religious minority. In recent years, it seems as if the pursuit of a faulty version of diversity has RIWHQVXSSODQWHGWKHSXUVXLWRI WUXWKDQGNQRZOHGJHDVWKHIRUHPRVWJRDORI XQLYHUVLWLHV)XUWKHUPRUHWKLVGLVWXUELQJWUHQGVKRZVQRVLJQVRI DEDWLQJ 7KHSUREOHPLVWKDWGLYHUVLW\LQLWVRUJDQLFIRUPLVQRWSXUVXHGIRULWVRZQVDNH ,WWDNHVRQDOLIHRI LWVRZQ$OO\LQJLWVHOI ZLWKWKHPDQWUDRI ´GLYHUVLW\ÂľLVWKHRQO\ ZD\IRUWKH8QLYHUVLW\WRSURYHLWVUDFLDOFUHGHQWLDOV7KHDWPRVSKHUHWRZKLFKWKH 8QLYHUVLW\LVVXEMHFWGLFWDWHVWKDWZHDUHJXLOW\RQUDFLDOLVVXHVXQWLOZHSURYHRXUVHOYHVLQQRFHQWÂłWKDWLVE\ZD\RI PRUHHPSKDVLVRQDIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYHDFWLRQWKDQHYHU greater emphasis on an ideological derivative of tolerance, and an ambiguously-purposed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Expect Respectâ&#x20AC;? campaign. 6R ZKLOHWKHYDOXHVRI GLYHUVLW\DQG WROHUDQFHDUH ZHOODQG JRRG GLYHUVLW\DV FRQVWUXFWHGE\WKH8QLYHUVLW\KDVLURQLFDOO\VWLĂ HGDQ\WUXHGLYHUVLW\WKDWPD\H[LVW on this campus. The problem for the University, though, is that for so many of its students, the monolithic mantras have undercut any credibility for these mandated FDPSDLJQV:KHQHYHUDQHZLQLWLDWLYHLVFUHDWHGOLNH´&RQVHQWLV6H[\ÂľRU´([SHFW Respect,â&#x20AC;? it results in a collective reaction of, â&#x20AC;&#x153;there they go again,â&#x20AC;? from the student body. The transparency of the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motives only result in skipped seminars, DQGOLWWOHLQWHOOHFWXDOHQJDJHPHQWRI LVVXHVWKDWPLJKWRWKHUZLVHSURYHXVHIXOIRUD VWXGHQWERG\WKDWLVLQIDFWTXLWHGLYHUVHLQPDQ\ZD\VEH\RQGVNLQFRORU 7KLV SKHQRPHQRQ ZDV QR PRUH HYLGHQW WKDQ LQ WKH DIWHUPDWK RI  ODVW \HDU¡V infamous â&#x20AC;&#x153;Asian urinationâ&#x20AC;? hate crime â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the incident that gave birth to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Expect 5HVSHFWÂľFDPSDLJQ7KHXSURDUIROORZLQJWKHDOOHJDWLRQVLPPHGLDWHO\EURXJKWSUHVVXUHXSRQDGPLQLVWUDWRUVWRDFWVZLIWO\WRFKDQJHWKHFDPSXVFOLPDWHNQRZLQJWKH DGPLQLVWUDWLRQZDVQHDUO\REOLJDWHGWRWDNHVXFKDFWLRQ$Q\GHOD\²WRZDLWXQWLOWKH IDFWVRI WKHFDVHZHUHHVWDEOLVKHG²ZRXOGKDYHEHHQVHHQDVWKH8QLYHUVLW\¡VDEDQdonment of minority students. :KHQWKHIDFWVGLGHPHUJHDORQJZLWKVHULRXVTXHVWLRQVDERXWWKHFUHGLELOLW\RI  WKH´YLFWLPVÂľDQGWKHLUDFFRXQWRI HYHQWVWKRVHIDFWVZHUHLJQRUHG7RUHYLHZWKHP ZRXOGKDYHEHHQVHHQDV´EODPLQJWKHYLFWLPÂľDQGZRXOGKDYHFDOOHGWKH8QLYHUVLW\¡V commitment to diversity into question. $QGVRZHHQWHUDQRWKHU\HDUDWWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI 0LFKLJDQ:HFDQRQO\FRXQW the days until student groups criticize the University for failing to protect minority students, and for betraying their commitment to diversity. This, of course, is the VDPH8QLYHUVLW\WKDWERDVWVDYDVWDUUD\RI PXOWLFXOWXUDORIĂ&#x20AC;FHVDQGLQLWLDWLYHVDQG has spent millions of dollars to defend admissions policies that grant preferences to minority students. We can also count the days until the annual boycott of the Michigan Daily, precipitated by something as egregious as making a legitimate point in regard to a UDFLDOO\VHQVLWLYHLVVXH´'LYHUVLW\FRPPLWWHHVÂľZLOOVSULQJXSPHHWLQJVZLOOEHKHOG DQGLQWKHHQGOLWWOHZLOOEHDFFRPSOLVKHG 2I FRXUVHRQHZRXOGEHKDUGSUHVVHGWRDUJXHWKDWWKHVHLQVWLWXWLRQVKDYHQRW UHSHDWHGO\SURYHQWKHLUFRPPLWPHQWWRGLYHUVLW\2QHZRQGHUVKRZPXFKPRUHFDQ EHGRQHWRUHDIĂ&#x20AC;UPWKLVFRPPLWPHQW" But in the era of diversity, more is never enough. MR

MR Back to the Bubble

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ELCOME BACK TO CAMPUS.

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE GLAD TO BE HERE, TOOâ&#x20AC;ŚWELL, SORTA. )RUWKRVHRI \RXOXFN\HQRXJKWRHVFDSH$QQ$UERUDQGWKH8QLYHUVLW\ for the summer, coming back to school may represent a bit of a paradigm shift. As if LWLVDQ\VKRFNWKLVVHUHQHOLWWOHFROOHJHWRZQLVWKHSHUIHFWVKLHOGIURPWKHUHDOZRUOG :LWKWKHVWDUWRI HDFKQHZWHUPWKHLYRU\WRZHUWKDWJXLOGVWKH8QLYHUVLW\HQVFRQFHV the entire city. Given that, it is no shock that many of us are so relieved to be back on campus. Ann Arbor and the University community have a lot of unique perks that make it a tremendous environment for school. The integration of Ann Arbor and the 8QLYHUVLW\DOORZVWXGHQWVWRDWWHQGHQWHUWDLQPHQWDQGFXOWXUDOHYHQWVVSRQVRUHGQRW RQO\E\WKH8QLYHUVLW\EXWIURPWKHORFDOVFHQHDVZHOO%XWLWLVZRUWKUHPHPEHULQJ WKHHWKHUWKDWFRXUVHVWKURXJKWKHYHLQVRI WKLVFRPPXQLW\SHUYHUWLQJZKDWFRXOG RWKHUZLVHEHDKRPHO\TXDLQWFRPPXQLW\ 2XUVLVDFRPPXQLW\ZKHUHOLEHUDODFWLYLVWVSXUVXHDJUHHQEHOWDVWKHLUFDXVHGX MRXUUHDVRQLQJWKDWWKHUHQHHGVWREHDOLPLWRQWKHFLW\¡VJURZWKDQGVSUDZO:LWK the passage of the greenbelt in 2003, Ann Arbor bought land in and around the city IRUWKHSXUSRVHRI VDYLQJRSHQVSDFHDQGFRQWDLQLQJXUEDQVSUDZO$QG\HWZKHQ a developer tries to build a sizeable apartment complex in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s center (thereby KHOSLQJWRDOOHYLDWHXUEDQVSUDZO DFWLYLVWVDQGFLW\FRXQFLOPDNHVWKHHIIRUWVVRGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWWKDWWKHGHYHORSHUSXOOVRXW7KLVLVRQO\RQHRI WKHPDQ\GLFKRWRPLHVWKDW dominate life in Ann Arbor. $VWKHMRNHJRHVLQRXURIĂ&#x20AC;FHDIWHUVSHQGLQJVXEVWDQWLDOWLPHKHUHLQ$QQ$UERU DWUDQVJHQGHUHGFORZQFRXOGKRSGRZQ6WDWH6WUHHWRQDSRJRVWUHHWDQGLWZRXOGQRW HYHQFDXVHRQHWRWXUQWKHLUKHDG6XFKLVWKHHQYLURQPHQWLQZKLFKZHOLYH:KLOHOLIH LQ$QQ$UERUPDNHVVWXGHQWVPRUHDFFHSWLQJRI OLIHVW\OHVXQOLNHWKHLURZQVWXGHQWV FRPH WR FHQVXUH WKHLU RZQ HYDOXDWLRQV 7KH HPSKDVLV RQ ´DFFHSWDQFHÂľ FDQ VWLĂ H honest discussion as students learn to favor silence over the possibility of offensiveQHVV6WXGHQWVEHOLHYHWKH\NQRZKRZHYHU\RQHHOVHVKRXOGIHHODERXWDFRPPHQWRU action. What is important for students, returning for another year, is to stay grounded DQGNHHSWKLQJVLQFRQWH[W3ROLWLFVDQGSHUFHSWLRQGRQRWZRUNWKHVDPHZD\KHUHDV WKH\GRLQQRUPDOWRZQV:KLOHWKH8QLYHUVLW\DGYRFDWHVGLYHUVLW\ZLWKXQUHOHQWLQJ ambition, intellectual diversity holds the least importance. While the Michigan Student Assembly has a variety of long-standing commissions such as Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Affairs DQG0LQRULW\$IIDLUVD'LYHUVLW\RI 7KRXJKWFRPPLVVLRQZDVRQO\HVWDEOLVKHGODVW \HDU)XUWKHUPRUHDVRI WKLVZULWLQJWKH'LYHUVLW\RI 7KRXJKWFRPPLVVLRQGRHVQRW HYHQKDYHDOLVWLQJRQ06$¡VZHEVLWH1RWWRPHQWLRQLI WKH8QLYHUVLW\KHOGHGXFDWLRQDVLWVSULPDU\JRDOZRXOGLWDVVLJQWKHSURPRWLRQRI WKDWJRDOWRDQ06$FRPmission? The more important lesson here, though, is that such commissions even H[LVW2QO\DWWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI 0LFKLJDQZRXOGWKHUHEHDSHUFHSWLRQWKDWQRWRQO\ VXFKFRPPLVVLRQVDUHRYHUZKHOPLQJO\QHFHVVDU\EXWVKRXOGDOVRSOD\DQLPSRUWDQW role in deciding University policies. 7KH 0LFKLJDQ 5HYLHZ FKHULVKHV LWV UROH DV D YRLFH RI  QRW RQO\ FRQVHUYDWLVP EXWDOVRUDWLRQDOLW\LQDSODFHZKHUHUDWLRQDOLW\PLJKWQRWRWKHUZLVHSUHYDLO,QRWKHU FLWLHVDQGWRZQVWKDWWUHQGIXUWKHUOHIWZDUGWKDQWKH'HPRFUDWLF3DUW\DWOHDVWVRPH VHPEODQFHRI FRQVLVWHQF\RUUDWLRQDOLW\SUHYDLO%XWZHVKRXOGEHVROXFN\WRKDYH rationality in Ann Arbor. 6RGRQRWZDGHWRRKHDYLO\LQWRWKLVHQYLURQPHQW*HWRXWDQGVHHWKHZRUOG EH\RQG$QQ$UERUZKHUHSROLWLFDOSUHWHQVLRQVGRQRWGRPLQDWHDOPRVWHYHU\DVSHFW of daily life. Contrary to the mentality too many of us adopt upon setting foot on FDPSXVUHDOLW\GRHVVWLOORFFXUDQGSURJUHVVZKLOHZHDUHKHUH.HHSLQJWKDWLQPLQG LVDJRRGVWDUWWRNHHSLQJ\RXUVDQLW\RYHUWKHQH[WIHZ\HDUVMR


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9.19.06

Ę&#x201E;6WULFW6FUXWLQ\

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ARLIER THIS WEEK,

Barriers and Educational Choices

HARVARD SURPRISED UNIVERSITIES QDWLRQZLGH E\ UHYLVLQJ LWV DGPLVVLRQV SROLcies by ending its early admissions program (although legacy policies still remain). Interim Harvard President 'HUHN %RN H[SODLQHG WKDW WKH FKDQJH ZLOO ´SURGXFH D fairer process, because the existLQJSURFHVVKDVEHHQVKRZQWR DGYDQWDJHWKRVHZKRDUHDOUHDG\ advantaged.â&#x20AC;? Harvard claims that early admissions programs hurt stuGHQWV ZLWK OLPLWHG Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO UHsources because many programs force students to commit to an institution before receiving inIRUPDWLRQ UHJDUGLQJ Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO ADAM aid. The Harvard program, PAUL KRZHYHU UHTXLUHG QR FRPPLWment to matriculate. Essentially, +DUYDUGWHUPLQDWHGLWVRZQSURJUDPWKDWGLGQ¡WUHTXLUH a binding commitment in the hope that other schools ZLOO HQG SURJUDPV WKDW +DUYDUG QRZ Ă&#x20AC;QGV REMHFWLRQable. Harvardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reasoning displays a disturbing trend in HGXFDWLRQZKHUHDGYRFDWHVRI DFFHVVWRHGXFDWLRQKDYH FHDVHG WR GLIIHUHQWLDWH EHWZHHQ OHJLWLPDWH EDUULHUV DQG V\VWHPVWKDWSUHVHQWVWXGHQWVZLWKFKDOOHQJLQJFKRLFHV )RU \HDUV WKH SDWK WR KLJKHU HGXFDWLRQ ZDV REstructed by numerous barriers. Racist and sexist policies actively excluded numerous individuals for pursuing a GHJUHH+RZHYHUFXUUHQWHDUO\DGPLVVLRQVSURJUDPVÂł

even those requiring a binding commitmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are not exclusionary. These programs present prospective stuGHQWVZLWKGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWFKRLFHVEXWGRQRWDFWDVDFWXDOEDUriers to higher education. 0DQ\VWXGHQWVPD\QRWNQRZHDUO\LQWKHLUVHQLRU year of high school if they may be able to afford tuition at a school like Harvard; they enter into early admissions ZLWKWKLVLQPLQG6WXGHQWVDUHIRUFHGWRPDNHDWRXJK FKRLFHLVWKHLUGUHDPRI JRLQJWRDVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FLQVWLWXWLRQ ZRUWKWKHULVNRI QHHGLQJWRORRNIRURXWVLGHVFKRODUships and aid if their institution doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t provide the UHTXLUHGIXQGV":KLOHĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOVROYHQF\LVDFRQFHUQ colleges are by no means the only source of scholarships, as a myriad of corporations, educational trusts, and charitable funds provide money. Early admission policies have also been criticized EHFDXVHWKH\WHQGWRFUHDWHWZRVHSDUDWHDSSOLFDQWSRROV %HFDXVH WKRVH VWXGHQWV ZKR DSSO\ XQGHU HDUO\ DGPLVVLRQV RIWHQ SURYLGH DQ H[WUD EHQHĂ&#x20AC;W WR XQLYHUVLWLHV E\ promising to attend if accepted, it is sensible that adPLQLVWUDWRUV PD\ZDQW WR SXWWKHPLQ D VHSDUDWH SRRO 6WXGHQWV NQRZLQJO\ WUDGH DZD\ WKH RSWLRQ WR SLFN EHWZHHQVHYHUDOVFKRROVLQH[FKDQJHIRUDEHWWHUFKDQFHRI  JHWWLQJLQWRWKHLQVWLWXWLRQWKH\PRVWZDQWWRDWWHQG 2EYLRXVO\ WKRVH ZKRVH SDUHQWV FDQ FRYHU DOO WKH costs of a four-year education face less of a daunting GHFLVLRQ WKDQ WKRVH ZKR PXVW VHHN Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO DLG  %XW this is not to say that this decision has become a â&#x20AC;&#x153;barrierâ&#x20AC;? to higher education. The call of critics to equalize the pressure on all students in applying to college

holds that colleges should be responsible for calculating and accounting for each and every factor in a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s background that exert pressure on an applicant. This puts universities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially large ones â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in an impossible position. A similar attempt to mandate â&#x20AC;&#x153;fairnessâ&#x20AC;? occurred ULJKW KHUH LQ $QQ $UERU ZKHQ WKH FLW\ SDVVHG DQ RUdinance attempting to end the early fall housing rush. %XW VKRXOGQ¡W VWXGHQWV ZKR ORRN IRU UHQWDO VSDFH HDUO\ EH UHZDUGHG"  2I  FRXUVH HYHU\ERG\ ZDQWV D KRXVH WZREORFNVIURPFDPSXVZLWKDPSOHSDUNLQJIRUDQG a large porch. But there is a limited supply, and great demand. Rather than searching for housing, students FRPSODLQZKHQWKH\FDQQRWĂ&#x20AC;QGWKHKRXVHWKH\ZDQWHG LQ'HFHPEHU/LNHZLWKDGPLVVLRQVWKRVHWKDWEHJLQWR search later still have a chance, they might just not get the perfect campus house/apartment/shoebox. NeiWKHU VWXGHQWV ZKR DSSO\ XQGHU UHJXODU DGPLVVLRQV QRU late housing seekers are barred because others got there Ă&#x20AC;UVW ,WLVWLPHWRUHH[DPLQHZKDWTXDOLĂ&#x20AC;HVDVDQDWWHPSW to â&#x20AC;&#x153;barâ&#x20AC;? students from campuses. Claiming that everyWKLQJWKDWLQĂ XHQFHVDGHFLVLRQIURPĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOW\ to not having enough time to decide, deafens people WRZDUGOHJLWLPDWHJULHYDQFHV6WXGHQWVQHHGWRVWDUWWDNLQJUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUWKHLURZQFKRLFHVRUZKRNQRZV PD\EHQH[WXQLYHUVLWLHVZLOOEHFDOOHGXSRQWRHOLPLQDWH admissions altogether, because obviously admissions are D´EDUULHUÂľWRWKRVHZKRGRQ¡WDSSO\DWDOOMR

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DQGĂ&#x20AC;nally, time is up. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about the College Republicans 1DWLRQDO&RPPLWWHH¡V &51& HOLWHQHZ bounty-hunting task force: the University of Michigan College Republicans (CRs). As The Michigan Daily Ă&#x20AC;UVWUHSRUWHGRQ September 12,  RXU RZQ &5V ZLOO VRRQ EH ZUDQJOLQJ LOlegal immigrants in exchange for AMANDA prizesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;W acNICHOLS WLRQ Ă&#x20AC;JXUHV presumably (or at least I hope). As a College Republican and, more importantly, as a patriotic American, I am personally thrilled. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s DERXWWLPHZHJRWWKLVLVVXHLQWRWKHSXElic consciousness, because it has become totally out of control. Yes, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rightâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I said it, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about time somebody did. ,WKLQNPDQ\RI \RXNQRZWKRVH,¡P talking about. They talk funny, they look funnyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;heck, sometimes, they even smell funny. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been surprised by a sudGHQZKLII RI VDSDQGSLQHWUHHVDQGPDSOH V\UXSLQ$QJHOO+DOO\RXNQRZZKDW,¡P HE CLOCK HAS BEEN TICKING

talking about. They cross our borders ZLWKRXW OLPLWDWLRQV RU HYHQ SDVVSRUWV  EULQJLQJWKHLUXQUHĂ&#x20AC;QHGFXOWXUHDQGJDUEDJH ZLWK WKHP DQG OHDYLQJ LW KHUH E\ WKHWUXFNORDG(YHQZKHQWKH\¡YHOHIWÂł moved onto greener pastures, or maybe a VWDWHZLWKDKLJKHUHPSOR\PHQWUDWHÂłWKH junky customs and trash remain. I think \RX NQRZ ZKDW ,¡P WDONLQJ DERXW  <HV Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about the Canadians, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for them to get the hell out. 1RZ,NQRZPDQ\VWXGHQWVDUHIURP RXWRIVWDWHRUOLYHLQORZHUULVNDUHDVRI  Michigan, and may not fully understand this issue. As a lifelong resident of Metro Detroit, let me tell you: the immigration issue in this area is absolutely out of control. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nuts. Try going across the bridge to Windsor sometime, maybe to play the slots at the casino or to have a not-sounderage drink at one of their lovely establishments. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see them coming over by the truckload, safely buckled in the backseats of Suburbans and Chevy Malibus. Ann Arbor is also a particularly DEDGSODFHLW¡VVLPSO\WHHPLQJZLWKWKHVH illegals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most like their homeland, \RXVHHÂłRSHQOLEHUDOZRRGHGÂłDQGVR WKH\Ă RFNKHUHE\WKHWHQVÂłQD\E\WKH dozens. Ann Arbor even has a sister city in Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Peterborough, Ontario; as if they needed more encouragement to

come here. In fact, I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t traverse South 8QLYHUVLW\ ZLWKRXW FUXVKLQJ DW OHDVW Ă&#x20AC;YH VHWVRI &DQDGLDQWRHVZLWKWKHELNHWLUHV of my purple Huffy. You might not realL]H LW EXW WKH\¡UH HYHU\ZKHUHÂłRUGHULQJ D0ROVRQQH[WWR\RXDWWKH%URZQ-XJ ZDONLQJDURXQGLQ'HFHPEHULQDWVKLUW and jeansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;hell, they even let one teach Shakespeare here! And, to make matters ZRUVHZHKDYHD&DQXFNIRURXUJRYHUnor! <HDK\HDK,NQRZ³´WKH\¡UHQRWDOO LOOHJDOÂľ \RX VD\  $QG , DGPLW RXU RZQ -HQQ\ IURP WKH %ORFN ZLWK D PROH WKH size of a large rock is probably a citizen. 0D\EH%XWVWLOOÂłZKHUHGRWKH\JHWRII  FRPLQJ KHUH DZD\ IURP WKHLU ODQG RI  IUHHKHDOWKFDUHDQGKRFNH\DQGWKURZLQJ around nonsensical, and possibly non(QJOLVK ZRUGV OLNH ´HKÂľ DQG ´D¡ERRWÂľ" Do they really think they can pass for <RRSHUV"'RWKH\WKLQNZHGRQ¡WQRWLFH the sudden increase in graciousness and SROLWHQHVV DURXQG KHUH"  :HOO ZH KDYH DQG ZH GR  , IRU RQH FDQ VWDQG IRU LW no longer. 7KDW P\ IULHQGV LV ZK\ , DP VR JODG &51& Ă&#x20AC;HOG UHSUHVHQWDWLYH 0RUJDQ :LONLQV JUDFHG RXU JUHDW FDPSXV ZLWK her presence. Without the brilliant and articulate pronouncements of this Southern Belleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;let me give her all the credit,

because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly earned itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;this issue may have never come into the public FRQVFLRXVQHVV  1RZ LW KDV DQG WKLQJV FDQĂ&#x20AC;QDOO\FKDQJH,EHOLHYH0RUJDQIXOO\ understands our plight. After all, as a student at Jefferson County Community College in Kentucky, I am sure she frequently encountered the same issues that ZH0LFKLJDQGHUVHQFRXQWHUHYHU\GD\, FDQ RQO\ LPDJLQH KRZ WKH LOOHJDO LPPLgrants overrun that campus as they do our entire state. So thank you, dear MorJDQIRUVSHDNLQJXSÂłZHDOORZH\RXRXU deepest gratitude. 6R&DQDGLDQVWKLVLVP\ZDUQLQJWR \RXOHDYHQRZRUZHVKDOOĂ&#x20AC;QG\RX1D\ ,VKDOOĂ&#x20AC;QG\RXP\VHOIÂł,ZLOOVWHSIURP my cluttered desk in the ReviewRIĂ&#x20AC;FHDQG search the streets, bars, and even ice rinks for every last one of you. If I must, I ZLOOHYHQJRWR-RH/RXLV$UHQDZKHUH, NQRZPDQ\RI \RXVHFUHWO\GZHOO.QRZ this: I shall not rest until, at long last, the maple leaf-shaped pox is lifted from this ODQGDQGZKHQDWODVWLWLVZHZLOORZHLW to Morgan. MR


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Spellings Commision Considers Future of Higher Ed Secretary of Education Convenes Commission Including former U-M President James Duderstadt BY JENNI CHELENYAK, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;10

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,*+(5('8&$7,215()250 is a hot topic. Even if students do not care, there are plenty of things they ZRXOG OLNH WR FKDQJH DERXW WKHLU HGXFDtional experience. US Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings recently convened a special commission devoted to studying the future of higher education. The commission is currently tackling various HGXFDWLRQDO UHIRUPV DOO RI  ZKLFK FRXOG greatly impact the University of Michigan and its students if implemented. The latHVWUHSRUWDOWKRXJKVLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQWO\OHVVDJgressive than previous versions, further promotes the committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals. 2QH RI  WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW JRDOV WKH FRPPLWWHHPHQWLRQVZRXOGSURYLGHHTXDODFFHVV to higher education. The Spellings Commission believes that, despite barriers, all children deserve a chance at higher education. Similarly, the commission plans to PRGLI\WKHĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDODLGV\VWHP,WZRXOG PDNH Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO DLG PRQH\ PRUH HDVLO\ available to studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a crucial aspect due to recent increases in tuition at the university. Additionally, the commission cites DFFRXQWDELOLW\DVRQHRI LWVJRDOV)RUH[DPSOHLQVWLWXWLRQVZLOOQHHGWRVWDWHWKH goals of their curriculums, and then proYLGHHYLGHQFHWRVKRZWKDWWKH\KDYHPHW

WKHVH DPELWLRQV  +RZHYHU 80 3URIHVVRU : 5XVVHOO 1HXPDQ ZKR WHDFKHV a class on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Academic Paradoxâ&#x20AC;? of higher education, believes that it is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;difĂ&#x20AC;FXOW LVVXH RI  GHYHORSLQJ DQG WHVWLQJÂŤ the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;value addedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of higher education,â&#x20AC;? especially in regards to such â&#x20AC;&#x153;phenomena as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;critical thinking skills.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Neuman DUJXHVWKDWLWLVKDUGWRGHĂ&#x20AC;QHZKDWKDV EHHQOHDUQHGPDNLQJSURJUHVVGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWWR measure. The commission echoed the belief WKDW OHDUQLQJ VKRXOG QRW VWRS ZLWK WKH end of formal education; rather it is a OLIHORQJSURFHVV7KHFRPPLVVLRQZLVKHV to develop a â&#x20AC;&#x153;national strategy for lifeORQJ OHDUQLQJÂľ D ZD\ WR HQVXUH FLWL]HQV the opportunity for education, learning DQG WUDLQLQJ QR PDWWHU ZKDW WKHLU DJH The commission claims that todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s employees â&#x20AC;&#x153;understand that in the turbuOHQW ZRUOG RI  D NQRZOHGJH HFRQRP\ÂŤ HPSOR\HHV DUH RQO\ RQH SD\FKHFN DZD\ from the unemployment line unless they FRPPLWÂŤWRDGDSWWRHYHUFKDQJLQJZRUN requirements.â&#x20AC;? A strategy rooted in lifeORQJ OHDUQLQJ ZRXOG HQVXUH WKDW RQFH D JUDGXDWHZDONVDZD\ZLWKD80GHJUHH KHZLOOEHDGHTXDWHO\SUHSDUHGIRUWKHUHVW RI  KLV FDUHHU DQG QRW EH RYHUVKDGRZHG by younger colleagues. President Emeritus James Duderstadt, professor of Science and Engi-

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MCRI,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; from Page 1 that he deemed in violation of Prop. 209, and asked that the state legislature repeal or amend them. While this much is agreed upon, the obvious quesWLRQ LV ZKDW KDSSHQHG WR WKHVH SURJUDPV" :H GRQ¡W NQRZEHFDXVH.DXIPDQQQHYHUJHWVWKDWIDU6KHRQO\ DUJXHVWKDWFHUWDLQSURJUDPVZHUHRQWKHOLVW6KHGRHV QRWLQGLFDWHZKHWKHUHDFKSURJUDPZDVHQGHGDPHQG-

Kaufmann cites the Early Academic Outreach Program as a program that was â&#x20AC;&#x153;targeted for eliminationâ&#x20AC;? in California. Today, the EAOP considers itself â&#x20AC;&#x153;one of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most successful pre-collegiate student academic programs,â&#x20AC;? and serves more than 80,000 students at 542 schools. ed, or expanded. She doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even list the names of the VSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FSURJUDPVWDUJHWHGE\:LOVRQ ,I  VKH ZRXOG KDYH WKH UHDGHU ZRXOG KDYH VHHQ D IDU GLIIHUHQW VWRU\ )RU H[DPSOH .DXIPDQQ FLWHV WKH Early Academic Outreach Program as evidence of the elimination of â&#x20AC;&#x153;pre college outreach and preparation for ORZLQFRPHDQGPLQRULW\VWXGHQWVÂľ+HUIRRWQRWHKRZever, reveals that instead of targeting underrepresented PLQRULWLHV WKH SURJUDP QRZ WDUJHWV ´XQGHUUHVRXUFHG FRPPXQLWLHVÂľ,QRWKHUZRUGVWKHSURJUDPXQGHUZHQWD semantic change. Today, the EAOP considers itself â&#x20AC;&#x153;one

neering, is a key member of the Spellings Commission. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If implemented, these UHFRPPHQGDWLRQV ZRXOG QRW RQO\ LPprove the quality of education and the Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO VXSSRUW SURYLGHG WR 0LFKLJDQ VWXGHQWV EXW WKH\ ZRXOG DOVR HQKDQFH their preparation for college and meet their lifelong needs for further post-secondary education,â&#x20AC;? said Duderstadt. The Spellings Commission faces allegations that the recent report has been ZDWHUHGGRZQLQFRPSDULVRQWRLWVRULJLnal counterpart. Duderstadt responded, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The original draft had really nothing WRGRZLWKWKHFRPPLVVLRQÂŤ,WZDVSUHSDUHG E\ FRQVXOWDQWV ZLWKRXW DQ\ LQSXW from the commissioners.â&#x20AC;? In contrast, Neuman remarks â&#x20AC;&#x153;Commission Chair Charlie Miller tried out a number of ideas from his experienceâ&#x20AC;Śand appropriately GURSSHG RU PRGLĂ&#x20AC;HG WKRVH LGHDV ZKLFK proved to be too controversialâ&#x20AC;ŚA consensus report by its nature is a calculated compromise.â&#x20AC;? If these recommendations are implePHQWHGPDQ\ZRQGHUZKDWPXVWFKDQJH at the local levelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in this case, at U-M itself. According to Duderstadt, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lots of things.â&#x20AC;? He cites â&#x20AC;&#x153;more attention given to helping K-12 produce graduates ready IRUFROOHJHOHYHOZRUNÂľDVZHOODV´PRUH VWUHVV RQ QHHG EDVHG Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO DLG¾³D topic close to the heart of many Michi-

of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most successful pre-collegiate student academic programs,â&#x20AC;? and it serves more than 80,000 students at 542 schools. Kaufmann also laments the demise of â&#x20AC;&#x153;a program helping paraprofessional teachers become fully licensed WHDFKHUV ZLWK DQ HPSKDVLV RQ WUDLQLQJ PLQRULWLHVÂľ Again, the footnote reveals a similar semantic change. Today, the California School Paraprofessional Teacher Training Program has expanded to serve 1,800 members; 70% are ethnic minorities. .DXIPDQQWKHQFLWHV´DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYHDFWLRQLQSXEOLF contractingâ&#x20AC;? as a victim of Proposition 209, arguing that pre-existing programs â&#x20AC;&#x153;simply required prime contractors either to make good faith efforts to meet goals for VXEFRQWUDFWLQJWRZRPHQRUPLQRULW\RZQHGEXVLQHVVHV or to demonstrate that they had made outreach efforts to notify those businesses of bidding opportunities.â&#x20AC;? 7KHVHPHUH´JRDOVÂľKRZHYHUZHUHGHĂ&#x20AC;QHGE\VSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FSHUFHQWDJHV IRUPLQRULW\EXVLQHVVHVIRU ZRPHQ ZKLFK&DOLIRUQLD&RXUWVUXOHGWREHGLIIHUHQW IURPTXRWDV´RQO\LQGHJUHHÂľ1RUZHUHWKH´RXWUHDFKÂľ efforts benign. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The outreach component requires conWUDFWRUV WR WUHDW 0LQRULW\ 2ZQHG (QWHUSULVHV:RPHQ 2ZQHG(QWHUSULVHVXEFRQWUDFWRUVPRUHDGYDQWDJHRXVO\ E\ SURYLGLQJ WKHP ZLWK QRWLFH RI  ELGGLQJ RSSRUWXQLties, soliciting their participation, and negotiating for WKHLUVHUYLFHVQRQHRI ZKLFKWKH\PXVWGRÂľIRURWKHU EXVLQHVVHV7KHVHUHTXLUHPHQWVZHUHLPSRVHGRQVWDWH FRQWUDFWRUVDQGVWDWHDJHQFLHVZHUHUHTXLUHGWRDELGHE\ WKHPDQGZHUHKHOGDFFRXQWDEOHIRUWKHLUVXFFHVV7KHVH SURJUDPVZHUHIDUIURPVLPSOH´JRDOVÂľDQG´RXWUHDFKÂľ HIIRUWV 7KH\ ZHUH PDQGDWHG SUHIHUHQFH SROLFLHV DQG

gan students. Among other things, he also recommends â&#x20AC;&#x153;challenging the faculty WRPRUHFDUHIXOO\GHĂ&#x20AC;QHWKHREMHFWLYHVRI  each academic program and then provide HYLGHQFH EDVHG PHDVXUHV RI  KRZ ZHOO students are achieving these objectives.â&#x20AC;? Duderstadt also endorses the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ideals of lifelong learning, innovation and competing in a global economy, but alludes that something must be done to promote these principles at the University of Michigan itself, not just nationally. Neuman, on the other hand, seems skeptical. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Usually nothing much comes RI  WKHVH UHSRUWV ZKLFK HQG XS LQ Ă&#x20AC;OLQJ cabinets and on book shelves.â&#x20AC;? In his YLHZLI WKHUHSRUWGRHVKDYHDQLPSDFW ´FXUUHQWVWXGHQWVDW80ZLOOEHLQJUDG VFKRRORULQWKHZRUNSODFHÂľE\WKHWLPH any changes occur. The Spellings Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposals could lead to a brighter future for higher education. University of Michigan VWXGHQWV PD\ UHFHLYH VWURQJHU Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO DLG DQG D PRUH UHZDUGLQJ FROOHJH H[SHrience. On the other hand, the reports FRXOGOHDGWRQRZKHUHRWKHUWKDQDQLVRODWHG IRUJRWWHQ VWRUDJH DUHD )RU QRZ VWXGHQWVZLOOVLPSO\KDYHWRZDLWDQGVHH if the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ideas are acceptedDQG KRZ WKH DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ ZLOO UHDFW LI  they are. MR

quotas. Kaufmann then attempts to detail the â&#x20AC;&#x153;dramaticâ&#x20AC;? decrease in minority and female representation in employment, education, and contracting. These scare tacWLFVKDYHPDGHWKHLUZD\WR0LFKLJDQDV0&5,RSSRnents predict precipitous declines in minority and female representation across the board. 0DQ\ZKRSUHGLFWWKHVHGUDPDWLFGHFOLQHVDUHRIWHQ WKRVH ZKR GHFODUH WKDW UDFH LV ´RQH RI  PDQ\ IDFWRUVÂľ XVHGLQWKHGHFLVLRQPDNLQJSURFHVVDQGQRWDGHĂ&#x20AC;QLQJ IDFWRU´<HVZHFRQVLGHUUDFHLQFKRRVLQJRXUHQWHULQJ FODVV HDFK \HDU DQG ZH FRQVLGHU D KRVW RI  RWKHU IDFWRUVDVZHOO2XUSROLFLHVDUHPRGHUDWHIDLUDQGFDUHIXOO\ consideredâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? University of Michigan President Mary 6XH &ROHPDQ GHFODUHG LQ  +RZHYHU WKRVH ZKR claim race and gender are but small considerations often FRQWHQG WKDW WKH 0&5, ZRXOG GUDVWLFDOO\ KXUW PLQRULW\DQGIHPDOHUHSUHVHQWDWLRQ,I DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYHDFWLRQSURvides only a small boost, then the removal of that boost VKRXOGKDYHDSURSRUWLRQDOO\VPDOOHIIHFW7KHUHZLOOEH QR ´GUDPDWLFÂľ GHFOLQHV XQOHVV WKHUH ZHUH ´GUDPDWLFÂľ SUHIHUHQFHVWREHJLQZLWK A look at Kaufmannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statistics reveals more distortion. In the UC system, she alleges, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hiring of AfriFDQ$PHULFDQ IDFXOW\ KDV VKRZQ WKH ODUJHVW GHFUHDVHV ZLWKDQRYHUDOOGHFOLQHRI EHWZHHQDQG Âľ/RRNLQJDWKHUFLWDWLRQKRZHYHULWDSSHDUV that Kaufmann arrived at this â&#x20AC;&#x153;decline of 14%â&#x20AC;? by comSDULQJ $IULFDQ$PHULFDQ IDFXOW\ WRWDOV IURP Ă&#x20AC;YH \HDUV before Proposition 209 (1991-1995) to four years

See â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MCRI,â&#x20AC;? Page 8


P. 7

9.19.06

1HZV

Annual Tution Increase 5DLVHV5HJHQW¡V Concern

be a good time to do so. A 2005 study by Commonfund, an organization that KLOHPDQ\VWXGHQWVZHUHDZD\IRU PDQDJHVHGXFDWLRQDOHQGRZPHQWVLQWKH the summer, the Board of Regents US and Canada, indicated greater than WRRNSDUWLQZKDWLVIDVWEHFRPLQJDQDQ- H[SHFWHG JURZWK LQ HGXFDWLRQDO HQGRZnual event. The Regents voted to approve ments. a tuition increase for all undergradu:KLOH WKH LQFUHDVH LQ WXLWLRQ ZLOO ates at the University of Michigan. The surely make students cringe, it is likely FRVW LQFUHDVH ZKLOH to have the greatORZHU WKDQ LQ \HDUV est impact on those past, still outpaces students already LQĂ DWLRQ DQG WKLV VWUDSSHG IRU Ă&#x20AC;QDQhas caused stress for cial resources. These many students and students may face a one regent. tougher time due to According to the increased prices. WKH 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH RI  )LWhile costs connancial Aid, the tinue to increase, the increases set the 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH RI  )LQDQFLDO undergraduate cost Aid makes perpetual of tuition to $9,724 adjustments to help for underclassmen ZLWK WKH EXUGHQ and $10,992 for upMargaret Rodriguez, perclassmen. These the Senior Associrates, of course, ate Director for the only apply if you 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH RI  )LQDQFLDO are from Michigan; Aid, said she reWKRVHZKRUHVLGHRXW mains committed to of state pay $29,132 Despite their frequency, tuition â&#x20AC;&#x153;a diverse student and $31,178 respec- increases at Michigan have lagged body.â&#x20AC;? Rodriguez behind other Big Ten schools. tively based on class further explained standing. that to match tuition Only one board member of the Re- LQFUHDVHV´FHQWUDOO\EXGJHWHGĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDODLG JHQWV $QGUHD )LVFKHU 1HZPDQ YRWHG is increased by the same rate or greater.â&#x20AC;? against the tuition increase. In a letter to Due to federal cuts to education The Grand Rapids Press 1HZPDQ ZURWH IXQGLQJ Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO DLG KDV WR LQFUHDVH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pricing future generations out of UHOLDQFH RQ ´LQVWLWXWLRQDO DQG HQGRZHG KLJKHUHGXFDWLRQ:HDSRORJL]HIRULWZH funds.â&#x20AC;? While unlikely to happen soon, PDNHH[FXVHVIRULWEXWZHNHHSUDLVLQJ Rodriguez said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;increased and/or level tuition.â&#x20AC;? She stated that even though tu- funding from the federal government LWLRQ LQFUHDVHV PD\ EH ORZHU RQ D \HDU ZRXOGKHOSXVWRIXUWKHUHQKDQFHRXUDLG by-year level than other institutions, the packages.â&#x20AC;? high-base tuition rate means that even 5HJHQW 1HZPDQ¡V FDOOV IRU DQ HQsmall increases create prohibitive costs GRZPHQW IRU WXLWLRQ KDYH DOUHDG\ EHHQ for many potential students. XVHGE\WKH8QLYHUVLW\LQVRPHZD\VVXFK 1HZPDQ DGYRFDWHV WKH FUHDWLRQ RI  DVHQGRZPHQWVXVHGE\WKHĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDODLG DQ´RSHUDWLRQDOHQGRZPHQWÂľWREHXVHG RIĂ&#x20AC;FH ,Q WKH HQG WKRXJK VWXGHQWV ZLOO VSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FDOO\ WR NHHS WXLWLRQ FRVWV VWDEOH UHVSRQG WR KLJKHU WXLWLRQ ZLWK D VLJK 2QFHVWDUWHGWKHSULQFLSDORI DQHQGRZ- possibly a prod at our families for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;litPHQW IXQG ZRXOG EH XVHG WR JHQHUDWH tleâ&#x20AC;? extra cash, and a â&#x20AC;&#x153;grin-and-bear-itâ&#x20AC;? interest that could be used to fund Uni- attitude. MR YHUVLW\FRVWV:KLOHODUJHVXPVZRXOGEH QHHGHGWREHJLQDQHQGRZPHQWQRZPD\ BY ADAM PAUL, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;9/11,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; from Page 1 WKH )LJKW $JDLQVW DO4DHGD" 5HĂ HFWLRQV )LYH <HDUV /DWHUÂľ :KLOH &ROH HPSKDVL]HG WKH OLQNDJHV EHWZHHQ DQGWKHFXUUHQWZDURQWHUURULVPKHVXUSULVHGWKH audience by avoiding his trademark controversial style. &ROHVWUHVVHGWKDWDO4DHGD´LVDZHLUGFXOWWRRUGLQDU\ Muslims.â&#x20AC;? Cole claimed that the exclusion of former Baâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ath party members from post-Saddam government has created alienation and dissatisfaction in Iraq. Cole

6RFLDO$FWLYLVPE\&LW\ 1HDUO\&DXVHV'HYHORSPHQW Deal Collapse

BY BRIAN MCNALLY, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08

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ith the Ann Arbor City Planning Commission having unanimously approved the Metro 202 Planned Project Site Plan and Development Agreement, it seemed like the green light for the potential development at South Division DQG:DVKLQJWRQZRXOGVXUHO\FRPHIURP City Council. In spite of this clear endorsement, City Council failed to amass the six needed votes at their August 21st PHHWLQJ WR DOORZ WKH  DFUH PL[HGXVH development to proceed, falling one vote VKRUWZLWKWZRPHPEHUVDEVHQWDQGRQH abstaining. What happened next surprised evHU\RQH )LUVW WKH 0F.LQOH\ &RPSDQ\ DQQRXQFHGWKDWWKH\ZRXOGQRWEHUHVXEPLWWLQJWKHLUSURSRVDOEXWZRXOGLQVWHDG pull out of the project, leaving the property on the corner of South Division and Washington. After spending several hundred thousand dollars bringing the project up to code, McKinley CEO Al Berriz decided to cut his losses rather than continue to endure the delays and special requests by the City that cast a cloud of uncertainty over the completion of Metro 202. ,PPHGLDWHO\ IROORZLQJ 0F.LQOH\¡V pullout, Ann Arbor residents began questioning the motives of City Council. The Ann Arbor News ran an editorial statLQJ´6XUSULVHVDUHĂ&#x20AC;QHDWELUWKGD\SDUWLHV EXW ZKHQ D GHYHORSHU VSHQGV KXQGUHGV RI WKRXVDQGVRI GROODUVZKHQFLW\VWDII  and planning commissioners invest hunGUHGVRI KRXUVLQZRUNLQJWKURXJKSURElems, there should be no surprise at the RXWFRPHÂłRQHZD\RUWKHRWKHUÂľ Jason Roberts of Ann Arbor comPHQWHG WKDW ´WKH WKUHH PHPEHUV ZKR YRWHGGRZQWKHSURMHFWJRWFDXJKWFDOOLQJ a bluff, and got seriously burned from it. . . . They expected the developer to jump through the same idiotic hoops they push onto everyone else.â&#x20AC;? $Q DQRQ\PRXV OHWWHU VLJQHG ´)RU

explained that U.S. efforts in Afghanistan have failed to stabilize that country, even citing that the current president is often referred to as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mayor of Kabulâ&#x20AC;? because he cannot H[HUWLQĂ XHQFHWKURXJKRXWWKHFRXQWU\ 7KH VSHHFK ZDV VSRQVRUHG E\ WKH *HUDOG )RUG School of Public Policy as their annual Josh Rosenthal (GXFDWLRQ )XQG /HFWXUH 5RVHQWKDO ZDV RQH RI  WKRVH NLOOHGLQWKHDWWDFNVRQWKH:RUOG7UDGH&HQWHUĂ&#x20AC;YH\HDUV DJR+LVPRWKHUZKRVSRNHEHIRUH&ROHDWWHPSWHGWR Ă&#x20AC;QG VRPH KRSH LQ WKH GD\ VWDWLQJ WKDW 6HSWHPEHU   ZDV DOVR LURQLFDOO\ WKH WK DQQLYHUVDU\ RI  WKH Gandhi movement for peace in India.

)DLUQHVVÂľZDVVHQWWRWKH$QQ$UERU&LW\ Council on August 29th, asking for the Council to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;absolutely open and fair ZLWK 0F.LQOH\ DQG RWKHU GHYHORSHUV LQ the City zoning and approval process. No more long delays. End the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reputation for being anti-developer.â&#x20AC;? In the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5-3 vote, Mayor John Heiftje (D), and City Council members Bob Johnson (D-1st Ward) and Stephen Rapundalo (D-2nd Ward), believed the Planning Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendaWLRQZDVLQHUURUDQGZHUHWKHWKUHHYRWHV against the McKinley Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed development. %RZLQJ LQ WR WKH SUHVVXUH DIWHU WKH result of the vote, Rapundalo used a litWOHNQRZQ ORRSKROH WR FDOO IRU D UHYRWH under the pretense that â&#x20AC;&#x153;the item failed RQDWHFKQLFDOLW\JLYHQLQVXIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWFRXQFLO PHPEHUVSUHVHQW4XLWHVLPSO\LWZDVQ¡W fair.â&#x20AC;? At the next meeting, held on September 5th, Rapundalo changed his vote WR´\HDÂľDQGZLWKPRUHPHPEHUVSUHVHQWWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOFRXQWZDVEURXJKWWR Hieftje and Johnson did not change their votes or their convictions that the project should go through a Planned Unit Development (PUD) before getting apSURYDO$38'JUDQWVWKHFLW\WKHSRZHU to overlook certain aspects of the building code in return for the developer proYLGLQJORZLQFRPHKRXVLQJRUSURYLGLQJ RWKHU VHUYLFHV ZKLFK ´KDYH D EHQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDO effect on the City, in terms of public KHDOWKVDIHW\ZHOIDUHDHVWKHWLFVRUFRQvenience.â&#x20AC;? While PUD appears to have good intentions, it gives the City more control over the project, leading some developers like Ed Shaffran to compare it to extortion. :LWK RWKHU Ă&#x20AC;UPV VXFK DV *RRJOH looking to expand into Ann Arbor, one FDQRQO\KRSHWKDWVLPLODUGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWLHVDSSURYLQJ GHYHORSPHQWV ZLOO QRW DULVH LQ the future. Since the revote, McKinley has agreed to return to the Metro 202 project. MR

Other students remembered 9/11 by attending a memorial event on the Diag. Speakers, such as Senate candidate Michael Bouchard, recounted memories and ORRNHGIRUZDUG Like every generation before us, our successes and RXUWUDJHGLHVZLOOLQIRUPKLVWRU\¡VMXGJPHQWVZLOO EHRXUGHĂ&#x20AC;QLQJWUDJHG\0HPRULHVRI FRQWLQXHWR LPSDFWSHRSOHDFURVVWKHZRUOGHVSHFLDOO\ZLWKWKHSDVVing of each anniversary. While some may have ambivaOHQWO\ZDGHGWKURXJK6HSWHPEHUIRUPRVWVWXGHQWVLPDJHVDQGLPSUHVVLRQVIURPĂ&#x20AC;YH\HDUVDJRFDPH to mind. MR


P. 8

)HDWXUHV 9.19.06 college outreach programs â&#x20AC;&#x153;the primary ing other schools. RXV 0LFKLJDQ LV D VHJUHJDWHG VWDWH ZLWK â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MCRI,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; from Page 6 vehicle of achieving diversity among the 6R ZKLOH PLQRULW\ VWXGHQWV LQ &DOL- a struggling economy and a poorly eduUCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s student bodyâ&#x20AC;? and stated that these fornia seem to be entering college better FDWHGZRUNIRUFH DIWHU3URSRVLWLRQ  ,I ZH programs â&#x20AC;&#x153;[continue] to serve a large prepared, and many are attending topKaufmann cites a 2006 report from FRPSDUH QXPEHUV IURP HTXDO Ă&#x20AC;YH\HDU portion of underrepresented minority notch schools, UC Berkeley Chancellor Harvard University to assert that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Michiperiods, 1991-1995 and 2000-2005, Afstudents.â&#x20AC;? Robert Birgeneau labels the system rican-American representation in the UC 7KHVH SURJUDPV QRZ JXDUDQWHH DG- â&#x20AC;&#x153;quite unfair,â&#x20AC;? apparently because he By declaring the MCRI a system has actually increased by 10%. mission to the top 4% of students in any doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see the â&#x20AC;&#x153;correctâ&#x20AC;? number of death knell for civil rights, MCRI Kaufmann also argues that the hirCalifornia public high school, and other blacks on his campus, and he feels it opponents have essentially declared LQJRI ZRPHQDOVRGHFOLQHG´LPPHGLDWHprograms offer deferred admissions to is his â&#x20AC;&#x153;moral obligation to address the O\ DQG GUDPDWLFDOO\Âľ +RZHYHU WKH WRWDO the top 12% of students, provided they LVVXHRI LQFOXVLRQKHDGRQÂľ/LNHZLVHthe successes of the civil rights era SHUFHQWDJH RI  ZRPHQ IDFXOW\ PHPEHUV complete courses at a community college. opponents of the MCRI also latch on contingent on racial preferences, on UC campuses stood at 23.1% before 7KHVHSURJUDPVKDYHSXWFROOHJHZLWKLQ to this â&#x20AC;&#x153;tragedy.â&#x20AC;? This brings us to and the progress of minorities Proposition 209 in 1996, currently stands the grasp of students at every Califor- TXHVWLRQZKRLVUHDOO\WKHIRFXVKHUH" contingent on white charity. DW  DQG QHYHU GURSSHG EHORZ WKH nia high school, and have focused not 0LQRULW\VWXGHQWVZKRDUHEHWWHUSUH1996 levels. In 2005, UC campuses had a RQ ORZHULQJ WKH EDU IRU XQGHUDFKLHYLQJ pared, attend top-tier schools, and receive gan schools are the third most segregated KLJKHUSHUFHQWDJHRI ZRPHQDQGPLQRUstudents, but on raising those students degrees in greater numbers, or politicians LQ WKH 86 IRU $IULFDQ $PHULFDQV ZKR ity faculty members than ever before. above the bar. DQGFROOHJHDGPLQLVWUDWRUVZKRDUHPRUH DUH PRUH OLNHO\ WR DWWHQG VFKRROV ZLWK Kaufmann then examines the im8&'DYLV&KDQFHOORU/DUU\9DQGHU- FRQFHUQHGZLWKWKHLU´PRUDOREOLJDWLRQÂľ high concentrations of poverty and all pact of Prop. 209 on university enrollhoef believes that many of these policies than minority achievement? its attendant problems, less experienced PHQWV7REHFOHDUIROORZLQJWKHSDVVDJH ZRXOGQRWKDYHEHHQLPSOHPHQWHGZLWKThis â&#x20AC;&#x153;moral obligationâ&#x20AC;? may also teachers, high student and teacher turnRI 3URSWKHUHZDVDPRGHVWGHFOLQH out the passage of Proposition 209. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The have played a role among organizations over, and less access to challenging colof about 11% in the number of underuniversity has been led to concentrate WKDWĂ&#x20AC;OHGDPLFXVEULHIVZLWKWKH6XSUHPH OHJHSUHSDUDWRU\FODVVHVÂľ+RZHYHUWKHVH represented minorities in the UC system, much more on real, fundamental disad- &RXUWLQ7KHVHEULHIVRYHUZKHOP- factors are not racially exclusive, nor does although this mirrored a drop in appliYDQWDJHVÂľKHVDLGLQ´,ZRXOGQ¡WVD\ ingly suportive of the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s admis- .DXIPDQQ H[SODLQ ZK\ WKH LQFUHDVHG cations from underrepresented minor,¡P VDWLVĂ&#x20AC;HG ZLWK WKH VWDWH ZH¡UH LQ EXW sions policy, have been cited by MCRI OLNHOLKRRG RI  GLVDGYDQWDJH MXVWLĂ&#x20AC;HV GLVity (URM) students. By and large, these ,¡PVDWLVĂ&#x20AC;HGZLWKWKHWUHQGDQGWKHLQWHQ- opponents and Kaufmann as evidence crimination. VWXGHQWVZHUHVLPSO\UHGLVWULEXWHGZLWKLQ WLRQV:KDW,NQRZIRUVXUHLVWKDWLW¡VQRW RI ´WKHFHQWUDOLW\RI DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYHDFWLRQWR The same Harvard report also states WKH 8& V\VWHP +RZHYHU .DXIPDQQ WKHHQGRI WKHZRUOG,W¡VQRWWKHHQGRI  their [companiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;] core values and opera- WKHIROORZLQJ´5DFLDOVHJUHJDWLRQLVQRW DQG RWKHU DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYH DFWLRQ VXSSRUWunderrepresented minorities being able WLRQVÂľ+RZHYHUDVSURPLQHQWEODFNLQWHO- MXVW DERXW UDFH ,I  UDFH ZHUH QRW OLQNHG HUVFKRRVHWRIRFXVRQO\RQWKHWRSWZR WR RWKHU IRUPV RI  LQHTXDOLW\ ZH ZRXOG schools in the system. This myopic focus EH D GLIIHUHQW VRFLHW\Âľ ,Q RWKHU ZRUGV on select schools feeds the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yale or jailâ&#x20AC;? race is not a disadvantage, but inequalGLOHPPDZKLFKLPSOLHVWKDWLI DPLQRULW\ LV $IĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYH DFWLRQ QRW RQO\ WUHDWV ity student doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t attend the best school race as a disadvantage, but it fails to adpossible, he or she ends up on the streets dress the underlying causes of inequalor in jail. It also implies that second tier LW\0RUHRYHULQDZRUOGGHYRLGRI UDFLDO VFKRROVDUHLQVRPHZD\GHĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW%XWUHpreferences, the inequalities associated JDUGOHVVZKDWKDVKDSSHQHGWRPLQRULW\ ZLWKUDFH²VRFLRHFRQRPLFGLVDGYDQWDJH One United Michigan commercials, or a McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ad? students in California? SRYHUW\ VLQJOHSDUHQW KRPHV ² ZRXOG Kaufmann argues that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;eliminato go to the university.â&#x20AC;? lectual Shelby Steele aptly points out, this be completely acceptable considerations tion of outreach programsâ&#x20AC;? has contribWhile outreach programs seem to VXSSRUWRI UDFLDOSUHIHUHQFHVZDVKDUGO\ in the college admissions process. Since uted to the decline of minority students have been expanded rather than elimi- EDVHGRQDQDQDO\VLVRI ZK\SUHIHUHQFHV Prop. 209, the UC system has been exin the UC system. Evidence doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t supnated, an increasing number of minority ZHUH QHHGHG LQ WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW SODFH RQO\ E\ tremely successful at enrolling disadvanport this claim. According to the UC sysstudents are choosing to enroll outside WKHIDFWWKDWSUHIHUHQFHVZHUHQHHGHGWR taged students. WHP¡VRZQUHSRUW8QGHUJUDGXDWH$FFHVV the UC system â&#x20AC;&#x201C; particularly at private â&#x20AC;&#x153;rope inâ&#x20AC;? enough minorities. MCRI opponents typically point to to the University of California After the colleges that Why must these institutions â&#x20AC;&#x153;rope in the struggling Michigan economy and a E l i m i n a t i o n While MCRI opponents frequently claim can legally enough minorities?â&#x20AC;? As Steele argues, ev- SRRUO\HGXFDWHGZRUNIRUFHDVUHDVRQVWR of Racethat outreach programs have been grant prefer- ery modern American institution is mired VXSSRUW DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYH DFWLRQ 2I  FRXUVH Conscious eliminated in California, the UC systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ences, and in an endless battle to prove their aver- WKHUH LV QR H[SODQDWLRQ DV WR KRZ DIĂ&#x20AC;UPolicies, since provide bet- sion to racism. Just as Berkeley Chancel- PDWLYH DFWLRQ ZLOO LPSURYH WKH VLWXDWLRQ own report declares that outreach 1996, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the WHU Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO lor Robert Birgeneau feels a â&#x20AC;&#x153;moral ob- ²DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYHDFWLRQVXSSRUWHUVDUHPXFK programs have been â&#x20AC;&#x153;dramatically University has aid packages. ligationâ&#x20AC;? to increase diversity, American more talented at demonizing the MCRI taken action expandedâ&#x20AC;? in the post-209 era. Another â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of the businesses are obligated to employ a suf- than at detailing the merits of racial and to strengthen report calls these programs the â&#x20AC;&#x153;primary VWXGHQWV ZKR Ă&#x20AC;FLHQWQXPEHURI PLQRULWLHVOHVWWKH\EH gender preferences. It is important to K-12 educavehicle of achieving diversity among the donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get in declared racist. This everlasting quest to QRWHKRZHYHUWKDW0LFKLJDQIDFHVWKHVH tion, enhance go to other prove a negative is, Steele argues, the driv- economic, educational, and racial crises UCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s student body. student prepat o p - n o t c h LQJIRUFHEHKLQGWKH)RUWXQHDPLFXV DIWHU\HDUVRI DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYHDFWLRQ ration for higher education, and impleschools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Harvard, Duke, Michigan,â&#x20AC;? EULHIV:KDWEHWWHUZD\IRUFRUSRUDWLRQV .DXIPDQQ LV ULJKW KRZHYHU WR DVment race-neutral alternatives designed UCLA sociologist Darnell Hunt told the to prove their â&#x20AC;&#x153;commitment to diversityâ&#x20AC;? sert that education is critical to economic to strengthen is ability to attract, admit, LA Times. Kaufmann states that minor- WKDQ WR Ă&#x20AC;OH PHDQLQJOHVV QRQELQGLQJ revival. To prove her point, she cites a and enroll an undergraduate body that ity students admitted to UC schools â&#x20AC;&#x153;of- EULHIVLQVXSSRUWRI DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYHDFWLRQLQ March 2006 survey of 1,200 businesses LV ERWK DFDGHPLFDOO\ ZHOOSUHSDUHG DQG ten choose instead to attend elite private DKLJKSURĂ&#x20AC;OH6XSUHPH&RXUWFDVH"3HU- DVHYLGHQFHWKDWDQHGXFDWHGZRUNIRUFH UHĂ HFWLYHRI WKHEURDGGLYHUVLW\RI &DOLinstitutions.â&#x20AC;? Indeed the percentage of KDSVWKHQQRERG\ZLOOQRWLFHWKHGHDUWK is critical to business creation. The survey fornia.â&#x20AC;? Instead of eliminating outreach URM students denied admission to UC RI ZRPHQDQGPLQRULWLHVLQ)RUWXQH polled private businesses to determine programs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the University dramatically %HUNHOH\ DQG 8&/$ ZKR VXEVHTXHQWO\ corporate board seats. ZKDWIDFWRUVFRQVWLWXWHDIDYRUDEOHEXVLH[SDQGHG LWV RXWUHDFK HIIRUWV EHWZHHQ choose to enroll in a private school has ,Q KHU Ă&#x20AC;QDO SDJHV .DXIPDQQ H[- QHVVFOLPDWHDQGZKDWUROHVWDWHXQLYHU DQG Âľ ZKLFK ´H[SDQGHG ERWK increased from 14% in 1997 to 24% in DPLQHV DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYH DFWLRQ ZLWKLQ ´WKH sities and governments can play in enthe number of students they served, and 2002. Minority students arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t being shut Michigan Context.â&#x20AC;? She uses a barrage the depth of programs they provide.â&#x20AC;? out of colleges. Many are simply attend- of statistics and quotes to state the obvi$QRWKHU UHSRUW ZULWWHQ LQ  FDOOHG See â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MCRI,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Page 9


P. 9

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Religion,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; from Page 3

)HDWXUHV IRUJRWWHQWKHVLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQFHRI WKLVDQQLYHUVDU\7KHUHOLJLRXVKLVWRU\RI WKH8QLYHUVLW\RI 0LFKLJDQLVOXVKZLWK WUDGLWLRQ DQG KRZ VXFK D EHQFKPDUN ZDV RYHUORRNHG raises serious questions about the priorities of the administration. With focus recently on ethics, via President Mary Sue Colemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ethics in Public Lifeâ&#x20AC;? initiative, LWZRXOGVHHPORJLFDOWRLQYLWHFRPPXQLWLHVRI IDLWKWR EHFRPHDFWLYHSDUWLFLSDQWVLQWKHGHEDWHRYHUKRZVWXGHQWV¡ HWKLFV PLJKW EH IRUPHG 7KH LQFOXVLRQ RI  ZLOOing communities of faith need not be alienating, but can UDWKHUEHFRQVLGHUHGDVDQRWKHUYLHZSRLQWUHSUHVHQWHG LQ WKH 8QLYHUVLW\ DW WKH ZLOO RI  WKH GLIIHUHQW JURXSV 0DQ\FULWLFVRI UHOLJLRQLQWKHLUDYRZHGVHFXODULVPFDQ Ă&#x20AC;QGWKHPVHOYHVLQVXODWHGZLWKLQWKH8QLYHUVLW\¡VEXWRIfering a chance for communities of faith to offer some input and advice as to perspectives on ethical issues seems deeply taboo at this point. Having a meaningful conversation about the importance of Ethics in PubOLF/LIHHVSHFLDOO\LQWKHEURDGZHOOURXQGHGHGXFDWLRQ RI  0LFKLJDQ VWXGHQWV PD\ ZHOO EH LQFRPSOHWH ZLWKRXW some degree of consideration of the religious, or in the OHDVW VSLULWXDO UDPLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQV ,WVHOI  D UHVRXUFH IRU WKH ZKROH HGXFDWLRQ RI  WKH VWXGHQW WKH 8QLYHUVLW\ PLJKW EHQHĂ&#x20AC;WE\PDNLQJLWVHOI PRUHRSHQWRWKRVHIURPPRUH religious and ethical traditions.

IRUZKLFKWKHODWHVWLQIRUPDWLRQKDVEHHQPDGHDYDLODEOH reveals that some 28% of students are Roman Catholic. Lutherans, Methodists, Presbyterians, and Baptists are the largest Protestant groups at 4.6%, 4.5%, 3.7%, and  RI  WKH VWXGHQW SRSXODWLRQ UHVSHFWLYHO\ 6SHFLĂ&#x20AC;FDOO\UHOLJLRXVO\-HZLVKVWXGHQWVPDNHXSURXJKO\ RU VR RI  WKH VWXGHQW ERG\ DOWKRXJK WKRVH ZKR FODLP D´-HZLVKÂľLGHQWLW\LQDEURDGHUFRQWH[WPD\FRPSULVH XSZDUGVRI RI 0LFKLJDQVWXGHQWV7KHVHFRQGODUJest segment on campus, though, is made up of students SURFODLPLQJ QR IDLWK ZKR DUH VRPH  RI  WKH FDPpus population. While large, this statistic represents a decline of the secular student population from the late VZKHUHDVWXG\UHYHDOHGWKDWDVPXFKDVDWKLUGRI  Michigan students claimed no religious belief. Today, religious groups and students of faith ocFXS\ D VRPHZKDW DZNZDUG DPELJXRXV SODFH RQ FDPpus. Some of the larger groups revolve around Hillel, 6W 0DU\¡V &KXUFK DQG 1HZ /LIH &KXUFKÂłZKLFK DIter years of shifting around through University space, LV EXLOGLQJ LWV RZQ IDFLOLW\ RQ :DVKWHQDZ 5RDG %XW many students and clergy from these groups often acNQRZOHGJH D VRPHZKDW FKLOO\ UHFHSWLRQ IURP WKRVH LQ WKH8QLYHUVLW\,WRIWHQVHHPVDVLI WKH8QLYHUVLW\ZKLFK EHQGVRYHUEDFNZDUGVWRDFFRPPRGDWHWKHPRVWSHFXliar interest groups on campus, has little time or effort for students of faith. Indeed, the interests of such a ODUJH VHFWLRQ RI  WKH VWXGHQW SRSXODWLRQ PLJKW ZHOO EH VTXHH]HGRXWLQDVWUXJJOHIRUUHVRXUFHVZLWKWKHVHRWKHU minority-oriented groups. To that end, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no shock that the University has overlooked that this coming school year celebrates the 150th anniversary of organized religious activity on campus. In the 1956-57 school year, a major celebration or the 100th year anniversary of organized religion ZDVKHOGLQFOXGLQJVSHDNHUVFRQIHUHQFHVUHSRUWVDQG at Michigan in 1957, the University commissioned a RWKHUZLVHWKDWKHOGXSDQGFRPPHPRUDWHGWKHUROHRI  UHOLJLRQRQFDPSXV2QO\Ă&#x20AC;IW\\HDUVODWHUHYHU\RQHKDV report by then-professor and Assistant Coordinator of

The devout life need not be crudely divorced from all RIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOOLIHDWWKH University of Michigan.

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,QVWHDGWKH\REVFXUHWKHLVVXHZLWK a dizzying array of emotionally charged couraging business creation. In the entire ZRUGV²´RXWUHDFKÂľ´DFFHVVÂľ´IDLUQHVVÂľ SDJHUHSRUW´GLYHUVLW\ÂľDQG´DIĂ&#x20AC;UPD- â&#x20AC;&#x153;diversity.â&#x20AC;? They call programs that mandates preferences an â&#x20AC;&#x153;outreach effort.â&#x20AC;? tive actionâ&#x20AC;? are never mentioned. After detailing the exclusion, seg- A quota system provides â&#x20AC;&#x153;accessâ&#x20AC;? to regation, and inequality that plague contracts. Admissions systems that dis0LFKLJDQ DIWHU \HDUV RI  DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYH DF- FULPLQDWH DJDLQVW TXDOLĂ&#x20AC;HG VWXGHQWV SURWLRQ .DXIPDQQ FRQFOXGHV WKDW DIĂ&#x20AC;UPD- vide â&#x20AC;&#x153;opportunity.â&#x20AC;? The divine concept tive action â&#x20AC;&#x153;remains an important tool RI  ´GLYHUVLW\Âľ EHFRPHV WKH TXDQWLĂ&#x20AC;DEOH for disrupting old patterns of exclusion QXPEHURI EODFNVWXGHQWVRQWZRFROOHJH and segregation,â&#x20AC;? and provides â&#x20AC;&#x153;fair and campuses. The anti-MCRI establishment equal access to opportunity.â&#x20AC;? She does FDQ FDOO WKHVH SURJUDPV ZKDWHYHU WKH\ QRW H[SODLQ WKDW DIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYH DFWLRQ SUR- ZRXOG OLNH WR IXOĂ&#x20AC;OO WKHLU ´PRUDO REOLJDgrams have no mechanism for determin- tion,â&#x20AC;? but spreading such propaganda is LQJZKRH[DFWO\KDVIDFHGVHJUHJDWLRQRU simply disingenuous, and belies the frailty H[FOXVLRQQRUGRHVVKHH[SODLQKRZSUHI- of their arguments. The end of racial and gender prefererential treatment ensures â&#x20AC;&#x153;fair and equal ences in California may have bruised the access to opportunity.â&#x20AC;? But none of that egos of moral crusaders, but it did not matters in a campaign based on distorting bring the state to its knees. Women and and avoiding reality. PLQRULWLHV DUH QRZ UHSUHVHQWHG LQ HPIn fact, aside from quoting the ballot ployment, education, and contracting by ODQJXDJH QRW RQFH LV WKH ZRUG ´SUHIHUvirtue of their achievements, not by an enceâ&#x20AC;? ever mentioned in Kaufmannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 18DFWRI FKDULW\2IĂ&#x20AC;FLDOVKDYHEHHQIRUFHG page report â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a report that supposedly establishes the necessity of racial and to confront the true issues underlying ingender preferences, and the dire con- equality. 5DFLDO DQG JHQGHU SUHIHUHQFHV ZLOO sequences of ending such preferences. not lead Michigan to equality or prosper0&5, RSSRQHQWV FDQ¡W HYHQ GHĂ&#x20AC;QH WKH LW\ (QGLQJ WKHVH SUHIHUHQFHV KRZHYHU policy they support, let alone mount a ZRXOGEHDJRRGĂ&#x20AC;UVWVWHSM R reasoned defense.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MCRI,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; from Page 8

9.19.06 Religious Affairs, C. Grey Austin, on the history of religion at Michigan. He opened his book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The University RI 0LFKLJDQZDVQHYHULQWHQGHGWREHDVHFWDULDQVFKRRO WKRXJKLWZDVLQWHQGHGWRKDYHDGLVWLQFWO\UHOLJLRXVDWmosphere.â&#x20AC;? 2YHUWKHSDVWRQHKXQGUHGĂ&#x20AC;IW\\HDUVDQGPRUHLWLV clear that this sentiment has become a distinctly minorLW\RQH7KHPRVWSUHVFLHQWGRFXPHQWVIURPZLWKLQWKH 8QLYHUVLW\ DFNQRZOHGJH DV PXFK $  UHSRUW IURP the OER makes several points. It argues students are VXEMHFW WR DQ ´LQYHUVH SURYLQFLDOLVPÂľ ZKLFK GHGLFDWHV itself to the systemic study of most all religious traditions but those underpinning American life. Ten years later, a study of student religious needs indicated a good QXPEHURI VWXGHQWVZHUHLQWHUHVWHGLQYDOXHVEDVHGHGXFDWLRQ&KDUDFWHULVWLFRI WKHVWXG\ZDVLWVDUJXPHQWWKDW ´&OHDUO\VWXGHQWV>DW0LFKLJDQ@DUHQRWĂ&#x20AC;QGLQJDGHTXDWH educational opportunity for integrating their lives, their YDOXHVWKHLUÂŤUHOLJLRXVKHULWDJHVDQGTXHVWVZLWKWKHLU DFDGHPLF NQRZOHGJHÂľ ,W DOVR TXHVWLRQHG ZKHWKHU SOXUDOLVPDVSUDFWLFHGRQFDPSXVZDVDIRUPRI QHJDWLYH â&#x20AC;&#x153;value neutrality.â&#x20AC;? *RG DQG 0LFKLJDQ DUH WRGD\ DW EHVW VWDQGRIĂ&#x20AC;VK Yet religion and education existed to complement each other in virtually the entirety of the history of higher education, save the modern era. Religion and education VHUYHHDFKRWKHUDQGXQOLNHZKDWPDQ\SRVWPRGHUQLVWV might argue, they are suited to uniquely serve and bolster one another. Michigan should not become a parochial FROOHJH LW LV TXLWH FOHDU WKDW VXFK D PLVVLRQ ZDV QHYHU HQYLVLRQHGE\WKH8QLYHUVLW\¡VIRXQGHUVDQGZRXOGIDOO ZHOOEH\RQGWKHVFRSHRI PRGHUQ)LUVW$PHQGPHQWODZ But that does not mean that religion should be almost quite literally a phenomenon excluded to the boundaries of campus. Whether in Mary Sue Colemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ethics initiative, academic pursuits, campus life, or personal activities, the devout life need not be crudely divorced from DOORIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOOLIHDWWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI 0LFKLJDQMR


P. 10

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ELCOME BACK TO SCHOOL, ALL! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve assembled the perfect playlist of those late summer/early fall songs that are sure to make it into heavy rotation on your iPod. These songs range from some rocking songs ZLWKVRPHVL]]OLQJKRRNVWRDIHZRYHUORRNHG numbers that are almost sure to make you pause for a second, and stare off into space. ,W¡VDSHUIHFWPL[IRUDXWXPQZLWKDOOLWVPL[HG feelings. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Mike Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien â&#x20AC;&#x153;HANDS OPEN,â&#x20AC;? SNOW PATROL: Easily the KDUGHVWURFNLQJ VRQJ RQ 6QRZ 3DWURO¡V ODWHVW album, the stanza containing a Sufjan Stevens reference should be enough to sell you on this song. â&#x20AC;&#x153;WHEN YOU WERE YOUNG,â&#x20AC;? THE KILLERS: (YHU\ERG\¡V IDYRULWH WKURZEDFN EDQG LV EDFN ZLWKWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWVRQJRII WKHLUXSFRPLQJVRSKRPRUHHIIRUW6DP¡V7RZQ7KHDQWKHPLFVRQJ ZLWK6SULQJVWHHQHVTXHVWULQJVDQGEHOOVPDNHV IRURQHFDWFK\VRQJZKLOHUHPLQGLQJXVRI HDVLHUGD\VZLWKHDVLHUGHFLVLRQVQRWWRRORQJDJR â&#x20AC;&#x153;ULTIMATUM,â&#x20AC;? THE LONG WINTERS: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You JRWWDNLFNLWRII ZLWKDNLOOHUWRJUDEDWWHQWLRQ Then you gotta take it up a notch, but you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ZDQWWREORZ\RXUZDG6RWKHQ\RXJRWWDFRRO it off a notch. There are a lot of rules.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;STILL FIGHTING IT,â&#x20AC;? BEN FOLDS: Just about any junior or senior here at the University, faced ZLWKWKHUHDOZRUOGRQWKHKRUL]RQZLOOHPSDWKL]H ZLWK WKH FKRUXV ´(YHU\ERG\ NQRZV LW VXFNVWRJURZXS$QGHYHU\ERG\GRHVÂŤ7KH \HDUVJRRQDQGZH¡UHVWLOOĂ&#x20AC;JKWLQJLWÂŤÂľ

â&#x20AC;&#x153;YOUNG ALUMNI,â&#x20AC;? MARITIME: A fun, poppy song that captures the foibles of our entire generation in a mere three minutes and fourtyIRXU VHFRQGV 7KHLU HQWLUH :H 7KH 9HKLFOHV DOEXP LV Ă&#x20AC;OOHG ZLWK VDLG PXVLF JRRGQHVV *R pick it up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ON A FREEZING CHICAGO STREET,â&#x20AC;? MARGOT & THE NUCLEAR SO AND SOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: This is easily the best band youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never heard of. The band LV DQ HQVHPEOH IURP ,QGLDQD ZLWK HYHU\WKLQJ from hard-rocking riffs evoking Weezer to VZHHW VRQJV OLNH WKLV RQH ZLWK D IRONV\ FHOOR and clever lyrics like, â&#x20AC;&#x153;So if your lover should leave, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get too sad/ And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t compose HSLFSRHPVWRZLQKHUEDFNÂś&DXVHZKHQ\RXU ELUGKDVĂ RZQVKH¡OOQHYHUUHWXUQKRPHÂľ â&#x20AC;&#x153;THREE MORE DAYS,â&#x20AC;? RAY LAMONTAGNE: An ironically funky number from a folk sensation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;HEY THERE DELILAH,â&#x20AC;? PLAIN WHITE Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: $VZHHWORYHOHWWHUWXUQHGVRQJIURPDVXUSULVLQJVRXUFH ´+H\WKHUH'HOLODKZKDW¡VLWOLNHLQ 1HZ <RUN &LW\" ,¡P D WKRXVDQG PLOHV DZD\ but girl you look so pretty, yes you do/ Times Square canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shine as bright as you.â&#x20AC;?) â&#x20AC;&#x153;SAMSON,â&#x20AC;? REGINA SPEKTOR: A poignant song about an odd topic: a contemplation of the ORYHEHWZHHQ6DPVRQDQG'HOLODKEXWOHIWRXW of the Bible. The lyrics may be a bit kitschy, but this simple piano ballad is most certainly one of those sit-and-stare songs. MR

Arts & Culture

9.19.06

'HYHORSPHQWArrested

BY NATALIE NEWTON, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;09

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OR THE FANS AND HYPER-NERDS ZKR KDYHIROORZHGWKHWKUHHWXPXOWXRXV VHDVRQV RI  )2;¡V Arrested Development, WKHUHOHDVHRI WKHWKLUGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QDOVHDVRQ RQ'9'WKLVIDOOZDVELWWHUVZHHWVXUHO\ OHDYLQJ WKH WKRXVDQGV ZKR SHWLWLRQHG )2; WR UHQHZ WKH VKRZ FU\LQJ OLNH D couple of girls, saying to themselves, â&#x20AC;&#x153;taste the happy.â&#x20AC;? )ROORZLQJ D VHULHV RI  LPSUHVVLYH DZDUGV LQFOXGLQJ WKH (PP\ IRU %HVW Comedy Series in 2004, it seemed as if WKH VWUXJJOLQJ VKRZ KDG Ă&#x20AC;QDOO\ IRXQG LWVQLFKHKDOIZD\WKURXJKVHDVRQWKUHH KRZHYHU )2; FXW GRZQ WKH QXPEHU of episodes, and shortly thereafter cancelled Arrested altogether. While other QHWZRUNVOLNH6KRZWLPHDQG$%&PDGH RIIHUVWKHFUHDWRU0LWFKHOO+XUZLW]GHclined them, and amidst constant rumors of a fourth season, he ended the VKRZDOWRJHWKHUFLWLQJH[KDXVWLRQIURP micro-managing the series and a desire on the part of the actors to move on to other projects. &RPSDUHG WR WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW WZR VHDVRQ ZKLFK FRQWDLQ  DQG  HSLVRGHV UHspectively, season threeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paltry 13 segments serve merely as a tragic reminder RI  ZKDW FRXOG KDYH EHHQ WKRXJK HDFK HSLVRGH UHPDLQV DV DOZD\V JROGHQ Sticking to its usual formula of complicated plot lines and constant cameos, the third season managed to maintain WKHFKDUPDQGZLWWKDWPDGHLWVRSRSXODUZLWKFULWLFVDQGDSSDUHQWO\XQSRSXODU ZLWKYLHZHUV

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,Q WKH Ă&#x20AC;QDO VHDVRQ 0LFKDHO %OXWK continues to hold together his crumEOLQJ DQG KDSKD]DUG IDPLO\ ZKLOH WKH remaining family members do their best WR ULVH WR WKH RFFDVLRQ ZLWK FRQVWDQW foibles, embarrassments, and general inappropriateness. While some of the more extreme plot lines may push some YLHZHUV¡ DWWHQWLRQ DQG EHOLHYDELOLW\ WR WKH EUHDNLQJ SRLQWÂłOLNH ZKHQ 0LFKDHO Ă&#x20AC;QGVKLPVHOI GDWLQJDPHQWDOO\UHWDUGHG %ULWLVKZRPDQSOD\HGE\&KDUOL]H7KHURQÂłWKHVKRZ¡VKXPRUUHPDLQVDVURFN solid as ever, and as any die-hard fan

SOS! Even Arrested Developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mulltiple Emmy wins couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t save their show.

NQRZVLWDOOPDNHVVHQVHLQWKHHQG :KDWPDNHVWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOVHDVRQVRGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWWRZDWFKLVQRWDQ\ODFNRI RULJLQDOLW\RUZLWEXWWKHDSSDUHQWGHVSHUDWLRQRI WKHZULWHUVRI WKHVHULHVIDQVFDQ actually track the events surrounding the VKRZ¡V FDQFHOODWLRQ LQ WKH HSLVRGHV DV the characters themselves actually make UHIHUHQFHVWR+%2DQG6KRZWLPHFOHDUO\ UHĂ HFWLQJ WKH UHDOOLIH FKDUDGH JRLQJ RQRIIFDPHUDDVWKH\VWUXJJOHGWRĂ&#x20AC;QGD UHQHZDO,QRQHRI WKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOHSLVRGHVHQtitled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exit Strategy,â&#x20AC;? the narrator (Ron +RZDUG  DFWXDOO\ UHIHUV WR WKH %OXWK

IDPLO\SDUDGLQJDVOHZRI PLQRUFHOHErities at a fundraiser in order to garner VXSSRUW WKHZULWHUVFOHDUO\GLGWKHVDPH WKLQJ ZKLOHDEDQQHULQWKHEDFNJURXQG reads â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Save Our Bluths,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; the same name given to the large, fan group petition for WKH VKRZ WR UHPDLQ RQ WKH DLU :KLOH FRQVLVWHQWZLWKWKHKXPRURI WKHVHULHV LWZRXOGKDYHEHHQQLFHWRVHHWKHVKRZ end on a more triumphant, and certainly OHVVGHVSHUDWHQRWHZLWKIHZHUUHPLQGHUVRI WKHVDGUHDOLW\EHKLQGWKHVKRZ¡V lack of popularity. $OWKRXJK WKH FRQVWDQW SORWWZLVWV DQGVOHZRI FRQIXVLQJFKDUDFWHUVPLJKW KDYHPDGHWKHVHULHVGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWIRUWHOHYLVLRQYLHZHUVLWHQDEOHGWKHKHDY\KDQGHGQHVV RI  WKH ZULWLQJ WR UHDOO\ HPHUJH WKLVLVPRVWHDVLO\VHHQWKURXJKYLHZLQJ WKHHQWLUHVHULHVRQ'9'$V5RQ+RZDUG SOD\LQJKLPVHOI VD\VLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOHSisode, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see it as a series... maybe a movie,â&#x20AC;? no doubt a criticism often heard by the creators. The special features are hardly the PDLQDSSHDORI WKH'9'DQGZLOOSUREDEO\ EH ZDWFKHG RQFH LQ ERUHGRP DQG then forgotten, and even then, only by true die-hard fans. Even the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last Day on Locationâ&#x20AC;? lacks the humor and apSHDO RQH ZRXOG H[SHFW IURP VXFK D tremendous series ending, though the commentaries serve as a heartbreaking UHPLQGHU RI  KRZ WKH VKRZ¡V HQVHPEOH cast manages to give life to its characters. Is this really the end of one of the most critically-acclaimed television series in a decade? My gut is telling me yes, but my gutâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also very hungryâ&#x20AC;Ś MR

Annual Fashion Trends Draw Fire

VERY YEAR, IT SEEMSDVLI DQHZIDVKLRQWUHQGPDNHVLWVZD\WRWKH0LGZHVWHUQEXEEOHNQRZQDV$QQ$UERU:KHWKHU

KRPHJURZQRUD/RQJ,VODQGWUDQVSODQWWKHVHWUHQGVVHHPWRJULSDVLQJOHFODVVVSUHDGWRRWKHUVOLNHDUDVKDQGSROOXWHWKH'LDJE\WKHHQGRI WKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWZHHNRI FODVV%XWZKDWH[DFWO\DUHWKHVHWUHQGVDQGZKLFKFODVVLVUHVSRQVLEOHIRUWKHLU unfortunate presence on this campus? CLASS OF 2008: CLASS OF 2009: CLASS OF 2010: CLASS OF 2007: THE POPPED COLLAR THE UGG BOOTS THOSE GIANT SUNGLASSES THE ENSEMBLE :H WKRXJKW WKLV WUHQG ZDV Perfect for making the trek The most frustrating and 1RW FRQWHQW ZLWK D VLQJOH dead too. Then former Re- over to your frat house of pervasive trend of the last trend, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freshman YLHZ (GLWRU -DPHV 'LFNVRQ choice, these boots hit their four years. Making Aviators FODVVEURXJKWDQHQWLUHRXWĂ&#x20AC;W â&#x20AC;&#x153;poppedâ&#x20AC;? up in the Daily, SHDN ZKHQ WKH FODVV RI  look miniscule, the sunglass- )URPWKHWRSGRZQWKHRXWĂ&#x20AC;W looking *fabulous*. Popped  FDPH WR WRZQ  6NLUWV es seen on campus today rival includes: 1) the side ponytail, collars have, fortunately, DQG8JJVZHUHWKHRXWĂ&#x20AC;WRI  WKRVH\RXZRXOGĂ&#x20AC;QGLQQRY-  WKHPDVVLYHVZHDWVKLUWDQG started to make an exit from choice for the sub-zero days elty or gag gift stores. They   WKH WLJKWHVW SDQWV NQRZQ the U, but the particular brand in January. These revolution- also lead to an untold num- to mankind. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still trying of douchebaggery that ac- DU\ ERRWV DOORZHG IHPDOHV ber of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who is that? Do I WR Ă&#x20AC;JXUH RXW WKLV RQH  ,V LW companied them has proved to complain year round. In NQRZKHU"&UDS,¡PJHWWLQJ a true attempt at the â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much tougher to eradicate. April thru October, there FORVHU WR KHU QRZ PD\EH , care about my appearance, Unless you are a member of ZDV WKH LQFHVVDQW ZKLQLQJ VKRXOG VD\ KL  %XW ZKDW LI  HYHQ WKRXJK ,¡P ZHDULQJ WKH7KUHH0DĂ&#x20AC;D\RXSURE- that the shoes these individu- , GRQ¡W NQRZ KHU" 7KHQ ,¡OO ZRUWKRI PDNHXS ably havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been popping als had looked at, purchased, just look like a tool. Maybe shoes, and daddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trust fund your collar ever since you can VHOHFWHG DQG SXW RQ ZHUH ,¡OOMXVWRIIHUXSWKHDZNZDUG ZRUWKRI MHZHOU\ÂľORRNRULV remember. You probably ´XQFRPIRUWDEOHÂľ1RZIURP half smile and glanceâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? mo- it intentionally ironic? Either started freshman year. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s November thru March, fe- ments on campus. ZD\ZH¡UHQRWDPXVHGMR over. Save the starch. Move males could complain about on. their legs being cold, all from WKH FRPIRUW RI  WKHLU ZDUP Ugg boots. Amazing really.


P. 11

9.19.06

Arts & Culture

7DONLQ¡$ERXW0\*HQHUDWLRQ Michigan alum examines the contradictions that inundate the attitudes and mindsets of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;self-esteemâ&#x20AC;? generation. BY KAREN BOORE, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;09

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RX¡UHVSHFLDO$WOHDVWWKDWLVZKDWSDUHQWVVFKRROV DQG 79 VKRZV KDYH EHHQ WHOOLQJ WKLV JHQHUDWLRQ WKHLU ZKROH OLYHV  $UH \RX VSHFLDO EHFDXVH \RX KDYH some talent that other people around you do not possess? Maybe, but probably not. In Generation Me: Why Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Young Americans Are More &RQĂ&#x20AC;GHQW$VVHUWLYH(QWLWOHG²DQG More Miserable Than Ever Before, -HDQ 0 7ZHQJH 3K' DUJXHV that though parents and teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; intentions may have been JRRG WKH HIIHFWV RI  LQĂ DWLQJ self-esteem in and of itself has done our generation a disservice. While the older generations may see the JUHDWHU RSSRUWXQLWLHV ZH KDYH 7ZHQJH DOVR KLJKOLJKWV WKDWRXUJHQHUDWLRQPXVWGHDOZLWKWKHGLIIHUHQWDQ[LHWies of our day. 7KHZKROHLGHDEHKLQGGeneration Me is that those RI XVERUQLQWKHVVDQGVKDYHJURZQ up in a culture that is very self-focused. While Baby %RRPHUV VWDUWHG WKH WUHQG LQ WKHLU WHHQV DQG WZHQWLHV ZH KDYH OLYHG LQ WKH LQGLYLGXDOIRFXVHG ZRUOG RXU ZKROHOLYHV7ZHQJHĂ&#x20AC;QGVWKDW´7KHDYHUDJHNLGLQWKH mid-1990sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;right in the heart of GenMeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;had higher self-esteem than 73% of kids in 1979, one of the last pre-GenMe years.â&#x20AC;? She points to and criticizes the naWLRQZLGHVFKRROSURJUDPVFUHDWHGWRERRVWVHOIHVWHHP as the cause of this large increase. 6RZKDW¡VZURQJZLWKIHHOLQJJRRGDERXW\RXUVHOI " Not much. That is, until you realize that these programs that taught kids that high self-esteem is contingent on nothing. Doing poorly in school? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ok; youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re

Book 5HYLHZ

special already. In Asian cultures, usually less focused RQVHOIHVWHHPFKLOGUHQZKRVFRUHORZRQDWDVNIHHOD greater desire to improve. 8QIRUWXQDWHO\WKLVLVQRWWKHFDVHLQWKH867ZHQJH concludes that â&#x20AC;&#x153;self-esteem is not linked to living a successful life, academic achievement, behavior, or any other outcomeâ&#x20AC;? that the self-esteem programs have allegedly addressed. In raising selfHVWHHPWKURXJKVXFKSURJUDPV7ZHQJH VD\V ZH KDYH SXW WKH ´FDUW EHIRUH WKH ZDJRQÂľ3DUHQWVDQGWHDFKHUVKDYHQRW focused on teaching children the skills and discipline needed to be successful, ZKLFKZRXOGLQWXUQUDLVHVHOIHVWHHP Rather, Americans have skipped ahead, promoting self-esteem at all costs. 7ZHQJHDOVRFRQWUDVWVRXUJHQHUDWLRQ¡V XSEULQJLQJ ZLWK WKH KDUVK UHDOLW\ ZH FXUUHQWO\ IDFH  2XU JHQHUDWLRQ KDV EHHQ WROG WKDW ZH FDQ EH DQ\WKLQJ ZH ZDQWWREH+RZHYHUDVWKHQXPEHURI  VWXGHQWV ZKR H[SUHVV DQ LQWHUHVW LQ DGYDQFHG GHJUHHV IDURXWZHLJKWKHQXPEHURI RSHQJUDGXDWHVFKRROSRVLWLRQVVRPHPD\KDYHWRĂ&#x20AC;QGVRPHWKLQJHOVHWKH\ZDQWWR EH$OVRRXUJHQHUDWLRQKDVJURZQXSZDWFKLQJVWDUVRQ 079ZKRKDYHVRPXFKPRUHWKDQWKHDYHUDJHSHUVRQ ZLOOHYHUKDYH2XUH[SHFWDWLRQVDUHKLJKEXWWKHUHDOLW\ RI D RUPD\EH Ă&#x20AC;JXUHVDODU\MXVWZRQ¡WVWDFNXSWR J-Loâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Add to that the rising costs of basic necessities, DQGLW¡VQRZRQGHUWKDW*HQ0HLVPRUHGHSUHVVHG :KLOHPDQ\RI WKHFRQFOXVLRQVGUDZQIURPWKHVWDtistical tests are very interesting and support her case, WKHUHDUHWLPHVZKHQ7ZHQJHJUDVSVDWDQ\WKLQJVKHFDQ use to support her claims. At one point, she bemoans

the adage â&#x20AC;&#x153;never give up on your dreams,â&#x20AC;? saying that SHRSOH LQ PRYLHV ZKR SXUVXH DQ ´LPSRVVLEOH GUHDPÂľ DOPRVW DOZD\V VXFFHHG  7KH H[DPSOHV VKH XVHV DUH Rudy, Erin Brockovich, and Miracle. Someone should have PHQWLRQHGWR7ZHQJHWKDWDOOWKUHHRI WKHVHPRYLHVDUH based on true stories. 0RUHRYHU 7ZHQJH ORRNV DW IXQGDPHQWDOLVW &KULVWLDQV ZKR VD\ WKDW -HVXV Christ is their personal savior, enterLQJLQWRWKHROGGHEDWHDERXW)DLWKDQG Good Works saying â&#x20AC;&#x153;these denominations teach that oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal faith guarantees acceptance into heaven, not WKH JRRG ZRUNV \RX SHUIRUP DQG WKH ZD\ \RX WUHDW RWKHUVÂľ  2QH PD\ TXHVWLRQ KRZ DQ LVVXH DW WKH KHDUW RI  WKH Protestant Reformation in the 16th century can support her case for a more individual-focused generation in America today? )LQDOO\7ZHQJHPDNHVVRPHSROLF\ VXJJHVWLRQV IRU WKH IXWXUH ZKLFK VHHP PRUH KRSHIXO WKDQUHDOLVWLF+RZHYHUVKHGRHVUHIUDLQIURPVXJJHVWLQJ SROLF\FKDQJHVWRWDOO\RXWVLGHWKHVFRSHRI KHUNQRZOedge and has some good suggestions for school policies WKDWFRXOGJUHDWO\EHQHĂ&#x20AC;WZRUNLQJSDUHQWVDVZHOODVSHUsonal advice for avoiding the pitfalls that face GenMe. While talking in person to one self-centered person can EHDQQR\LQJUHDGLQJDERXWWKHPHQPDVVHDVDZKROH self-centered generation can drive a person to strongly FRQVLGHU7ZHQJH¡VPHVVDJHMR

Congressional Interns Suck WKH &RQJUHVVLRQDO RIĂ&#x20AC;FH LV D VWULFWO\ KLHUDUFKLFDO SODFH 7KHFRQJUHVVPDQLVODUJHO\DĂ&#x20AC;JXUHKHDG7KHFKLHI RI  VERY SUMMER, THOUSANDS OF BRIGHT-EYED, EAGER VWDII WHOOVKLPZKHQDQGZKHUHWRJRDQGRQOHVVLPyoung interns descend on our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital, try- SRUWDQW ELOOV KRZ WR YRWH 0RYLQJ GRZQ IURP WKHUH LQJWRJHWWKHLUIHHWLQWKHGRRUE\EHLQJFRIIHHZKRUHV RQH Ă&#x20AC;QGV OHJLVODWLYH DVVLVWDQWV ZKR VSHFLDOL]H LQ EURDG and toolish cogs for The Man. VZDWKV RI  LVVXHV 7KH\ DUH DOVR SDLG VR OLWWOH WKDW RQH But there is a special breed among these interns. famous ex-legislative assistant made a fortune on her di$ VSHFLDO JURXS RI  LQGLYLGXDOV NQRZQ IRU being the best of the best asskissers this nation has to offer. These special individuals are Congressional interns. Native Washingtonians call them â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Hill rats.â&#x20AC;? We just call them â&#x20AC;&#x153;assholes.â&#x20AC;? 0DQ\DUHNLGVZKRMXVWDUHQ¡WWDOHQWHG HQRXJKWRĂ&#x20AC;QGUHDOMREVLQ'&,PDJLQHD group of not-too-intelligent, promiscuous Whether in Ann Arbor or DC, still useless. GUXQNV ZLWK HJRV WKDW FRXOG Ă&#x20AC;OO D VZLPming pool even though their excessive selfDU\WXUQHGQRYHODERXWKRZVKHZKRUHGKHUVHOI RXWWR LPSRUWDQFHLVWDNHQIURPWKHLUPHDQLQJOHVVZRUN7KHQ various staffers around the Hill. LPDJLQHWKHSHRSOHWKDWZRUNIRUWKHP7KHVHZRXOGEH $W WKH ERWWRP \RX Ă&#x20AC;QG LQWHUQV ZKR LQ QR ZD\ Congressional Interns. represent the underprivileged due to their pro-bono asThe irony about the internship market in D.C. is sistance and high cost of DC living. The most exciting that perhaps the most respected and recognizable posi- thing interns get to do is giggle amongst themselves at tion to non-insiders is being a Congressional Intern. But VRPHRI WKHORRQVZKRZULWHLQ²DQGWKHQVLJKDQGFRQLW¡VLQWKHQRQ+LOOMREVZKHUH\RXDFWXDOO\JDLQPHDQLQJ- tinue to open an endless pile of constituent letters. Or ful experience. PD\EHLW¡VVWDQGLQJLQOLQHIRUVHFXULW\ZLWKDWRXUJURXS Contrary to our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to equality, WZLFHGDLO\²DQ\WKLQJWRJHWRXWRI WKHRIĂ&#x20AC;FH

BY NICK CHEOLAS, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07, AND MICHAEL Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;BRIEN, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08

E

Within the district, there is little prestige or respect for Congressional interns. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing special about WKHPKXQGUHGVURDPWKH&DSLWROZRUNLQJIRUWKHLUUHSresentative or a committee. Some haul coffee, others hold Chuck Schumerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coat, some pull his chair out, and RWKHUVOD\RQWKHJURXQGLQIURQWRI KLPZKHQLWUDLQVVR KHGRHVQ¡WKDYHWRJHWKLVVKRHVZHW 2I FRXUVHWKLVJUXHOLQJZRUNUHTXLUHV a thorough vetting by the application process. In fact, the application for southern 5HSXEOLFDQFRQJUHVVPHQQRZFRQVLVWVRI D photo AND bust line measurements. Sure, WKRVH QHFNXS VKRWV XVHG WR ZRUN EHIRUH EXWQRWDQ\ORQJHU&RPSHWLWLRQLVĂ&#x20AC;HUFH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; only the best are admitted. Congratulations, your dad is a major donor to Rep. Jeb %UDGOH\<RX¡UHQRZTXDOLĂ&#x20AC;HGWREHD&RQgressional intern. 7KHVHLQGLYLGXDOVDUHEDFNLQFROOHJHQRZSRSXODWLQJ*UHHNKRXVHVDOODFURVVWKHFRXQWU\ZLWKVNLOOVWKH\ OHDUQHG DW &RQJUHVVLRQDO UHFHSWLRQV )RU WKRVH ZKR havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t experienced one, receptions are characterized E\WKHFRPLQJVDQGJRLQJVRI IUHHORDGLQJLQWHUQVZKR gorge themselves on the free booze and food and then OHDYHIDVWHUWKDQNLGVDWDSDUW\ZKRĂ&#x20AC;QGRXWWKHNHJKDV run out. MR


P. 12

Faceoff

9.19.06

Student Activism: Worthwhile or Waste? Michigan is known worldwide as a bastion of social and political activism. But what is the role of activism on campus? Is VWXGHQWDFWYLVPDPRQJJURXSVDQGLQGLYLGXDOVZRUWKWKHVWUXJJOHRUDZDVWHRIWLPH",VDQGVKRXOGDFWLYLVPEHDGHÂżQLQJ charactersitic at the University of Michigan? The Michigan Daily and Michigan Review face off on the role of student activism.

MR

BY BRIAN BIGLIN, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 - CONTENT EDITOR, MICHIGAN REVIEW

I

t has been made painfully clear by some of the far-fetched student groups at this university, or perhaps, by the Michigan Student Assembly, that student activism has had the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;activeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; taken out of it. There are hundreds of well-intentioned student groups at this university, but it is not unfair to say that some do far more good than others. There is certainly a lesson to be learned from the organizations which are active, but may be overshadowed by those that are just loud. Drawing a distinction between different types of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;activismâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is important. First of all, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make clear that most Diag protests cannot accomplish much, but rather give self-satisfaction to students who are looking for a release of their â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;activistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; energies. Activism as currently manifest on this campus is more of an act of self-indulgence, and a cry beckoning the attention of others, than it is any concrete contribution to the University community. No one can stop a student or group of students from making their views about the evils of Israel or the Coca-Cola Corporation or Dick Cheney known; but, while these people are the most outspoken (despite usually getting ignored by students rushing to class), they, without question, have less power to effect change than their fellow students signing up to do service work in the inner city, or an alternative spring break trip. The point being, most of the substantial work that can be done to effect change in this world, can and should be done in the real world, not on the Diag with loudVSHDNHUV0XFKRI WKHJORULĂ&#x20AC;HGÂśVWXGHQWDFWLYLVP¡LVUHDOO\MXVWDQRVWDOJLFDWWHPSWDW impersonating the protests of the last generation. Being active and making a difference is, in fact, inglorious. But true service to othersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and a true dedication to change and justice in this worldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;must be borne of a sense of humility and conviction that does not draw attention to oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s action for the sake of it. The truth of the matter is students are much more enabled to do things that could change the world after they leave this university, empowered by a degree. Political student activism, while not having as much direct impact as hands-on activism, still has a place. The question remains: what is the difference between a Diag SURWHVWDQGDVLPSOHOHWWHUWRDFRQJUHVVSHUVRQ"$QGZKHQDUHPDVVLYHGHPRQVWUDWLRQVZDUUDQWHG",WLVDSUREOHPZKHQSURWHVWLQJDQDQWLDIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYHDFWLRQPHDVXUH is compared to the actual civil rights movement of the 1960s. In this case, a misunderstanding of major issues on all levels causes â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;activists,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; in their self-righteousness, to elevate themselves to inappropriate levels. Posing nude or in undergarments, with ambiguous allegations towards the producers of University apparel is not tantamount to liberating women from the daily drudgery of housework. It is nothing less than an act of hubris for student activists to assume it so. The distinction is between being â&#x20AC;&#x153;activeâ&#x20AC;? and being an â&#x20AC;&#x153;activist.â&#x20AC;? Being an activist is accomplishing nothing but smug self-satisfaction when MSA passes meaningless resolutions (wasting time, no less) condemning the War in Iraq, against the Coca-Cola Corporation, or calling for divestment from Israel. Being active is getting out in the world and accomplishing something tangible. It is spending thirty hours on oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feet raising money for a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hospital at Dance Marathon, or it is helping facilitate an American Red Cross blood or bone marrow drive at the Union. Or maybe, it is even stopping in for twenty minutes, and donating blood yourself. Apathy is the opposite of what we need. While possibly not very productive, student activists are far from apatheticâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that, if small, is something to their credit. They are motivated and always thinking and they are making their thoughts known. But some of them stop at this, while some people get their hands dirty. The real students activists, deserving of the most praise (yet never making news headlines because of stunts in the Diag), are the ones who are active. If you have ever taken an alternative spring break, worked at a Habitat for Humanity building site, or volunteered for a Detroit Project activity, you have put your talents to good use and have helped others. MR

BY EMILY BEAM, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 - EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR, MICHIGAN DAILY

I

n the middle of the Vietnam War, members of the Inter-Faith Council for Peace wanted to dig a â&#x20AC;&#x153;bomb craterâ&#x20AC;? on the Diag that would represent what was taking place in North Vietnam as a result of U.S. intervention. To the surprise of many, University President Robben Fleming didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t interfere, reasoning: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a big job to throw the dirt back in the hole after they get tired.â&#x20AC;? Indeed, the dirt was eventually put back in place, and today no trace of the gaping hole in the center of campus remains. But even without concrete physical evidence that yes, activists were here, the impact of student-led protests against the Vietnam War continued to resonate long after students took off their armbands and set down their signs. The contributions of past activists have had no small effect on the present University experience. It was angry graduate students and their supporters that led reluctant University administrators to negotiate a contract with the Graduate Employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Organization. It was the Black Action Movement that pushed the University to address low minority enrollment, as well as led to the creation of the Center for African-American Studies and the dedication of Trotter House. That University committees ranging from the Dispute Review Board to the LSA Curriculum Committee have spots reserved for students did not come about from administratorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; benevolence â&#x20AC;&#x201D; students long ago demanded a say in how their university was run. Today it is easy to suspect that student activism has been reduced to joining a Facebook group or holding a bucket drive. Though the Diag continues to be the center stage of student activism on campus, it is more frequently home to teeter-tottering Greeks than massive rallies. Current students, perhaps too worried about getting into grad school or putting together a stellar resume, rarely show the force that characterized student activism in the 1960s and 1970s. But just because student activism today is in many ways a shadow of its former self doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imply that it is not present or that it has no place on campus. Recent years have shown that students are still capable of organizing and making change. Student opposition killed the couch ban three summers ago, and student pressure helped bring about the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new lease-dateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ordinance. And where there havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been results â&#x20AC;&#x201C; student activism was disappointingly ineffective stopping the U.S. invasion in Iraq, for example â&#x20AC;&#x201C; there is still potential. As students mobilize now in support of or against the 0LFKLJDQ&LYLO5LJKWV,QLWLDWLYHWKH\KDYHWKHFKDQFHWRLQĂ XHQFHWKHFRXUVHRI WKHLU university and the state. As students, we have an obligation to address the problems that plague our society and the world. We can volunteer our time to lessen the blow societal inequalities have on individual lives. But while tutoring a child in math may help him do better in school, it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t convince the Legislature to equalize per-pupil funding across the state. Rebuilding houses in New Orleans will help restore a neighborhood, but it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t resolve the gross inequalities that heaped the brunt of the devastation on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poorest residents. The most effective way to bring about lasting social change is by altering the very system that creates those inequalities and injustices that offend our sense of what is right. Individual service can extend beyond the act of volunteering by raising public awareness and forging bonds between communities, but it is far more powerful when accompanied by loud voices unwilling to stand for the status quo. It is simply unwise to trust that administrators, politicians and policymakers automatically know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best. Relying solely on authority to determine the common good would have made the Civil Rights Movement, among other things, impossible, and would have resulted in a radically different University experience. Activism has been, and continues to be, an effective means of holding policymakers accountable and of demanding certain rights or societal changes. The act of waving a sign canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do much, if anything, to change things. But the power of large groups of students armed with signs has proved and will remain a potent foe of authorities reluctant or unwilling to take action.

vol_25_no_2  

vol_25_no_2

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