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Š Alan Vernon

Protecting a Key Migration Flyway

Thousands of raptors, owls, and other birds use this flyway as they migrate toward their summer nesting grounds in Canada. Large numbers of neo-tropical migrants also pass through the Keweenaw Peninsula during their annual migrations.

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umerous conservation organizations, including the Michigan Nature Association, have been cooperatively acquiring parcels of land on and around the Keweenaw Peninsula’s famed Brockway Mountain. Over the past three years, these efforts have resulted in the protection of hundreds of additional acres on Brockway Mountain. With a little hard work and continued support, hundreds more acres will be protected as well. As one of the highest points of elevation in the United States east of the Mississippi, visitors at the top of Brockway Mountain have a commanding view of Lake Superior and surrounding forests. The key to effective conservation of this iconic landscape is working across a patchwork of public and private ownership to connect and assemble protected areas at a landscape scale. This requires vision, partnership, coordination, and strong financial backing. Fortunately, the pieces are coming together.

michigan nature | spring 2017

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Michigan Nature Magazine - Spring 2017  

Spring 2017 issue of Michigan Nature magazine

Michigan Nature Magazine - Spring 2017  

Spring 2017 issue of Michigan Nature magazine

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