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November • December 2013

Chef Ross Olling Executive Head Chef Morris Inn, Notre Dame

The New Morris Inn: Where Community & Campus Meet

Painting the Town

Red

HELP!

I Can't Keep Up With

Technology

Antiquing in

Michiana


CeleBrate the moment Bountiful thanksgiving Dinner Celebrate Thanksgiving in the Morris Inn ballroom with our traditional holiday buffet. We will be serving a bountiful array of soups, salads, entrées, side dishes and desserts. A glass of Riesling or sparkling wine is included. Thursday, November 28 // 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm $39.95 Adults // $33.95 Young Adults 13 – 20 years $10.95 Children 5-12 years // 4 and under free

Breakfast with santa Meet Santa and his elves in the festive Morris Inn ballroom. A delicious breakfast buffet along with entertainment for the whole family. Each child will have a chance to meet Santa and will receive a present. Don’t forget your camera! Saturday, December 14 // 9:00 am – 11:00 am $24.95 Adults // $10.95 Children 3-12 years // 2 and under free

MORRIS INN GIFT CARDS Morris Inn gift cards can be used for dining at Sorin’s and Rohr’s, and for lodging. Purchase a $100 gift card and receive a complimentary $25 bonus card.

HOLIDAY CHOIRS Select weekdays, December 3-20

Christmas Day BrunCh

Enjoy your favorite carols as local choirs perform in the lobby.

Join us for delicious food and merriment as we roll out an expansive buffet of appetizers, entrées, side dishes and sweet treats in our festive ballroom. Wednesday, December 25 // 11:00 am – 3:00 pm

The Notre Dame Glee Club will be performing December 3rd and 10th from 4:00 pm – 4:45 pm. For more information call 574.631.2000 or visit MorrisInn.nd.edu

$39.95 Adults // $10.95 Children 5-12 years // 4 and under free

Reservations can be made by calling 574.631.2000. Prices exclusive of tax and 17% gratuity. Parking is included.

1399 NOTRE DAME AVENUE

//

SOUTH BEND, IN 46617

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574.631.2000

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MORRISINN@ND.EDU

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MORRISINN.ND.EDU


CONTENTS

ON THE

boom

COVER

cover model: Chef Ross Olling Photography: Classic Image Photography

EVERY MONTH 4 Letter from the Publisher 5 Contributors, Testimonials 6 BOOM Time 10 Things we Love: Holiday Gifts For The Season 12 Apps to Keep you Savvy boom BOOK REVIEW 8 The Unlikely Reunions

Reviewed by Shari Nakakura

boom HEALTHY LIVING 14 Keeping On Track Of Your Health By: Maggie Scroope

16 18 20

Battling Cancer With A Laugh

By: Chaunie Brusie

What We Can Learn From Celebrity Wills

By: Chris Godfrey

Become a Hero This Holiday Season

By: Tiffany Teeguarden

boom THE TRAVELER 22 Road Trip

By: Sharon Sautter

boom HOBBIES 24 Antiquing in Michiana

By: Phyllis Rose

28

Painting The Town Red

By: Margo Bell

boom COVER STORIES 30 How To Host a Wine Tasting

By: Pam Molnar

32

Help! I Can’t Keep Up With Technology

34

The New Morris Inn: Where Community & Campus Meet

By: Margo Bell

By: Chaunie Brusie

boom HEART-HEALTHY RECIPE 44 Autumn Butternut Squash Soup boom HOME 38 The Age-in-Place Bathroom

By: Evie Kirkwood

40

What Baby Boomers Can Teach Future Generations

42

Buried in Brown Bags? 11 Ways to Reuse Them During the Holidays

By: Thomas J. Saelens By: Ashley Talmadge

THE PLANNER 45 Boom events to put in your planner Photography: Classic Image Photography

THE SCENE 48 The Hilly Hundred Weekend 50 Taste of Care Ambulance Event

boom | November & december 2013

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letter from the

publisher

10

Things

We Learned Making the November Issue

PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER: Betsy Tavernier Betsy@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com

Assistant Editor:

Chaunie Bruise Chaunie@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com

Creative marketing director: Jena Bontrager Jena@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com

Photography: Classic Image photography Makeup: CamellIa Cosmetics, Granger

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Simple changes can help you stay on track of your health this holiday season. Page 14.

Betsy Tavernier Publisher & Editor-in-Chief

2.

We can learn a lot from celebrities. From their wills, that is. Page 18.

Marketing Coordinator: Jill Ludwick Jill@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN Manager: Zuzanna Zmud Zuzanna@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNer:

3.

Giving back feels so good. Find ways to get involved through volunteering right here in Michiana on page 20.

Katie Brenneman Katie@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com

Publisher's Assistant: Amy Kociolek Amy@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com

MEDICAL EDITOR: Dr. Jesse Hsieh

4.

Wine tastings are fun! Learn how to host your own on page 30.

5.

The perfect weekend might involve some antiquing. Browse our list of antique shops in Michiana on page 24 as you start your own browsing!

Distribution Manager: Mike Trentacosti

BOOM Magazine is a division of Michiana Family Magazines, LLC established in 2006. All rights reserved. We would love to hear from you! Please submit press releases, event information and inquiries to: Media@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com

7.

Technology can be challenging. While technology can enrich our lives, it also brings its own challenges. On page 32.

The FAMILY Magazines 1233 E. University Dr. Granger, IN 46530 PH: 574.387.5420 • FX: 574.217.4700 www.MichianaFamilyMagazine.com Permission from the publisher is required for any reproduction or reprint of this publication.

6.

Hats are always in style. Especially hats from The Red Hat Society! Learn more on page 28.

8.

The Morris Inn has a new look. You may remember the Morris Inn on the campus of Notre Dame, but you might not recognize it today. Page 34.

Read BOOM Magazine online each month! Go to www.MichianaFamilyMagazine.com and flip the pages, cover-to-cover the organic and green way! November & December 2013 Volume 2: Number 7

9.

Bathroom remodels can age with you. Learn how one writer and her husband remodeled theirs to last them forever on page 38.

LOOK WHO’s TALKING

follow us on Twitter, and become our fan on Facebook. @FAMILYMagazine

10.

Baby boomers have a lot of wisdom. From the pursuit of happiness to lessons on the real cost of wealth, find out what baby boomers can teach future generations on page 40. 4

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom

www.facebook.com/Family-Magazine pinterest.com/familymags/


November & December / contributors

boom / testimonials

Phyllis Rose Phyllis Rose is a freelance writer and editor from Vicksburg, Michigan. For nine years, she wrote a day trip column for the Kalamazoo Gazette, visiting hundreds of places in the Michiana area.

The October BOOM cover was great!”

-Jennifer

Maggie Scroope Maggie Scroope is the Manager of Media & Community Relations at Beacon Health System, the affiliation between Elkhart General Hospital and Memorial Hospital of South Bend.

Thanks for including my “Guidebook to the Past” article in the October issue of Boom. I can't wait to see the Wine Tasting article in November!" -Pam Molnar

Margo Bell Margo Bell, a first-wave Boomer, has a B.S. degree in Biology from Arkansas State University and worked in medical and marine biology research before making a midlife career change to writing for adults and children. Margo is a former magazine editor and has published over 50 articles and features in newspapers and magazines. She and her husband Jim live in South Bend and have two grandchildren. Photo Credit: Classic Image Photography

I was at the Sassy Event and it was awesome! It was well organized and the venue and the food were GREAT! And the fashion show was nice!" -Elaine Hochstetler Wright

boom | November & december 2013

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Put That Turkey Down? From The New York Times

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• The average meal takes 1 to 3 hours to leave the stomach; Thanksgiving dinner, however, can take 8-12 hours! • Even one gluttonous meal can raise your risk of heart attack, blood clots and gallbladder problems. • After about 1,500 calories in one sitting, the gut releases a hormone that causes nausea. • The average stomach capacity is about 8 cups, although it can range from 4 to 12.

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• Although the Calorie Control Council claims that the average person eats 4,500 calories at Thanksgiving Dinner, one writer found his most fat-laden attempts put him at 2,500 calories.

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Friendship Group, Charles Martin Youth Center

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Holiday Blues, Lory's Place

International Survivors of Suicide Day

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Annie, South Bend Civic Theatre

The Contemporary Nutcracker, The Lerner Theater

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom

Easy Thanksgiving Side: Green Beans With Bacon & Mushrooms Cook 3 strips of bacon until crisp and remove from pan. Add 1 tsp. of olive oil to bacon grease and sauté 1 minced shallot and 12 oz. sliced mushrooms. Add 1 lb. of fresh green beans and cook 3-4 minutes. Add in crumbled bacon and season with salt and pepper. Serve warm.


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Lose Weight Seminar, Lakeland Medical Suites Pre-Diabetes Class, Lakeland Community Hospital Christopher’s Christmas, O'Laughlin Auditorium, BellaNova Women's Health Saint Mary's College Holiday Spa Open House

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"Annie," South Bend Civic Theatre

Free Tax Classes, Liberty Tax Services 1 Wellness Workshop, Ferry Street Resource Center

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A Christmas Carol, Lerner Theatre

Friendship Group, Charles Martin Youth Center

The Contemporary Nutcracker The Conservatory of Dance invites you to view the classic Christmas tale from a unique perspective. Imagine a different picture—one that we face every day: busy streets bustling with shoppers talking on their cell phones, joggers hurrying from one place to the next and, in the midst of the chaos, a girl left homeless and destitute on the bitter winter streets. She cries out for compassion and love but is met with indifferent, wintry glares. Be a part of this incredible adventure at the Lerner Theater in Elkhart. Tickets are $20.00 for adults and $10.00 for children, students, and senior citizens. This emotional experience will influence you to love your neighbors and to understand the true meaning of the holidays because, in the end, “only kindness matters”. Show dates are on Saturday November 30, 2013 at 2:00pm and 7:00pm. Call to purchase tickets call (574) 293-4469.

Pet of the Month! Zoey, German Shepard

Submitted by Lisa Chapman.

eet Pet Your Sw HERE! FEATURESheDpard is adorable

man Zoey the Ger t to see your And we wan . ow h, kn e w – , rabbits, fis ! Dogs, cats ail em pet pictures an end u name it! S e. in az ag lizards – yo M ily MichianaFam of e ur to info@ ct pi ur favorite yo ith w on ni com ) compa rry (or scaly! your little fu with some ck ba ht hear and you mig feature your so we can questions e of BOOM e next issu buddy in th Magazine!

boom | November & december 2013

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boom

book review

By: Shari Nakakura

The Unlikely Reunions

T

he photographic essay "The Unlikely Reunions" spans three years chronicling the unlikely friendship between former Vietnam war adversaries and the impact on countless lives continents apart. Below follows an excerpt for the book. “On January 20, 1972, Lt. Nguyen Hong My, flying a MiG-21 from an airbase in North Vietnam, chased down an American RF-4C Phantom reconnaissance jet flying a low altitude mission in search of SAM missile sites in Laos, near the border with Vietnam. The MiG was low on fuel, but pressed on, ignoring his fuel warning lights and audible alarms. He was not going back to base without a “kill.” Unaware of the closing threat, the Phantom, flying at 600 knots and 500 feet, discovered a SAM missile site on route 71. While making a "high G" turn to come back for another photo pass of the mobile missile site, the American aircraft, crewed by pilot Bob Mock and WSO John Stiles, was suddenly and violently blown apart by two heat-seeking missiles from an unseen enemy plane.

exploded into a fireball, his MiG-21 flew through the fireball and "flamed out." He managed to restart the engine and fly back to his secret base in North Vietnam. He landed his jet with just 10 liters of fuel. At the time of the shoot-down, no American military rescue crews were immediately available to save the downed pilots, so the two American airmen were on their own. Eventually, the clandestine CIA aviation organization known as Air America dispatched two helicopters to recover the downed aircrew.

Visit Boom’s ge k pa Faceboo o win t to enter py of a free co k! this boo

Hong My's missiles split the jet in half. The pilot and WSO ejected at such a low altitude that their parachutes didn't deploy, but got caught in the trees above the flaming wreckage. Neither was injured. Hong My was traveling at such a high rate of speed and was closing so fast that when the American jet

After about eight hours of evading the enemy, the American aircrew was rescued by Air America pilot Bob Noble. As Stiles was reaching for the cable hoist to be lifted to safety, a man emerged from the underbrush, dressed in black holding an AK-47 across his chest. The enemy soldier, standing only a few meters away, never fired on John. He only smiled and waved.

On April 16, 1972, four months after Hong My shot down Bob Mock and John Stiles, the American F-4D Phantom “550” pilot Dan Cherry shot down Hong My in a five-minute dogfight 35 miles southwest of Hanoi. After five missiles failed to shoot down the MiG-21, Cherry’s last missile blew the right wing off


During the 2008 television show, Cherry noticed an American high school class ring that Hong My wore, a ring that he purchased at a Hanoi jewelry store in 1982. Hong My has returned the ring to Cherry and now the search is on for the owner or family of the Mackin High School Class graduate of 1972.

of the enemy fighter jet. When Hong My ejected from his MiG-21 he was severely injured...breaking both his arms from the ejection and his back during the parachute landing. He never flew in combat again. Thirty-six years later, in 2008, after a few short months of searching, the now-retired Brig. General Dan Cherry was invited to Vietnam to meet Hong My on live TV. The meeting was so successful that Cherry traveled to Hanoi to meet Hong My’s family and hold the former enemy pilot’s only grandson on his first birthday. A new and unlikely friendship was forged. In 2009, Hong My came to the United States for the first time. Thirty-seven years to the day after their first hostile meeting, Hong My was present for the dedication of a park dedicated to aviators in Cherry’s hometown of Bowling Green, Kentucky. For first time in history an aviator sat in the cockpit of the actual enemy aircraft that had shot him down. In Washington D.C., a few days later, Hong My reunited with John Stiles the back seater (weapons systems operator) he shot down in 1972. Bob Mock, the RF-4 Phantom pilot, survived the war, but was killed in an automobile accident a few years ago.

In April 2010 Dan Cherry, Hong My, John Stiles and Bob Noble, the Air America helicopter crewman who helped rescue John Stiles, were all reunited at the American Reunion in Raleigh, North Carolina. It was Hong My’s second visit to the United States and third meeting with Cherry. It was My’s second chance to meet John Stiles and the first time to meet Bob Noble.” •••

About the Author Born in 1956 in Indianapolis, Indiana, John Fleck received his B.F.A. in commercial photography from Brooks Institute of Photography in 1980 and has traveled throughout the world for corporate and advertising clients since that time. His passion for photography and love for aviation is what contributed to John first meeting Dan Cherry in 1977 while he was attending school and Dan was commander leader of the USAF Thunderbirds. John has accumulated thousands of images as part of his effort to capture this amazing story of Dan Cherry’s “My Enemy – My Friend” and created his own photo documentary book “The Unlikely Reunions”.

boom | November & december 2013

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boom

things we love!

Reason for the

Season

Great Holiday Must-Have Items for the Grandkids.

A Gift that Gives Twice.

When is a doll more than a gift for a child you love? When its “twin” is given to a child in a family affected by HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe. Handmade by women artisans in Zimbabwe. Ten Thousand Villages, Goshen - $28 574-533-8491

Matching Holiday Dresses

Can’t decide what to get your granddaughters for Christmas? How about putting an end to the present wars with these two perfectly adorable matching holiday gowns by Mudpie? Your love, equally divided, of course. Sizes 12mo-5T. Jules Boutique, Goshen - $38 www.Jules-Boutique.com

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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom


Pajamas for the Prancing Princess Backyards is your headquarters for adorable Mud Pie children's clothing. Meet Glitzen, who dazzles in prancy-fanciness. This Christmas pajama set will have your little one dancing for joy! Stop by for best size selections. Backyards Furniture & Embellishments, Mishawaka 574-968-7087

Holiday Festivities with the Grandchildren!

Join us at Fernwood for Holiday Festivities and children's' activities throughout December. Check out our website for further information. Fernwood Botanical Garden and Nature Preserve, Niles fernwoodbotanical.org

For the Cuddle Bug

This comfy tunic set made of soft Peruvian cotton is perfect for your active grandbabies! Your cuddle bug will look and feel so sweet and cuddly with its long sleeves, stylish rose front and leggings. Flirt Boutique, Rochester - $72 www.facebook.com/myflirtboutique

boom | November & december 2013

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Apps to

Keep you Savvy American Well

Faster and less expensive than urgent care to see a doctor now, with no appointment needed.
American Well connects you with U.S. Board Certified, licensed doctors securely from your iPhone or iPad.

Features include:
 find a doctor, physician profiles, patient ratings,

online care visit costs, live video visits
, healthcare records, secure messaging and ePrescriptions as appropriate. Get urgent care for colds, flu, upper respiratory infection, urinary tract infection, bronchitis, sinusitis and similar conditions.

Key Me

KeyMe is a simple and secure way to store, copy and share your keys. Store your keys now, thank yourself later.
Take a picture of your keys on your phone and create a digital version of your physical keychain for free. Access them from anywhere and share a digital copy of your key instantly for free. The recipient can get a physical copy made through our mail order service, at a kiosks or at a regular locksmith. Order copies of the key on your phone and the company will send you brand new keys in the mail. If you ever get locked out, download your key information for just $10 (IAP). A locksmith can make your key from scratch by viewing instructions displayed on your phone.

Clinical Trials

Stay up to date on Cleveland Clinic’s more than 130 active clinical trials for cancer patients. With the app, patients can navigate through more than 130 study opportunities, categorized by disease being studied, trial phase, administrating physician or hospital location. Users can also check on a trial’s eligibility criteria 12

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom

and connect with someone who can help them enroll in a study. Through the ClinicalTrials app, patients are able to save data from past trials, as well as contact trial administrators. This free Cancer Clinical Trials app is available for both iPhone and iPad devices.


Star Walk

With the Star Walk app, if you hold your iPhone up towards the sky, you can see all the stars and constellations. It even tells you the names of all the planets. Then, if you point it towards the ground, it shows you what all the stars are in the other hemisphere. It’s beautifully designed and makes clever use of the available technology. Every object you tap has an information box next to its name, which you can tap to access information. There is also a calendar of celestial events to make sure you never miss anything interesting. If you use a telescope for stargazing, the TelRad feature will help you find the exact position of an object.

TelRad

Looking for a romantic getaway at a great little boutique hotel or Bed & Breakfast?
 ILoveInns.com presents your guide to America's best and most romantic inns right on your iPhone or iPod touch. Top award-winning inns offer you unique one-ofa-kind adventures and great value for your dollar. Business travelers can find the perfect inn from thousands across the country. Includes thousands of B&Bs and boutique inns to choose from
with detailed information on each property with photos
. You can locate inns around you, or search by city and state, with Instant access to contact the inn for reservations. Also read guest reviews from inns that accept them
and access more than 1,300 recipes from Bed & Breakfast kitchens.

Gneo

True productivity involves doing the right things at the right time. Gneo helps you take action with your to-dos by prioritizing all the things you need to get done. When you effectively manage tasks, you'll meet your goals. When you meet your goals consistently, you'll begin tapping into your greatest potential. As you create tasks inside the app, Gneo helps you organize them, according to their relative importance and urgency. Work Canvas gives you a clear picture of your most pressing tasks, and the Forecast view shows you when you'll have time between appointments to do them. Follow-ups and reminders ensure that nothing falls through the cracks. Also features synching from your calendar and to-do list, notebooks for work, play, home and work, filters and tags and follow-up reminders. Also synchs with Evernote.


boom

HEALTHY LIVING

On Track I

Keeping your medications organized is essential— especially as you age. By: Maggie Scroope

t’s not uncommon for senior adults to juggle five or more medications at once, and keeping track of the doses can be a dizzying feat at any age. Plus, with so many prescription drugs on the market—not to mention over-the-counter supplements on the shelves—keeping meds organized has never been more important. Fortunately, an array of new products and Internet tools makes both monitoring and management easier.

Why It Matters

Skipping doses can lead to a host of problems, cautions Ann Ziegert, RPh., CDE, compounding pharmacist and certified diabetes educator at Memorial Home Care Advanced Pharmacy Services. It opens the door to your original symptoms and creates new ones. Just a day or two without some medications could really set you back and make you sick. You could go into withdrawal because your body is relying on that medication. You can actually put your health at risk or cause physical damage. (Antidepressants and insulin injections are just a couple of examples.) Certain people are more at risk for losing track of their doses, Ziegert adds, including those who are older than 60, suffer from Alzheimer’s disease or have bipolar disorder. Medication regimens can be stressful when you are taking different types of medication capsules, injections or inhalers. With hectic schedules, you don’t want to add more stress.

Ways to Keep Track

There are several simple ways to reduce that stress and ensure you never miss a dose again.

1.

Make a list. Write a detailed list of every drug you take, including over-the-counter products. Write down each drug’s brand name and its generic counterpart, the strength in milligrams, formulation (e.g., capsules or tablets) and the directions/dosage. Keep copies at home, in your wallet and with a friend or family member for reference.

2.

Create a chart. On a dry erase or bulletin board, draw a chart that shows the weeks, days and medications. Add a checkmark every time you complete a dose. For people on the go, a medical journal works just as well. You can jot down any side effects you experience and show the journal to your doctor. Several websites let you print out free charts and calendars.

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Granger, IN

*Offer valid at participating locations shown. Containers 574-247-5757 NEW! EdibleArrangements.com/coupons for details & restriction WATERMELON KIWI noted SUMMER are trademarks BOUQUET™of Edible Arrangements, LLC. ©20 fruit bouquet featuring In the end, using an array of reminders TOWN 1234 MAIN | (123)-456-7890 sun-shaped pineapple, and |understanding theST. importance watermelon and kiwi of staying on top of your medication TOWN | 1234 MAIN ST. | (123)-456-7890 schedule, you can take steps to keep your health on track. ••• TOWN | 1234 MAIN ST. | (123)-456-7890 TOWN | 1234 MAIN ST. | (123)-456-7890 EdibleArrangements.com TOWN | 1234 MAIN ST. | (123)-456-7890

Offer valid at participating locations shown. Valid on arrangements and dipped| fruit boxes only.ST. Offer expires XX/XX/XX. Offer code must TOWN 1234 MAIN | (123)-456-7890 EdibleArrangements.com be used when placing order. Containers may vary. Delivery not available in all areas. Cannot be combined with any other offer, promotion, 12 08/31/13 Offer code must Offer valid at participating locations shown. Valid on arrangements and of dipped fruit boxes Offer expires XX/XX/XX. coupon or coupon code. Excludes tax and delivery. Not valid on previously purchased items. Acceptance and use coupon is only. subject be used when placing order. Containers may Deliveryand not available in all areas. Cannot be combined with any other offer, promotion, ® &vary. o all applicable laws. Void where prohibited. See store for details. EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS Design all other marks noted are coupon or coupon code. Excludes tax and delivery. Not valid on previously purchased items. Acceptance and use of coupon is subject rademarks of Edible Arrangements, LLC. ©2013 Edible Arrangements, LLC. All laws. rights to all applicable Voidreserved. where prohibited. See store for details. EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS® & Design and all other marks noted are trademarks of Edible Arrangements, LLC. ©2013 Edible Arrangements, LLC. All rights reserved.

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HEALTHY LIVING

With a

Battling cancer Laugh Learn about using humor to hope and heal with cancer.

By: Chaunie Brusie

While there is certainly nothing funny about cancer (except I do enjoy the bold irony of those patients who laugh about their “bad hair” days), laughter and humor can be useful for patients battling cancer. The American Cancer Society states that,“Humor therapy is the use of humor for the relief of physical or emotional pain and stress. It is used as a complementary method to promote health and cope with illness.” Laughter really is medicine. And it can be employed in the treatment of cancer.

How does it work?

16

Glad you asked. The pure act of laughing actually has surprising physical health effects on the body: • Relaxation. Laughing has actually been proven to reduce tension in the muscles and reduce stress hormones. Even better, muscles stay more relaxed for up to 45 minutes following that belly laugh, according to Helpguide.org. • Pain relief. This one is so important and relevant when talking about cancer. Not only does laughter mentally distract a patient from the pain he/she is experiencing, but laughing triggers a mental “distraction” of the pain in the body as well. Think of pain as a pathway in the body— little pain signals shoot up to your brain, telling your brain that you are in pain. Pain pills work by essentially blocking those pain signals, thus decreasing, or removing the pain you feel. Laughter can act in the same way, blocking the pain signals to your brain and as a result, reducing pain. Tension in the muscles also increases pain, so pain relief will also be affected by the relaxation properties of laughter. • Can I get a boost? Laughter boots your immune system by increasing the production of immune cells. Immune cells act like soldiers in your body, direction the detailed operations to ward off germs and viruses in your body, while strengthening your body’s ability to heal. Because many cancer treatments, like chemotherapy, severely damage the body’s immune response, this benefit of laughter is extremely relevant for cancer patients. Many cancer patients often suffer from secondary diseases, or sicknesses they catch as a result of a lowered immune system from chemotherapy, so any boost to the body’s defense is a definite plus. • It’s all about the endorphins. We know all about endorphins, right? Those happy chemicals that happy things like good food, great wine, or exercising bring out? Endorphins are nature’s gift to us to make us feel happy and enjoy life and one another. They also serve as those nifty pain-blocking stimuli, making these a two-for-one special. • Feel the flow. Laughing relaxes blood vessels (called vasodilatation), which in turn increases blood circulation, which in turn sends more oxygen to your body, which in turn makes the heart’s job a little easier, which in turn makes your whole body happy. A happy heart = a happy body. The vasodilatation in the body that occurs also increases the flow of all the good things in the blood, like immune cells. See how this all works together? NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom


How is humor used in cancer treatment?

The medical community is aware of the tremendous benefits that humor can have in cancer treatment. Hospitals and treatment centers promote the use of humor through interventions like movies, games, books, or even trained volunteer visitors who act like personal patient comedians. Some hospitals even offer specialized “humor therapy” as a standard part of the patient’s care plan.

Where do you come up with this stuff?

It wasn’t me, honestly. The American Cancer Society reports that thirteenthcentury doctors used humor therapy to distract patients from painful treatments. (Think: amputation without anesthesia). And let’s be honest—any parent knows the value of making a hurt child laugh. Small bumps and bruises are instantly forgotten as tears dry through a smile.

What’s the catch?

Realizing that humor and laughter will not cure cancer, but it can be a part of a successful treatment plan that is based on your specific needs. The American Cancer Society also warns against too much laughter and humor in the face of cancer; that is, using laughter as a crutch to avoid the real life-and-death issues that cancer brings up.

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How can I start using humor?

The beauty of humor is that it is completely objective. What is funny to one person might seem ridiculous to another. Surround yourself with people or things you find funny to start. You may also consider doing a simple online search—there are lots of online communities and resources to support patients choosing humor therapy. Laughter is just one step in the battle against cancer. And that’s worth smiling about. •••

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boom

healthy living

What We Can Learn From Celebrity Wills By: Chris Godfrey

Celebrity wills, and the missteps found with them, get our attention. James Gandolfini’s will has been no exception. It’s available on the Internet, as was Michael Jackson’s when he died in 2009. Comparing the two is an opportunity to see how much two wills can differ. Clients are often upset to find out that wills are public. However, a will does not have to disclose very much. It was interesting to witness how Mr. Jackson’s will did not generate anywhere near as much press as Mr. Gandolfini’s. Regardless of the press time however, we can learn a few lessons from these two celebrity wills.

A “pour over,” not a “do-over”

Most states have laws that a will must be deposited with the courts when someone dies, even if there is no need for a probate. This gives all possible heirs and creditors (along with anyone else) a chance to examine it. Even when there is a revocable living trust, there should be a will. When someone dies, the trust only controls property titled in the trust’s name or made payable to the trust on death. A trust-based plan should include a “pour over will,” which is a will that leaves anything not in the trust to the trustee.

Private property

Because Michael Jackson had a revocable living trust, the will that made it to the Internet was a pour over will. It was short, only five pages long. The only thing an outsider can learn from the will is that Michael Jackson had a living trust and that property not in the trust would go to the trust in the name of the trustee. Any private, family information (who Michael Jackson left things to or how much he left to them, for example) would be in the trust, which is not at all public.

Watch your wording

James Gandolfini did not have a revocable living trust. His will, a longer version at 17 pages, had the instructions about who got what and how much they got, open to public scrutiny. Mr. Gandolfini made specific gifts (his assistant Patricia received $200,000) and named residuary beneficiaries, who are people who divide by percentage what remained after the specific gifts (for example, his wife Deborah received 20% of the residuary). It is important to understand that specific gifts are always paid first, and residuary beneficiaries only get what’s left. If there is nothing left, they get nothing. The will also provided that estate taxes should be paid from the residuary. This means that his wife (and the other residuary beneficiaries) paid the tax from their share, with 18

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no help from specific beneficiaries! Was this Mr. Gandolfini’s choice after counseling with his attorney, or is it what he got because it was on the attorney’s word processor? We may never know. The pros and cons of specific or residuary bequests in a will or trust, whether property passes because of the will or outside the will (joint tenancy, beneficiary designation or trust) and whether administrative costs and taxes should be shared among all recipients, or only by residuary beneficiaries, are all important issues to consider. •••

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healthy living

By: Tiffany Teeguarden

‘Tis the season of giving. It is that wonderful

time of year again when festive holiday music will soon be heard on every radio station and stores will be packed with eager Christmas shoppers. For most people, however, this can be more of a stressful time of year than a joyous one. Who enjoys waiting in long lines at the cash register or fighting an endless line of holiday traffic?

To combat the holiday stress, why not do something different this year? Take time out of your busy schedule and give back to your local community by spending a few hours volunteering. To be a volunteer is to be a local community hero. There are those in our area who either cannot provide adequately for their families or are simply in need of a little extra assistance this holiday season. By becoming a volunteer you will not only change the lives of the people you help, but you could change your life as well.

South Bend/Mishawaka The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center 900 West Western Avenue South Bend, Indiana 46601 (574) 233-9471

“Many of us don’t realize how well off we have it,” said Scott Holmlund, HR and Volunteer Coordinator with the South Bend Salvation Army. “Volunteering hits home for a lot of people and it has a ripple effect on the volunteer’s life and the lives of the many people in need.” The holidays are an especially important time for volunteers. This is the time of the year when families find they need extra help with food or a few more gifts for a child. “Volunteering can make a huge difference in the lives of everyone, especially small children,” Holmlund continued. Remember, a helping hand and smile can go a long way. This holiday season bring joy to someone’s life, rather it be big or small, and you will feel the difference. To learn more about how you can help your local community, the list below offers a few places around Michiana that could use some assistance:

“We bring joy and comfort to families in a magical way,” said the Founder of the Christmas Commandoes. “These families have no idea. On Christmas morning they truly feel the love that is enveloping them.” Get involved: Email ChristmasCommandos@gmail.com.

Opportunities offered: Adopt-a-Family, gift wrapping, Red-Kettle Bell Ringers, food pantry, Angel Tree Booth and Christmas tree families in the mall, holiday meals and other activities offered year round.

Center for the Homeless 813 S. Michigan St South Bend, IN 46601 (574) 282-8700

Get involved: Go to www.mykroc.org and fill out an online volunteer application.

At the Center for the Homeless, volunteers are vital parts of the organization.

Christmas Commandos Bring the magic of Christmas to life with this incredible local organization. On Christmas Eve, the commandoes leave gifts of love and hope to families who have experienced the tragic death of a loved one. They secretly deliver these gifts in an effort to bring some happiness to the surviving family members.

“People who are homeless get disconnected from the usual support system,” said Peter Lombardo, Volunteer Coordinator. “Volunteers help to begin the process of reconnecting.”

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Opportunities offered: Volunteers are needed to cook food such as stuffing or green bean casserole for the Christmas feast. Other volunteers are needed for front desk work, coordinating special events, improving interview skills and various other tasks.


Get involved: Attend a monthly volunteer seminar or contact Peter Lombardo at plombardo@cfh.net. Food Bank of Northern Indiana 702 Chapin Street South Bend, IN 46601 (574) 232-9986 Opportunities offered: Separate food donations, assemble food packages, re-pack certain foods such as bread and a multitude of other tasks. Get involved: visit www.feedindiana.org and fill out the online form.

Opportunities offered: Cover the phone and answer questions, decorate the building, sign people up for Christmas gifts, toy sorting, work the gift room, gift pick-up and restocking the shelves. Get Involved: Visit www.guidanceministries.com. Santa’s Pantry P.O. Box 159 Elkhart, IN 46515 (574) 262-4478 Santa’s Pantry promotes the “Pay it Forward” movement in the Michiana area. Opportunities offered: Assisting local areas such as food pantries and working to “pay it forward”.

Elkhart The Salvation Army 300 North Main Street Elkhart, IN 46516 (574) 970-0088 Opportunities offered: Adopt-A-Family, Christmas bureau, Christmas distribution, holiday meals and volunteer bell ringers. Get involved: Contact Julie Poerner at Julia_Poertner@usc. salvationarmy.org or Nic Montgomery at Nicholas_Montgomery@ usc.salvationarmy.org. Guidance Ministries 216 N 2nd Street Elkhart, IN 46516 (574) 296-7192

Get involved: Visit www.santaspantry.org.

Berrien, MI The Salvation Army of St Joseph and Benton Harbor 233 Michigan Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022 (269) 927-0408 Opportunities offered: Adopt-A-Family, Christmas bureau, Christmas distribution, holiday meals and volunteer bell ringers. Get involved: visit www.sabentonharbor.org or contact Aaron Cox.

Choose to make the most of life For more than 33 years, Center for Hospice Care has helped over 25,000 patients live their final months on their terms, providing the depth of services they need to have the highest quality of life possible.

To learn more or self-refer, call anytime. 1-800-HOSPICE or CenterForHospice.org

Services from Center for Hospice Care are typically covered by Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance. No one is turned away due to inability to pay. CFIN-029 7.375x4.8125 4c_Brand.indd 1

©2013 Center for Hospice Care boom | November & december 2013 AM 21 4/5/13 11:33


boom

THE TRAVELER

Road Trip!

By: Sharon Sautter

After a surprise early retirement at 61, my husband and I decided to take our "bucket list" road trip in our new-to-us Red Mustang convertible. Our goal was to visit the sights in America that we had not yet seen. With only a month available to travel, we started planning our itinerary. Other than taking non-highway treks, our first "real stop" was at the Badlands of South Dakota. We didn't really know what the Badlands were but they were beautiful and we couldn't figure out why they weren't called the "Goodlands"!

"bucket list" road trip Our travel took us to Mount Rushmore, The Black Hills, Deadwood, South Dakota and beautiful Wyoming. We continued to Montana, where we enjoyed Yellowstone National Park and our favorite—Glacier National Park. We traveled through Washington and discovered they have a South Bend, too! We enjoyed the beautiful coast of Oregon and then on to discover the Redwoods of Northern California, as well as Napa Valley. Several days were spent in San Francisco, followed by the stunning views of Lake Tahoe and the drive through the desert in Nevada to Las Vegas. We were fortunate enough to see the Grand Canyon just two days before the government shutdown. Our travels included many segments of historic Route 66. Then, we headed back to Indiana through New Mexico, Texas and Oklahoma with a special stop in Branson, Missouri. We finished our trip with entertainment by the Redneck Tenors, who happened to be finalists on America's 22

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Got Talent. And our trip wouldn't be complete without a trip to Lambert's—watch out for the thrown rolls! On this trip we saw great wildlife, including elk, deer, buffalo, prairie dogs, rams horn sheep and some things we "city folks" weren't sure of. Gratefully, we didn't see any bears—although we were warned upon entering the national parks to avoid them! Not only did we see and experience many exciting things, but we also learned a great deal about our country. Do you know what an Alpine lake is? We learned that it's a lake approximately 5,000 feet above sea level. The diverse topography of our great nation was stunning and was hard to capture even in our over 1,100 pictures. Google was our constant companion—both in finding places on the map, as well as learning interesting facts along the way.

This was a trip of a lifetime, and we couldn't be more glad that we did it!

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HOBBIES

Antiquing in

Michiana By: Phyllis Rose

Meandering through Michiana’s many antique shops means discovering not only antiques, but so much more. Whether you take a day or a weekend for your antiquing amble, you’ll relish reminiscing about days gone by and maybe even discover a priceless memento to take home.

Across the street in a Spanish style home is Blue Pearl Antiques on 112 N. First. You’ll have a hard time choosing from the beautiful estate jewelry, furniture and fine art. They focus on finding unique items that you won’t see in other shops.

Indiana

More: Indulge in rich, smooth and creamy chocolates at Weckmuller Fine Chocolates on 118 N. First. (Especially the chocolate covered cashews!) The chocolates fulfill Psalm 34:8, painted on the wall: “O, Taste and see that the Lord is good.”

Antiques: At Plasterer’s Antiques & Things, 620 N. Jefferson, you’ll enjoy browsing through the collection of antique furniture, glassware, estate jewelry and many other items. Owners Teresa and Ed Plasterer have a long history with antiques. Teresa’s father owns Norma’s Antiques on 231 N. Grand, in Schoolcraft, Michigan, another shop to check out.

Also, visit the library, located in a Carnegie Library building from 1916. Maybe you’ll meet Muffin, the library cat, who enjoys sleeping on the shelves.

Huntington The hunt is on for antiques in Huntington.

Teresa provided me with a copy of the “1st Annual Indiana Guide to Unique Shopping,” a publication listing antique, collectible and vintage shops. Antiqology on 401 N. Jefferson defines itself as a “unique blend of old and new.” It has antiques and an old-fashioned soda fountain with 110 varieties of gourmet bottled sodas and handdipped ice cream. More: Taste the chocolates at The Party Shop on 413 N. Jefferson. The milk chocolate cashew turtles are scrumptious. Then, drive around town to see beautiful old homes and churches with their fabulous architecture. Pierceton Pierceton will pierce your hearts with love for antiques and chocolates. Antiques: Village Antique Gallerie on 109 N. First St. is filled with beautifully-carved furniture such as armoires and hutches, reminiscent of furnishings in Europe’s stately homes and castles. Nearby is Sydow’s Antiques on 103 N. First St., with delightful antiques including chiming wall clocks—some of my favorite things. 24

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Roanoke Roam Roanoke to enjoy antiques, art and the abundance of colorful flowers in the downtown streetscape. Antiques: Rescued Relics, 138 W. First St., a two-story, brick home, is filled with a variety of delightful items including pastel chests of drawers, perfect for a child’s bedroom and furniture to add class to your dining or living rooms. A short drive from downtown is Antiques From Bruce Chaney on 10979 North Roanoke Road. Beautiful paintings from various estates and period furniture catch your eye in this shop, located in an old township school built in 1915. More: To take a break from antiques, visit Katharos Art and Gift on 159 N. Main, featuring work by local artists, including glasswork, jewelry, painting and photography.

Michigan

Allen Billing itself as the “Antique Capital of Michigan,” Allen makes a capital spot for antiquing. Antiques: You’ll see why Allen claims the capital title as you drive West Chicago Road and see a whole slew of antique shops: Allen Antique Barn, 9247 West Chicago Road; Capital Antiques, 9115 W. Chicago; Hog Creek Antique Mall, 10750 W. Chicago Road; Allen Antique Mall, 9011 W. Chicago; and Preston’s Antique Gaslight Village, 8651 W. Chicago.


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For more information: Indiana Pierceton Village Antique Gallerie 574-594-9494 www.villageantiquegallerie.com

260-519-2278 Katharos Art and Gift 260-676-244

Sydow’s Antiques 574-594-9100 www.sydowsantiques.com

Michigan Allen Preston’s Antique Gaslight Village 517-869-2928

Blue Pearl Antiques 574-594-9800 www.bluepearlestatejewelry.com

Allen Antique Barn 517-869-2888 www.allenantiquebarn.com

Weckmuller Fine Chocolates 574-594-3444 www.weckmuller.com

Capital Antiques 517-869-2055 www.hstrial-capitalantiques. homestead.com

Huntington Plasterer’s Antiques & Things 260-356-2191 Antiqology 260-200-1065 www.antiqology.com

Hog Creek Antique Mall 517-869-2250 www.hogcreekmall.com Allen Antique Mall 517-869-2788

The Party Shop 260-355-0142

The Outpost Grille 517-869-2101

Roanoke Antiques from Bruce Chaney 260-672-9744 Rescued Relics

Grand Rapids East Fulton Art & Antiques 616-774-3320

Just pick one and work your way down the road. We started at Preston’s Antique Gaslight Village, which has 20 historic buildings onsite, creating the perfect ambiance for immersing yourself in history and antiques. The main building, now filled with memorabilia and antiques, was once the Green Top, a residence and eatery for travelers on the Chicago Road. Capital Antiques features a 75-year-old model train layout among its 300 vendor booths. Allen Antique Barn, a spacious two-story shop, has over 25,000 square feet devoted to antiques and collectibles. Hog Creek features crafts as well as antiques while at Allen Antique Mall, the antiques fill two large buildings. More: For homemade comfort food in a rustic, comfy atmosphere, try The Outpost Grille right next to Allen Antique Mall.

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City Antiques Resale Boutique 616-776-5500 Bluedoor on Fulton 616-456-7888 www.bluedoorgr.com Niles Main Street Antique Mall 269-684-9393 www.mainstantiquemall.com Four Flags Antique Mall 269-683-6681 ‘Cross The Street 269-684-6129 Veni’s Sweet Shop 269-684-1323 www.venissweetshop.com Note: Not all antique shops keep regular daily hours and some are seasonal so contact the shops to be sure they will be open when you plan to visit.

Grand Rapids, Fulton Street Shopping Fulton Street makes a “grandtiquing day” in Grand Rapids. Antiques: At East Fulton Art & Antiques, 959 E. Fulton, Ellie, the shop dog, welcomed us before we wandered through the shop’s collection of antiques, home accessories and garden accents. Across the street, City Antiques Resale Boutique on 954 E. Fulton, is a treat for the eyes with its neat arrangement of antiques and collectibles. Nearby, Bluedoor on Fulton, 946 E. Fulton, rents shop space for vendors to display their antiques and home decor items. You’ll find things like beautiful stained glass windows and furniture painted in delicate pastels. More: Stop at Van’s Pastry Shoppe, 955 E. Fulton, to enjoy your favorite pastry. They’ve been at it since 1929 so you can’t go wrong. You’ll also enjoy their cookie jar display, including a chubby monk who admonishes, “Thou Shalt Not Steal Cookies.”

Niles Along with antiques, you’ll find miles of smiles in friendly Niles. Antiques: Main Street Antique Mall, 109 E. Main, has wide aisles and neatly arranged booths allowing you to browse without feeling like a bull in a china shop. Four Flags Antique Mall, 218 N. Second, located in an old Montgomery Ward’s Store from the 1930’s, makes you wonder if any of the antiques and collectibles on display were originally sold in a Ward’s store. ‘Cross the Street on 209 N. Second is a tiny shop featuring collectibles, toys and memorabilia. More: When a candy shop has been in business since the 1920’s, you know the candy has to be good. Veni’s Sweet Shop, 228 E. Main, makes its delicious candy by hand. After trying samples, you’ll want one of everything. (I recommend the peanut butter fudge!) Antiquing in Michiana isn’t just about the antiques. It’s about discovering unique shops, chatting with friendly shop owners and maybe, most of all, reminiscing about the way it was way back when. •••


When

getting aWay means

getting together.

here’s a place where time slows down and you can leave the rush of life behind. A place to reconnect with friends. A place where you spend more time enjoying and less time getting around. The place: Perrysburg, Ohio. From its quaint downtown to its rich history, Perrysburg has the shops, restaurants and hotels to make a perfect girlfriends’ weekend. Go to visitperrysburg.com to find out all the area has to offer.

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HOBBIES

PAINTING THE TOWN The Red Hat Society Offers Fun and Friendship

Red By: Margo Bell

Riddle: What is the largest social organization for women in the world? Answer: With hundreds of thousands of members in 40,000 chapters worldwide, it’s the Red Hat Society®. We’ve seen “Red Hatters” all over the place: restaurants, hotel lobbies, on TV, in stores or just about anywhere women gather to have fun. They were even featured on an episode of The Simpsons. These ladies are easily recognized by their red hats and purple outfits. It Began with a “Warning” The seed of the Red Hat Society was inspired by one woman’s gift to a friend. Sue Ellen Cooper presented to Linda Murphy a copy of a poem, Warning, about a lady’s light-hearted approach to growing old in that she will wear purple with a red hat. On Linda’s 55th birthday, Sue Ellen gave Linda a red fedora. The following year on April 25, 1998, Sue Ellen and five friends donning purple clothing and red hats met for tea in Fullerton, California. Thus the Red Hat Society (RHS) was born. Such a gathering of “uniformed” ladies on their outings drew attention and, thanks to national news coverage, exploded into RHS groups in all 50 states and 30 foreign countries, each chapter averaging 20-25 members, although there is no size limit. The membership encompasses a wide variety of women: active workers, retirees, attorneys, teachers, grandmothers, Olympians and entertainers of all ages. Among notable Red Hatters are singer Cyndi Lauper, actress Tina Sloan, Olympian Anne Abernathy and Candy Spelling (Tori’s mom). Women under 50 years of age wear lavender outfits and pink hats until they turn 50 and “graduate” to the purple-and-red attire. A dozen companies are licensed by RHS to offer quality 28

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom

merchandise with the official Red Hat Society Logo tag through the Red Hat Society Store and select retail stores. The Society’s Mission Red Hatters can come up with their own royal titles (Queen, Royal Pita, Head Mover and Shaker, as examples), their own fun traditions and their way of doing things in their own chapters. Their mission, according to the Red Hat Society’s website: • Fun: We celebrate life at every age. • Friendship: We solidify and expand the bonds of sisterhood. • Freedom: We discover and explore new interests. • Fulfillment: We realize our personal potential. • Fitness: We embrace healthy, life-lengthening lifestyles. Red Hat Society chapters aren’t bounded by meeting at a certain time or place. Members attend festivals, go to movies or concerts, stroll through botanical gardens, shop at outlets, visit museums and art shows, eat at restaurants, arrange parties or take cruises—anything that’s fun for them at any time. A special feature is an online chapter called “Chat Room Sisters” that draws members from most of the 50 states, Canada, Australia and England. There they can tell jokes, exchange recipes and stories, deliver holiday greetings and celebrate life events such as a birth or weddings. These “virtual sisters”


recognize each other in the sea of red and pink by a white silk poinsettia on a hat or at the end of a wand or scepter. Changing the Hearts and Lives of Women Although the Red Hat Society stresses fun and companionship, the organization fills a need for its members needing support and emotional, physical or mental relief. “I have often referred to the Red Hat Society as my mental health break from my personal and professional life,” states Marcy LaSalle, “Marcy the Queen Bee” of the FUN-key Flint Red Hat Society, one of the first 25 chapters in the world and the first registered chapter in Michigan. “I am able to spend a few hours with my Red Hat sisters and get my batteries recharged.” “Women from all walks of life are encouraged to participate,” she continues. “We may share a common bond due to cancer or divorce or death, which in turn provides positive support for each other. We encourage and empower women to tap their inner strength to promote a better life for themselves.” Marcy, a retired English teacher and saleswoman for educational products, goes on to say that although the RHS doesn’t host or sponsor charitable causes, members will help fellow members who are active in service organizations.

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Marcy also serves as an Ambassador for the Red Hat Society, promoting the organization while building and strengthening relationships between the Hatquarters in California and its members. There are two Red Hat Society chapters in Niles, Michigan. To start a Red Hat Society chapter contact Emily Yost, Marketing Director, Red Hat Society, Inc., 431 South Acacia Avenue, Fullerton, CA 92831; 714-888-8132 or visit www. redhatsociety.com. •••

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How to Host a

C ov e r st o ry

WineTasting By: Pam Molnar

H

osting a wine tasting in your home is a great excuse to come together with friends and sample new wines. So many of us get stuck in a rut with the wine we drink. We order the same variety and more often, select wines from the same winery because it is what we know. We are less likely to pick up a completely new wine just to try it. Let’s face it, with the cost of wine, it would be a shame to dump the whole bottle if the wine does not please our palate. Attending professional wine tastings at wine shops and restaurants can be intimidating to the average wine drinker. Many fear that they don’t know enough about wines to make a judgment about them. One’s fondness to a wine is unique. It is no different than how a person perceives art. While you may love Renoir, your friend may prefer Seurat. They are both talented artists, but not everyone will see them the same way. The best way to try new wines is to have a wine tasting party. Invite other wine enthusiasts like yourself, put on some music, sample a variety of good food and new wines and let the conversation flow. It is really that simple.

Did you know? 1 grape cluster = 1 glass 75 grapes = 1 cluster 4 clusters = 1 bottle 40 clusters = 1 vine 1 vine = 10 bottles 1,200 clusters = 1 barrel 1 barrel = 60 gallons 60 gallons = 25 cases 30 vines = 1 barrel 400 vines = 1 acre 1 acre = 5 tons 5 tons = 332 cases Source: 800wine.com

Where to start? Plan your guest list. Twelve to twenty-four people will make a nice sized group. If inviting couples, have every couple bring a bottle to taste. Twelve bottles gives you a nice variety of wines to try in an evening. A 750ml bottle of wine has approximately twenty-four one-ounce “tastes.” If you have more than twenty-four guests, you may need to ask the guests to bring more than one bottle in order for everyone to have a taste. A second bottle will allow guests to have a second taste of the wines they enjoyed when the tasting is over. What kind of wine should everyone bring? As the host, that is up to you. You could choose a varietal (like Chardonnay or Pinot Noir), a regional (a wine from the Sonoma County region in CA or a wine from northwestern Spain) or something silly like choosing a wine based on the name on the label. Other options include a wine tasting based on the price of the bottle or asking the guests to bring their favorite wine to share.

Should we eat? Of course! To cleanse your palate, be sure to have plenty of snacks like water crackers, bread sticks or Tuscan bread. When sampling the same varietal, cleansing your palate makes it easier to differentiate between the tastes. Wine-friendly appetizers include olives, fruit (berries), hummus, sausages, cheeses, nuts and chocolate. The flavors from the different foods will alter how a wine will taste. If you are not crazy about a wine, try tasting it with food and you may get a different perspective. Because wine can be dehydrating, be sure to have plenty of water available for your guests.

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Does an expensive wine make it “better”?

Find out for yourself.

Many wine novices believe that the more money you pay for a bottle of wine, the better it is. Wine snobs endorse that myth by telling you that good wine cannot be purchased at a grocery store. Why not test that theory at a wine tasting party? In this wine tasting, it is more convenient if the host purchases all the wine. Given that this is an expensive party, you might want to add up the cost of the wine and divide it by the number of people attending to share the cost. Pick 4 or 6 varietals (like Shiraz, Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio and Cabernet Sauvignon). Choose a $10 bottle, a $20 bottle and a $40 bottle of each varietal. Be sure to wrap each bottle to cover the labels before the guests arrive. As the host pours the wine for tasting, he reveals only the name of the varietal. It is up to the guests to pick their favorite and to guess which is the most expensive. You are guaranteed to find some surprised faces in the crowd when the wines and the prices are revealed.

Wine tasting “glossary of terms.” What else do you need? Purchase inexpensive wine glasses at the local Walmart or restaurant supply store. Don’t worry if the glasses are for white or red wines. As long as they are glass and you have one for each guest, you will be fine. You will need a dump bucket for your guests to pour out any wines that don’t appeal to them. An ice bucket works well for this job. Blind taste testing is preferred because wine tasters often judge a wine by its label. The host can cover the wine bottles with bags or cloth as the guests hand him the bottle. Be sure to mark the bottle with a number so everyone can identify the wine they are tasting. Use random numbers so no one can guess the bottle based on when the guests arrived. Lastly, you will need pens and paper for each taster to make their notes and mark their favorites.

1. Aroma - The smell of a wine. Also described as nose, bouquet or perfume.

Putting it all together. As each guest arrives, place the bottle in a bag and mark with a number. If tasting red wines, uncork the bottles to allow them to breathe. Everyone can mingle and eat while they are waiting for the rest of the guests to arrive. When you are ready to taste, the host then goes around and pours everyone about 1 oz. to taste. The wine will be identified by the number on the bottle. Each guest will rate tthe wine in their own way – smiley faces, scale of one to ten, notes about color or bouquet. Remember, you are among friends, so there is no right or wrong way. When all the wines have been tasted, the guests choose their top three. By a simple show of hands, the best wines are tallied and a winner is chosen. As the host, you may want to offer a prize for the best wine of the evening – a wine shop gift card or a wine accessory would be appropriate. When the tasting is over, all the wines are removed from their bags and the guests can make note of their new favorite wines to add to their cellar. •••

9. Oaky - A wine with a noticeable perception of the effects of oak giving the wine a sense of vanilla, nutmeg or a smoky flavor.

2. Body - The sense of alcohol in the wine. 3. Complex - A wine that gives a perception of being multi-layered in terms of flavors and aromas. 4. Dry - A wine that is perceived as lacking sweetness. 5. Finish - How the wine is perceived after swallowing. 6. Heavy - A wine that is very alcoholic. 7. Legs - The tracks of liquid that cling to the sides of a glass after the wine has been swirled. 8. Minerality – The sense of stoniness or dissolved minerals in wine.

10. Tannic - A wine with aggressive tannins – tasting dry and astringent. Can be felt on the middle of your tongue and front of your mouth.

boom | November & december 2013

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C ov e r st o ry

HELP!

I Can't Keep Up With

Technology

R

By: Margo Bell

ecently there appeared in the newspaper a cartoon showing two men in front of a hospital nursery. One said to the other something like, “I can’t wait `til she’s three. Then she can show me how to use the computer.”

OK, this is an exaggeration but some truth rings in the silly caption. Some boomers, particularly us older ones, remember calculating math problems with a slide rule, taking exams printed out on a mimeograph machine, looking up stuff in a hard-cover encyclopedia, listening to taped music on our 8-track and talking on a land line telephone, the receiver leashed onto the phone base. I remember the first computer that my husband brought home in the early ‘80s. It was a garage-invented Vector Graphic with a MEMORITE word processing app and a floppy disc drive. It sat on the desk for a month before I got the courage to even turn the contraption on, fearing it would blow up. The operating manual had an entire section of warnings: keep the room very cool, avoid vacuuming around it and other instructions that may seem odd by today’s standards, except for the ever-important SOS (“save often sweetie”). The black-and-white screen burned my eyes so much that I placed a sheet of green plastic wrap on the screen front, mimicking a pair of sunglasses. Margins and other editorial commands had to be typed in code. The printer was a tractor-fed dot matrix Oki Data. That computer was replaced by a PC with blue background and yellow or white lettering. When I worked at a magazine, I was introduced to the Macintosh computer, which was much more user friendly. I decided to improve my capability by taking a couple of Mac courses at a local junior college. At last, I was in the modern world and no longer felt like a technophobe.

The Technology Boom

Then, as we ventured into the ‘90s, things seemed to explode in technology: Bluetooth wire replacement technology (1998), the BlackBerry phone (1999), text messaging (1993), camera phone (2002), the iPhone (2007) with the latest iPhone-5 and 5C versions introduced September 2013 and the Android™ (2008) mobile phone. Desktops, laptops, notebooks, I-pads and online books all came on board with expanded applications. Bulky cell phones with their stubby antennae shrank to hand size. Search engines. Online games. And especially daunting to many of us “old timers,” was the advent of social networking used by over a billion people since it was introduced in the mid-1990s. 32

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Despite the fact that some of us Boomers are retired with time on our hands, we’re struggling to acquaint ourselves with the latest technological developments. There are hundreds of thousands of mobile apps available. No wonder we can’t keep up! Even the most tech-savvy user—such as the typical college student—can get floored by the avalanche of new tech products. “I talked with my friends and most everyone agreed that it can be tough to stay on top of all the new technology,” observed Rob Wahl, a senior at Notre Dame University. “A few are very much into knowing about and downloading all the latest technology and apps.” Wahl said that his tech friends keep up their knowledge through online blogs and tech websites. And, he continued, “Personally, I learn about many new apps from word of mouth.”

So How Should You Keep Up With The Technology That Matters?

First, treat the situation as if you’re in a cafeteria. Choose what you want or need and leave the rest. A cell phone, to me, is a must (and I have met someone who doesn’t believe in owning one) with two chargers: one for the house/office and one for the car. Then start with a computer, either desktop or laptop, with a monitor and keyboard, plus a printer. Newer model computers generally have easy-to-use menu selections that assist you in learning basic functions. Begin with basic applications, such as word processing and spreadsheets, that will cover most of your needs. Sign up for e-mail to send messages, order supplies, do online bill paying and other financial transactions and look up data on a search engine such as Google or Yahoo. Add on other applications as you get more comfortable with the basics. Get information about new apps through the media, such as TV news and computer magazines/newspapers. First-time users may look into the Telekin computer. “Many seniors and computer novices have never had the opportunity to learn the computer skills which are second nature to tech-savvy users,” says Lauren Allegrezza, Telekin sales and marketing associate. “The concepts of windows, desktops, drop-down menus, right-click options, minimizing and maximizing, task bars, etc., are so familiar to us because we’ve been using computers with these features for so long. We never stop to think how confusing it may be for someone who’s never used a traditional computer before.” The Telekin, which comes in three models priced from $699-$1,249, offers pre-loaded software, a mouse plus touch screen, a Linux-based protection system, large print font and buttons, user’s manual and free US-based tech support, among other features.

Free classes are also available:

Elkhart Public Library 300 S. Second Street Elkhart, IN 46516 574-294-2847 Includes beginning computing and Internet. Also offers Computer Tutor one-on-one instruction. Mishawaka-Penn-Harris Public Library 209 Lincoln Way East Mishawaka, IN 46544 574-259-5277 ext. 273 Beginning Internet, Basic E-mail, Basic Word St. Joseph County Library 304 South Main Street South Bend, IN 46601 574-282-4630 A variety of classes from introduction of various apps to advanced Internet skills.

For tutorial help:

Notre Dame Center for Social Concerns 574-631-5293 NOTE: if you’re ever in the San Francisco Bay/Silicon Valley area, consider visiting the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, just off the 101 Freeway. It’s the world’s largest museum for the preservation and presentation of computer artifacts and stories. A truly fascinating place! www.computerhistory.org 650-810-1010

Mac purchasers can get a year’s package of oneon-one tutorial sessions for $99. Mobile phone users can also find support through the phone’s bookmarks option or in-store. ••• boom | November & december 2013

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C ov e r st o ry

The New

Morris Inn Where Campus & Community Meet By: Chaunie Brusie

Many of you may be familiar with the Morris Inn of the past—but ladies and gentlemen, you may not recognize the Morris Inn of today.

Money well spent

The Morris Inn has a fascinating history as part of the University of Notre Dame. The beginnings of this majestic hotel as it stands today actually began with a rather humble $100 donation! In 1905, a Presbyterian orphan named Ernest Morris, having grown up in the area, dreaming of attending the prestigious University, appealed to the school’s president for a loan in order to fund his studies. The amount of his loan request? A cool $100. Apparently, Notre Dame knows a wise investment when they see it, because not only did the University’s president spot Ernest the 100 bucks, but he granted his admission as well. And Ernest went on to graduate from Notre Dame to start a career in law and finance. What’s more, however, he eventually founded what became the Associates Investment Corp of America, which according to Ancestry. com, is the third largest independent finance company in the United States. Ernest didn’t forget his humble roots, or the school that had generously given him his start and in 1950, Ernest sought to pay back some of the kindness that had been granted to him—Ernest, along with his wife, Ella, provided the backing to fund the original construction of the Morris Inn. (Hey, that name makes sense now!) 34

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A grand opening

Sadly, although Ernest passed away before he could see the completed construction of the Inn, his contributions led to the majestic creation of the original hotel, whose notable guests have included John Kennedy, Jr. and his wife, Caroline. Although Ernest was not able to see the fruit of his financial labors, when the Inn opened in 1952, it featured an impressive 85 twin guest rooms and 7 double rooms. The original hotel was designed by Holabird, Root, and Burgee Architects, constructed by Sollitt Construction Company of South Bend and decorated by B. Altman Company of New York.

All in the family

Fast forward 63 years from Ernest’s first generous contributions that led to the Morris Inn opening its doors and you have the new and improved Morris Inn. In an unprecedented and inspirational gesture, Ernest’s daughter, Ernestine Raclin, a long-time supporter of Notre Dame University, donated $15 million to restore the Morris Inn to its original glory—and then some. “Our family has a long and deep emotional bond with the University and with the Morris Inn,” Raclin said in an interview with Notre Dame’s press. “The Morris Inn has long been a treasure, not just for the Notre Dame community, but for all of Michiana. It is where the community and the campus meet.”

A new look

According to the Notre Dame’s website, highlights of the renovation and expansion project of The Morris Inn included: 
• An increase from 92 to approximately 138 guestrooms, and an increase in the average room size from 240 square feet to 360 square feet. 
• A completely renovated lobby and the relocation of Leahy’s Pub to a more prominent location within a much larger casual dining facility. • A 300-seat ballroom constructed at the north end of the building, and three private dining rooms, located along an expansion to the east side of the building. 
• Replacement of the building’s 60-year old plumbing, heating, cooling and electrical system infrastructure. boom | November & december 2013

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The New

Morris Inn

continued...

• The building’s design and construction was eco-friendly and “green,” leading the Inn’s current quest for LEED Silver certification. • The finished building added an additional 58,000 square feet.
 • A new outdoor courtyard on the west side of the building. • A covered driveway at the lobby entrance. • An expansion of the adjacent parking lot, with valet service offered at peak times. Additional staff was also hired to ensure that the Morris Inn can continue its standard of meeting the needs and comfort of its guests. Other traditional parts of the Morris Inn, such as Sorin’s Restaurant, remained intact as part of the renovation.

A tasteful tradition

One tradition that hasn’t changed at the Morris Inn is its offerings of delicious and varied menu options through its three different dining establishments, offering a “distinctive blend of classic elegance and relaxed casual, along with excellent service, great atmosphere, an exceptional wine list and uniquely and creatively presented cuisine.” Chef Ross Olling took over the role of Executive Head Chef in 2004 at the Morris Inn after finishing the American Culinary Federation Apprenticeship Program. He was recruited by former Executive Chef Don Miller in 1996 and worked all the stations in the kitchen until becoming Sous Chef in 2000. Chef Ross explains that the menu at Sorin’s is “seasonal” and uses the freshest products possible. “We make everything from stocks to butchering our meat in house,” he says. Granted, Chef Ross may have a hand in this, but he maintains that the dining at Morris Inn is exceptional because the products they start with are of the highest quality. “Everything from the freshness of the seafood to the marbling of our steaks and of course, the way that we handle those products [matters],” explains Chef Ross. He is also especially proud of the connections that the Morris Inn keeps with the community, citing that the Inn contracts with over a hundred local farms and businesses for fresh ingredients. 36

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Chef’s Choice: What is Chef Ross’ personal recommendation for a fine dining option?

I would recommend the scallops or the Double R Ranch Strip Steak with the dauphinoise potatoes.” - Chef Ross

Worth a stay

If you remember the Morris Inn of the past, now might be the perfect opportunity to freshen up your memories with a stay at the new and improved Morris Inn. “Many things have changed since 1952, but what has not changed, nor will, is the warmth and cordiality with which our guests are greeted and treated,” states the Morris Inn website. Morris Inn employee Heather Goralski recommends that guests both old and new stop in to check out all that the new Morrs Inn has to offer. “We welcome all visitors to experience the newly re-imagined Morris Inn!” says Goralski. For instance, you might stop in for a tour or consider a cozy fall dinner at the outdoor Fireside Terrace, which features a natural gas fire pit, heat lamps and pashmina shawls to keep you warm. Sounds like something deserving of cheers for both the old— and new—of Notre Dame traditions!

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28070 CR 24W • Elkhart, IN 46517 574.295.6260 866.295.6260 F: 574.295.5852

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&Beautiful

BALANCED

Standard overnight rates for the Morris Inn begin at $169 per night. To book a stay or learn more about the new Morris Inn, visit morrisinn.nd.edu. •••

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boom | November & december 2013

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boom

Home

The

Age-in-Place

Bathroom By: Evie Kirkwood

T

he tub was cracked and the sink was scratched. The wicker toilet topper had to go. It was time to remodel the bathroom. When we moved in over 30 years ago, this was one of the first rooms we tackled. But after trying to repair our old toilet four times, we came to the realization that it was time to tackle the room again. This time it would be a major overhaul, including stripping off the wall board. And we decided we would create an age-inplace bathroom. We are fit and healthy ourselves, but in recent years, we’d helped my husband’s parents settle into assisted living facilities. This gave us a heightened awareness of the limitations of most homes as mobility decreases with age. Bathrooms can be the most challenging. Tubs are difficult to climb over; twist faucets are demanding on arthritic hands.

Making it work

A few months before we began the work we researched options for bathroom components. Much to our delight we discovered “age-in-place designs” that provide easy access and use, but don’t look like hospital fixtures. Our bathroom is very small, just eight feet by five feet, so we needed to be thoughtful about our choices. Each needed to fit precisely, but not overwhelm the space, or make it appear smaller than it already was.

A shower with all the fixings

By instituting simple and universal design techniques, your bathroom can look great now, and still meet your needs in the future.

We considered a walk-in tub (bathtub with a door) but it was costly, and we really wanted a shower. Our anchor selection was a 5-foot by 3-foot walk-in shower. After discarding the concept of an expensive marble or tile stall that would be difficult to modify in time, we found a sterling age-in-place shower with a 1-inch threshold, making it very easy to step over. A sleek optional bench, which we purchased for future use, snaps into a fitting built into the surround. This allows for sitting in the shower if standing becomes too difficult.

The fiberglass surround comes with backer boards to secure grab bars during installation or at a later date. We opted to install both a horizontal and a vertical grab bar. Their unique oval profile is much more sophisticated than traditional chunky round grab bars and it is amazing how much we use them. All the shower fixtures operate with levers, not twist handles, and we included both a regular overhead shower head and a hand-held shower head, the latter of which will be essential if we integrate the bench. The smooth glass doors are easy to clean, but don’t make the room feel smaller than it is.

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The porcelain throne

We also selected a “right-height” toilet, at 18 inches tall. A taller toilet makes it easier to get up and down. The tank and oblong seat are all one piece, so it is very easy to clean.

Vanity through the years

Lastly, the vanity sink unit is about an inch taller than standard, which puts less strain on backs when brushing teeth or washing hands. The single lever faucet can even be turned on with an elbow. Today there are a range of options for age-in-place bathroom components. Zero threshold showers allow you to walk or roll directly into the shower from the bathroom floor. A trenchstyle drain runs the length of the shower entrance and is flush with the floor. Touch-free faucets and self-closing toilet lids are other possibilities.

Hiring it out

We decided to hire a contractor for the installation. To save money, we did all the demolition ourselves, including ripping off the drywall, cutting out the tub and shower and stripping off the vinyl floor.

When choosing a contractor, here are a few things to consider: •

Get referrals from friends or neighbors, or ask for a list of recent clients that you can contact.

Are they registered and bonded within your city or county?

Do they have liability insurance?

Will the contractor you hire use subcontractors who are licensed and bonded?

Get estimates in writing, and be sure to have the contract spell out who will do what work if you will be doing some (such as demolition) yourself.

Clarify if you, or the contractor, will purchase and pay for the components and cabinetry. Will they arrange for delivery? Who will supply items such as paint or light switch covers?

Who is responsible for daily, or the end-of-project clean up, and who will dispose of boxes, scraps and other unused items? Find out what kind of a pay schedule the contractor requires, including a deposit and the time of final payment.

By instituting simple and universal design techniques, your bathroom can look great now, and still meet your needs in the future. •••

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boom | November & december 2013

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boom

Home

What Baby

Boomers Can Teach

Future Generations By: Thomas J. Saelens

I

often speak to younger people as part of my job and try to share some nuggets of knowledge that they may find useful. As a member of the “baby boomer” generation, I see the impact that my generation has made on humanity and as I have grown older, the intelligence of my youth has been improved with this wisdom of age. The final chapters that I and the other boomers write may become our finest.

Place in History

The baby boomers experienced a unique economic position within the history of the world. The post-World War II conditions and circumstances created a fertile field of pent-up demand, limited global competition and the use of American industrialization to rebuild a devasted world. Unfortunately, these factors aligned perfectly to create the great American middle class that manufactured a culture of consumerism and materialism and has been glorified throughout the world.

The American “Dream”

The American definition of individual worth and value substantially defined through income and possessions has been the driving force of our economy. I, and the rest of the baby boomer generation, sold this story. The story that happiness is linked to having things, buying things and making money to buy more things. I myself believed this story well into my thirties and kept the faith waiting for the special feeling of euphoria that never seemed to arrive regardless of my salary or size of my house. No level of income, number of cars, HD television or mega mansions can bring the human heart the happiness that I now believe is available without the material picture our generation has painted.

The Pursuit of Happiness

So how can I—and the rest of the baby boomer generation— help to share the real story of human happiness? I once heard that man is the only living organism, other than cancer, that consumes more than he needs to survive. Maybe we need to rebalance our human perspective. The world is now a global community and we must realize that everything is connected to everything else. With more people consuming, connecting and creating, the future we all must look at is individual behavior. Each person must try to make the world a better and happier place with less, rather than more, 40

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom

consumption. Doing more with less can be compassionate, bring prosperity and provide an enduring society; a person’s value cannot continue to be measured by money, houses, cars and objects. Maybe when we each decide to stop chasing the wrong things, the right things will have a chance to catch us. I want to share some thoughts that may help baby boomers to take the first small steps on a sojourn of change, one interaction at a time.

Promote giving and sharing by making things and gifts. It is not the present but the thought and connection within that present that bring meaning and happiness to most people. My daughter once wrote me a poem and placed it in a picture frame with family photographs. This was more powerful and beautiful then something manufactured and sold in a store.

Practice doing something good every day. Studies have proven that doing good for someone returns the feeling to the giver. So try to do something small every day. Encourage someone, provide your expert insight, give guidance, donate your time or show those in your circle of influence that compassion and caring are the strongest measures of someone’s value to society.

Be mindful and pay attention to what is going on around you. Cultivate awareness of the simple but powerful impact that people have on others and the world. Awareness takes understanding of what is happening, what is missing and what is possible. This will build the power of empathy.


Right is not always as clear as we think. Proverbs 12:15 says that “the way of a fool is right in his own eyes: but he that hearkened unto counsel is wise.” Just because someone speaks with confidence or has power does not mean he has wisdom, but how we respond is crucial. A foolish person is 'quick' to condemn what they do not understand. A wise person is 'slow' to condemn what he does understand. Be mindful that your actions may be viewed as foolish to those you judge as foolish. Be patient and work with those that oppose you or your views.

Take long-term solutions over short-term benefits. Teach patience and the wisdom of looking at the long-term results our actions will produce. For example, many corporations and CEOs will cut wages and expenses to increase short-term profits to help the stock price and the value of their stock options. In the long term, however, they sacrifice the benefits and wages of their employees, the very people that need to make strong wages to buy their products in the future. For example, Henry Ford was thought a fool by his corporate peers when he increased the daily wage of his factory workers to a previously unheard of $5.00 per day.

Try to make an enemy into a friend. We fear and hate what we do not understand. Never judge someone unless you have walked in his shoes. Criticisms and judgment are easy but can’t reflect the warmth and courage of human depth, fail to produce solutions and build walls between people and ideas. Being intelligent does not always bring wisdom, but the heart and mind must work together so that the hands of humanity can build. According to “The Power of Habit”, what you do every day matters more than what you do every once in a while. Change does not always happen in an explosion of inspiration, but in a gradual and ongoing effort that reveals the better part of our nature. As a nation and as a generation, we should give thanks for the wonderful world that has been our friend. We must pass on this favor to the next generations—but that requires change. Real changes in how we think, act and share the wisdom that we have learned. Together, we can work to write our finest chapter. •••

boom | November & december 2013

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Buried in Brown Bags?

11 Ways to Reuse Them During the Holidays By: Ashley Talmadge

Reusable bags may qualify as standard equipment

for any 21st century shopper. But many of us still have a hard time remembering to use them. The result? More than a few garages and basements bursting at the seams with stacks of brown bags. Here are a few suggestions for paring the pile over the holidays—some practical, some fun and some that’ll wow you!

Decorate. Create paper bows by cutting a brown bag into ½ -inch strips, about 8 inches long. Curl the strips with scissors, as you would regular crimped ribbon. Secure several curled strips together using a staple or brad. Tape bows of all different sizes to your gifts. It’s a wrap. Embellish the brown paper with paint, glitter or rubber stamps for gift wrapping. Or use it “plain and simple” to cover boxes for shipping. Safe packing. Run your paper bags through the shredder to create oodles of great packing material. Stuff your shipping boxes to ensure safe delivery of fragile gifts. Leftovers can be used for confetti at your wild holiday party. Holiday “scent-sations.” Cut a bag into several pieces and fold into envelopes, being sure the sides and bottom are well-sealed. Sprinkle some of your favorite holiday spices (cinnamon, cloves or nutmeg) into the packets. Seal the top and stash your spice sachets in drawers and closets for an infusion of holiday comfort throughout your home. Windshield clearer. Holiday events and shopping trips often mean more time in the car. Who needs the added aggravation of scraping ice and snow? Cut open a brown paper bag and spread it over the outside of your windshield. Secure it under your vertically positioned wipers. When you’re ready to drive, carefully remove the bag and the glass is clear. No more numb fingers! Fire starter. Need a little kindling to start your hearth-warming fire? Tear a brown bag into three or four pieces and place a few tightly twisted balls or “sticks” under your log pile. For harder-to-light wood, stuff a brown bag with balls of newspaper, and wrap tightly into a flame-ready “log.” Floor makeover. You’ve signed up to host a holiday party, and suddenly realize how worn your bathroom floor is. Let your DIY nature shine when you resurface it with brown bags. You won’t need much more than white glue, polyurethane and a big stack of bags to create a unique and beautiful floor that will wow your holiday guests. Multiple sites online provide detailed how-to info. 42

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom


Fruit ripener. Winter is not usually the best time to buy fresh ready-to-eat produce. Put your not-quite-ripe fruit in a brown bag (no more than 2 or 3 pieces per bag), fold loosely and set on the counter. In a couple of days your peaches and avocados will have ripened to appetizer-ready perfection. Surface protection. That stack of brown bags will prove to be a great boon during holiday project time. Cut and spread them to protect your tables and floors from glue, paint, glitter and frosting.

That Special Something Alice has her special something...

“I absolutely love living here. It’s like Heaven to me. I love that it is all on one floor...no steps to worry about. The nurses are wonderful and they always come when I call for them. I would like everyone to live in a place as wonderful as this!” - Alice, Assisted Living Resident

Alice’s Amenities:

Building materials. Make building blocks by stuffing brown bags about ¾ full with balls of newspaper. Fold the top down and secure with packing tape or staples. Your little ones will happily help you make the blocks, and use them to build a fort while you decorate and bake for your holiday guests.

• Spacious apartment • Safety and Security

Reuse as…bags! The holidays inevitably bring extra trips to the grocery. As a reminder, put “Remember bags!” at the top of your shopping list. You can usually get several uses out of one brown bag. •••

• Dedicated concierge • Chef designed meals • 24/7 nursing staff • Theatre, pub, library and stylish courtyard • On-site skilled nursing and rehab center

Do you want to live life like Alice? Call 574.222.1234 today and take a tour.

60257 Bodnar Boulevard, Mishawaka, IN 46544

View directions to the care center and photo gallery at: www.rehabinsprenger.com HalfPgVertb_8_2013.indd 1

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boom

recipe

Autumn

Butternut Squash

Servings: 6-8

Soup

Cook Time: 35 Minutes Total Time: 50 Minutes Ingredients: • 1 large butternut squash • 1 medium yellow onion, roughly chopped • 3 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled • 7 cups water • 1 tablespoon salt • 2 tablespoons sugar • 1/2 cup heavy cream Instructions: 1. Combine all of the ingredients except for the heavy cream in a large soup pot. Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer for 35 minutes. 2. Use a hand-held immersion blender to puree the soup until smooth. (If you don’t have an immersion blender, use a food processor to puree, working in batches.) 3. Stir in the heavy cream and bring to a simmer. Season to taste.


The

Planner November & December 2013


November & December 2013 Events The following listing includes events around town. Always call ahead for updates. November 19 Tree-Mendous Fun 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Harris Branch Library It’s not too early to start thinking about decorating for the holidays. Now’s your chance to learn how to fold an ordinary magazine into a perfect tree. Magazines are provided while supplies last. Additional decorations are not provided but ideas for finishing your tree will be shared. Call: 574-271-3179.

Cooperative Antique Study Group 1:30 pm- 3:30 pm

Downtown Mishawaka Library You may bring one or two antiques to discuss with the group. The meeting is open to all antique lovers. The Cooperative Antique Study Group is sponsored by the Friends of the MishawakaPenn-Harris Public Library. Registration is not required. Call: 574-259-5277.

November 20 Skies over Michiana 4:00 pm- 6:00 pm

Harris Branch Library Chuck Bueter, amateur astronomer and organizer of local Comet ISON activities, will describe the fall/winter sky over Michiana, including where to look in the sky to find the comet that will be visible during Thanksgiving week. Bueter is knowledgeable and will share facts and stories about the stars with those entering the sky lab. In addition, librarians will read the story “There Once Was a Sky Full of Stars” by Bob Crelin. Each session in the lab will last approximately 20 minutes. Families and attendees will be assigned a lab session when they arrive at the program.

November 21

Ready to Quit Smoking? Call for times

Lakeland Community Hospital, Niles Lakeland HealthCare offers free quarterly seminars and one-on-one support sessions to help and encourage smokers to quit. Schedule a consultation with a tobacco treatment specialist and receive the tools needed to kick the habit for good. Call: 269-927-5403.

November 22 Celebration of Dance 7:30 pm

IUSB, South Bend Embrace the talent of the IU South Bend 46

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom

Dance Company in this exciting and eclectic performance of auditioned pieces. Call: 574520-4203.

November 23

BYU vs. Notre Dame Football 3:30 pm

University of Notre Dame

Noodle Making From Scratch 2:30 pm- 3:30 pm

Bittersweet Branch Library Making delicious pasta from scratch isn’t as hard as you think. Michelle Collier will lead an interactive program on making your own homemade noodles on Saturday, November 23, from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Bittersweet Branch Library. Participants should bring an apron.

November 27 Alligator Blackbird 10:00 pm

O'Rourke's Public House Stop by O'Rourke's for your pre-Turkey Bash on the evening of Wednesday, November 27th and experience Alligator Blackbird live at O'Rourke's! Call: 574-251-0355.

November 30

The Contemporary Nutcracker 2:00 pm

The Learner Theatre The Conservatory of Dance invites you to view this classic Christmas tale from a unique perspective. Imagine a different picture—one that we face every day: busy streets bustling with shoppers talking on their cell phones, joggers hurrying from one place to the next and, in the midst of the chaos, a girl left homeless and destitute on the bitter winter streets. She cries out for compassion and love but is met with indifferent, wintry glares. Call: 574-273-8888.

DECEMBER EVENTS December 1-31

MPHPL Locations Accepting Donations

During the month of December, all MPHPL locations, in cooperation with the “Sole Food” Project, will be collecting new hats, gloves, scarves, socks and slippers for the residents at the Center for the Homeless. Patrons are encouraged to knit or crochet winter gear items,

but store bought items are also accepted. Donation boxes will be located at the downtown Mishawaka-Penn-Harris Public Library, the Bittersweet Branch Library and the Harris Branch Library. The Center for the Homeless “Sole Food” project was originally organized by JoHanna Manningham, a Penn High School graduate. Manningham knits a variety of items for the residents. Call: 574-259-0392.

December 1

What’s in the Name? The History of Local Roads 10:00 am

Center for History, South Bend Pokagon Street, Coquillard Drive, Leeper Avenue and many other streets in Michiana were named for people who had a significant impact on the area. In fact, street names in the community represent a veritable who’s who of local history. Many roads originated as trails and footpaths hundreds of years ago. Today, they serve as a reminder to the past. Explore the history of the area in this unique exhibit about street names. Call: 574-235-9664.

December 3

The Inner Workings of Ten Thousand Villages 6:30 pm

Downtown Branch Library Ten Thousand Villages works with more than 130 artisan groups in 35 countries, helping them gain opportunities to use their traditional skills in making products to sell in the United States. Learn their story on Tuesday, December 3, at 6:30 p.m. in the Lions Room of the downtown Mishawaka Library. Listen to the experiences of several of these groups, and see a display of some of their work, including holiday ornaments and decorations. There will be a question and answer session at the end of the talk. Call: 574-259-5277.

December 6

Downtown for the Holidays 5:00 pm- 9:00 pm

Downtown South Bend The downtown festivities will include a tree lighting, shopping, fireworks and of course— Santa’s arrival! Call: 574-282-1110.

Christmas Dinner and Celebration 6:00 pm

South Bend Firefighters Union Hall Let's bring in the Christmas season together with an event to celebrate our journey this year with our ItWorks family tree. What an


incredible year it's been and there’s no better way to enjoy each other than with a wonderful dinner followed by fun and dancing the night away. We have secured a DJ to provide us with music and we will have a great time.

Christopher’s Christmas 7:00 pm

show contains smoke, gun shots, strobe lights, drug references, sexual situations and profane “authentic Jersey language.”

December 11 Free Tax Classes 9:00 am

December 7

Liberty Tax Service, Mishawaka Liberty Tax Service-Mishawaka is now offering FREE tax classes, open to the public. Registration is appreciated. These tax classes will teach tax code, highlight changes for the new tax year and provide some information on the Affordable Care Act. These classes are easy and informative. They are great for persons with no tax experience, the experienced wanting to continue education, retirees, self employed, recent grads and those looking for employment in the tax office. Call: 574-387-4220.

4:00 pm- 8:00 pm

Free Screening and Wellness Workshop

O'Laughlin Auditorium Christopher's Christmas is an original story in dance written by local artistic director Debbie Werbrouck. The performance was written for younger audiences, has been running for over 30 years and is truly a celebration of the true meaning of Christmas. Bring your family, small and tall, to enjoy this unique holiday treasure and support dancers in our own community. Call: 574-247-1590.

Home for the Holidays Hope Ministries Family Life center Hope's 6th Annual Home for the Holidays Open House! Live music, Christmas cookies, tours of Hope's Family Life Center, fun activities for kids and adults and pictures with Mrs. Claus!

BellaNova Women's Health Holiday Spa Open House 10:00 am

BellaNova Women's Health, St. Joseph, MI Give yourself an early gift this holiday season and come to a special Women’s Health Day on Saturday, December 7. Guests can enjoy light refreshments, spa services, discounted products and learning about the services provided at the practice. There will also be an opportunity to win door prizes and receive free product.

December 8 Bazaar Sunday 10:00 am- 4:00 pm

The State, South Bend Come one, come all to the greatest bazaar around! Join us for a fun South Bend tradition as we turn The State into an upscale shopping venue with music, food and local vendors offering vintage goods, antiques, hand-crafted items, repurposed furniture, sustainable products and more. Admission is free. Grab a friend and make it a Bazaar Sunday! Call: 801-209-2987.

Jersey Boys 7:00 pm

Morris Performing Arts Center Tony® Award-winning Broadway blockbuster musical about Rock and Roll Hall of Famers Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. This is the story of how four blue-collar kids became one of the greatest successes in pop music history. They wrote their own songs, invented their own sounds and sold 175 million records worldwide—all before they were 30! JERSEY BOYS is not recommended for all ages. The

8:30 am- 11:35 am

Ferry Street Resource Center The Margaret Beckley Upton Center for Health Enhancement of Lakeland HealthCare will offer a free fasting cholesterol lipid panel, blood pressure and BMI screening. Registration is required; walk-ins will be accepted if space is available. The cholesterol lipid panel includes total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and blood sugar. A 12-hour fast (no food, only water) is required. Participants must be age 18 or older. Following your screening, stay and enjoy a class on risk factors and lifestyle modification. Refreshments will be provided. The Margaret Beckley Upton Center for Health Enhancement of Lakeland HealthCare will offer a free fasting cholesterol lipid panel, blood pressure and BMI screening. Registration is required; walk-ins will be accepted if space is available. The cholesterol lipid panel includes total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and blood sugar. A 12-hour fast (no food, only water) is required. Participants must be age 18 or older. Following your screening, stay and enjoy a class on risk factors and lifestyle modification. Refreshments will be provided. Visit http://www.lakelandhealth.org or call: 269-556-2808 for more information.

The CreativeVillage

December 12

Knitting & Crocheting Group 6:00 pm- 8:00 pm

Bittersweet Branch Library The bi-monthly Knitting & Crocheting Group will meet at the Bittersweet Branch Library on Thursday, December 12, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. All skill levels are welcome. Bring a project or come to learn. Instruction is available. Call: 574-259-0392.

December 13 A Christmas Carol 7:30 pm

The Learner Theatre Call: 574-293-4469.

December 14

The Nutcracker Ballet 2:00 pm

Morris Performing Arts Center This timeless holiday classic returns to thrill and enchant audiences of all ages. Delightful sets and costuming will enhance your travels with Clara as you watch her Nutcracker come to life, see her Christmas tree grow and travel with her to the world of the Sugar Plum Fairy. From dancing soldiers to pirouetting snowflakes, it's a treat for the whole family!

Find us on FaceBook!

Art, Education & Inspiration

items by local artists

A Unique New Shopping Destination

51772 SR 19 Elkhart, IN (North of the toll road) • 574-326-3103 • www.the-creative-village.com boom | November & december 2013

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Scene

BOOM Magazine promotes Michiana’s cultural offerings, personalities, attractions and local businesses, with a special emphasis on non-profit organizations’ events and activities. We expect this section of BOOM to grow significantly, and we’d like your help to get it rolling! Please send us some of your favorite photos from your organization’s or charity’s best events and fundraisers. They just may make the next issue of BOOM Magazine! We prefer snapshots of people that are full of life and enjoying the moment, so please send them our way: Info@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com.

The Hilly Hundred Weekend The Hilly Hundred Weekend offers two inspiring days of riding in Southern Indiana, approximately 50 miles each day. The Hilly Hundred Directors do their best to provide a one-of–a-kind experience for their riders. Riders are greeted to refreshments and entertainment when they check-in on Friday night. Both Saturday and Sunday routes offers two rest stops and a lunch stop. Indoor and outdoor camping is available, shower trucks are onsite (Edgewood School District, Ellettsville) and breakfast and dinner options are offered as well. Local entertainment abounds throughout the tour. While the Hilly Hundred is not a race, it is a challenging tour. With inclines from 6% to 25% each day, it’s difficult to find flat terrain. One of the most challenging hills on the tour is the infamous Mt. Tabor. Although only 0.3 miles in length, it’s boasts a 24% incline tand offers either the thrill of victory for those riders who seem to roll to the top with ease or the agony of defeat for those who find they must walk their bike to get to the top. The challenges don’t deter the riders; they keep coming back year after year, for whatever the Hilly Hundred might bring. The Hilly Hundred Weekend is an Indiana tradition presented by the Central Indiana Bicycling Association (CIBA). Proceeds from the Hilly Hundred Weekend support CIBA activities, the CIBA Foundation, Inc., Bicycle Indiana and the Edgewood High School Dollars for Scholars program. Hilly Hundred Weekend proceeds are also used to support the local communities. Unused food from the rest stops is donated to the Hoosier Hills Food Bank. To learn more about CIBA or the Hilly Hundred, please visit www.hillyhundred.org.

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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom


Original Poster

boom | November & december 2013

49


Scene

BOOM Magazine promotes Michiana’s cultural offerings, personalities, attractions and local businesses, with a special emphasis on non-profit organizations’ events and activities. We expect this section of BOOM to grow significantly, and we’d like your help to get it rolling! Please send us some of your favorite photos from your organization’s or charity’s best events and fundraisers. They just may make the next issue of BOOM Magazine! We prefer snapshots of people that are full of life and enjoying the moment, so please send them our way: Info@MichianaFamilyMagazine.com.

Breast Cancer Awareness PROMPT Ambulance

Prompt Ambulance's Taste of Care Prompt Ambulance's Taste of Care event hosted a fundraiser supporting wounded service members through Wounded Warrior Project™ in South Bend, IN on October 17th, 2013. Prompt Ambulance started The Taste of Care back in 2009. The event was created as a way to showcase the outstanding culinary skills of our region's retirement communities. The first competition was held at the Prompt Ambulance Merrillville base. This event has grown over the years and is not only held in Lake County, but Porter County and St. Joseph County as well. The proceeds raised from the event will go to assist service members who have been injured in the line of duty. All proceeds from the Taste of Care event will be donated to the nonprofit organization Wounded Warrior Project™ (WWP) and will support a full range of programs and services for this generation of injured veterans and their families. To get involved and learn more, visit www.woundedwarriorproject.org. 50

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2013 | boom

Attendee’s

Sprenger Health Care of Mishawaka


1. 3.

2.

4.

6.

5. 7. 1.) Southfield Villages booth at TOC. 2.) Registration volunteers – Amy Flager, Madelyn Flager, and Harley Rosenberg with Stephanie Rosenberg, PROMPT Ambulance, coordinator of Taste of Care Event. 3.) Michiana Health and Rehabilitation. 4.) 3rd place winner: Southfield Village, Chef Jack Renbarger. 5.) One of the dishes that was served by Sterling House – Carolina Style pulled pork on pretzel bun with a side of smoked BBQ rib tips. 6.) The Hearth at Juday Creek. 7.) 1 st Place/“Top Chef 2013” Sanctuary at Holy Cross, Chef Derrick Stevens.

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Prostate Cancer Clinic at Memorial Regional Cancer Center At Memorial Regional Cancer Center’s Prostate Cancer Clinic, our patients meet one-on-one with cancer care specialists to discuss treatment options, developing a comprehensive treatment plan for their prostate cancer. To help decide which treatment is best for you, the monthly Prostate Cancer Clinic brings patients and family members together with medical oncologists, urologists and radiation oncologists to discuss the different treatment options in one convenient visit. Our team of multispecialty, board-certified physicians will review your case and work together with you to coordinate a collaborative care plan. For additional information or to make an appointment at the Prostate Cancer Clinic, please speak to one of our Cancer Center Coordinators by calling 574-647-1100.

You are eligible if you are a male with: • Untreated, biopsy-proven, localized prostate cancer • Elevated PSA level measured within the last six months • Increasing PSA watched over several months What happens at the consultation? • Meet with clinicians and specialists in surgical urology, radiation oncology, medical oncology, nutrition and social work. • Comprehensive assessment, including examination, from each specialty. • One-on-one discussion about findings, treatment options and any questions. • Recommendations of potential treatment plans. • Access to cutting-edge clinical trials for prostate cancer. Patient Benefits: • Discuss all treatment options with specialists in one visit. • Team approach focusing on the whole person including nutrition, exercise and social work resources. • Board-certified physicians develop a comprehensive care plan together as a team.

615 N. Michigan St. | South Bend, Indiana 46601 | qualityoflife.org/cancer


Boom November December 2013 Magazine