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Kids & Pets | tech Summer Camps | Camp Review: The Joy Now Arts Project Portland families Eat: Breakfast

nwkidsmagazine.com

Mar 2014


2 | NW Kids Magazine


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Saturday, April 5th 10am - 5pm

at OMSI

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A “one-stop shop” opportunity to find the perfect summer camps for your kids. Meet and talk with over 30 camp directors from local summer camp programs. You’ll find all the information you need to make a memorable summer for your kids!

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editors’

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Pets. Our kids love them. From fish to furred critters, most children, at some point, will inquire about getting a pet, if they don’t already have one. Choosing the right pet for your family can take some time, but once you decide on the best fit, pets can be great companions for your kids. Having someone to look after (other than themselves) can encourage compassion, a sense of responsibility, exercise and best of all, can create really special relationships. Not to mention, put a smile on your face every time you hear a kiddo call out, “Pepperoni Pizza,” after the neighborhood kitty. This month we look at the natural connection between animals and children, and how to introduce a pet into your family. Guess What? Spring is right around the corner, which means summer camp registration isn’t far off. In this issue we explore STEM camps, for kids who are curious about technology, and for those kids mesmerized by the art of stilt walking and acrobatics, we feature a camp review of the Joy Now Arts Project. And for parents who need a respite from cooking, going out to breakfast can be such a simple treat; be sure to check out our new column, Portland Families Eat. This time around we focus on breakfast without the wait. Mark your calendars! Our 3rd annual Summer Camp Expo is right around the corner. If you are looking for more summer camp options, you will have the opportunity to explore over 30 camps in one place. Stop by OMSI on Saturday, April 5th from 10 am - 5 pm to discover all there is to learn about camps in Oregon. We look forward to seeing you there. Kelley & Beth

Cover and Contents Photography courtesy of Lindsay Hile, Sit! Stay Pet Photography sitstaypetphotography.com Delia, the cover model, is 6 and is represented by Option Model Management, and Maryn (the adorable golden retriever) does pet therapy at Doernbecher Children’s Hospital. 4 | NW Kids Magazine


Contents March 2014

8 Portland Families Eat: Breakfast 10 Future Tech Innovators: STEM camps 14 Camp Review: The Joy Now Arts Project 16 A Natural Connection between Kids and Pets 20 Found Around Town: Pet Related Toys & Goods 22 STEM Experiment: Balloon Blow-Up 26 Best of Portland and Beyond: Our Top Picks for Getting Out This Month 30 Best Pet Books

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Listings Aadland Dental..................................................... 19 Aim High Martial Arts.......................................... 32 All Star Dance Academy....................................... 12 Amiguitos Preschool............................................. 28 Aprende Con Amigos............................................ 34 Barre3.......................................................................7 Bennett Suzuki Violin Studio................................ 17 Camp WILD........................................................... 12 Catlin Gabel School............................................... 32 Cedarwood Waldorf School.................................. 23 Coffee Kids...............................................................9 Delphian School.................................................... 24 Dizzy Castle........................................................... 17 French American International School................. 23 German American School..................................... 24 Glendoveer Tennis................................................. 32 GoodTime Chinese School.................................... 31 ID Tech................................................................... 13 Just Between Friends...............................................9 Just Between Friends Vancouver.......................... 28 Kiako Foundation.................................................. 34 Larry Steele Basketball......................................... 13 Laughing Planet.................................................... 19 Laurelwood Brewpub..............................................9 Leisure Sports Inc.................................................. 31 Little Fruit Farm Montessori.................................. 28 Meadowood Springs............................................ 34 Merry Kitchen....................................................... 31 Metro Arts Camps................................................. 12 My MasterPiece Art Studio................................... 34 North Portland Orthodontics................................ 23 NW Children’s Theater........................................... 32 NW Kids Camp Expo................................................3 Omega Gymnastics............................................... 25 OMSI...................................................................... 15 Oregon Childrens Theater........................................7 Oregon College of Art and Craft........................... 33 Oregon Episcopal School...................................... 15 Oregon Gymnastics Academy.............................. 33 Oregon Hope Chinese School............................... 19 Oregon Zoo............................................................ 25 Peg Stilts............................................................... 33 Portland Aquarium............................................... 21 Portland Christian Schools................................... 17 Portland Early Learning Project............................ 13 Portland Jewish Academy.................................... 24 Portland Language Arts....................................... 17 Portland Montessori............................................. 12 Portland Park & Rec.............................................. 34 Portland Spirit....................................................... 21 Portland Trampolines...............................................2 Royal Ridges.......................................................... 29 School of Rock....................................................... 31 Scuola Italiana...................................................... 23 Sit! Stay! Pet Photography.................................... 17 Soccer Shots.......................................................... 35 Spielwerk Toys..........................................................9 SuperKids Resale................................................... 19 SW Community Center......................................... 25 Tears of Joy Theatre............................................... 25 The International School....................................... 29 The Kids’ Backyard Store..........................................2 Washington County Museum............................... 12 WeVillage.............................................................. 29 Whole Foods Market............................................. 36 World Forestry Center........................................... 19 World of Smiles..................................................... 17 Zenger Farms........................................................ 33 6 | NW Kids Magazine

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Publisher / Advertising Director Michelle Snell michelle@nwkidsmagazine.com Editorial Beth Friesenhahn beth@nwkidsmagazine.com Kelley Schaefer-Levi kelley@nwkidsmagazine.com Account Manager Laurel Ackerman laurel@nwkidsmagazine.com Client Services Coordinator Brenna Burke brenna@nwkidsmagazine.com Design Robyn Barbon robyn@folkloremedia.com Client Ad Design Karel Chan karel@nwkidsmagazine.com

Calendar Contributor Jana Wingate calendar@nwkidsmagazine.com Advertising Inquiries: 503-282-2711, ext. 1 sales@nwkidsmagazine.com Accounting & Business Services Heather Rex heather@nwkidsmagazine.com Connect With Us: • Phone: 503.282.2711 • email: contact@nwkidsmagazine.com • Facebook: facebook.com/nwkids • Twitter: @nwkids • Pinterest: pinterest.com/nwkids NW Kids is published monthly by Miche Media, LLC. Every effort is made to ensure accuracy; sometimes we make errors. Please let us know when we do and accept our apologies. Printed locally; Please recycle.

what we’re reading


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Portland Families Eat

Breakfast

by Laura Locker

Tom’s Restaurant With a nondescript exterior, located on the busy intersection of SE 39th and Division, one of Tom’s first charms is that it has one of the biggest parking lots in SE Portland (on Division that is no small thing). It is a classic diner where kids under 12 can enjoy the $3.95 special: two pancakes, two strips of bacon or ham, and one egg. The cooks shape the pancakes into a Mickey Mouse shape for the kids that, although often unrecognizable, is still endearing for the effort. Breakfast served all day.

It is 10am on a Saturday. Somehow it has taken us two hours to get everyone dressed and ready to leave the house, and the first danger signs of hypoglycemia are already setting in on the children. I have promised a family breakfast out in the world, but I am now faced with the reality of Saturday brunch lines in Portland with children. My kids will likely start re-enacting a scene from the “Hunger Games” if it takes more than ten minutes to get seated. So, where to go? Here are some suggestions for those of you who, like us, love breakfast with the kids but fear the wait.

style (Liege) waffles. The Alberta location is rarely full and the turnover for the seating area at the Hawthorne location, located inside the Bread and Ink Cafe, is quick. This is surprising considering how filling, delicious and inexpensive the waffles are. My daughter goes crazy for the Alberta, which is topped with thick-cut bacon and drizzled with maple syrup ($4.50), and my son loves the dark chocolate dipped waffle ($3.00).

Tilt Tilt’s big, glossy new Pearl district location at NW 13th and Everett is still relatively quiet during breakfast hours, but serves up a menu of solid, all-American biscuitbased sandwiches ($7-$10) that truly rival anything at Pine State. The enough-for-two sandwiches, and a variety of leviathan breakfast pastries, are all scratch-made on site. Kids can order eggs and more a la carte ($3), and the in-house Ristretto Roasters counter provides a full line of espresso and hot cocoa.

Waffle Window Waffle Window has two locations, one on SE 36th and Hawthorne and the other on NE 26th and Alberta. Both are excellent places to please children with sweet or savory Belgian8 | NW Kids Magazine

The Overlook Family Restaurant Located on North Skidmore and Interstate, the Overlook has served breakfast (and lunch and dinner) to Portland for over 40 years. The menu is extensive and has Greek offerings in addition to its classic American diner fare. Large windows and comfortable booths make it a cheery place to bring kids on drizzly days. Picky kids can order a la carte, and the waitstaff doesn’t bat an eye at complicated modifications. Laura Locker is a native Portlander who has lived and eaten around the world. She has two restaurant-loving children, aged 5 and 9.


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Hands-on training at OES

Future Tech Innovators:

STEM Camps by Kelley Schaefer-Levi

While some kids lean toward sports or nature and can’t wait to get outside as the school year comes to a close, some might welcome the free time to learn more about computer science and technology. Maybe your kiddo is a blogger or a gamer, or is simply curious about how websites are built. If any of these apply, you might consider sending your young techie to a camp specifically designed for them this summer. Luckily, Portland has a few options for nurturing your kiddo’s curiosity about how technology works. Oregon Episcopal school (OES) offers half and full day camps to grade school, middle school and high school students that are designed to engage students in higher levels of learning in their area of interest. Campers can create their own websites; begin to understand the basics of HGTML and coding, or if they’re into gaming can learn the basics of game design with Gamemaker 10 | NW Kids Magazine

and Scratch. Of the Computer & Technology camps available at OES, Summer Program Director, Joan Lowe says, “From rocketry to animation, our science and technology camps offer plenty of individual attention and a chance to work with state-of-the-art technology.” iD Tech also offers camps and academies for young techies. The national program will be offering tech camps at Lewis & Clark College this summer. Camps are open to kids ages 7-12 and for teens ages 13-18. Campers create iPhone® and Android™ apps, video games with Minecraft and other popular titles, C++ and Java programs, websites, digital movies, 3D models and animations with Autodesk® Maya®, robots, and more. The curriculum is hands-on and projectbased. Attendees gain self-confidence with the STEM skills they learn. Many incorporate their new tech expertise into school projects and become mentors for other students. With


this tech knowledge, some students even start businesses, write books, develop apps for their school, earn thousands of dollars selling their app in the Apple® Store, get summer internships at Facebook, and achieve other entrepreneurial business ventures. Karen Thurm Safran, Vice President of Marketing says of the camps, “Our programs are inspiring and life changing, and students have done amazing things. iD Tech is much more than just a camp.” Kid Institute of Technology (K.I.T), with camp programs in both Portland and Beaverton, offers morning and afternoon weeklong sessions in robotics engineering, stop-motion animated movie making, computer video game creation, & 3D game design. Each child is provided with their own computer to work on during class. Students receive both individual and group instruction from well-qualified staff. Tech camps are proving successful and have shown impressive results. Campers take what they’ve learned and apply it to their schoolwork and extracurricular activity, and some have gone on to work in the field. And with an ever-evolving world of innovation available to them, why not get them started as early as possible?

Do your kids master any app they try? We get lots of questions about how to choose an app. Here is a list compiled but not endorsed by iD tech for ages 4 and up. Each app has different learning components to improve skills in Math, Spelling and object recognition. Ages 4 and Under Shapes & Puzzles by Pirate Trio | Puzzles | Beginner | for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad Moose Math by Duck Duck Moose | Math | Beginner | for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android Intro to Math by Montessorium | Math | Intermediate | for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad TableTots | Letters, Spelling, Object Recognition, Math | Intermediate | for iPad, Android, Kindle Fire, Nook HD Ages 5-8 Daisy the Dinosaur | Coding | Beginner | for iPad Easy Studio | Animate with Shapes! | Animation | Beginner | for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad BugMath | Math | Intermediate | for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android Cato’s Hike: A Programming and Logic Odyssey | Coding | Intermediate to Advanced | for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad Ages 9-12 Robots for iPad | Robotics | Beginner | for iPad Animate It! | Animation | Intermediate | for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad Rube Works: The Official Rube Goldberg Invention Game | Innovation Intermediate | for iPhone, iPad, Android

Fun with Robotics at iD Tech

Move the Turtle. Programming for kids | Coding | Intermediate to Advance | for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad

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Camp Review:

The Joy Now Arts Project by Elodie Massa

I discovered the The Joy Now Arts Project a couple of years ago after watching a MarchFourth Marching Band show (If you don’t know MarchFourth you MUST check them out!) In the middle of the performance suddenly a whole bunch of kids, big and small, showed up and presented a show of their own!

interest in the performing arts. If you have a little show wo/man at home, this school will provide them with everything they need to grow into fantastic performers. If your child is shy and/or not confident, the teachers have the gentleness necessary to help them break free from their shells.

It was very impressive to see such young teenagers up on stilts, playing awesome tunes, performing all sorts of tricks. They were fantastic! My kids were screaming with excitement: “I want to do that too mummy.”

I feel these classes and camps will help increase my children’s skills of working together in a group, gaining confidence in themselves and most of all, making new friends and having fun. From “Rock Your Rhythm-Drumming for Kids” to Stilt Walking classes to costume design, The Joy Now Arts Project has something for every age and skill level.

I inquired about their program, and they were soon opening a session for small kids. I registered Leela (6 at the time) and Ylo (5) right away. They went every week last year and loved it, they would perform mini shows for us at home to present all of the tricks they had learned that day, what a pleasure. They are going back this year, eager to learn new things. I am delighted by the patience and creativity of the teachers. It is fantastic to see my little ones blooming with new confidence, developing fine motor skills (juggling with scarfs, turning plates on sticks…) and coming back from class beaming and excited to share with us their new found talents. The school offers a rich variety of classes and training, adapted to every kid’s level and 14 | NW Kids Magazine

The Joy Now Arts Project empowers, excites and engages youth 5-18 through circus arts, music and performing arts programs taught by members of Portland’s MarchFourth Marching Band. Sign up now for after school programs and summer camps. joynowproject.org Elodie Massa has been living in Portland for the past 10 years where both her children were born. She was born and raised in France and is a Dream Tailor Artist. elodiemassa.com


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A Natural Connection Between Kids and Pets by Kathy Eaton

Recognizing they’re not always the center of attention, kids learn compassion and responsibility in caring for pets. “It’s not always about what the child needs right now when there’s a pet who needs to be fed or walked,” said Jessica Wiseley Kruger, humane education manager at the Oregon Humane Society. Introducing baby to pets Fourteen months ago, Kruger introduced two resident dogs to her newborn baby, Eleanor. Both Woody, her Border Collie/terrier mix and Ranger, a high-energy Australian cattle dog/Pointer mix had been hyper socialized to kids ages four and up. Upon learning she was pregnant, Kruger desensitized her dogs by exposing them to noise-making lifesize dolls and observing their behavior with friend’s children. Initially the dogs appeared anxious about Eleanor’s crying but quickly learned that the baby was an important part of the family as humans were always holding or carrying her around. Vigilance is key Kruger advises parents not to leave their dogs alone with the baby, not for one minute. “Infants and toddlers are ground dwellers, so parents need to keep high value items to the dog away from their reach. Vigilance is key, you can never be too cautious,” she said. “It only takes a minute for disaster to happen, and you can never get it back.” Pets will adjust Kruger sees a natural connection between children and pets; parents can teach older children how to pick up pet’s body cues and reactions. Pets encounter children everywhere they go, in parks, in homes, and on the side-

OHS tips for parents: 1. Go slow and exercise patience when introducing pets and young children. 2. Never leave babies or toddlers under age 4 unattended around family pets. 3. B  e attentive to your dog’s need for exercise and attention. 4. Study your pet’s body language, like dogs licking their lips or cats flicking their tail. Subtle cues can escalate to growling and hissing which may predict more aggressive behavior like biting or scratching. 5. Invest in training: take your dog to classes to learn manners and skills. walk. Pets can learn that good things happen when babies are around. Training pets and kids In the classroom, Kruger has seen some children express fear around animals as a result of a bad experience, lack of exposure to pets or cultural bias. Her dog Woody is a great canine ambassador and she’s able to teach fearful children how to interact safely and act appropriately around him. Kruger advises kids not to hug their pets. Avoid prolonged eye contact or staring with dogs. Use side-to-side greetings: dogs don’t shake hands (paws) like humans. Always give the dog a choice by calling them over to you. In To Hug or Not, Michael Baugh wrote, “And yes, people do get bitten by their own dogs. It’s children mostly, hugging, kissing or riding the family dog.” continued on p. 18

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tressed and give their children tools they need to be successful,” said Roberts.

Woody at Work

Warning signs “Growling is good,” said Tanya Roberts, animal behavior expert with OHS, who views it as an audible, nonaggressive warning sign to children and adults. Growling is a clue that you should intervene between the dog and child and parents should not punish the dog for growling because it’s a warning sign. Playtime with pets Roberts advises that like kids, not all dog breeds are the same. Herding breeds in general can be tricky around young children who may squeal, run around and chase, and dogs often view it as an invitation to play. “A cattle dog bred to herd large animals uses its teeth to do so,” said Roberts. Guardian breeds like Great Pyrenees whose job is to protect their family or flock may snap at a child who doesn’t understand this instinct. Exuberant children who get in an animal’s space may upset them. Animals are vulnerable when pulled up off secure ground and dangled or worse yet, dropped. “Like babies, puppies can get tired and worn out, responding with nips when it doesn’t want to play any longer or just needs a nap,” said Roberts. Finding the right match When adopting a shelter pet or getting one from a breeder, the absolute goal is to find the right match according to Roberts. Parents should seek animals that fit their particular lifestyle or circumstance, keeping in mind family activities before settling on a particular dog who may not enjoy camping trips or hiking. When adopting a dog from OHS, every parent receives a copy of a one-page flyer Canine Common Sense. “Parents need to recognize and learn the cues of when dogs or cats are dis18 | NW Kids Magazine

For information about free classroom presentations at local schools, or schedule a tour of OHS, contact Jessica Wiseley Kruger at jessicaw@oregonhumane.org or call (503) 416-2986. Know a young Monet or Rembrandt? OHS is accepting student entries for its annual Be Kind to Animals Poster and Photo/ Essay Contest. Students in grades 1-12 are invited to create a poster or write a short story portraying a part of the OHS’s mission to help animals. Prizes are awarded to winners, and deadline for entries is March 19, 2014.

Resources Pet Meets Baby, brochure from the American Humane Society. americanhumane.org. Canine Common Sense, a 1-page flyer available from the Oregon Humane Society. oregonhumane.org “Dogs and Babies: Can they be Safe in the Same Household?” by Dr. Sophia Yin, veterinarian and animal behaviorist. drsophiayin.com “To Hug or Not?” by Michael Baugh, originally published in Houston PetTalk Magazine, June 2012. michaelbaugh. com/2012/07/12/to-hug-or-not/ Dog Training for Children, DVD by Dr. Ian Dunbar. dogwise.com

Kathy Eaton, originally from the east coast, has lived in Northeast Portland for almost 20 years. Her articles have been published in Just Labs On-line and Working Border Collie Magazines, as well as local community newspapers, the Hollywood Star News, The Bee, and the Canby Herald. Since retiring in 2007 from a career with the Federal government, Kathy enjoys volunteering at the Oregon Humane Society, traveling, and researching her family’s genealogy.


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Plush Boo the Dog at Papersource, $25

Millions of Cats by Wanda Gág at Powell’s, $8

found

around Town

AquaFarm, Aquaponic Fish Tank by Back to the Roots at Pets on Broadway, $60

Balancing Animal Boat Game by Plan Toys at Child’s Play, $20

Girl with Cats and Kittens by Playmobil at Kids at Heart, $8

Yeah Buddy Tee by Prefresh at Prefresh.com, $42

Calico Critters Cottontail Rabbit Family at Coffee Kids, $23 20 | NW Kids Magazine

Bee Pet Home by Thoughtful Gardener at Spielwerk, $24

Hand Embroidered Custom Dog Portrait, by Shophoopla on Etsy.com, $96


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STEM Experiment:

Balloon Blow-up Equipment Plastic flask (any other bottle like shampoo bottle, soda bottle, etc.) Spill tray or bowl Vinegar Baking soda Balloon Teaspoon

Procedure

1

S quirt approximately Âź cup of vinegar (acetic acid) into your flask or bottle. Place it in the spill tray or bowl to catch any spills.

2

Pour approximately 5mL (about 1 teaspoon) of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate, a base) into the balloon.

3

Carefully, and without spilling any of the baking soda from the balloon, attach the mouth of the balloon to the top of your flask or bottle.

4

Lift the balloon so the baking soda falls into the flask. If it leaks, hold the balloon onto the flask.

5

Watch the balloon inflate, as if by magic.

Why? The vinegar and baking soda create a chemical reaction. One of the results is CO2, carbon dioxide gas, which expands (gets bigger) and blows up the glove. Carbon dioxide is the same gas that humans and other animals breathe out (they breathe in oxygen). Plants, on the other hand, breathe in CO2 and breathe out oxygen. CO2 is also found in fire extinguishers, because it pushes oxygen out of the way. Fire, just like us, needs oxygen.

Mad Science is on a mission to spark the imagination and curiosity of children worldwide through fun, interactive and educational programs. With a range of hands-on activities and demonstrations, children explore science’s phenomena and how it relates to our daily experiences. portland.madscience.org 22 | NW Kids Magazine


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Best of Portland and beyond Our top picks for getting out this month

March

1

Spring is upon us and it’s time to get out and explore the great outdoors. Friends of Tryon Creek have numerous activities to help you connect with nature. Take the little ones on Friday for Story and Stroll, Saturdays involve a guided nature hike, or check out Owl Fest on Saturday, March 1st at 5pm. tryonfriends.org

2

Portland Japanese Gardens will be commemorating Hina Matsuri, an annual observance to mark the changing of the seasons. To celebrate, the gardens will have on display homemade dolls from Japan that represent the imperial family, now through March 3rd. japanesegarden.com

3

Help keep our beaches pristine and litter free with the annual Solve Spring Beach Clean-up on the Oregon Coast. Celebrating 28 years this spring, you and your family can take part in this important event to keep our oceans and beaches clean. On March 22nd, there will be 45 cleanup sites, ranging from Brookings to Astoria; choose your favorite beach or find a site close to home. solv.org

4

Celebrate Mardi Gras by attending the 11th anniversary spectacular of the MarchFourth Marching Band on Tuesday, March 4th at the Crystal Ballroom. The fun begins when the doors open at 6pm with crowd pleasing performances by DJ Global Ruckas and Joy Now Brigade. marchfourthmarchingband.com

Please confirm calendar events and performances as scheduling changes may occur. 26 | NW Kids Magazine


Photograph courtesy of Seaside International Hostel

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seasidehostel.net

While on the coast, be sure to bring your binoculars with you as March begins the northbound migration of whales on their way to Alaska’s Bering Sea. From March until June, you have a good chance of spotting more than one of the 18,000 whales that will pass by our beautiful coast during their journey. For more information on visiting one of the 24 viewing spots, check out: oregon.gov/ OPRD/PARKS/WhaleWatchingCenter/ pages/watch_weeks.aspx.

Calling all LEGO® fans! On March 8th and 9th, the Adult LEGO® enthusiast group, Bricks Cascade will be holding a public exhibition at the Oregon Convention Center. These creative LEGO® fans will wow you with thousands of artistic and imaginative LEGO® creations. Made from vintage to new versions of LEGOS®, this showcase of talent is certain to impress the whole family. brickscascade.com

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Photograph by Owen Carey

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Don’t let the title keep you awake at night. “Zombie in Love” is the new, charming Oregon Children’s Theatre musical about Mortimer, a lonely zombie dying to find true love. He’s tried the gym, but his arm kept falling off. He’s offered his actual heart to a classmate, but she ran away screaming. Now he’s pinned his hopes on the annual Cupid’s Ball. Will the girl of his dreams be waiting for him by the punch bowl? March 1 - March 23; octc.org

Could this get any cuter? Improve your reading skills and make a new friend by reading aloud to a therapy dog at the Multnomah County Library. Check the library’s website for times and locations. multcolib.org/events/read-dogs

Remember to check the NW Kids online calendar for dozens more outings and activities each day. Share with friends, subscribe to the RSS, add directly to your calendar, and more features. There’s something going on you don’t want to miss!! nwkidsmagazine.com/events/month NW Kids Magazine | 27


9

Local children’s entertainers are aplenty in Portland, with local shows all over the city every day of the week, and at every type of venue. From music to storytelling you can’t go wrong with these extraordinary and talented performers. Musicians like Mo Phillips (mophilips.com) and Tallulah’s Daddy (tallulahsdaddy.webs.com) let your kids’ inner rock star shine bright. Red Yarn lets his puppets do the talking and singing for him (redyarnproductions.com) and Olive and Dingo (oliveanddingo.com) let the shenanigans reign free with stories and balloons. Check their websites for show dates and times and get yourself out of the house, let the kids be entertained and give yourself a reprieve!

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Help support the Buckman Arts Focus Elementary school’s PTA, with their 24th annual Buckman Art Show and Sell. With over 140 artists and craftspeople, food, dance, musical performances and free supervised kids’ activities, this is one event you won’t want to miss. This amazing display of talent takes place on Saturday, March 8th and Sunday, March 9th starting at 11am. buckmanartshow.weebly.com


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Best Pet Books by cat Wiese of Green Bean Books This Little Hamster by Kass Reich (Board book $9.95) If you enjoyed numbers and counting with Kass Reich’s Hamsters Holding Hands, then be sure to follow up with colors! This Little Hamster uses playful hamsters to illustrate fun, colorful items. One hamster enjoys dancing in a blue tutu on a blue sofa, while another hamster adores brown chocolate with a brown crown Rhyming couplets help your little one have fun while learning about the world of colors! Paul Meets Bernadette by Rosy Lamb (Hardcover $14.00) Paul lives a monotonous life. He swims round and round, what else is there to do? But when Bernadette enters his bowl, she reveals the world Paul has been missing all along! A boat shaped like a banana; a vase holding a forest of beautifully colored trees; and even the sun and the moon (sunny-side up, of course). Rosy Lamb beautifully illustrates the vastness of the imagination with her saturated, thick brush strokes, and shows how a new friend can change your whole idea of the world around you.

The Pet Project: Cute and Cuddly Vicious Verses by Lisa Wheeler (Hardcover $16.99) For any child wanting a pet, you should know to do your research first! The Pet Project shows the scientific side of acquiring a pet. What would a scientist do? Devise a plan. You must do your research, write down your observations, and don’t forget to make hypotheses! Will a chicken’s squawk be too loud? Do skunks really smell that bad? Are turtles actually too slow? Lisa Wheeler helps you find what is just right for you in this silly scientific inquiry and rhyme! No! by Marta Altés (Paperback $7.99) Most dog owners understand their dogs are just trying to be good! Well, this little pup is no different. He’s just trying to help out. He only tastes your food to make sure it’s just right for you. He digs for treasure outside, all for you. What more could you ask for in a dog? There’s just one little thing that this dog doesn’t quite understand . . . The adorable illustrations by Marta Altés are full of the playfulness you find in your own dog. Surely you can’t say “No” to this canine!

1600 NE Alberta Street 503-954-2354 greenbeanbookspdx.com

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B e I ma g

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t i na

Free Family Pass* GET STARTED TODAY! WWW.CLUBSPORTS.COM Now enrolling for Spring and Summer Camps! *Some restrictions apply. Must be a local resident, firsttime guest, 21 years or older to receive free guest pass. One per household. ID is required. Expires 3/31/14.

503/616-5205 18120 SW LOWER BOONES FERRY RD TIGARD, OR 97224

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healthy eating

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