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FROM HARVEST TO HOLIDAY we’ve got you covered ‘TIS THE SEASON: 46 gift ideas under $100

Celerie Kemble

(+ baby on the way): Ever-evolving style on Central Park South

Happy Birthday, Lonny

We’re celebrating our one-year anniversary!


MARKET

SLEEK VANITY + HEAD-TURNING EXT

+

+ Cheetah Roman Chair: $899, Horchow

Cabana Vanity: $1,995, ducduc

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+ Dressing Table: $2,085, Century Furniture

Bubbles Ceramic Side Table: $129, West Elm

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+ Princess Vanity: Call for price (+420-775-931-639), Process

Drew Stool: $139.20, Burke Decor

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+ Tribeca Vanity: $3,765, Pieces 1

Lonny

march • april

2011

Royal Python Faux Snakeskin Rectangle Bench: $383.95, Bellacor


MARKET

TRAS = PICTURE-PERFECT PRIMPING

+ 24” Hollywood Strip Light in Reverse Silver Leaf: $420, Circa Lighting

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Natural beauty

Giorgio Armani Gold Rush Holiday 2010 Palette: $55, Nordstrom

+ Hinge Sconce: $59.95, CB2

Teint Terrybly: $87, Barneys New York

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=

Playfully polished

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Downtown glam

Berlin Red Compact: $55, Neue Galerie

Rabbit Lamp: $501, Hive

+ Elkins Double Sconce: $294, Circa Lighting

=

Animal instincts

YSL Matte and Radiant Pressed Powder: $45.50, Sephora 2011

march • april

Lonny

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MARKET

FASHION PLATE Donna Karan brings high fashion to the table with her new collection for Lenox

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nvite haute couture to dinner with Donna Karan’s tableware collection for Lenox. Fashioned from blown glass, fired metals, and sculpted wood, the collection includes dinnerware, glassware, and flatware as well as limited-edition porcelain giftware. Handcrafted and organic in shape, the designs are luxe yet functional for everyday use. “Each piece is a balance of artistry and function, modernity and soul,” says Glenn de Stefano, president of Donna Karan Lenox. “The perfect example is the sleek, Manhattan-inspired Seven Easy Pieces collection. Its mix-and-match system easily takes you from breakfast to dinner.” r

Vanessa Van Ryzin

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Rippled Vases: $200, Neiman Marcus

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This hand-carved wood vase made in Thailand from sustainable mango wood will be available at Lenox.com on May 1st.

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march • april

2011

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Seven Easy Pieces Set: $425, Neiman Marcus Abstract Coral Round Bowl: $300, Neiman Marcus Hand Carved Wood Smooth Tall Vase: $175, Neiman Marcus Artisan Glass Black Cased Grand Low Bowl: $750, Neiman Marcus Small Singing Bowl: $75, Neiman Marcus Rift 5-Piece Place Setting: $70, Neiman Marcus


MARKET

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ring warm, natural elements to modern interiors with RabLabs, designer Anna Rabinowicz’s line of home accessories. Offering “an antidote to contemporary technology,” the line—ranging from tabletop decor to stationery—is made of semiprecious gems such as agate and crystal and luxurious materials such as 24-karat gold and sterling silver. “Handcrafted by artisans, our products combine precious materials with cutting-edge design,” says Rabinowicz. “They’re jewels for the table.” L

Eye Candy W

ith its sleek construction, the Candy Light brings Baccarat’s venerable 250year history into the modern era. Designed by Jaime Hayon, it’s available in copper, platinum, and white. Hayon seamlessly contextualizes Baccarat’s legacy for the 21st-century consumer with the delicately embossed waffle collar and cut-crystal shade, reinvigorating a traditional material. L Candy Lights: $2,400; Baccarat

cutting edge

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eep your decor aesthetic unique and personalized by considering furnishings designed with outside-the-box thinking, such as the innovative products from Moroso. Under the creative direction of Patrizia Moroso, daughter of the original founders, the Italian furniture company continues to stretch the limits of design. Recently, Moroso released the Soft Wood sofa, a hardwood frame topped with polyurethane and covered in a silky-smooth wood print textile to illustrate the difference between the visual and tactile experience. “The world is changing fast,” says Moroso. “People demand something extra special for their homes.” L Soft Wood by Front: $7,380; Moroso (800-705-6863)

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july • august

2011

Kiva Platters: $290–$330; RabLabs


MARKET

DROP A

hint...

Celebrate the season of love in high style by taking the guesswork out of your Valentine’s Day wishes

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Lonny

january • february

2011


MARKET

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3.1 Phillip Lim Disco Bralette: $115, Barneys New York 3.1 Phillip Lim Tap Shorts: $75, Barneys New York Custom Calligraphy Paper Weights: $95, Bernard Maisner Thin Buckle Bracelet: $69, Leighelena Fox Love Note: $50 (set of 10), Dempsey & Carroll Wishbone Charm Necklace on Chain: $67, Viv & Ingrid

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Othello Candle by Ladurée: $68, Aedes de Venustas Lip Tease Cup and Saucer, Reiko Kaneko: $47.42, Liberty of London Marshmallow Triple Milled Soap: $19, Mor Maldives Jewelry Box: $180, Vellum New York (Call 212343-3499 to order)

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“Everyday I Love You” Wafer Notebook: $60, Smythson

2011

january • february

Lonny

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HOW-TO

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NOVEMBER

DECEMBER 2011


HOW-TO

Seasonal Soiree Lonny Editor in Chief Michelle Adams shares her secrets for throwing an elegant and stress-free holiday dinner party

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he holidays are a time of joy, filled with celebrations with family and friends. Therefore, this year, let’s cast aside the stress that often comes with the season—even if it’s your turn to host the party. When the role of hostess fell to Lonny’s Michelle Adams, she knew just how to keep her spirits high: careful planning. A hostess’s enjoyment rises with her level of preparation, so if you’re looking to throw your own holiday fete without the fret, take note of Adams’ secrets to throwing a seamless soiree. L

Send invitations three to six weeks in advance. The holidays are a busy time, so you want to be sure your guests reserve room for you on their calendars. Plus, the sooner you receive the RSVPs, the sooner you can begin to adequately prepare.

Written by Shawn Gauthier • Photography by Patrick Cline • Art Direction by Michelle Adams 2011 NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

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HOW-TO

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LIGHTING Create accent lighting with candle-lit hurricane lamps. Your guests will appreciate it; everyone looks better by candlelight.

12" Modern Short Hurricane in Natural Brass: $450; Ralph Lauren Home

18" Modern Tall Hurricane in Natural Brass: $550; Ralph Lauren Home

FLATWARE AND PLATES

Pic yet Bamoun Stripe Fabric sch in Kohl: $240/yard; tom Ralph Lauren Home ah Edith Metallic Tweed in Umber: cle $240/yard; Ralph Lauren Home abl For fab Art Deco design of her formal dinnerw setting would boast the glitz of the hol

PARTY PL Maddox 24-Karat Gold Flatware: $1,500; Ralph Lauren Home

Hutchinson Charger: $195; Ralph Lauren Home

PLACE

Callia Diamond Deco Dessert Plate: $95; Ralph Lauren Home

What mood do you want to create? A candlelit dinner with low music and intimate conversation? A swinging cocktail party with dancing and jazzy music? Whatever you choose, translate it into your table’s decor. Adams imagined an elegant evening that combined Art Deco’s urbane sophistication with Ralph Lauren’s romantically rustic Southwestern style. To this end, she paired gold Ralph Lauren flatware with a Callia Diamond Deco plate, underscoring the look with a leopard charger.

Set your table to perfe A. salad fork B. dinner fork C. napkin D. charger E. dinner plate F. salad plate

GLASSWARE I

Paulette Highball: $45; Ralph Lauren Home

Norwood Goblet: $70; Ralph Lauren Home

Norwood Wine Celeste Champagne Glass: $65; Ralph Flute: $115; Ralph Lauren Home Lauren Home

Decide on the perfect glassware. “Understated glassware,” says Adams, “allows your dinnerware to take center stage.”

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B C

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DECEMBER 2011


HOW-TO

INENS

FLOWERS

ck your linens. After searching for a festive t sophisticated tablecloth that suited her color heme, Adams decided instead to design a cusm cloth made from one of her favorite fabrics, heavy twill with touches of gold. “Most dry eaners are able to quickly sew simple, reasonly priced tablecloths and runners,” she says. r napkins, Adams chose a Southwest-style bric with a small diamond motif to echo the ware. This combination ensured that the table lidays and the warmth of a cozy ski lodge.

LANNING

E SETTINGS

G. knife H. spoon I. bread plate J. highball glass K. goblet L. wineglass

K L

F E D

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Get your holiday floral arrangements right with Tom’s advice: • Keep table centerpieces low so they don’t block sight lines and disrupt conversations. • Heavily scented flowers such as oriental lilies don’t belong on the dinner table, but a big bouquet of them is perfect for an entryway. • A single bloom in the powder room is always a nice touch.

ection with this helpful guide.

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Choose your centerpieces. Centerpieces add texture and color to the table. To ensure a selection of beautiful blooms, Adams turned to florist Tom Borgese. “Sometimes it’s more interesting to use a nontraditional color scheme,” says Borgese. “The burgundy and raspberry palette is unexpected, yet still feels appropriate with its dark, rich textures.”

• If you’re bringing flowers to a party, make sure they’re already in a vase so your host doesn’t have to arrange them.

INVITATIONS Consider using a professional calligrapher for the invites, particularly for black-tie events. “In our age of e-vites, it’s exciting to receive an old-fashioned letter, much less an invitation addressed in calligraphy,” says Adams, who hired calligrapher Anne Robin. “And, while you’re at it, ask your calligrapher to create place cards. It shows your guests that you’re honored to have them at your party.”

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DECEMBER

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HOW-TO

DAY OF PART To avoid the stress of meal preparation, Adams hired chef Dan Kluger from ABC Kitchen. “For one, I can’t cook a Pop-Tart without burning it,” says Adams. “But, more important, hiring a caterer allows the hostess to enjoy her own party.” Named Best New Restaurant of 2011 by the James Beard Foundation, ABC Kitchen operates on a farm-to-table approach, sourcing 70 percent of its organic menu locally. Kluger’s menu for Adams’ party included such drool-worthy dishes as crispy oysters, salt-baked black bass, and apple dumplings. “Serving family-style dishes at holiday parties creates a more communal and interactive dining experience,” says Kluger. 1

Click here to learn more about ABC Kitchen

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(1) Kluger and his catering crew for the evening. (2) Kluger prepares uni toast with spicy habanero mayonnaise and lime segment. (3) Fig salad with arugula and shaved ham. “These dishes are simple,” says Kluger, “yet have a little luxury to them.” 4

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DECEMBER 2011


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(4) Salt-baked black bass, served with roasted beans and sofrito. (5) Black truffles. “Black truffles, sea urchins, caviar, and oysters are not your everyday items,” Kluger says. “They’re a bit more special and indulgent, and perfect for a holiday party.” (6) Apple dumplings with cinnamon ice cream. (7) Crispy oysters with crème fraîche, caviar, and dill. (8) Dry aged rib-eye, cauliflower, and black truffles.

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Dan’s Tips for Hiring the Perfect Caterer Find someone who’s passionate about catering, professional, organized, and has previous experience. Ask to see menus and pictures of dishes he or she has prepared in the past. Narrow your search by selecting a caterer who’ll prepare the type of food you and your guests want, and make sure you taste the food before the event. 8

2011 NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

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HOW-TO On the day of the party, set the table early. Completing that task will give you peace of mind and ample time for last-minute chores. It might sound old-fashioned, but a well-choreographed seating plan can make a party. Try not to seat couples side by side in order to encourage them to talk to strangers. Pair the socially graceful with the shy in order to bring them out. Consider asking everyone to switch places between courses to give your guests a chance to chat with multiple dinner partners and to prevent the evening’s energy from lagging.

Dinner-table conversation with a stranger can be awkward. To stimulate lively topics, offer your guests such conversation pieces as horoscopes, news clippings, or even a fortune cookie at each place setting. Such small gestures provide an easy way to jump-start an evening and make your guests feel appreciated. Be sure to rearrange your furniture to accommodate cocktail-hour mingling. Women wearing floor-length gowns are unlikely to sit down before dinner, so make sure to provide them with comfortable places to stand.

SETTING THE SCENE 12

Lonny

NOVEMBER

•

DECEMBER 2011


HOW-TO

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(1) Supply each place setting with a copy of the evening’s menu. Guests will feel as if they’re at an intimate restaurant. (2) Set up a self-serve bar so guests don’t have to wait for their drinks. Adams also poured flutes of her favorite bubbly, Veuve Clicquot, before people arrived so each person could be greeted with a glass of Champagne. (3) Mix and match dishes and glassware. Adams paired Ralph Lauren’s angular Art Deco dinnerware with leopard chargers. Custom place settings personalize a table and make your guests feel welcome.

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DECEMBER

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(1) Designer Nick Olsen converses with his neighbor. (2) Designers Elizabeth Bauer and Laura Day catch up beside the breathtaking view. (3) Designers Ryan Korban, Ron Marvin, and Callie Jenschke share a drink before dinner is served. (4) Adams and designer Amanda Nisbet preside over the ends of the dinner table.


HOW-TO 3

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In the end, the key to every great party is great company. “These are all designers and dear friends of mine who have been endlessly supportive of Lonny throughout the past years,” says Adams. “I couldn’t have asked for a more inspiring group.”

FINAL FETE

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DECEMBER

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arts culture

A look into design-savvy travel via the Parisian Hotel Keppler

Written by

Shawn Gauthier

Photography by

Patrick Cline

Styled by

Michelle Adams

Illustrations by

Caitlin McGauley


n the buzzing, jet-setting industry of travel, it’s evident that trends are not exclusive to the runway, and that consumers are just as interested in stylizing their getaways as they are their wardrobes. Lately, vacationers have approached organized escapes with an entirely new ideal; seeking out boutique hotels that feel more like chic “homes� as opposed to the commercialized industry standard, preferring the refuge of a more intimate, uniquely styled venue.


n the buzzing, jet-setting industry of travel, it’s evident that trends are not exclusive to the runway, and that consumers are just as interested in stylizing their getaways as they are their wardrobes. Lately, vacationers have approached organized escapes with an entirely new ideal; seeking out boutique hotels that feel more like chic “homes” as opposed to the commercialized industry standard, preferring the refuge of a more intimate, uniquely styled venue. “In general, people have become a lot more aware of their surroundings, so when they travel, they want to be impressed and inspired,” says Tamara Heber Percy, co-founder of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, a hotel booking service out of London that specializes in individualized and boutique hotels. “The

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abric and wallpapers include designs from Ralph Lauren, Manuel Canovas, Pierre Frey and Dedar, as well as rugs from the luxury carpet company Tai Ping.

issue two

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Don’t forget the romance: Book a special night in your hometown and keep the romance alive in an affordable fashion. Plan an evening for two that suggests only dinner, then sweep your partner to the special overnight surprise.

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Swap distance for decadence: Traveling doesn’t need to cross the border. Save a bundle on costs and snap up city-break destination deals from low-cost airlines, leaving you extra money for dinner in Napa Valley, shopping in Miami or a night in an NYC luxury hotel.

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Play the packing game: Utilize your carry-ons and pack light. If your destination is a great shopping zone, take half the luggage and twice the cash. Another suitcase secret: Interweave your folded clothes with issues sprayed with your favorite scent.

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Enjoy getting there: Make sure your journey is half the fun. Check in online to avoid the hassle at the airport, and stay away from the very front or back of the plane to steer clear of high traffic bathroom zones.

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Avoid plane drain – moisturize, avoid alcohol and arrive fresh. During the flight, baste your skin in moisturizer to prevent arriving crumpled, and spritz some perfume to wake you up upon arrival. Sunglasses are a glamorous essential for just-off-the-plane eyes.

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issue two


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Flying From the Cozy in the Resting on the VIP treatcolors seatback rocket charm and 2 air ment for 1 Keep 3 4 5 6 tray of... carry on your ID Globe-Trotter速 Centenary 21" trolley case, $1,350, J.Crew

Stripe Travel Set: $29.50, J.Crew

Passport Cover with Slide Closure (Red Viana): $180, Smythson

Gold Suitcase Boxed Stationary: $55, Dempsey and Carroll

Lightweight merino wool shawl waterfall (black): $215, Barneys

Par Avion Airline: $50, kate spade new york

issue two

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IN GOOD TASTE

New-World Classic Giada de Laurentiis’ Tuscan White Bean and Garlic Soup is a simple, hearty meal for the cool, crisp days of autumn

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ot only is Giada de Laurentiis an Emmy Award–winning chef and a New York Times bestselling author, but she was also recently given the honor of wining and dining Prince William and Kate during their visit to the States in July. As a native Italian living on the West Coast, she blends Old World with New, creating a healthy and easy compromise between family traditions and the practicalities of a fast-paced life. Kid-friendly and Buckingham Palace–approved, her cuisine strikes the perfect balance between sophistication and simplicity. Her Tuscan White Bean and Garlic Soup is a fall staple; hearty and comforting, it’s filled with ingredients she recommends everyone have on hand in the pantry, such as lowsodium chicken broth and white beans. Although Italians consider soup a snack, de Laurentiis suggests transforming this recipe into a meal by adding cooked kale, Swiss chard, or sausage, and, for those picky eaters in the family, serving crostini for dipping. —K.C. L 22

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OCTOBER 2011

Tuscan White Bean and Garlic Soup Recipe courtesy of Giada de Laurentiis Yield: 4 to 6 servings 2 tablespoons butter 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 shallots, chopped 2 sage leaves, stems removed 2 15-ounce cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed 4 cloves garlic, cut in ½ 4 cups low-sodium chicken broth ½ cup cream ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 6 slices ciabatta bread Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling Place a medium, heavy soup pot over medium heat. Add the butter, olive oil, and shallot. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the shallots are softened, about 3 minutes. Add the sage leaves, cannellini beans, and garlic, and stir to combine. Add the chicken stock to the pan. Bring the mixture to a simmer. Cook until the garlic is softened, about 15 minutes. Pour the soup into a large bowl. Carefully ladle ⅓ to ½ of the soup into a blender and puree until smooth. Be careful to hold the top of the blender tightly, as hot liquids expand when they are blended. Pour the blended soup back into the soup pan. Puree the remaining soup. Once all the soup is blended and back in the soup pan, add the cream, salt, and pepper. Keep warm, covered, over very low heat. Place a grill pan over medium-high heat. Drizzle the slices of ciabatta bread with extra-virgin olive oil. Grill the bread until warm and golden grill marks appear, about 3 minutes per side. Serve the soup in bowls with the grilled bread alongside. CLICK HERE to PRINT


IN GOOD TASTE

Stainless Steel Mezzaluna Knife by Giada de Laurentiis for Target: $21.79; Target

Chicken Stock by Giada de Laurentiis for Target: $2.99; Target Mud Flared Bowls by Mud Australia: $17–$120; Horne

2011 SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

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IN GOOD TASTE Serves 4

fresh cATCH Celebrate summer’s arrival with a seasonal seafood recipe from Barton Seaver, paired with expert fish-buying tips from Santi Zabaleta

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arton Seaver is a Washington, D.C.–based chef and National Geographic Fellow known for his efforts to restore our relationship with the ocean. Here he shares a recipe from his first cookbook, For Cod and Country, hitting bookstores this month. “Barramundi is a great substitute for the not-always-available and usually-not-sustainable snapper,” says Seaver. “It has the same thin skin, which crisps nicely in the pan, and a similar meaty texture and mild sweetness. Here, I pair it with a simple rice pilaf enlivened with scallions.”

Barramundi with Toasted Almond Butter and Basmati Pilaf

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing fillets 1½ cups basmati rice 3 cups water Salt 3 tablespoons slivered almonds 3 tablespoons butter, softened 1 teaspoon prepared horse­ radish 1 clove garlic, finely grated on a Microplane or very finely minced ½ tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley Four 5-ounce portions skin-on barramundi fillet, brined (click below for how to brine) 1 bunch scallions, chopped For the pilaf, heat the olive oil in a medium saucepan over high heat. Add the rice and cook, stirring constantly, until the rice is golden brown and has a rich, nutty aroma. Add the water and bring to a simmer. Season with salt to taste and reduce the heat to low. Cover and let cook until all the water is absorbed, about 15 minutes. Preheat the broiler. For the almond butter, toast the almonds in a small, dry sauté pan over medium heat. This should take 3 to 4 minutes— watch closely! Continuously shake the pan so the nuts brown evenly all over. When they are golden brown (a little uneven color is OK here), place them in a small bowl and add the butter, horseradish, garlic, parsley, and a pinch of salt. Mix to incorporate and set aside. For the barramundi, place each of the fillets in an ovenproof pan with the skin side up. Brush the skin of each fillet with a little bit of oil and broil for about 7 minutes. The skin should begin to blister and crisp as the flesh cooks evenly. Pull it from the oven just before the fillets are

Photography and Styling by Isa Salazar 24

Lonny

may • june

2011

CLICK HERE TO PRINT


IN GOOD TASTE

Flat-leaf parsley, scallions, and basmati rice Prepared almond butter

Grated garlic

Prepped ingredients

The almond butter pairs nicely with all kinds of fish

(We substituted fresh red snapper from Santi’s A&H Gourmet and Seafood Market for the barramundi called for in the recipe.)

Fish brine

We asked Santi Zabaleta— fishmonger and former executive chef at La Taberna del Alabardero in D.C.—to lend us tips on everything fishy. If you’re in the D.C. area, be sure to visit his neighborhood grocery, A&H Gourmet and Seafood Market, where you’ll find impeccably fresh fish, delectable specialty foods from Spain and Portugal, and great cooking advice from the friendly guys behind the counter. Not to mention you’ll be pleasantly surprised by the prices…

1. What are a couple of good rules to follow when purchasing fish? If you enjoy seafood, find a local fishmonger—someone you can talk to and trust. A fishmonger can offer you specialty advice on choice seafood cuts and can direct you to what’s best that day, that season. If you’re on your own, however, look for fish meat that’s firm and has a nice shine, not a dull look. 2. How should fresh fish smell? It shouldn’t smell fishy; fish should smell like the ocean! 3. Sometimes there are stray bones found in fish fillets. What’s a good method to remove them? Tweezers work well, though I recommend cooking fish on the bone or whole—that’s where the flavor is. 4. Is it OK to leave the skin on while cooking fish? In most cases, yes. It helps keep the fillet intact, preventing it from flaking apart. 5. What’s your favorite fish to eat? Bacalao (salted cod), which is typical to Northern Spain.

2011

may • june

Lonny

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ARTS & CULTURE

Lilly Pulitzer relaxing at her Palm Beach home, in a photo taken by renowned society photographer Howell Conant.

Written by Shawn Gauthier • Photography by Patrick Cline • Art Direction by Michelle Adams 26

Lonny

january • february

2011


ARTS & CULTURE

Pulitzer Prize

The design team at Lilly Pulitzer takes us inside the Pennsylvania art studio where its whimsical prints are born

Courtesy of Lilly Pulitzer

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january • february

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lly Courtesy of Li

Pulitzer

ARTS & CULTURE

Above: Pulitzer running fabric swatches to her printing factory in Key West as her husband, Peter, looks on. Right: The designer in her original Palm Beach shop in 1962.

ivacious New York socialite Lilly Pulitzer was never satisfied with being a lady of leisure. After eloping and moving to Palm Beach at age 21, she set up a juice stand in one of her husband’s orange groves. Needing an outfit that would hide the juice stains, she asked her seamstress to create a shift in a colorful print. “People started telling her, ‘Hey, we love the juice, but we really want the dress,’” says Lilly Pulitzer Fashion Director Janie Schoenborn. And voilà, a brand was born. Pulitzer’s fashions exploded in popularity after Jacqueline Kennedy appeared in one of Pulitzer’s shifts on a 1962 LIFE magazine cover. “People have an emotional connection to these prints,” says Schoenborn. “They’re happy, a little devil-maycare, and very optimistic.” Now, almost 50 years later, Lilly Pulitzer has grown into a lifestyle brand 28

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2011

selling everything from the original shift dress to sportswear to iPhone cases. Inspiration comes to Schoenborn and her team of designers (headquartered in an art studio in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania) from a variety of sources: Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island led to the best-selling print Booty Call, and the Grateful Dead inspired summer 2011’s Pink Begonias. Events from the designers’ daily lives also sneak in. “A team member’s breakup inspired the Queen of Hearts print,” says Schoenborn. “Everything that’s going on in our lives becomes a part of the process.” Recently, the Lilly Pulitzer team began translating the company’s whimsical sensibility to the stores’ decor. Disco balls and floor-to-ceiling zebra wallpaper have infused several shops with a quintessential Palm Beach vibe. “We want to take our customers’ breath away, to make them smile or chuckle,” says Schoenborn. “Anything to add a little twinkle.” r


ARTS & CULTURE

Courtesy of Lilly Pulitzer

In the summer of 1964, Pulitzer enjoys a boat ride in one of her classic print dresses.

Cut from the Same Cloth

Courtesy of Lilly Pulitzer

A close friend from boarding school in Connecticut, stylesavvy Jacqueline Kennedy helped Lilly Pulitzer become a household name when she began wearing her shifts. The two often spent time together in Palm Beach in the early ’60s.

2011

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ARTS & CULTURE

“Lilly was a rule

A dress from the spring 2011 readyto-wear collection is modeled in front of a background painted by print designer Paige Smith.

Artist Jeff Mattia’s inspiration board.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Janie Schoenborn, Fashion Director for Lilly Pulitzer.

breaker. We love that.”

—Janie Schoenborn

Painting

Computer Rendering

The Lilly Pulitzer design team paints or draws all prints by hand. The designs are then scanned into a computer, where they’re cleaned, adjusted, and perfected. Finally, the designs are printed on fabric and turned into garments.

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Ready to We

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ARTS & CULTURE “The initial creation of the line is very free,” says Schoenborn. Together, the team brainstorms to develop each season’s overriding theme, and then the designers begin painting and drawing potential ideas.

All Lilly Pulitzer designs are created from start to finish at the company’s in-house art studio in King of Prussia. “Very few companies have full-time artists like these print designers,” says Schoenborn. “We don’t buy anything; every embroidery, every lace—it’s all designed in house. That’s very rare.”

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ARTS & CULTURE

“Lilly really is the symbol of

Palm Beach.” —Janie Schoenborn

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Enter the world of Lilly... The Lilly Pulitzer store in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, recently received a very Lillyesque makeover. “We want the stores to have a personality that embodies the brand,” says Schoenborn. Trains and planes on the walls and ceilings pay tribute to the brand’s resort roots, and framed prints let customers see how the designs have evolved. The bathroom is adorned with zebra print, and 3-D orange slices line the dressing room’s walls in honor of Pulitzer’s juice-stand days. “Our goal is to always have the Lilly spirit embrace you the second you walk in the door,” says Schoenborn.

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ARTS & CULTURE

2011

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ARTS & CLUTURE

Written by Shawn Gauthier 36

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december

2010

Photography by David Land

Art Direction by Michelle Adams


ARTS & CULTURE

David Hoey Senior Director of Store Presentation David Hoey shares the secret behind Bergdorf Goodman’s spectacular holiday window displays nce upon a time, Bergdorf Goodman’s holiday window displays were celebrated for their simplicity. But when window designers Linda Fargo, senior vice president of fashion office and store presentation, and David Hoey, senior director of store presentation, were first hired in 1996, they felt it was time to shake things up. “We were new to the store,” says Hoey. “We were excited to be at the corner of 58th and Fifth, right in the center of town. And…we were not minimalists when it came to holiday.” Full of wit, fantasy, and impeccable detail, Bergdorf ’s windows have since showcased everything from two tons of quartz crystals to miniature monkeys dressed as Louis IV. “It’s all about the surprise,” says Hoey. “We don’t simply get away with what we can get away with; we take it to the nth degree.” From creating a concept to un2010

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Photo by Ricky Zehavi and John Cordes

ARTS & CULTURE

Since Bergdorf’s designers work to create the store’s holiday window displays throughout the year, the back room is a constant site of inspiration and change.

veiling the final product, the entire process takes a full year. “Our team…is the best imaginable,” says Hoey. “They’re the secret behind our displays.” Though the department store has 35 windows, the real show takes place in the five ground-floor windows facing Fifth Avenue at 58th Street. This year’s “Wish You Were Here” theme takes creative license with the idea of holiday travel. Mannequins dressed to the nines in Bergdorf ’s best can be seen voyaging the globe and beyond. “We want to astonish people, to startle them, to make them feel like they just went on a real trip,” says Hoey. “Like they just wandered onto Fifth Avenue…and ended up on the moon.” r

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Photo by Ricky Zehavi and John Cordes

Secondary windows facing 58th Street required such precision in their development that a freelance architect created scaled paper replicas to ensure accuracy. “These windows were made of very elaborate scenery that required a photo lab to enlarge,” says Hoey. “They needed to fit perfectly.”

Watch how the windows are made!

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“The Scenic Route” mannequin is clad in Oscar de le Renta. 40

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Inspired by Le Voyage dans la Lune, a 1902 silent French film, “Day Tripping” features a primordial lunarscape with animals encrusted in crystal and quartz. “We figured if we’re going to use travel as a theme, we’d better throw in a real surprise,” says Hoey. 2010

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It took a full year to collect the materials needed to build the “flying contraption” for the “Ready for Takeoff” window. For inspiration, Bergdorf’s design team consulted sources dating back to the 17th century. 42

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ARTS & CULTURE

The nautically themed “Full Speed Ahead” includes a custom-made sailor ensemble by designer Naeem Khan.

“Our windows are about fantasy, surprise, high camp, wit, and a little bit of show business.”

e

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Assouline’s limited-edition Windows at Bergdorf Goodman highlights a decade of the department store’s renowned window displays.

­—DAVID HOEY

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oastline casual Designer Jarlath Mellett transforms an Amagansett home into a relaxed retreat

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Written by Shawn Gauthier

Photography by Patrick Cline

Art Direction by Michelle Adams


Mellett painted the walls with vertical stripes to accentuate the entryway’s high ceilings. The chair, which is crafted of antlers, is from Mellett’s Amagansett shop.


Jarlath Mellett, a fashion industry veteran, employs a couture metaphor to explain why details are vital to his interior designs: “Think of shopping for a simple shift dress,” he says. “There could be hundreds of them, but the one that has that attention to detail is the one that stands out above the rest. It’s the one you’ll remember.” Likewise, the Amagansett home Mellett recently completed for a client revels in carefully curated detail. By focusing on the home’s picturesque location and the client’s laid-back personality, the designer created “a little beach wonderland” complete with a poolside cabana. “When people come to the Hamptons, they’re looking for an experience,” says Mellett. “So we utilized every inch of this home to create the perfect getaway.”

Focusing on an airy, seaside vibe, Mellett bleached and whitewashed the floors and decorated the rooms with antique French furnishings stripped to their natural state. The neutral palette is peppered with turquoises and greens pulled directly from the home’s stunning views. To provide contemporary touches, large-scale graphic wallpapers and bold artwork punctuate the space. There’s a casual coherence to the home’s decor. Instead, each room flows calmly into the next; a root coffee table in the living room complements the dining room’s rustic table; the white master bedroom offers serene contrast to the sitting room’s rose wallpaper. “The home is filled with unexpected and interesting accents,” says Mellett. L 2011

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Left: A mural of trees in faded gray tones provides a sense of depth in the living room. Above: A coffee table handcrafted from tree roots is topped with beachthemed books.

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Jarlath’s Tips for Bringing

the

beach indoors

Fill large glass vases with seashells. Include the colors of the ocean in your decorative palette. Seek out unconventional beach-themed accessories, such as a lifeguard stand. Bleach your furniture to appear weathered by years of exposure to sea and salt air. Use beachwear fabrics—breezy linens, sheer cottons, and faded khakis—for duvets, slipcovers, and drapes.


In another guest bedroom, Mellett created a “mid-century moment” beside the bed with a tulip table and a vintage light. Opposite: Instead of focusing on one accent wall as in other spaces, Mellett chose to cover all four walls of this guest room in beach grass wallpaper. “It provides a sense of walking over the dunes to the ocean,” says Mellett. A Hans Wagner chair and a rustic side table enhance the room’s theme.

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This Graham & Brown wallpaper, patterned with empty frames, has been personalized with playful touches by the Vincent family. “This home is happy, fun, whimsical, and creative,” says decorator Lisa Sherry, “just like this family.”

Decorator Lisa Sherry creates a whimsical home for a playful family

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Courtney and Scott Vincent relax in their living room.

Written by Shawn Gauthier

Photography by Patrick Cline

Art Direction by Michelle Adams


The home’s original layout was confused and closed off, resulting in a maze of doorways. “We opened the plan and exposed the staircase so that it became the focal point from which the house could radiate,” says Sherry.


Sherry juxtaposed a 1950s patio chair with a decorated cow skull. “Together, they create a simple, organic story,” she says.

isa Sherry, a photo stylist turned decorator, approaches interiors as she would a photo shoot. “I see a room as a series of vignettes playing off each other,” she says. “I pride myself on accessorizing, as well as graphically composing, every space.” Her style, which she calls “casual luxe,” is composed of four ingredients: organic beauty, quiet energy, unexpected touches, and unique juxtapositions. Whether through jewelry draped over a framed painting or vintage American flags repurposed as upholstery fabric, Sherry likes to bend the rules, if not break them. “Great design is about unfolding layers that inspire thought and delight,” she says. “Always, the goal is to reach the soul of a room.” According to client Courtney Vincent, Sherry is “a bevy of ideas.” “She has tremendous design instinct and confidence,” she says. “It boggles me.” Vincent speaks from experience: Sherry designed not only her Moroccan-inspired wedding to husband Scott, but the couple’s first apartment and, most recently, their 1920s French country home

on Lake of the Isles in Minneapolis. The house boasted stunning millwork but a tricky floor plan. “It was choppy and claustrophobic,” says Sherry. “The entire first floor cried out to be edited. We knew we had to open up the space to let the amazing existing features realize their full potential.” As walls were knocked down, the house’s mahogany staircase became a dramatic focal point. Antique wood floors were discovered beneath outdated carpeting, and

hand-nailed, intricate molding began to take on new life against fresh paint and wallpaper. The kitchen received a long-overdue update, complete with a colorful ceiling medallion above the island. Almost a year after the process began, Vincent, her husband, and their three children saw the finished product. She describes their reaction as “pure giddiness.” “I literally skip around the joint not quite believing that we get to live here every single day,” says Vincent. “It’s a new reality.” r 2011

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creating compelling vignettes Lisa’s Tips

one

Mix the old and the new. For example, pair an heirloom secretary with a Lucite chair.

two

Bend the rules: lacquer the cabriole legs of a classic chair.

three

Mix textures and materials.

four

Juxtapose the sophisticated with the casual. Your room should look polished yet lived in.

five

Play against type, and add contrast to a space by blending design styles. Too much of one period or style can be dull.

“The Vincents are such a cool, fun couple, so we wanted this room to be funky and edgy with a variety of patterns,” says Sherry. The family’s three daughters are often found in this bubble swing from Lexington Modern.

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Sherry gave this vintage chair two different styles of feet to “mix it up a bit.�


Local artist Iliana Rossell, a friend of Courtney’s, painted a graphic motif on the living room wall. White furnishings give the bright patterns room to breathe.

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creating an open, airy space Lisa’s Suggestions

one

If you have a small space, think about removing walls or widening an entrance.

two

Paint your walls in light colors. 

three

Use a single unifying color throughout a space.

four

Edit your rooms, and know when to take things away.

five

Hang window treatments higher and wider than the actual window.

In the home office, Sherry framed wallpaper so it appears like a piece of art. “We knew the kids would have fun hanging things on it,” she says. A boldly striped fabric gives the traditional wingback chair a modern touch.

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decorating with humor Lisa’s Ideas

one

Place a Shriners hat on a classic bust.

two

Hide a toy car inside a terrarium.

three

Hang decorative plates on the wall in a trailing pattern instead of in tidy rows.

four

Upholster a headboard with a flag.

five

Add a dash of silver paint to an upholstered chair.

Decorator Lisa Sherry

A duck perches on a floral stand from Dransfield & Ross.

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Sherry repurposed a vintage laundry cart as a portable bar. “I wanted something with a basket at the bottom to hold liquor, and to be able to clip photos and art on it,” says Sherry. A trail of vintage and modern plates creates an eclectic wall grouping.

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Nina Freudenberger, interior designer and owner of Haus Interior, offers chic, affordable dĂŠcor


Make sure your home reflects your own style and comfort level; your space should not be designed only to be ‘photo ready.’ The chair you sit in to drink your morning coffee and read the paper should be just as comfortable as it is attractive.

MAKE NO COMPROMISES

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“Moments of inventiveness and history can instantly make your space feel like a home, whether it be the stripes on the wall you labored over to paint or special family photos,” says interior designer Nina Freudenberger. “A true home should always reflect your personal style without compromises, budget included.” A desire to help others accomplish great style affordably inspired Freudenberger to open Haus Interior in 2007. The fullservice firm offers interior design and decorating services for private residences, showcases, model residences and commercial space. With the emergence of design blogs, magazines and mainstream stores, she noticed interior design was fast becoming a less “exclusive” service for the wealthy, and more of a self-educating process that allowed people to cultivate their issue two

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*Experiment with paint and wallpaper – these items are typically not huge investments but usually make the largest difference to any home.


style on their own. Up to date, her clients are largely sophisticated with their design choices and savvy about working within their budget, and Freudenberger gladly helps create décor that mixes both high- and low-end pieces. “I started this company believing that great design and satisfying projects do not have to break the bank,” she says. Freudenberger is clearly aware of great design; her shop is fresh and subdued, washed in neutral, organic tones energized and accented by geometric patterns and shapes. Along with offering interior design services specifically, Freudenberger also retails décor pieces, all of which she sources mainly from small, independent artists and designers. Specifically, she seeks “curious” objects; the slightly unusual mixed with the functional, and natural materials that retain their intrinsic properties while moving beyond their original purposes. Truly believing that well-designed pieces are not contingent with a hefty price tag, Freudenberger keeps all prices below $300; in fact, the majority are under $50.

*Layer the old, new, unusual and quirky – it will create a personal history that will make your home undoubtedly unique.

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Interestingly, these pieces have done more than offer her customers stylish accessories within budget; they actually inspired the initial design direction of the store. Compelled by the beautifully uncomplicated pieces upon their collection, she realized their potential to shine could be enhanced if featured in an environment that opposed their basic nature. Mixed with a fabric sample of Kelly Wearstler’s/ Groundworks flame stitch that she’d been admiring for some time, the engaging and complementing geometric direction took flight, and she worked the ingenious concept directly into her flooring and walls. “[The flame stitch] was such an incredible pattern because of its ability to fit in almost anywhere, whether it be traditional or modern style,” she says. “Conceptually, it was exactly what I wanted to convey in my store.”


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I started this company believing that

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FIVE TIPS FOR ACHIEVING

THE LOOK OF HAUS INTERIOR one

Don’t be afraid to get a little wild by layering patterns. It’s easier to keep colors neutral and simple, but bold graphics both catch the eye and bring movement to a space.

two

Don’t be timid of highlighting those often forgotten spaces. Have ugly floors? Paint an amazing pattern on them. Need something fun for an entrance way? Don’t just paint the walls, but cover the ceiling as well. Think outside the box!

three

Warm up a space by using natural materials. In the store, I chose walnut for the built-ins and use rope to hang the throws on for display. It’s important to pair the natural elements with a cold material such as glass in order to keep the visual balance.

four

Appreciate the beauty of handmade linens. Use them everywhere: on your bed, in the bathroom or even as placemats for your next dinner party. Handmade items bring in those important moments of old-world elegance.

five

Edison bulbs are an extremely simple and inexpensive way to update your vintage chandelier or bathroom vanity light.

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Although the wall and floor applications were professionally done in Haus Interior, according to Freudenberger, it can easily be done in one’s own home. Looks like this are often achieved through wallpaper, although full-fledged papering can be a turn-off, not to mention expensive. Instead, creating this design is as easy as experimenting with paint, which also allows for a certain degree of flexibility in terms of color and the design itself. If painting seems too timely or permanent, another option is to simply lay a graphic, zig-zag carpet over a larger, basic color rug. Freudenberger often brings elements of her store’s design into client’s homes in a variety of decorative ways, all while maintaining a cost-effective approach. Rather than painting an entire room, she often focuses on just one surface, such as the wall behind the headboard in a bedroom, or even the ceiling in some cases. A savvy way to add shelving space is to create floating-wood white shelves as opposed to built in glass; they’ll stylishly disappear when layered with objects. Instead of simply using

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color as an accent, Freudenberger often takes it a step further, layering patterns within pillows, throw blankets and carpets. “Even small things like updating your pharmacy lamp with an Edison lightbulb versus a standard incandescent bulb can make such a difference,” she says.

*Fill your walls with artwork. If you find it hard to commit because of a tight budget, find alternative options. So many wonderful websites now support small artists (Etsy, 20x200) that you can always find something to fill those empty walls.

A graduate of Rhode Island School of Design with both a BFA and a Bachelors of Architecture, she continues to believe in the importance of accessible design. She’s also one to seek inspiration in several places, knowing that true creative energy can leap from anywhere. “Traveling always provides incredible inspiration,” says Freudenberger, “but I also find inspiration in small things, such as an amazing vintage photograph or antique fabrics.” r

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A Tale of Two Cities

Escape to the comfort of J.K. Place’s two exclusive hotels, as famous for their luxurious service as for their exquisite decor

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Photography by Patrick Cline

Art Direction by Michelle Adams


The timeless sophistication of

F lorence‌


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here’s no “check-in” at a J.K. Place hotel. There’s no extra charge for breakfast, or each room’s organic fruit basket. Coffee and cappuccino are complimentary, and after the first cup is served, the next will arrive exactly as the guest prefers. “At J.K. Place, we know all our guests by name,” says Claudio Meli, general manager of J.K. Place, Florence. “This is a very different hotel. This is like home.” Located in the Piazza Santa Maria Novella, J.K. Place, Florence is the brainchild of Ori Kafri. In 2003, when Kafri first decided to create a four-star hotel, he imagined the ambience that now infuses J.K. Place—where visitors feel like they are staying in a friend’s beautiful home, and guests are never asked to sign a bar tab. “Of course a guest’s bottle of Champagne will show up on their bill, but why ask for a signature?” says Meli. “I trust them. It is perfectly understood in our philosophy.” There’s no question that the exceptional service offered at J.K. Place, Florence—and its sister hotel, J.K. Place, Capri—keeps guests coming back, but 2010

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I

Breakfast is served around the dining table in a glass-covered courtyard, where guests are encouraged to sit together and mingle.

“ t’s a unique moment, every morning, watching everyone share their stories about Florence,” says Meli. The room used for the dining area was once a flower shop.

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The hotel’s reception area is cleverly disguised. Instead of designing a typical registration desk, Bonan placed a desk lengthwise in the middle of the room, creating a more approachable space for guests. “So often you enter a hotel and the desk acts as a barrier; it feels like client on one side and employee on the other,” says Meli. “But here we are a home, so why would there be a barrier?” By covering a portion of the desk with books and statues, Bonan managed to hide the computer wires and create a surface that’s both decorative and functional. 82

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The average visitor to the city of Florence spends just two nights in a hotel. But the average visitor to the J.K. Place, Florence spends three nights or more. “We often have people who book five or six nights here,” says Meli. Several continue their stay at J.K. Place, even while they travel outside Florence. “We help our guests organize trips throughout Florence and outside the city, so they stay with us and visit all of Tuscany.”

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From the cobblestone streets of Florence...

...to the island retreat of 86

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Capri.


The difference between J.K. Place, Florence and J.K. Place, Capri lies in colors and materials; each hotel distinctly represents the city in which it resides. “In Capri, the colors possess the flavor of the Mediterranean and of the island,” says Kafri. “Sometimes you go to a hotel, look around, and have no clue what city you’re visiting.”

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C

“J.K. Place, apri is very cozy,”

says Porreca. “It’s meant to look like an English

traveler’s home filled with pieces he’s collected from all over the world.”

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Inspired by Blakes Hotel in London, Kafri wanted the decor to convey a sense of timelessness. “We want people to wonder,…is this hotel old? Is it new?” he says. “It’s ambitious, but that’s what we wanted our guests’ first impression to be.”


Samuel and Claudio Explain

How to Bring the J.K. Place Look Home with You Lights and Candles It’s extremely important to have the right illumination, both smooth and chic.

“It’s Capri, so we wanted to emphasize that connection with the sea,” says Kafri of Bonan’s starfish-accented lampshades.

Music The key ingredient in creating a J.K.-styled atmosphere is the right background music. It should change throughout the day: soft in the morning, lively and happy during the day, and mellow from 6 PM onward.

Library Create your own library with signature books. TASCHEN and Assouline editions are preferred.

Flowers Bouquets of live flowers give your home that “fresh” feeling.

Something Unique Find a collector’s piece that may seem a bit “extreme” in relation to the rest of your decor. It gives that “extravagant and hip” look that hits the eye!

Potpourri Use a charming potpourri, such as the Antica Farmacia Santa Maria Novella used in J.K. Florence.

Fireplaces Find a way to include a fireplace. At J.K. Place, Florence, the fireplace room has become a J.K. icon. 92

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beginnin

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ng Rachel Ashwell sheds new light on the Shabby Chic® brand, while offering a tour of her London flat

Written by Shawn Gauthier Photography by Patrick Cline Art Direction by Michelle Adams 2010

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Last year, when Rachel Ashwell’s iconic company, Shabby Chic©, was forced to file for bankruptcy and liquidate all 15 of its shops, the designer found herself at a fork in the road: either say goodbye to the Shabby Chic brand, or reinvent it. “I began thinking, what can we put together from this? What can I use that I’ve already got? What can I bring back to life again?” she remembers. “I realized I just wasn’t ready for Shabby Chic Brands to go; I still very much believed the world had a place for [these] products.” Now, with help from the brandmarketing firm Brand Sense Partners, Shabby Chic Brands is back on the map, boasting several new shops and licensing deals. “The one thing I knew is [that] I’m good at making these cute little boutiques and that I wanted to bring the Shabby Chic brand to a level it hadn’t reached before,” says Ashwell. She opened three shops under the name of Rachel Ashwell Shabby Chic Couture™, in Santa Monica, Manhattan, and ( for the first time ever) London, focusing primarily on vintage and custom-made pieces. “I’m extremely proud because there isn’t a single thing that I haven’t closely determined, whether it’s

a flower on the sheets, the fragrance of a candle, the feathers in a cushion,” she says. “I’ll admit I settled a few times before; I’d bring in dinner plates because it was recommended, not because I wanted them. This time the store is totally real.” Needless to say, the past couple of years have been a bumpy ride for Ashwell; before filing for bankruptcy, her mother passed away. It was both as an homage to her English heritage and a

According to Ashwell, a piece can be emotionally resonant as well as practical, like the needlepoint legend on this ribbon. “I always look at these words when I’m down and think, ‘Don’t be so weary, because you’re doing it. You’re making this happen,’” says Ashwell.

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“You don’t run a company for 20 years and raise a couple of kids in this world without getting some strength,” says Ashwell on finding the bravery to reinvent Shabby Chic Brands.

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Ashwell’s flat came largely furnished, including a couch that the landlord described as “terribly uncomfortable.” Instead of purchasing a new one, Ashwell simply applied Shabby Chic furniture logic by lining its cushions and back with 12 Marseille quilt pillows from the store. “It instantly became a quasi–Shabby Chic sofa!” she says.

tribute to her late mother that she decided to open a shop in London, a slightly risky move considering her company’s previous focus had primarily been in the American market. “I didn’t want to come in as this big American corporate person. I simply wanted to bring my…mix of English roots and California openness,” she says. Ashwell played it safe by keeping the store tiny (a cozy 850 square feet). “I wanted it to feel grand in detail but small in presentation, so it feels familiar to the British in its intimacy.” With a dislike for both the Underground and expensive taxis, Ashwell rented a flat within walking distance of her London shop. Bathed in white, with chipped paint on the coffee table and a soft, cushy sofa, the apartment embodies the brand’s signature style. “I walk my talk,” says Ashwell, who initially dreamed up the line while attempting to design a home that was beautiful yet functional enough for her two infant children. “We’re not a company that’s based on going out…to see what the trends are. I’ve always regarded Shabby Chic Brands in a very personal way.” r

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“Portobello Road is some says Ashwell, who

frequents it for in

thing quite special,”

spiration and “eye

candy.”


” . h ic r ly p m si s t’ I . … fe li f o e r tu ix m a h c su e v “You ha


Rachel’s Navigation of London’s

Portobello Road One It’s not the cheapest place to shop for vintage, but the quality is quite lovely, especially for linens and silver.

Two The one thing that I always buy is lots of fun, cheap jewelry. I wear little bits, or even use it in my decor, such as brooches for napkin rings.

Three Be prepared to pay cash, and be sure to come with cash, as the local ATMs always have lines around the block. And always watch your bag, as Fagin from Oliver Twist still has his pickpockets [on the lookout].

Four Avoid Portobello from 11 to 3 on a Saturday; it’s packed. A few stores open on Thursdays, although little happens from Monday to Wednesday. Friday is the best day to visit, as street vendors are open then and it’s less busy.

Five Because it does attract a lot of tourists, bargaining is a must. You can be quite competitive in your offer, as vendors are quite negotiable.


BLOGGER STYLE

A good pair of statement sunglasses is an integral part of any Mrs. wardrobe. These snakeskin sunnies are simply sensational. Snakeskin Covered Cateye Sunglasses by Linda Farrow for Alexander Wang: $740; Saks Fifth Avenue

K

Kelley Lilien

I’m into capes. I mean, really, why wear a coat when you can don a cape? This Paul & Joe Sister number makes me crazy. Chenpan Wool-Blend Cape Coat by Paul & Joe Sister: $750; NET-A-PORTER

elley Lilien’s blog, Mrs. Lilien Styling House, celebrates the indulgent pleasures of the modern lady. A graphic designer and prop stylist by trade, Lilien began blogging to satisfy a craving for style as bold and fanciful as her personality. She now covers everything from glitterdusted desserts to the ultimate Champagne cocktail recipes, writing each post in witty rhymes to “push the rules by taking creative license.” “The blog honors everyday luxuries and celebrates the good life,” says Lilien. “Bringing joy and conviviality: that’s what it’s all about.” —S.G. L

A lady can do no wrong in a classic leopard pump. I call these Louboutins my power pumps. Fifi Paillettes by Christian Louboutin: $1,495; Barneys New York

The perfect perch for latenight blogging—I’m head over heels for this pillow. My Boyfriend’s Back Initial Pillow: $340; Chic Shop by Hillary Thomas Designs (Photo courtesy of One Kings Lane)

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BLOGGER STYLE YSL Rouge Pur Couture Lipstick in #13 Le Orange is my go-to glam lipstick. It’s showstopping red-orange. Rouge Pur Couture in #13 Le Orange by Yves Saint Laurent: $30; Bloomingdale’s

No one rocks it better in the costume bauble department than kate spade. I live for my jumbo aqua sparklers. Clip Earrings in Aqua: $54; kate spade new york

I love a good conversation piece—especially one that creates a stir! I can see a beautiful bouquet of blushing carnations peeking out from the top of this vase.

Lines of any kind are just not sexy. This hydrating spray is magical mist in a plastic pump bottle. Rose Water Hydrator Spray by Frownies: $14.95; The Vermont Country Store

Georgia Vase: $450; Jonathan Adler

There’s nothing quite like game night with the gals. This glamorous backgammon set is the perfect excuse to drink too much and gossip whilst gaming! Backgammon Set: $198; Henri Bendel

Statement clutches can really make the outfit, and the outfit can really make the woman; therefore, statement clutches make the woman! Scales Clutch: $995; Kelly Wearstler


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