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JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 2, 2018 B A LT I M O R E , M A RY L A N D

WAT E R F R O N T M A R R I OT T

CONFERENCE GUIDE


Fruit and Beverage Processing Solutions

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CIDERCON 2018

Bin Dumpers /Sorting Tables /Brush Cleaners

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 2 Letter from the President Welcome message from Bruce Nissen, president of USACM.

4 Letter from the Executive Director Executive Director Michelle McGrath highlights the 2017 USACM membership accomplishments.

6 USACM Board of Directors Meet the 2018 United States Association of Cider Makers Board of Directors.

8 Thank You United States Association of Cider Makers and the 2018 CiderCon Committee gratefully

CONNECT & SHARE THE FUN: TAG PICKCIDER AND USE #CIDERCON2018 L IK E US ON FACEB O OK @PICKCIDER

acknowledge the generous support and efforts of its official sponsors and partners.

11 Conference Schedule View each day's schedule of sessions and events.

14 Conference and Tradeshow Maps A visual guide to session and vendor locations.

F OL L OW US ON T W I T T ER @PICKCIDER F OL L OW US ON INS TAGR A M @PICK _ CIDER

16 Session Desciptions Detailed descriptions of the conference’s educational sessions, networking opportunities, tasting seminars and heritage cider tracks.

CiderCon is presented by United States Association of Cider Makers United States Association of Cider Makers is a 501(c)6 non-profit organization.

26 Presenters Biographies for the 2018 experts, cider makers, growers and enthusiasts presenting at the 2018 conference.

P.O. Box 66483 Portland, OR 97290 www.ciderassociation.org CIDERCON 2018

1


A MESSAGE FROM

THE PRESIDENT H

ello and welcome to CiderCon 2018! As president of USACM, I am honored to have you all here on the East Coast for our annual gathering where we learn and share about cider production. I know it has brought many of you to CiderCon for the first time, so if you have questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to me or the conference staff. We want you to have a positive, informative, fun week here in Baltimore with us. A couple notes:

qWe welcome Nielsen and Cyder Market as featured speakers this year. These

speakers reflect our commitment to offering you useful market data as part of your USACM membership.

qCiderCon is more international than ever before. We are pleased to have visitors from eight countries with us, and we hope you enjoy the ciders from this year’s international guests of honor from New Zealand. qOur program has session descriptions that note if a session is best suited for all, beginning, intermediate or advanced levels. Use that key to guide your workshop choices. qWe have a special track of heritage ciders this year. The workshops are focused on

orchard-based ciders produced using traditional methods. This track is clearly marked in your program. Please note, that due to having more tasting sessions than ever, this year’s tastings are ticketed events that you purchased when registering.

qUSACM board elections and general business meetings are scheduled on Friday. I hope our cidery level members will participate in electing new board members at this time. Your vote is a USACM member benefit.

THERE ARE FEW INDUSTRIES WHERE YOU HAVE A CHANCE TO CROSS PATHS WITH THE FOUNDERS, THE LEGENDS AND THE UPSTARTS IN SUCH A RELAXED AND OPEN CONFERENCE.

qUSACM is proud to be sponsoring Cider Week Baltimore this year. Please help us support a booming food scene here in Baltimore by exploring one of these great offerings. Visit ciderweekbaltimore.com for details. The USACM has come a long way since we first met in Salem, Oregon, many years ago. I am especially proud to have been a part of this group that has worked to bring attention and respect to cider at the national level. I think you will find our program in Baltimore to be another step down this path. Learn about the certification program, find new techniques or ideas in the sessions, make new friends in the cider community over a cider and share a few business stories that only we understand, and find a way to get involved with what we are doing. There are few industries where you have a chance to cross paths with the founders, the legends and the upstarts in such a relaxed and open conference. Let’s make this a great week! Cheers, Bruce Nissen President

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CIDERCON 2018

LEFT PHOTO BY ERIC LEWANDOWSKI


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THANK YOU FOR BEING A MEMBER OF USACM

T

hanks to your support, 2017 was a year of substantial investment for USACM. We launched new and grew existing programs, we invested in our staff, we spread the cider gospel and we found new ways to deliver benefits to the cider industry and our members. It was my first full year serving as your executive director, and looking back, I think we have much to celebrate together. BUT ESPECIALLY, YOU.

HERE’S WHAT YOUR MEMBERSHIP DOLLARS ACCOMPLISHED IN 2017: C hanged the definition of hard cider for federal q excise taxes to include all ciders less than 8.5% ABV, less than 6.4 g/L CO2 and made from apples or pears (CIDER Act went into effect on January 1).

S uccessfully lobbied for an extended compliance q

deadline and an additional comment period for the CIDER Act rules.

Helped members contact their congressional represenq

tatives to support the Craft Beverage Modernization and Tax Reform Act, which passed a temporary expansion of the Small Producer Tax Credit and allowed sparkling cider producers to receive the credit for the first time.

Partnered with Nielsen, LLC to collect market data q

for the cider industry, enabling us to share reports with our members in 2018.

L aunched the online exam platform to certify 130 q people as knowledgeable cider professionals.

Developed the first-ever USACM Cider Style Guide, q

introducing 10 foundational styles, which received coverage in Food & Wine, Brewbound, Cidercraft and other publications.

Promoted cider to the media, landing stories in local q and national news sources, including NPR.

Created our first three-year strategic plan. q Encouraged co-marketing of cider as the beverage q

of choice for the Fourth of July and Thanksgiving by providing our members with marketing collateral and social media support (growing #pickcider to over 7,000 uses). Celebrated the best “Fourth of July” sales bump to date.

Hosted a successful CiderCon in Chicago with our q largest trade show ever.

P lanned a brand new “heritage cider” track for q CiderCon 2018 focused on smaller, orchard-based cider makers' educational needs.

Revamped the USACM website to make information q easier to find and membership easier to renew.

Hosted two educational webinars for our members. q N egotiated additional discount benefits for our q members.

Updated the USACM bylaws to represent a proper, q modern membership-organization.

S ponsored regional cider events to support local q marketing efforts.

C onducted countless hours of membership outq

reach, listening to and learning from the ideas of cider makers on how to improve the US cider industry.

And lastly, I celebrated my first full year as USACM’s q full-time executive director.

We haven’t raised membership fees since our founding in 2014. We are committed to keeping membership and our programs affordable and accessible for all industry members to participate in. We know you have limited resources for your marketing budget, and we appreciate you entrusting USACM to help your business grow and thrive. THANK YOU FOR BEING A MEMBER OF USACM.

Represented the U.S. cider industry at the Global q Cider Forum.

Became a member of the National Beer Wholesaler q Association and began developing distributor outreach strategy.

Funded three cider research projects helping to fill q

Michelle McGrath Executive Director United States Association of Cider Makers (USACM)

the knowledge gap on apple and cider production.

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CIDERCON 2018

LEFT PHOTO BY ERIC LEWANDOWSKI


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CIDERCON 2018

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REGIONAL CHAIRS

Eric Foster

MOUNTAIN WE ST C HAIR

USACM BOARD EXECUTIVE BOARD

Bruce Nissen

PRE SIDE NT | ME MB E R AT L ARG E

In 2004, Bruce Nissen co-founded Fox Barrel Cider Company. In 2007, Fox Barrel took on a new partner when it actualized Crispin Cider. In 2012, the Crispin and Fox Barrel brands were acquired by MillerCoors. Today, Nissen runs an 80,000-barrel production facility, which is used to package his cider brand, Jester & Judge, incubate and actualize new beverage opportunities with selected partners and produce products for selected partners in the soda and wine categories. He’s been a member of USACM since the beginning, and he joined the board of directors in 2014.

Trevor Baker

VIC E PRE SIDE NT | SOUTHE RN C HAIR | MARKETING C HAIR

Trevor Baker is a coastal North Carolina native and currently lives and works in Asheville, North Carolina. He is the co-founder and general manager for Noble Cider, Western North Carolina's first hard cider company, established in 2012. He's been a CiderCon regular and USACM member since 2013. He joined the board of directors in 2015.

Eleanor Léger TRE ASURE R | FINANC E C HAIR | ME MB E R AT L ARG E

Eleanor Léger and her husband and partner Albert founded Eden Ice Cider Company in Vermont in 2007. There they produce specialty ciders, including ice ciders, aperitifs and naturally sparkling hard ciders from 100 percent locally grown apples. She joined the USACM board of directors in 2015. Check out her interview on Cider Chat at http://ciderchat.com/cidernomics.

Paul Vander Heide

SECRETARY | CC P C HAIR | ME MB E R AT L ARG E

Paul Vander Heide started Vander Mill in 2006, along with his brother, Stu. The vision wasn’t elaborate: a small-town cider mill where people can feel at home. After countless hours of dedication to learning the craft of pressing, fermenting and blending, their vision still has the small-town charm, but their reach now goes across five states and is still growing. He is involved with the Michigan Cider Association and joined the USACM board of directors as in 2016. Special thanks to 2018 Cider Conference Chairman MIKE BECK

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CIDERCON 2018

In 2011, Eric Foster and his co-founder Phil Kao produced the first batch of Stem Cider (now known as Real Dry) in Foster’s home cidery. You can listen to his Cider Chat episode (ciderchat.com/038-eric-foster-stem-ciders-colorado) to learn more about his cider philosophy. When he’s not at Stem, he’s enjoying family time, fly fishing or out skiing the backcountry. Foster lives in Lafayette with his wife, Colleen, and their sons, Quinn and Connor. He joined the USACM board of directors in 2017.

Marcus Robert

NORTHWE ST C HAIR | ME MB E RS HIP C HAIR

Marcus Robert joined Tieton Cider Works in 2010 as the cider operations manager, orchard manager and cider maker. He is a fourth-generation farmer in the Yakima Valley of Southern Washington. He is a former board member of the Northwest Cider Association, and he joined the USACM board of directors in 2017.

Dan Wilson E ASTE RN C HAIR

Dan Wilson owns and operates Hicks Orchard and Slyboro Ciderhouse in Granville, New York. He is on the board of the New York Cider Association, and he joined the USACM board of directors in 2014.

Dan Young

MIDWE ST C HAIR

Together with his wife Nikki, Dan Young is the owner and cider maker of Tandem Cider in Northern Michigan. The intention at Tandem Ciders is to produce ciders that reflect the beauty of the apple. You can listen to his Cider Chat episode (ciderchat. com/079-dan-young-tandem-ciders-michigan) to learn more about his cider philosophy. He joined the USACM Board of Directors in 2017. L ARG E C I D E RY S E AT S

Ryan Burk

L ARG E CIDE RY S E AT

Ryan Burk is the head cider maker at Angry Orchard. A native to Williamson, New York, he now lives near Angry Orchard’s Walden, New York, facility where he is free to create innovative ciders for the cidery. You can listen to his Cider Chat episode (ciderchat.com/angry-orchard) to learn more about his cider philosophy. Burk is on the board of the New York Cider Association and joined the USACM Board of Directors in 2015.

Ben Calvi

L ARG E CIDE RY S E AT

Ben Esser Calvi is the director of cider making for Vermont Hard Cider Co. in Middlebury, Vermont. Previously, he made cider at Champlain Orchards in Shoreham, Vermont, and wines at Esser Vineyards and Quintessa in the Napa Valley, for BurklinWolf in Germany and at the Robert Mondavi Institute in Davis, California. Calvi lives on a tiny apple orchard in nearby Cornwall with his wife, Sophie, and two children, Arthur and Delfina. He joined the USACM board of directors in 2016.

Brian Shanks

L ARG E CIDE RY S E AT | LEG ISL ATIVE C HAIR

Brian Shanks got his start in cider in beautiful New Zealand. In 2010, he co-founded Bold Rock Cider Company in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. They dedicated their sourcing to local farms, and sold 48,000 cases in their first year. Today, they have distribution in 10 states and multiple taproom facilities. Shanks joined the USACM board in 2017.


THANK YOU

TO OUR SPONORS FOR THEIR GENEROUS SUPPORT

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CIDERCON 2018


CIDERCON 2018

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CIDERCON 2018


WEDNESDAY

JANUARY 31

REGISTRATION DESK:

7 AM – 6 PM 8:00

Cider Institute of North America (CINA) In-depth Session

8:30

ESSEX A-C

9:00

Certified Cider Professional Class LAUREL A-D

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

TTB Workshop

Lunch (for CINA only) ESSEX A-C

Media Meet & Greet KENT A-C

CINA In-depth Session (continued)

12:00

GRAND BALLROOM 5

12:30 1:00

Tradeshow Vendor Setup HARBORSIDE BALLROOM

1:30

ESSEX A-C

2:00 2:30

VIP Cider Share

3:00

HARBORSIDE FOYER

3:30

Cider Share

4:00

HARBORSIDE FOYER

COURSE KEY

4:30

ICONS

USACM Event

Heritage Cider Track

Networking Salon

Tasting Session

Heritage Cider Session

Ticket Required

5:00 5:30 6:00

CIDERCON 2018

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THURSDAY

REGISTRATION DESK: TRADESHOW OPEN:

FEBRUARY 1

7 AM – 6 PM 10 AM – 5 PM

8:00 8:30 Opening General Session with Keynote from Nielsen

9:00

GRAND BALLROOM 5-10

9:30 10:00 Visit the Tradeshow 4TH FLOOR HARBORSIDE BALLROOM

10:30 11:00 11:30

Building Craft Cider with Contemporary Apples ANDREW BYERS ESSEX A-C

Working Together for Strong Cider SIMON & JASON HOUSE LAUREL A-B

Protecting and Enforcing Trademarks

Reverend Nat’s is a Marketing Company, Not a Cider Co.

Collaboration and a Shared Cider Economy

MARTHA ENGEL LAUREL C-D

NAT WEST GRAND BALLROOM 1 & 2

RYAN BURK & GREG PECK DOVER A-C

NZ Tasting: Zeffer JOSH TOWNSEND & JODY SCOTT GRAND BALLROOM 3-4

Champagne Methods ERIC SHATT, ELEANOR LEGER, AUTUMN STOSCHECK, TIM LARSEN GRAND BALLROOM 7-10

NETWORKING SALON: Pomme Boots Women in Cider KENT A & B

Visit the Tradeshow: 4TH FLOOR HARBORSIDE BALLROOM

12:00 Lunch with Speaker Dale Brown GRAND BALLROOM 5-10

12:30 1:00

Visit the Tradeshow: 4TH FLOOR HARBORSIDE BALLROOM

1:30 2:00

Sensory Analysis Pomme Boots Women in Cider SARA SHERRER ESSEX A-C

Quantitative Chemical Fingerprints JOHN EDWARDS LAUREL A-B

Finding Distribution in a Crowded Market

How to Crowdfund Your Cidery

AARON LANCTOT LAUREL C-D

ZACHARY ROBINS GRAND BALLROOM 1 & 2

CHARLES MCGONEGAL GRAND BALLROOM 7-10

Leave it to Keever EMILY RITCHIE, ANDREW BYERS, MARTIN BERKELEY, DAVE TAKUSH DOVER A-C

KENT A & B

2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30

Developing a Dryness Scale NY CIDER ASSOC. ESSEX A-C

CAROL MILES & TRAVIS ALEXANDER ESSEX A-C

Build your Brand w/ Experimental Mktg

Holistic Orchard Management

Regional Variations in Apples and Cider

MARC SORINI LAUREL C-D

KRISTYN DOLAN GRAND BALLROOM 1 & 2

MICHAEL PHILLIPS, ERIC SHATT, AUTUMN STOSCHECK

DARLENE HAYES & DAN PUCCI

Promoting Cider in Wine Country

How to Use Nielsen Data to Grow Your Sales CAITLYN BATTAGLIA & MATTHEW CROMPTON DOVER A-C

DOVER A-C

GRAND BALLROOM 3-4

Tactics for Marketing, Branding & Media Outreach CAITLIN BRAAM & ERIN JAMES

LAUREL A-B

Prevention & Correction of Sulfur Off Odors in Cidermaking REBEKKA DEKRAMER LAUREL C-D

MEREDITH COLLINS GRAND BALLROOM 1 & 2

Wild Fermentations RYAN BURK, TOM OLIVER, LEIF SUNDSTROM, KEVIN ZIELINSKI GRAND BALLROOM 7-10

Visit the Tradeshow: 4TH FLOOR HARBORSIDE BALLROOM ELEANOR LEGER ESSEX A-C

5:30 6:00

12

Legal Side of Distribution

Visit the Tradeshow: 4TH FLOOR HARBORSIDE BALLROOM Varietal Ciders: From Branch to Bottle

Cidernomics

5:00

What’s Selling? On- and Off-Premise Retailers Discuss MATTIE BEASON, JED JENNY, SAM PITH LAUREL A-B

NETWORKING SALON: Nielsen Workshop: Drop Off Your UPCs, Talk About the Data, Ask About Packaging Analysis

CIDERCON 2018

State Regulatory Compliance

Marketing with Apples

Carbonation Fundamentals

JANEEN GRACE LAUREL A-B

PETER MITCHELL LAUREL C-D

PHIL KELM GRAND BALLROOM 1 & 2

How to Use Nielsen Data to Grow Your Sales CAITLYN BATTAGLIA & MATTHEW CROMPTON DOVER A-C

NZ Tasting: Peckham’s Cider ALEX PECKHAM GRAND BALLROOM 3-4

NETWORKING SALON: Orcharding KENT A & B

NETWORKING SALON: Brainstorming Sustainability in the Cidery ERIC JORGENSEN KENT A & B


FRIDAY

REGISTRATION DESK: TRADESHOW OPEN:

FEBRUARY 2

7 AM – 3 PM 8 AM – 3 PM

8:00 Visit the Tradeshow: 4TH FLOOR HARBORSIDE BALLROOM

8:30 9:00

USACM Elections

9:30

GRAND BALLROOM 5-10

10:00 Visit the Tradeshow: 4TH FLOOR HARBORSIDE BALLROOM

10:30

Yeast Whisperer SHEA COMFORT ESSEX A-C

11:00 11:30

Climate Change in the Orchard DAYNA BATEMAN, DARLENE HAYES, TOM OLIVER, JIM KOAN, IAN MERWIN, GREG PECK, ALEX PECKHAM, MARCUS ROBERTS, STEVE WOOD LAUREL A-B

Separation Anxiety: Understanding Cider Filtration MARIA PETERSON LAUREL C-D

Juicing Tourism Marketing KEVIN CLAY & CAROLINE LOGAN GRAND BALLROOM 1 & 2

Horizontal Tasting LAUREN SHEPARD GRAND BALLROOM 3-4

Heritage Cider: Keys to Success in the Next Growth Category

NETWORKING SALON: Production Hacks ELEANOR LEGER KENT A & B

DIANE FLYNT GRAND BALLROOM 7-10

Break: Visit the Tradeshow

12:00 Lunch / USACM Business Meeting GRAND BALLROOM 5-10

12:30 1:00

Growing Bittersweet Apple Varieties for Cider

2:00

STEVE WOOD, KEVIN ZIELINSKI, MARCUS ROBERTS, HARRY RICKER, DAVE DEFISHER ESSEX A-C

2:30

Distributor Panel

1:30

Visit the Tradeshow: 4TH FLOOR HARBORSIDE BALLROOM Build Your Team

UK Cider Trends

ANDREW BYERS GRAND BALLROOM 1

GABE COOK LAUREL C-D

Craft Beverage Collaboration PAUL VANDER HEIDE, KELLIE SHEVLIN, DOUG FABBIOLI AND SCOTT HARRIS

LAUREL A-B

NZ Tasting: Harvest Cidery HAMISH JACKSON GRAND BALLROOM 3-4

Visit the Tradeshow: 4TH FLOOR HARBORSIDE BALLROOM LAUREN SHEPARD ESSEX A-C

3:00 3:30

Heritage Ciders on the Menu SAM FITZ, BRIAN RUTZEN, JACKSON CANNON

4:00 4:30

ESSEX A-C

Understanding Terroir DEREK PLOTKOWSKI LAUREL A-B

Let’s Get This Party Started: Cider Events MATTIE BEASON, ERIC FOSTER & JENN SMITH LAUREL A-B

Using Heirloom Apples for Cider and Spirits

Basic Cider Analysis DARREN MICHAELS GRAND BALLROOM 1 & 2

Cidermaking with Heirloom & High Tannin Apples IAN MERWIN, GREG PECK, AUTUMN STOSCHECK, JONATHAN AND CHRISTOPHER OAKES, CHRIS NEGRONIDA, DEIRDRE BIRMINGHAM, WHIT KNICKERBOCKER

NETWORKING SALON: Global Global Networking Salon KENT A & B KENT A & B

GRAND BALLROOM 7-10

DANIEL BUSSEY LAUREL C-D

Fruit Chemistry, Yeast and Fermentation AMANDA STEWART LAUREL C-D

Advanced Cider Analysis DARREN MICHAELS GRAND BALLROOM 1 & 2

Nutrients WILLIAM GROTE, TOM BELL, HOLLY SCHMIDT, DOUG SCHMIDT

GRAND BALLROOM 3-4

Working with Oak

NETWORKING SALON:

SHEA COMFORT GRAND BALLROOM 7-10

Pomme Boots Draft Tech Mini-Class: How to Put Together a Jockey Box KENT A & B

NZ Cidermakers Panel GRAND BALLROOM 5-10

5:00 5:30

Grand Tasting & Commencement Toast GRAND BALLROOM 5-10

6:00

CIDERCON 2018

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MARRIOTT BALTIMORE WATERFRONT 70 0 A L I C E A N N A ST R EET · B AL T I M O R E, M A RYLAND 21202

REGISTRATION KENT A

ESSEX A

A

TRADESHOW

B

LAUREL

B

H A R B O R S ID E B A L L R O O M B C

C

C

LEVEL

4

FALK LA N D

D

GALENA

HER O N IR O N

F R E IG H T E L E V A T O R

JA M E S

G R A N D F O Y E R WE S T BOA RDRO O M

POSTERS

7

2

8 GRAND BALLROOM

3

5

6

9

DOVER A-C

4

ATLANTIC

10

B R IS T O L

CHASSEUR

F R E IG H T E L E V A T O R PARKING GARAGE

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CIDERCON 2018

G RA N D F OY E R NOR T H

1

LEVEL

3


TRADESHOW MAP H A R B O R SIDE BALLROOM

H A R B O R S ID E F O Y E R

SHOW ENTRANCE TABLES 1

500

401

400

301

300

201

200

101

100

502

403

402

303

302

203

202

103

102

504

405

404

305

304

205

204

105

104

5

506

407

406

307

306

207

206

107

106

6

508

409

408

309

308

209

208

109

108

510

411

410

311

310

211

210

111

110

512

413

412

313

312

213

212

113

112

514

415

414

315

314

215

214

115

114

518

419

KENT A

2 3

ESSEX A 4

ESSEX B

7

KENT B

8

ESSEX C 9 10

Vendor Company Name Booth # 33 Books Co. 419 AAA Metal Fabrication 215 Aaqua Tools 105 ABS Commercial 508 AEB USA 514 Alcohol & Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) TABLE 10 American Keg Company 319 Amoretti 213 Arton Products 303 Atlas Labels & Packaging 401 Bevv Inc 506 Brewery Finance 409 BSG Select Ingredients 102 Cask Brewing Systems 309 CCP - Certified Cider Professional TABLE 9 Cider Pak Insurance Programs 302 CiderCraft 209 CINA - Cider Institute of North America TABLE 8 ClearWater Tech Ozone Disinfection 103 Codi Manufacturing 218 Countryside Farm and Nurseries 214 Criveller 405 Croxson's Global Packaging 104 Cummins Nursery 313 Della Toffola USA, LTD 106 DK Advanced Technologies 404 EKOS 107 Embark Craft CiderWorks 418

420

418

319

219

220

218

Vendor Company Name Booth # Enartis USA 108 Fermentis - Division of Lesaffre Yeast Corporation 304 Flextank USA 504 Fruitsmart 300 G & D Chillers 220 G.W. KENT 502 Gamer Packaging, Inc. 202 GEA North America 311 Glacier Hops Ranch 420 Goodnature Products 111 GLINTCAP TABLE 7 Gusmer Enterprises 205 In-Line Packaging Systems 301, 400 Iron Heart Canning Company 112 JUCLAS USA 206 Juicing Systems 201 JVNW 403 Kegstar 312 King Orchards 115 Knouse Foods 407 Laffort USA 211 Lightweight Containers (Key Keg) 305 McClain Ozone 207 Neil Jones Food Company 518 New York International Beer Competition TABLE 1 Nielsen 114 Northwest Cider Association TABLE 2 NWNaturals 412

KENT C

L EVE L

Vendor Company Name Orchestrated Pall Corporation Palmer Canning Systems Petainer Manufacturing USA Peterson Farms Pine River Group Portland State University Premier Wine Cask Pro Chiller Systems PRO Engineering and Manufacturing Prospero Equipment Corp. Rack & Maintenance Source Saxco International Schaefer Container Systems Scott Laboratories Serigraphie Richford (SRI Ohio Inc) Spec Trellising Stanpac Ink Taphandles Tapped Tees The Alison Group Thermo Fisher Scientific United Bottles and Packaging Valley Processing Vance Metal Fabricators VORAN Wild Goose Canning - Meheen Manufacturing

4 Booth # 406 307 314 109 402 510 208 306 210 411 101, 200 212 100 408 315 219 310 414 308 410 110 203 113 500 204 413, 415 512

CIDERCON 2018

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SESSION DESCRIPTIONS CURRENT AS OF JANUARY 23, 2018 SUBJECT TO CHANGE

CIDERCON

SCHEDULE HIGHLIGHTS Wednesday, January 31 The annual Cider Share starts at 3 p.m. for distributors and media only. Attendees should plan on arriving at 4 p.m. to sample cider with 50-plus cider makers from around the world. The Cider Share is open to all attendees in the Harbor Foyer area of the fourth floor in the Baltimore Waterfront Marriott. CiderCon badges are required.

Thursday, February 1 Don’t miss the opening General Session with a presentation on cider data in the United States by Nielsen. The session starts at 8:30 a.m. in the Grand Ballroom and is open to all attendees.

Friday, February 2 COURSE KEY

The Grand Tasting this year features our guests from New Zealand. Sample ciders from Peckham’s, Harvest and

TASTING SESSION HERITAGE CIDER TRACK Beginner  Intermediate  Advanced 

Zeffer and hear about cider-making in the land of Kiwis. The event starts at 4:30 p.m. with a panel discussion moderated by Gabe Cook, followed by the Grand Tasting and Commencement Toast at 5:30 p.m. Say goodbye to CiderCon 2018 with a toast and get ready for CiderCon 2019 when we return to our hub city of Chicago!

All Levels è

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PHOTO BY ERIC LEWANDOWSKI


WEDNESDAY JAN UARY 31 , 2 01 8

Become a Certified Cider Professional USACM CCP Committee Members 9 – 11 a.m. q Laurel A-D The United States Association of Cider Makers introduces the Certified Cider Professional program. This first-ever cider accreditation program is designed for distributors, servers and others who are interested in becoming bona fide experts on all things cider. This lecture format will have you ready to take the test. The test will not be administered during the Wednesday session. CCP representatives will be at the Trade Show at Table 9. Cost is $40. All Levels è

Cider Institute of North America Boot Camp Cider Institute Educators 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. q Essex A-C Come join Cider Institute of North America (CINA) educators for a sneak peak at the weeklong courses being taught across the United States and Canada. This will be a condensed version of beginning-and advanced-level coursework that will build upon cider skills and transition into further institute training. We hope you can join us and hear from our board and new executive director about CINA's plan for 2018 and beyond! Topics include: • What is Cider and How is it Made? (Peter Mitchell, Cider & Perry Academy) • Chemistry of Juice and Cider (Brianna Ewing, Washington State University) • Understanding Cider Faults (Chris Gerling, Cornell University) • Sensory Analysis and Focus groups (Elizabeth Tomasino, Oregon State University) • Using oak to your advantage: Barrel aging and fermentation protocol (Ryan Burk, Angry Orchard) • Keeping it clean. Sanitation and its effects on cider quality (Andrew Byers, Finnriver Cider) CINA representatives will be at the Trade Show at Table 8. Cost is $75 and includes lunch. Intermediate 

TTB Representatives of the TTB 12 – 4 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #5 The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade bureau talks on permit applications, record keeping, operational reports and tax returns, formulas and labels. TTB representatives will be at the Trade Show at Table 10. All Levels è

THURSDAY F E B UARY 1 , 2 01 8

Opening General Session Nielsen 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. q Grand Ballroom USACM has partnered with Nielsen to offer relevant, segmented market data as a benefit for our members. Nielsen will present on some of the greater trends of the 2017 cider market to open up CiderCon on Thursday morning.

Champagne Method Cider Moderator: Jenn Smith Panelists: Eric Shatt, Autumn Stoscheck and Eleanor Léger 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. q Grand Ballroom #7-10 Tirage, riddling, disgorgement, dosage: what does it all mean? Three heritage cider producers share their experiences producing ciders with the Champagne method and pour their examples. All Levels è

NETWORKING SALON: Women in Cider Pomme Boots Society 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. q Kent A-B A session in a casual setting discussing a specific, expert-run topic. Audience participation is encouraged. All Levels è

Collaboration and a Shared Cider Economy Ryan Burk and Greg Peck 10:45 – 11:30 a.m. q Dover A-C Angry Orchard and its partners in New York State are committed to growing the cider industry in the United States. Join Head Cider Maker Ryan Burk and partners, including Cornell and independent growers and producers, to learn what they are doing to help establish an American cider culture, through research, learnings and the goal of getting more cider fruit in the ground. Intermediate 

Working Together for a Strong Cider Segment Simon House and Jason House 10:45 – 11:30 a.m. q Laurel A-B As cideries, we need to stop attacking our own placements — both draft and bottle — and start going after beer placements. This session will discuss ways to go about looking for an additional cider draft line, an additional cider display, an additional cider menu feature, etc. We will also discuss the ways to work together as allies, rather than competitors, to build a healthy segment the right way. If we consider the segment and the consumer before our personal gains, the segment will grow larger and we will thrive together. Intermediate  CIDERCON 2018

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SESSION DESCRIPTIONS Protecting and Enforcing Trademarks Martha Engel 10:45 – 11:30 a.m. q Laurel C-D Your competitors can all make cider or a perry, but what makes you stand out from the crowd? Your brand and the names of your ciders. This presentation will discuss strategies for selecting marks, how to protect your brand and cider names, how to enforce your marks against others and strategies for strengthening your brand.  In addition, the presentation will touch on legal issues relating to labels and advertising, including social media. 

Dale Brown 11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. q Grand Ballroom As part USACM's efforts to get market data to our members, Dale Brown of the Cyder Market will discuss the lastest trends from his multiyear cider maker survey.

Sensory Analysis Charles McGonegal 1:30 – 3 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #7 Sensory analysis focuses on flavor, aroma and clarity of ciders. The session will delve into sensory flaws, enhancements and general tastings that a cider drinker/maker should be aware of while in the cider industry.

Intermediate 

All Levels è

Building Craft Cider with Contemporary Apples

NETWORKING SALON: Nielsen Data

Andrew Byers 10:45 – 11:30 a.m. q Essex A-C This is a walk through the stages of product development. First we will discuss inception and feasibility — what do you have to make cider with and why. Next is blending at the press and blending from the tanks, then trials on the bench and concerns in scaling up and how to replicate. Lastly, we will discuss polishing both process and cider with consideration of styles guidelines and tradition. This session is also about encouraging cider makers to put thoughtful products into the market so we can all drink “better” cider. Beginner 

Reverend Nat’s is a Marketing Company, Not a Cider Company Nat West 10:45 – 11:30 a.m. q Grand Ballroom #1 A brand isn’t what you say it is. A brand is what your customers say it is. A strong brand is one that commands a higher price in the market, more loyal customers and a longer life in the industry, unable to be copied by competitors. In this talk, Nat West will show the process that he took his company through to develop the Reverend Nat’s Hard Cider strong message, story and brand. Beginner 

Zeffer Cider: New Zealand Cider Tasting Josh Townsend and Jody Scott 10:45 – 11:30 a.m. q Grand Ballroom #3 Sample Zeffer Cider’s Slack ma Girdle, Hopped and Apple Crumble ciders. Zeffer Cider Co. is proud to be one of New Zealand’s leading cider brands and the largest independent, dedicated cider producer. Our real cider-lovers founders started Zeffer in 2009 after scouring New Zealand orchards to find specific apple varieties to make world-class cider, using only the best ingredients. This was sold in small batches at a farmers’ market to rave reviews. The number of fans and quantity of cider being produced has grown significantly since then but we remain a small team dedicated to making the world’s best cider. Today we produce more than 500,000 liters annually from our new cidery and orchard in sunny Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand’s home of apples, and our cider is sold throughout New Zealand and exported across the globe to 11 countries. This year Zeffer won the Champion Cider at the International Cider Awards in London for their Cidre Demi-Sec Cider. All Levels è

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Lunch Presentation

CIDERCON 2018

1:30 – 3:30 p.m. q Kent A-B A session in a casual setting discussing a specific, expert-run topic. Audience participation is encouraged. All Levels è

Women in Cider: Pomme Boots Society Moderator: Jennie Dorsey Panelists: Michelle da Silva and Sara Sherrer 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. q Essex A-C Pomme Boots Society will host an interactive panel featuring women leaders from various sectors of the cider industry. Panelist will share their background, experiences, challenges and inspiration to illuminate industry trends and empower others in the field. Panelists will include experts in orchard/production, sales/ distribution, entrepreneurship/ownership and cidery/taproom. Beginner 

Leave it to Keever Emily Ritchie, Andrew Byers, Martin Berkeley and Dave Takush 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. q Dover A-C The Intricacies of keeving: a walk through the USDA/NW Cider Association-sponsored trip through Normandy, Brittany and southern England. This session will also include a practical exploration of what keeving aims to accomplish, why one might do this and the parameters of environment, juice and spirituality that bring this halted fermentation to market. Intermediate 

Finding Distribution in a Crowded Market Aaron Lanctot 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. q Laurel C-D Now more than ever, securing distribution in both your home and out-of-state markets is very competitive. Learn how to interview distributors and figure out why certain distributors are better for you than others. This presentation is designed for cideries that are currently self-distributing, thinking about distribution or are distributing in their home state and looking to expand out of their home market. Advanced 


How to Crowdfund Your Cidery

Developing a Dryness Scale

Zachary Robins 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #1 We will discuss ways to sell equity to the public in order to fund the launch of a cidery and build a strong following. We will also touch on other means of funding, such as distribution agreements with wholesalers.

Moderator: Eric West Chris Gerling and Jenn Smith 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. q Essex A-C How do we help eliminate consumer confusion and aid them in finding a cider they like the first time? Earlier this year USACM released the first version of their cider style guide, and the New York Cider Association is working to develop a dryness scale. This panel will review the progress on this project.

Beginner 

Quantitative Chemical Fingerprints John Edwards 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. q Laurel A-B When 1H NMR spectroscopy is applied to the complex mixtures that comprise apple juice and finished cider, it provides a quantitative assessment of alcohols, organic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and other yeast metabolites. The analysis requires no sample preparation and can yield information at any point in the cider-making process. The detailed chemical composition that it provides can be used to investigate process problems and to yield quality control information on batch-to-batch consistency. Finally, the chemical composition can be summarized to provide nutrition label information and ethanol content. Advanced 

Holistic Orchard Management Moderator: Eleanor Léger Michael Phillips, Eric Shatt and Autumn Stoscheck 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. q Dover A- C Join Michael Phillips, author of "The Apple Grower: A Guide for the Organic Orchardist" and "The Holistic Orchard," and two of his practicing colleagues, Eric Shatt (owner of RedByrd Cider and farm manager for Cornell University Orchards and Research) and Autumn Stoscheck (owner of Eve's Cidery and orchards) to discuss small-scale biodynamic and holistic orcharding. The group will talk about the key elements of this alternative approach, how it impacts the quality of the fruit, the life of the farmer and the economics of growing, especially in relation to cider fruit. All Levels è

All Levels è

The Legal Side of Distribution Marc Sorini 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. q Laurel C-D This presentation will explore the legal aspects of cider distribution. Sub-topics will include distribution strategies, agreements with distributors, prospects for direct shipping to consumers, other retail rights and the pros and cons of self-distribution. Advanced 

Building Your Brand with Experimental Marketing Kristyn Dolan 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #1 Do you participate in events? Do you run your own events? By utilizing experiential marketing and brand activation, better known as “special events,” a brand is able to capture the consumer and also make the brand relatable, relevant and talk-worthy, which builds brand loyalty, sales and press. Learn what experiential marketing is, how to take advantage of it for your brand, the dos and don’ts when creating your experience, and the best practices for making your next marketing campaign more effective or your next festival participation more meaningful. Beginner 

What’s Selling – On-and Off-Premise Retailers Discussion Mattie Beason, Eric Foster, Jed Jenny and Sam Pith 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. q Laurel A-B A panel of retailers to talk about the success they see in cider and what they are having success with in cider. All Levels è

Regional Variations in Apples and Cider Darlene Hayes and Dan Pucci 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #3 North America is host to a wide range of climates, conditions, landscapes and terroirs. Regional differences in wines made from the same grape varieties have been well studied and are more or less understood to exist by most consumers. This is not the case for apples and cider. We have been exploring some of these regional variations and will present analytic data from apples harvested from more than 30 orchards across the United States and taste a range of Newtown Pippin single varietal ciders, which have some shared traits while still expressing their unique terroir. All Levels è

LEFT PHOTO BY ERIC LEWANDOWSKI

CIDERCON 2018

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SESSION DESCRIPTIONS NETWORKING SALON: Orcharding 3:45 – 4:30 p.m. q Kent A-B A session in a casual setting discussing a specific, expert-run topic. Audience participation is encouraged. All Levels è

Basics to Bold: Tactics for Marketing, Branding and Media Outreach Caitlin Braam and Erin James 3:45 – 4:30 p.m. q Laurel A-B Take a closer look at the tools needed to construct a successful brand and keep it top of mind for consumers. Whether you’re just starting out, looking to enhance an existing brand, needing tried and true tips for increased exposure or assistance with sales and gaining recognition for your brand through media outreach, this session can benefit your brand. Also, learn from real-life case studies that showcase companies in the beverage industry breaking the mold of traditional marketing. All Levels è

Prevention and Correction of Sulfur-Off Odors in Cider-making Rebekka deKramer 3:45 – 4:30 p.m. q Laurel C-D Sulfur-off odors are a common issue that many cider makers face. This presentation will focus on cider-making practices that can reduce the formation of sulfur-off odors and also tools for correcting sulfur-off odors should they occur. Presentation will include yeast selection, nutrient recommendations, fermentation parameters and fining tools. Intermediate 

Promoting Cider in Wine Country Meredith Collins 3:45 – 4:30 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #1 Cider isn’t wine or beer — it’s cider. Nevertheless, people continue to ask about cider’s relationship to other beverages. This session will address what it’s like to sell and promote cider in a wine-producing region: the Finger Lakes of upstate New York. Wine regions all over create additional challenges and benefits for cider makers when it comes to labeling, wine trails, tourism and local on-premise accounts. Let’s turn these features to our advantage! Intermediate 

Varietal Ciders: From Branch to Bottle Carol Miles and Travis Alexander 3:45 – 4:30 p.m. q Essex A-C From 2000 to 2015, 17 cider apple cultivars grown in northwest Washington were evaluated for commercially relevant characteristics. Trees were evaluated for relative bloom time, bloom habit and productivity (biennial or consistent). Fruit size was recorded, as was juice tannin, titratable acidity, specific gravity and pH. Varietal cider was made from each variety and a panel of commercial cider makers evaluated sensory attributes. Intermediate 

How to Use Nielsen Data to Grow Your Sales Caitlyn Battaglia and Matt Crompton 3:45 – 5 p.m. q Dover A-C This session will explain the nuts and bolts of Nielsen/Nielsen CGA off-and on-premise data: what it is, how to interpret it and how to use it to grow your sales. Anyone with a need for a “factbase” to help understand cider retail market trends and better position your products within the broader category context should benefit from attending this session. All Levels è

Wild Fermentation and Other Heritage Cider Options Moderator: Jenn Smith Panelists: Ryan Burk, Tom Oliver, Leif Sundstrom and Kevin Zielinski 3:45 – 5 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #7-10 Four very different but equally passionate cider makers share their cider production experiences with “heritage” techniques for heritage ciders. Wild fermentations, barrels and more. Panel with cider tasting. All Levels è

Marketing with Apples Peter Mitchell 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. q Laurel C-D Real pictures of your own apples are hard to beat in any marketing materials to promote your cider brand. But growing apple trees is a pain and cost-prohibitive for many urban cideries. This presentation will discuss alternatives to orchard ownership and strategies to save time and money in small-scale cider orchards designed to market your cider brand while still providing quality juice for blending. Beginner 

Cidernomics for Start-up and Small Scale Cideries Eleanor Léger 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. q Essex A-C How do the decisions you make about your product impact your business? It’s not just production cost you need to think about. Asset utilization, working capital and sales channel economics are just a few other considerations. Eleanor Léger, founder of Eden Specialty Ciders and creator of “Cidernomics” shares some key concepts so you can make cider and make money too. Beginner /Intermediate 

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PHOTOS BY LIZ HOUGH


NETWORKING SALON: Brainstorming Sustainability in the Cidery Eric Jorgensen 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. q Kent A-B This session is intended to be a participatory workshop/discussion to explore how members of the cider industry might collectively engage in and promote sustainable business and production practices. While Eric Jorgensen will present several models from the wine industry as well as thoughts and experience from his Finnriver Farm & Cidery, the utility of this workshop will also depend on the participation of those in attendance. All Levels è

State Regulatory Compliance Janeen Grace 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. q Laurel A-B In addition to TTB, cider makers need to comply with state liquor control requirements. Although each of the over 50 liquor control agencies is unique, a number of common issues exist for companies making and selling cider. This session provides an overview of some of the key issues related to state regulatory compliance such as differences in cider definitions, license types, the three-tier system, label registration, direct shipping, bottle bills and tax reporting. Beginner 

Carbonation Fundamentals Phil Kelm 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #1 This session will review cider carbonation levels with regard to cider taxation class; carbonation terms, units and principles; cider carbonation techniques; and proper use and maintenance of carbonation equipment. Intermediate 

Peckham’s Cider: New Zealand Cider Tasting Alex Peckham 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #3 Sample Moutere, Cider with Feijoa, Boysenberry, Sweet Serious Frenchie and Wild All The Way from Peckham’s Cider, a small, family-run cidery, and one of the very few New Zealand cideries which grow only cider apples specifically for cider making. We strive to make complex, full-bodied, vintage ciders, which can only be done by using cider apples harvested at optimal ripeness. We have 30 different cider varieties on our family orchard in the Moutere Valley near Nelson — true apple country. Our clay soils, combined with exceptional sunlight hours, are famed for producing fantastic, full-flavored fruit. We put a lot of thought into blending so as to make the best of the broad range of cider characteristics available to us. Our ciders are made in autumn from fresh juice from our own cider press, and we take our time slow fermenting and aging our ciders in steel and oak for at least six months. The cidery was awarded New Zealand Champion Cider in both 2015 and 2016 at the New Zealand Cider Awards. All Levels è

FRIDAY F E B UARY 2 , 2 0 1 8

USACM Board of Directors Elections 9 – 10 a.m. q Grand Ballroom Cidery-level members are invited to vote for the 2018 cohort of board of directors. There are two at-large positions up for election as well as the regional chair for the South and one of the large cidery seats. The membership will also vote to update the USACM bylaws.

NETWORKING SALON: Production Hacks Eleanor Léger 10:15 – 11:15 a.m. q Kent A-B A session in a casual setting discussing a specific, expert-run topic. Audience participation is encouraged. All Levels è

Heritage Cider Keys to Success in the Next Growth Category Diane Flynt, Shana Muhammad, Sam Fitz and Autumn Stoscheck 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. q Grand Ballroom #7-10 James Beard Awards nominee Diane Flynt shares her assessment of the market for heritage ciders, and the keys to business success. Flynt has been a passionate advocate for heritage cider’s place at the table, and has 10 years of market experience to bring to this lively presentation and tasting session. Joined by a couple of regional luminaries from the trade, she will get you fired up about this exciting category. All Levels è

The Yeast Whisperer Shea Comfort 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. q Essex A-C Understanding fermentation: a practical guide to nutrition, strain selection, fermentation management and style creation. All Levels è

Climate Change in the Orchard Moderator: Dayna Bateman Panelists: Stephen Wood, Marcus Robert, Alex Peckham, Greg Peck, Ian Merwin, Jim Koan, Darlene Hayes and Tom Oliver 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. q Laurel A-B Growers respond to a changing world. Seasoned orchardists will share their observations of how changing weather patterns have impacted growing conditions and will share their strategies for managing these new extremes. All Levels è

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SESSION DESCRIPTIONS Juicing Tourism Marketing Kevin Clay and Caroline Logan 10:45 – 11:30 a.m. q Grand Ballroom #1 Don’t leave that money on the table! This session will explore building relationships with statewide tourism offices and local destination marketing organizations through grant and event sponsorship opportunities. A representative from Virginia Tourism Corporation will co-present and share different ways to build these relationships at home. We’ll also take a look at partnering and building momentum with other beverage producers in your region. Beginner 

Separation Anxiety: Observational Insights to Understanding Cider Filtration Maria Peterson 10:45 – 11:30 a.m. q Laurel C-D A session on why we filter and the timing of it, including what we need to understand about fining and clarification, and how that makes filtration more economical. We will discuss different types of media and equipment on the market (plate and frame, lenticular, cartridge and crossflow) and things to look for when buying used or new. The session will also look at what colloids are and why they can make filtration a nightmare and how to keep these nightmare filtrations from occurring. Plus the timing of “sterile” filtration before packaging. Intermediate 

Horizontal Tasting

Cider-making with Heirloom and High Tannin Apples Ian Merwin, Deirdre Birmingham, Jonathan Oakes,Christopher Oakes, Autumn Stoscheck, Greg Peck, Whit Knickerbocker and Chris Negronida 1:30 – 3 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #7-10 Many cider makers prefer using traditional American and/or European apple varieties for their ciders. These apple varieties are often difficult to obtain from nurseries, and they pose unique challenges to orchardists used to growing common dessert varieties. At present these apples also command high prices and some are dual purpose for fresh market sales. Are the potential rewards worth the extra efforts to grow specialty cider varieties? This session will explore the pros and cons of these apple varieties, from the nursery, orchard, cider-making and economic perspectives. The presenters will share their considerable experience propagating and growing these apples, making and marketing craft ciders and developing commercial cideries based upon traditional cider varieties. Intermediate 

Growing Bittersweet Apple Varieties for Cider Stephen Wood, Marcus Robert, Harry Ricker, Kevin Zielinski and Dave DeFisher 1 – 2:15 p.m. q Essex A-C This practices and terroir panel tackles bittersweet apple orcharding from a commercial approach. Is there a sustainable business in the growing of bittersweet apple varieties for cider? Experienced commercial growers discuss their approaches to varieties, planting, management and harvest. This panel is aimed at commercial growers considering planting cider varieties and at cider makers who want to source these varieties and encourage increased supply from growers.

Lauren Shepard 10:45 – 11:30 a.m. q Grand Ballroom #3 While more and more people are drinking cider, the apple’s potential as a fermentable is still limited in the minds of the general public — and sometimes in the minds of certain restaurants and bars, who “already have a cider on their menu.”  How do we as cider makers, cider bars and cider distributors really convince drinkers that there is more to cider than apple flavors? This tasting will explore a new format for tasting cider that can be used with consumers and industry members alike, with the goal of highlighting the diversity of cider. We’ll taste several different ciders, each one paired with a different drink that it shares flavor components with and, as a group, explore the similarities and differences among them. Our goal will be to come up with a structured format that can be replicated and used to draw new cider drinkers in to the fold in an inclusive, interesting way and further educate existing ones. There really is a cider for dry red wine drinkers! Beer geeks really can find a cider to geek out over!

Intermediate 

Beginner 

U.K. Cider Trends

USACM Business Meeting at Lunch

Gabe Cook 1:30 – 2:15 p.m. q Laurel C-D An overview of what’s new in the world’s largest cider market, including market segmentation, new flavor innovation, the latest packaging trends, consumer expectations, legislation, juice content, ingredients labeling and the rise of craft cider.

11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. q Grand Ballroom USACM's annual business meeting will include 2017 updates on USACM's budget and programming as well a look into the year ahead.

Building Your Team Andrew Byers 1:30 – 2:15 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #1 This session is focused on the benefits of training and retaining a high quality and contented workforce. Management level tools to help you be a better boss also help your employees take satisfaction in their days’ work despite repetition, sub-par equipment and foul weather. This session is an introduction to team management theory, a way to begin to craft yourself as a manager of people whom care about the work you do together. Begin to create a team that cares about doing all jobs well because they are invested in the success of the whole, from mopping to product development. Drawing ideas from servant leadership, lean thinking, daily flow management and six years at Finnriver Cidery. Intermediate 

All Levels è

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CIDERCON 2018


Cider, Beer, Wine and the Spirit of Collaboration

Distributor Panel

Panelists: Paul Vander Heide, Doug Fabbioli, Scott Harris and Kellie Shevlin 1:30 – 2:15 p.m. q Laurel A-B Since 2009, hard cider has been the fastest-growing segment in the alcoholic beverage industry. But with each passing year, it is becoming more and more imperative for hard cider producers who want to stay ahead of their competition and gain market share to understand the entire beverage landscape. One of the keys to success is fostering collaboration by creating relationships with independent producers in other beverage categories. Join this panel of brewers, winemakers and distillers to discuss the challenges and benefits of collaboration as it relates to building your business, making your product and selling to your shared consumers.

Lauren Shepard 2:30 – 3:15 p.m. q Essex A-C A panel discussion of small distributors that work with artisanal producers, focus on quality of quantity, education over marketing dollars and work with flexible margins to sell high-end products. More suited to small producers who do not have a budget for flashy packaging and marketing support, and are more focused on tradition than innovation.

All Levels è

NETWORKING SALON: Global 1:30 – 2:15 p.m. q Kent A-B A session in a casual setting discussing a specific, expert-run topic. Audience participation is encouraged. All Levels è

Harvest Cidery: New Zealand Cider Tasting Hamish Jackson 1:30 – 2:15 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #3 Sample Harvest Ciders including Scrumpy Apple, Harvest Summer Citrus, Harvest Apple and Thomas & Rose Watermelon and Cucumber from Harvest Cidery, the iconic New Zealand cider company. The Harvest Cidery story began in 1989 when Brian and Irene Shanks, local Gisborne orchardists, began making cider from their own Braeburn and Granny Smith apples. Keen to develop, they began a period of intensive research including a trip to the U.K. where they visited almost 54 cideries in the south of England. Needing room for expansion, the cidery moved to a site at the end of Customhouse Street, overlooking the harbor and Poverty Bay, in 1995. By 2003 it was time to expand again and a year later the cidery moved to its current site on Customhouse Street. The cidery now produces a range of award-winning ciders as well as other products, each with its own unique taste.

Intermediate 

Understanding Terroir Derek Plotkowski 2:30 – 3:15 p.m. q Laurel A-B The concept of terroir can at times be opaque and intimidating, and expressing terroir in cider can seem to be an unattainable goal for cider makers and orchardists. In this session we will attempt to demystify terroir by looking at how terroir is defined, breaking down the concept into its components, examining examples of terroir expression and exploring the steps that can be taken to develop and define North American terroirs. This session is meant for beginners, but could be useful for anyone who wants to learn more about terroir. Beginner 

Using Heirloom Apples for Cider and Spirits, Just like Our Ancestors Did Daniel Bussey 2:30 – 3:15 p.m. q Laurel C-D The choice of which apples to grow for cider can be daunting for both the amateur and professional. Heirloom apples from our past have a proven record of providing a high-quality base for your cider and distilling operation, as well as being a valuable marketing tool for advertising. This program will discuss the selection of varieties that will work for you. Intermediate 

All Levels è TOP PHOTO BY LIZ HOUGH

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SESSION DESCRIPTIONS Advanced Cider Analysis Darren Michaels 3:30 – 4:15 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #1 Explores the required and non-required common and uncommon analysis involved in cider-making, including methods, relevance, equipment and budgeting for small to large cideries.

Basic Cider Analysis Darren Michaels 2:30 – 3:15 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #1 Explores the required and non-required common and uncommon analysis involved in cider-making, including methods, relevance, equipment and budgeting for small to large cideries. The basic course is followed by an advanced course at 3:30 p.m. Beginner 

Working with Oak Shea Comfort 3:15 – 4:15 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #7-10 The “Yeast Whisperer” takes on a new topic: the use of oak in cider production. This session is relevant for all types of cider. Using one base cider, the session will cover the different sources and methods for using oak, including a comparison of French, American and Hungarian, toast levels and fire. What do the different approaches do for cider? How can oak help you achieve your cider goals? Come taste and find out. All Levels è

Heritage Ciders on the Menu Brian Rutzen, Sam Fitz and Jackson Cannon 3:30 – 4:15 p.m. q Essex A-C How do heritage ciders work best as part of a restaurant or bar program? Brian Rutzen of Chicago’s The Northman interviews Sam Fitz of AnxoDC and Jackson Cannon of Boston’s Island Creek/Eastern Standard group. Hear from these leaders why they are passionate about heritage ciders and how they incorporate them in their approaches. All Levels è

Let’s Get the Cider Party Started Moderator: Matthew Ostrander Panelist: Mattie Beason, Eric Foster and Jenn Smith 3:30 – 4:15 p.m. q Laurel A-B This is an opportunity for cider makers, distributors and owners to hear about successful events in the cider industry. We will also discuss how to design successful events in small or large terms to help spread the word of cider and how to throw cider centric events. All Levels è

NETWORKING SALON: Draft Tech Mini Course Pomme Boots Society 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. q Kent A-B A session in a casual setting discussing a specific, expert-run topic. Audience participation is encouraged. All Levels è

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Advanced 

Fruit Chemistry, Yeast and Fermentation: A Complicated Relationship Amanda Stewart 3:30 – 4:15 p.m. q Laurel C-D An advanced look at fruit chemistry, yeast and fermentation geared toward academics, cider makers and apple growers. Advanced 

Nutrients: Additions or Subtractions and What Happens with Both William Grote, Holly Schmidt, Doug Schmidt and Nathan Williams 3:30 – 4:15 p.m. q Grand Ballroom #3 Nutrients in cider: stimulating both fermentation and debate. Some cider makers swear you need to use them while others swear you need to remove them. We wish to add some fresh data to the great “added nutrient vs. depleted nutrient” debate by presenting the results of a controlled fermentation experiment, involving three batches of the same juice fermented under identical conditions with a single changing variable: nutrient level. The experiment will use a commercial testing laboratory throughout the course of fermentation to measure levels of YAN, phenolic compounds and fermentation by-products of all three ciders. Speed and temperature of the fermentations will also be constantly measured and logged using remote sensors for accuracy and detail. The accumulated data will be analyzed by both cider makers and academics, and we will present the results and analysis at the session, concluding with a tasting of the three ciders for everyone in attendance. Advanced 

New Zealand Cider Makers Panel Moderator: Gabe Cook Panelists: Alex Peckham, Jody Scott, Josh Townsend and Hamish Jackson 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. q Grand Ballroom A panel discussion on the state of New Zealand cider, with a tasting of their selections. Open to all attendees. All Levels è

Tasting and Commencement Toast 5:30 – 6:15 p.m. q Grand Ballroom Help us say farewell to CiderCon2018 and look forward to CIderCon 2019 when we return to Chicago.


NOTES

F R E D E R I C K C O U N T Y, M D

Wineries Breweries Distilleries

REQUEST A FREE BROCHURE Sip and sample local wine, brews, cider, mead, and spirits at dozens of unique tasting rooms across HIP & HISTORIC FREDERICK COUNTY, MD

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SPRINGFIELD MANOR

CIDERCON 2018

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PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES Travis Alexander

› is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Horticulture at Washington State University. His doctoral research is focused on advancing Washington State cider apple production through evaluations of mechanized harvest, rootstock and scion performance, in addition to regional juice quality. He has had the opportunity to collaborate with cider apple growers and cider makers across Washington State, participate in CiderCon since 2016 and publish cider-based scientific journal articles and extension bulletins. Prior to joining WSU, he completed a Master of Science in Horticulture at the University of California, Davis with a focus on peaches. Varietal Ciders: From Branch to Bottle

› Dayna

Bateman

is the founder of cidrbox, a premium hard cider subscription box celebrating American heritage orchard cider and its makers. With roots in user experience (MSc, HCI), Bateman directed online marketing, ecommerce operations and digital product development for Crocs, Hammacher Schlemmer and Experian Automotive, and has provided ecommerce consulting across the Fortune 500.

The 2018 CiderCon sessions are brought to you by the following experts, makers, growers and enthusiasts

Climate Change in the Orchard

› Caitlyn

Battaglia

is a manager within Nielsen’s Beverage Alcohol Practice Area, where she supports Nielsen’s initiatives and thought leadership across beer, wine and spirits clients. She has been with the Practice Area for nearly two years. Prior to joining the Beverage Alcohol Practice Area, Battaglia worked in advanced analytics focusing on pricing and promotion as well as sales and marketing effectiveness. A current Houston resident, she holds a B.A. from Denison University and has been with Nielsen for more than four years. How to Use Nielsen Data to Grow Your Sales

› Mattie

Beason

is the owner of Black Twig Cider House and Mattie B’s Public House, both located in Durham, North Carolina. A certified cider expert, Beason was one of just eight cider instructors for the United States Association of Cider Makers at the first Cider Certification in Portland, Oregon, in February 2016. A longtime pillar of Durham’s culinary and drink scene, Beason developed the awardwinning wine programs at Pop’s and Chef Scott Howell’s Nana’s. He also launched Txakoli Fest in 2008 and in 2016 hosted Txotxfest — the first cider festival in the Southeast. Follow Black Twig Cider House @blacktwigciderhouse or Mattie Beason @mattiebdurham. What’s Selling – On and Off-Premise Retailers Discussion | Let’s Get the Cider Party Started

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CIDERCON 2018

PHOTO BY ERIC LEWANDOWSKI


Tom Bell

› started making cider out of necessity. After rejuvenating the remnants of a 19th century orchard, he wondered what to do with all the apples these longneglected heritage trees produced. Cider seemed the only solution to disposing of a bounty of Baldwin, Northern Spy and a still-unidentified, early-season apple. After some research, he purchased a press, built a scratter out of an old garbage disposal, brought some unused glass carboys out of retirement and set to work. Bell currently produces about 65 gallons of heritage cider each year using traditional methods of natural fermentation, nitrogen depletion through repeated racking and careful blending to create a cider with balanced tannins, acid and residual sugar cleared of lees by disgorgement after bottle conditioning. Nutrients: Additions or Subtractions and What Happens with Both

Martin Berkeley

› of Pilton Cider specializes in keeved cider production in Somerset, England. Having trained in Normandy, France, Pilton makes bottle-conditioned, keeved cider from full, bittersweet West Country apples. Pilton Cider was a stop on the Northwest Cider Association’s "Tour de Keeving."

He holds an Honors Bachelor of Business Administration from York University in Toronto, Canada. After residing in Western Canada for most of his early years, and then moving to Toronto, he relocated to the U.S. in the mid-1990s, and now lives in Mission Viejo, California.

Leave it to Keever

Opening General Session

› Deirdre

› is the head cider maker at Angry Orchard, based in Walden, New York. He is on the boards of the United States Association of Cider Makers and the Cider Institute of North America.

Birmingham

is the chief executive orchardist of The Cider Farm in southern Wisconsin. She has specialized in organically growing English and French true cider apples for their brand of dry ciders and apple brandy. Since these apple trees were not commercially available in the United States in 2003 when she and her husband started the orchard, they learned to graft trees in order to get the varieties they wanted. Cider-making with Heirloom and High Tannin Apples

Caitlin Braam

› is the brand strategist for Angry Orchard, responsible for driving education, engagement and industry relations for the brand. She was previously president of Seattle Cider Company and Two Beers Brewing Company. Originally from Minnesota, Braam lives in Seattle and is a Certified Cider Professional. When not drinking cider, she can be found hiking, skiing and traveling the world. Basics to Bold: Tactics for Marketing, Branding and Media Outreach

›Danny Brager is the senior vice president of Nielsen’s

Beverage Alcohol Practice Area in the United States, supporting relationships with Nielsen’s many cider, beer, wine and spirits clients, as well as with key industry groups and the media. In this role, Brager and his team provide business information, analysis and insights, focusing on the U.S. retail environment and consumer — who they are, what they buy and why. In addition, he supports the differentiated needs of the U.S. Beverage Alcohol client base within the Nielsen products/services portfolio. He is a frequent speaker at many client and industry events, both domestically and globally, on the subject of U.S. beverage alcohol retail and consumer trends. Brager has 15 years of experience specific to the beverage alcohol industry, and has held a variety of marketing and sales positions with Nielsen, as well as with the Beverage Information Group and Resources Optimization International (ROI) for the past 30-plus years. PHOTO BY ERIC LEWANDOWSKI

Ryan Burk

Cider Institute of North America Boot Camp | Collaboration and a Shared Cider Economy | Wild Fermentation and Other Heritage Cider Options

› Daniel

Bussey

is an orchardist, horticulturist, historian, professional cider maker and former businessman. He has taught workshops on grafting fruit trees, cider-making and other apple-related topics for more than 30 years and has grown heirloom apple varieties all of his life. He has been featured on Public Radio International’s “The Takeaway” and National Public Radio’s “Science Friday,” and has been the subject of numerous newspaper articles. This past August saw the long-awaited release of Bussey’s seven-volume work, “The Illustrated History of Apples in the United States and Canada,” which lists over 16,000 apples that were grown in North America between 1629 and 2000. The book was a 30-year project in the making. He now resides near Decorah, Iowa, where he is the orchard manager and apple historian for the Seed Savers Exchange, maintaining and enlarging the Historic Orchard at Heritage Farm to contain nearly 1,300 apple accessions and make them available to orchardists. Using Heirloom Apples for Cider and Spirits, Just like Our Ancestors Did

Andrew Byers

› is a culinary botanist turned cider maker. He has worked in kitchens, schools, orchards, farms and two cider houses. For the last five years he has been the production manager and head cider maker at Finnriver Farm and Cidery. Byers has a passion for fungal ecology and management theory, which are both about community relations, community environment and how those two factors affect each other. Cider Institute of North America Boot Camp | Building Craft Cider with Contemporary Apples | Leave it to Keever | Building Your Team CIDERCON 2018

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PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES ›Shea A.J. Comfort helped start MoreWine! in 2000. Over ›Jackson Cannon has always lived to exacting standards.

Son and brother of renowned award-winning journalists Lou and Carl Cannon, he grew up immersed in a world of travel, politics and literature. After working in the music industry in his 20s, he settled in Boston and transitioned into bartending. Cannon opened Boston’s lauded Eastern Standard in 2005, the iconic Island Creek Oyster Bar in Boston in 2010 and Burlington, Massachusetts, in 2016, the award-winning The Hawthorne Bar in 2011 and, most recently, Les Sablons in Cambridge’s Harvard Square. In 2013, he collaborated with 165-year-old Boston knife-makers R. Murphy Knives to design the Jackson Cannon Bar Knife, a multipurpose tool with many applications in drink making. Cannon has also been recognized as a finalist for “Best Bar Mentor” at the 2013 and 2014 Tales of the Cocktail Spirited Awards and as a 2014 Wine Enthusiast Wine Star Award nominee for “Mixologist/Brand Ambassador of the Year.” When he’s not roving the world in search of rare spirits, Cannon travels the country participating as a judge in such esteemed industry competitions as Tales of the Cocktail’s Spirited Awards and the San Francisco World Spirits Competition. Heritage Ciders on the Menu

Kevin Clay

› is a serial entrepreneur, having built GayRVA, Virginia’s first news website for the LGBT community, before selling the company in 2013. Clay’s PR & Marketing firm for food and beverage brands, Big Spoon Co., has successfully partnered with numerous clients to innovate and improve their guest experiences, increase foot traffic and grow sales. He brings his humor, intuition and compassionate personality to the table from brainstorming over coffee to forging meaningful connections at cocktail hour. Clay also offers a global perspective and community-driven awareness to facilitate sweet success for his clients and partners. He is a native to Richmond, Virginia, and attended Virginia Commonwealth University where he studied Mass Communications and Business. He currently resides in Richmond with his fiancé, Mike. Juicing Tourism Marketing

Meredith Collins

› is the blogger behind Along Came A Cider (www.alongcameacider.blogspot.com), where she has been tasting, photographing and reviewing hard cider for five years. In addition to managing her blog, Collins has judged for the Good Food Awards, the Great Lakes International Cider and Perry competition and the Pennsylvania Farm Show's inaugural cider competition. She has presented at CiderCon and taught classes on the cider business and America's cider renaissance. Her cider experience also includes two years in a cidery tasting room and working with Finger Lakes Cider Week as a social media ambassador, educator, writer and guest pourer. She is also a member of the first class of the Cider Certification Program by the United States Association of Cider Makers. Promoting Cider in Wine Country

the next four years he did intensive fermentation research on yeast, oak, malolactic bacteria, tannins and oxygen. He also created and taught an amateur winemaking program, educated the company staff and created a series of technical “how-to” manuals. He has been an on-going contract winemaker for Lallemand Oenology since 2001, creating yeast and malolactic bacteria trials, along with giving technical winemaking presentations for them throughout the country. Comfort is currently the consulting maker for Reliez Valley Vineyards, the Guthrie Cider House, The Cider Project and the Alaska Berries Winery. Since 2007 he has been working with individual wine and cider makers through his independent winemaking consultation business, YeastWhisperer (www.yeastwhisperer.com). The Yeast Whisperer | Working with Oak

Gabe Cook

› is the Ciderologist. He has a passion for cider and perry, which has enabled him to work across the cider industry for the last decade, in the United Kingdom, New Zealand and now all around the world. He has worked for all sizes and types of cider makers, from a traditional farmhouse producer, all the way up to the world’s largest. Along the way Cook has made cider, developed cider, advocated cider and judged at national and international cider competitions across three continents. He has even presented a bottle of cider to the Queen of England. You could say he knows his apples. Cook is a consultant, writer, broadcaster and educator on all matters cider. It is his mission to celebrate the heritage, diversity and innovation within the cider category. He believes cider can have as much finesse and elegance as any wine and as much boldness and character as any craft beer, and he wants the world to know! U.K. Cider Trends

Matthew Crompton

› is an associate client director for Nielsen CGA and is responsible for the implementation of Nielsen CGA’s on-premise services in the United States. Since joining CGA, Crompton has risen through the CGA ranks, becoming an expert in all things on-premise. He has managed and provided consultancy for some of the largest beverage alcohol manufacturers across Europe including Diageo, Anheuser Busch and William Grant & Sons. Crompton is now part of the U.S. On Premise Specialist team, providing first-class insight into an often perceived dark market. How to Use Nielsen Data to Grow your Sales

›Michelle da Silva is the co-founder and head cider maker

at Bantam Cider Company, a craft cidery based in Somerville, Massachusetts. Growing up around a Portuguese table, she was raised in an environment where food and wine were highly celebrated and small-batch winemaking was a family tradition. It was her passion for wine that led her to pursue a career in cider making. In January 2012, da Silva and her co-founder Dana Masterpolo launched Bantam Cider Company, which distributes four core products as well as limited edition ciders to six states throughout New England. Women in Cider

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CIDERCON 2018


John Edwards

›Dave DeFisher is the owner and operator of his family’s

fourth-generation fruit farm, DeFisher Fruit Farms. For over 80 years, DeFisher Fruit Farms has grown apples, cherries, pears, peaches and other fruit on 400 acres in Williamson, New York. In 2011, DeFisher established Apple Country Spirits, a farm-based distillery offering fruit-based spirits and offering custom distilling services to other craft makers. Then, in 2014, he established Rootstock Ciderworks, a farmbased craft cider facility. He is proud of the fact that both the distillery and the cidery exclusively use fruit that is grown on the family farm, a true “from-tree-to-glass” operation. The range of products includes fruit-based brandies, vodka and applejack, as well as a full line of craft hard ciders offered in bottles, cans and kegs. Over the last five years, DeFisher has been adding quite a few acres of cider-specific apples to the operation. By means of either grafting or replanting, he has about 20 acres worth of this fruit in the ground now. DeFisher Fruit Farm’s preferred style of plantings is semi dwarf trees. Most new orchards they are planting are either B118 rootstock or MM106. There are also many MM111 rootstock trees still in production on the farm. Growing Bittersweet Apple Varieties for Cider

Rebekka deKramer

› joined the fermentation group at Scott Laboratories in 2005 and is currently the Velcorin product manager and cider specialist. She manages the technical sales staff specializing in fermentation, cellar and filtration products. She was also the technical editor of the Scott Laboratories Cider Handbook. She graduated from the University of California, Davis in 2004 with a B.S. in Biological Sciences. Prevention and Correction of Sulfur-Off Odors in Cider-making

› Kristyn

Dolan

is the director of event production and sales at Starfish Junction Productions LLC, an event planning, production and management company. She specifically manages the Pour the Core hard cider festivals, with locations in Boston, Brooklyn, Long Island, Philadelphia and Baltimore, in addition to two coffee and tea festivals in New York and Pennsylvania. Prior to this position, Dolan served as Starfish Junction’s marketing manager specializing in event logistics and operations, branding and promotions. She is a certified beer judge with the Beer Judge Certification Program and has accomplished level one of the Cider Certification Program. She is also a Certified TIPS Trainer through Health Communications Inc. Building Your Brand with Experimental Marketing

›Jennie Dorsey is the general manager, buyer and cider

maker for Schilling Cider House Portland, Oregon, and is a founding member of the Pomme Boots Society. She first learned about cider when she moved to England in 2005. On first drink, she completely fell in love with the local cider culture and the nuance of the beverage, and was hooked for life. Dorsey has worked and is passionate in numerous areas within the industry including managing a pub in England, orcharding, picking, pressing, production, sales, marketing and distributor management. Women in Cider

› operates an analytical laboratory specializing in NMR spectroscopy, supporting the analysis needs of all industrial sectors such as pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, food and beverage and herbal supplements. Over the past few years his lab has developed a detailed chemical fingerprint analysis of alcoholic beverages. Edwards obtained his B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Durham in the United Kingdom in 1986 and his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from University of South Carolina in 1990. He resides in the Hudson Valley of New York. Quantitative Chemical Fingerprints

› Martha

Engel

is a shareholder at Winthrop & Weinstine, P.A., a law firm based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She has extensive experience helping breweries, wineries, distilleries and cideries throughout the country with trademark strategy, protection and enforcement. Along with the rest of the alcohol beverage team at Winthrop (including Zach Robins who is also speaking at CiderCon), Engel helps businesses with corporate structure, regulatory, financing, exit strategy and other issues that particularly impact these businesses. Protecting and Enforcing Trademarks

› Doug

Fabbioli

had many years of experience in the New York and California wine industries when he and his wife Colleen moved their family to Virginia in 1997. A graduate of Syracuse University’s Whitman School of Business, he was able to help many wineries and vineyards with the unique challenges facing the wine industry in the Mid-Atlantic. In 2001 Fabbioli utilized all his education and experience to open his own family run vineyard and winery — Fabbioli Cellars opened its doors as the 113th winery in the state and the 13th winery in Loudoun County. Currently producing over 6,000 cases of wine and cider, Fabbioli Cellars is a strong presence on the wine trail as well as in the stores and restaurants. Fabbioli himself has been instrumental in setting a tone of collaboration in the Virginia wine industry as well as other sectors of the Northern Virginia rural economy. He has been consulting for numerous other wineries, vineyard owners and prospective newcomers to the industry for over 20 years. In addition to his work responsibilities, he serves on the Virginia Wine Board and the Loudoun County Rural Economic Development Council. He has been a Boy Scout Leader with Troop 1910 since 2001 and is greatly involved with many other community organizations and efforts. Cider, Beer, Wine and the Spirit of Collaboration

› Sam

Fitz

is the co-founder and director of operations for ANXO Cider. He oversees the ANXO cider brand as well as two brick-and-mortar establishments in Washington, D.C., including the award-winning restaurant ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar. Fitz became the fist certified cicerone in Washington, D.C., in 2011 while running beer programs for notable bars and restaurants before devoting his career to the apple. ANXO's philosophy is "apples only" and he hopes to grow the category through a commitment to its primary ingredient and resource. ANXO ciders feature apples of uncommon character with minimal intervention, and the ANXO locations only serve ciders made from apples and pears. While Fitz and ANXO recognize there is no right way to go about making cider, he and his company hope to be a voice for traditional cider making and the orchardists, producers and restaurateurs that embrace it. Heritage Cider Keys to Success in the Next Growth Category | Heritage Ciders on the Menu CIDERCON 2018

29


PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES Diane Flynt

› founded Foggy Ridge Cider in 1997 by planting one of the first 20th century cider apple orchards. The Foggy Ridge orchards include over 30 authentic cider apple varieties such as Dabinett, Tremlett’s Bitter, Ashmead’s Kernel, Harrison and Hewe’s crab apple. Foggy Ridge Cider has been recognized as producing high-quality, orchard-focused cider. Flynt has received James Beard Award nominations for “Outstanding Beverage Professional” in 2015 and 2016, and was a finalist for this award in 2017. She is active in national and state cider initiatives and has played a leading role in promoting Virginia beverages. She is also a member of the governor-appointed Virginia Wine Board, a board member of the Southern Foodways Alliance and she speaks on cider, farming and food culture in national and regional forums. Flynt’s vision was to plant excellent ingredients and to make fine cider using the same techniques and care that go into making fine wine. In early 2018, Flynt retired the Foggy Ridge Cider brand and now focuses full time on growing cider apples for the Southern cider community. Heritage Ciders Keys to Success in the Next Growth Category

Eric Foster

› , along with his co-founder, Phil, produced the first batch of Stem Cider (now known as Real Dry) in his home cidery in 2011. You can listen to his Cider Chat episode (www. ciderchat.com/038-eric-foster-stem-ciders-colorado) to learn more about his cider philosophy. When he’s not at Stem, he’s enjoying family time, fly fishing or out skiing the backcountry. Foster lives in Lafayette, Colorado, with his wife, Colleen, and their sons, Quinn and Connor. He joined the United States Association of Cider Makers Board of Directors in 2017. What’s Selling – On and Off-Premise Retailers Discussion | Let’s Get the Party Started

› Chris

Gerling

is an enology extension associate at Cornell University, the manager of the New York Wine Analytical Laboratory and a board member of the Cider Institute of North America. Cider Institute of North America Boot Camp | Developing a Dryness Scale

›Janeen Grace has worked in alcohol regulatory compli-

ance for more than 13 years, including over six years at a large craft brewery and cidery, and over four years as a field investigator for the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau. In 2015 she established Grace Regulatory Consultants so she could bring her regulatory expertise to a broader market. She assists many cideries and other alcohol producers, with services from license applications for start-ups to state and federal liquor law compliance for established companies. She lives in Washington State. State Regulatory Compliance

William Grote

› is a certifiable cider geek who splits his allocated apple time between a field in Franconia, New Hampshire, and a basement full of carboys in Boston. Grote’s interest in cider began in Frankfurt — the cider capitol of Germany — where he lived for almost 10 years and continued when he returned to the United States, thirsty for real cider and frustrated by its scarcity.

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CIDERCON 2018

Determined to fill his bembel with real apfelwein, he started making cider in his basement and planting trees on his parents’ farm. Since those first scary batches, Grote’s ciders have won multiple awards at Beer Judge Certification Program competitions, Franklin Country CiderDays and the Great Lakes International Cider and Perry competition. Grote received a Bachelor’s degree from Cornell University and an MS-MBA from Boston University. He currently works for Confirm.io, a mobile technology provider of identity verification solutions. Nutrients: Additions or Subtractions and What Happens with Both

› Scott

Harris

graduated with honors from Georgia Tech with two degrees in Computer Science. He spent the last 20 years building a software career in telecommunication systems and government IT solutions. In 2009, he traded it all in for the chance to own and run his own distillery, Catoctin Creek Distilling Company, with his wife, Becky. Cider, Beer, Wine and the Spirit of Collaboration

› Darlene

Hayes

turned her eye to the world of cider after stints as a biochemist, attorney and small business owner. She has traveled throughout the United States and around the world interviewing cider makers and drinking many fabulous ciders and now writes for a variety of publications, including a regular column on cider for Spirited Magazine. She is the author of “Cider Cocktails: Another Bite of the Apple,” and is also a well regarded cider judge and teacher specializing in classes in cider appreciation, sensory perception training and ciders of the world.

Regional Variations in Apples and Cider | Climate Change in the Orchard

›Jason House is the vice president of production and opera-

tions for the California Cider Company. He works at the cidery in Sebastopol, California, ensuring product quality, consistency and the safety of our cider making team. He is Sicera Level 1 certified and has been working in the family business for over four years. Working Together for A Strong Cider Segment

›Simon House is the vice president of sales for the California

Cider Company. He works out of Los Angeles and travels throughout the United States working with the sales team, wholesalers and retailers. He is Sicera Level 1 certified and has been working in the family business for over five years. Working Together for A Strong Cider Segment

› Hamish

Jackson

was raised on a citrus and kiwifruit orchard in Gisborne, New Zealand. As many young New Zealanders do, Jackson left university after completing a Bachelors in Horticulture Tech with honors, and later a Masters in Agricultural Management Systems, to travel and work in United Kingdom. He was employed to design and run New Zealand’s largest salad production plant for LeaderBrand Produce, and in the United States he has worked for Rousseau Farming in Phoenix, JV Smith Companies’ Fresh Innovations in Yuma, Arizona, and El Toro Agricola in Mexico. Jackson later found a job he knew he would love at Harvest Cidery, a local company where he had misspent many university holidays becoming very familiar with the products. Proud to be working for an iconic New Zealand company, Jackson took over the reins from founder Brian Shanks as general


manager. Harvest Cidery is now a subsidiary of Carton United Breweries Australia, which is owned by AB-InBev. He was the chairman of the New Zealand Fruit Wine and Cider Association for three years, stepping down in October, but remains a member of the New Zealand committee. Harvest Cidery: New Zealand Cider Tasting

›Erin James is the editor-in-chief of Sip Publishing, where

she is at the helm of editorial affairs for the award-winning Sip Northwest and Cidercraft magazines. In addition to freelance writing for regional and national publications, she authored “Tasting Cider: The CIDERCRAFT Guide to the Distinctive Flavors of North American Hard Cider,” released by Storey Publishing in 2017. When she’s not writing or reading, she can be found drinking cider and eating her weight in cheese. Basics to Bold: Tactics for Marketing, Branding and Media Outreach

› Eric

Jorgensen is the co-founder and co-owner

of Finnriver Farm & Cidery on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State. While a lover of cider, his interests tend towards the business side of cider making: how cider can be good for the bottom line and good for employees, the land and the community in which it is made and consumed. A certified B-Corps company, Finnriver is engaged in a constant exploration of these ideas and, true to the B-Corps mission, is devoted to making business a “force for good” in the world. Brainstorming Sustainability in the Cidery

› Phil

Kelm

is the owner of Gitche Gumee Brewery Services. He is a mechanical engineer, Siebel Diploma and has consulted for breweries all over the world for over 20 years. He is also the owner of Gitche Gumee Ciderworks in Hancock, Michigan, a partner in Korea's first cidery, partner in new cidery in India and manager of cidery in Palau. Carbonation Fundamentals

Whit Knickerbocker

› graduated from Cornell in December, with a Bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Economics. He is a seventh generation field-crop farmer at Knickerbocker Farm in Pittsford, New York, and is excited to apply his experiences and insight from school to various projects back home. Whit hopes to pursue blueberry cultivation, aquaponics and honey production in the coming years. Cider-making with Heirloom and High Tannin Apples

Jim Koan

› has spent his life dedicated to providing the best fruits and vegetables that can be found in the mid-Michigan area through Almar Farm & Orchards. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan and a member of the board of directors for many agricultural committees both throughout the state and county. The orchard is a family-owned, fourthand fifth-generation establishment growing over 70 varieties of organic apples across 120 acres. A few years ago, Almar Orchards launched JK’s Farmhouse Cider, a cider without artificial flavors, additives or preservatives. They ferment using only natural aging to turn Almar Orchards’ apples into a sparkling refreshing drink. Koan is also an organizer of the Organic Tree Fruit Association and the Michigan Cider Makers’ Guild. Climate Change in the Orchard

›Aaron Lanctot is the director of sales at Blake's Hard Cider Co. out of Armada, Michigan. He has been in the beer and cider industry since he was 15-years-old. He is an alum from Central Michigan University (FIRE UP CHIPS!) and oversees sales and distribution for Blake's. Finding Distribution in a Crowded Market

Eleanor Léger

› and her husband and partner, Albert, founded Eden Ice Cider Company in Vermont in 2007. There they produce specialty ciders, including ice ciders, aperitifs and naturally sparkling hard ciders from 100 percent locally grown apples. She joined the United States Association of Cider Makers Board of Directors in 2015. Champagne Method Cider | Holistic Orchard Management | Cidernomics for Start-up and Small Scale Cideries | Production Hacks

›Caroline Logan serves as director of communications for

the Virginia Tourism Corporation, the state agency charged with marketing the Commonwealth as a premier travel destination and film location. In this capacity, she oversees public relations and public affairs efforts for the agency, as well as a communications liaison to the Office of the Governor. Logan was raised in Richmond, Virginia, and attended the Collegiate School. She is a graduate of the University of Richmond, where she studied Political Science and French. She presently resides in the historic Ginter Park neighborhood of Richmond with her husband, Paul, and nine-year-old Goldendoodle, Millie. Tourism and film are instant revenue generators for Virginia. In 2016, tourism in Virginia generated $23 billion in revenue, supported 230,100 jobs and provided $1.7 billion in state and local taxes. Juicing Tourism Marketing

Charles McGonegal

› started ÆppelTreow Winery & Distillery (pronounced “apple true”) in 2001 as an elaborate ploy to buy his wife more jewelry — and that's what he keeps telling her. Starting with a biochemistry degree from Michigan Technological University, a modicum of food analytical chemistry experience, a burgeoning relationship with a grower of heirloom apples and carboy of insanity, McGonegal leveraged a basement cider operation into the smallest nationally distributed cider brand. He practices an esoteric branch of cider-making; growing traditional bittersweet European cider cultivars and perry pears and exercising the fine art of the methode champenoise. His pursuit of “building cider from the ground up” has even led him into the labyrinthine mysteries of the USDA Quarantine System, from which he has emerged with even more hard to grow, but flavorful, apples and pears. McGonegal has been an active participant in the developing American cider community, as vice president of the Great Lakes Cider and Perry Association, judge-educator for the Great Lakes International Cider and Perry Competition, contributor to the Beer Judge Certification Program Cider Style Guidelines and presenter at cider seminars in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Virginia. In 2009, ÆppelTreow branched into the world of nano-distilling. In his spare time, McGonegal is employed as a chemist at a Chicago-area petrochem research company where he entertains his co-workers with amazing tricks in Microsoft Excel, has presented informatics philosophy and implementation to the National Conference of the American Chemical Society and scribbles on the backs of his 15 patents in reactive chromatography and high-throughput catalyst screening. Indeed, only McGonegal’s boundless modesty keeps him from world domination. Sensory Analysis CIDERCON 2018

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PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES Ian Merwin

› is an emeritus professor of Horticulture and the grower and cider maker at Black Diamond Farm in New York. He grew up on a farm in the Hudson Valley. After graduating from Reed College in 1969, he lived in Chile for a year and then worked 14 years in the California horticulture industry. He finished a Ph.D. in Pomology and Plant Ecology in 1990, and then worked at Cornell University until he retired in 2013 to be a full-time orchardist and cider maker. Merwin and his wife have owned a 64-acre family farm in the Finger Lakes region of New York since 1992. They grow wine grapes, peaches, plums, sweet and tart cherries and more than 125 apple varieties. The farm winery, Black Diamond Cider, makes eight cider blends using our own homegrown fruit. He can be found via email at im13@cornell.edu. Climate Change in the Orchard | Cider-making with Heirloom and High Tannin Apples

› Darren

Michaels

is a trained biochemist and fermentation specialist, having entered the wine industry more than 15 years ago as a wine chemist in Trinchero Family Estates, covering wine and beverage projects. He moved to Santa Maria, California, as the Central Coast manager of Vinquiry, an ISO 17025 accredited wine lab and yeast product company, and left to become the director of enology and quality for Terravant, a custom and private label winery and commercial laboratory that produced multiple alcohol-related products. Michaels eventually became a winemaker for Laffort USA and made his way up to Washington State to start Tetrahedron Winery and Big River Laboratories, a lab that supports and consults for wine, cider, kombucha and vinegar producers. Basic Cider Analysis | Advanced Cider Analysis

Dr. Carol Miles

› has diverse international experiences both growing up and in her early career where she has lived in subsistence agriculture communities in places such as Panama, Afghanistan, Cameroun, Malawi and Tanzania. Dr. Miles received her B.S. (1983) in Bio-Agricultural Science from Colorado State University, and her M.S. (1989) and Ph.D. (1993) in Vegetable Crops from the Department of Fruit and Vegetable Science at Cornell University. Her goal has been to work with farmers to create sustainable production systems that provide a source of well being to both the family and the community. Varietal Ciders: From Branch to Bottle

› Peter

Mitchell

is the other Peter Mitchell — owner of Headwater Cider in Hawley, Massachusetts, in business since 2007. Their motto is: “grow what you press, press what you grow.” Headwater uses its own apples and press, fermenting, bottling and distributing from its orchard. The cidery makes dry ciders in a traditional fashion. Marketing with Apples

› Chris

Negronida

, along with his wife Alexis Self, owns and operates Perry City Orchard and Nursery in the Finger Lakes region of New York. The nursery specializes in the propagation of North American heirloom and European Cider varieties using holistic and organic practices. Negronida is also a cider maker at Black Diamond Cider in Trumansburg, New York. Cider-making with Heirloom and High Tannin Apples

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CIDERCON 2018

› Christopher

Oakes

is a fourth-generation fruit farmer from Lyndonville, New York. He is the production manager in charge of all farming activities at his family farm, LynOaken Farms. Oakes has been growing cider varieties for almost 10 years and has experience growing over 350 varieties in their heirloom U-pick orchard. He is very passionate about growing the highest quality of fruit possible. With his family’s other business, Leonard Oakes Estate Winery, they produce Steampunk Cider, which is made with bittersweet and bittersharp varieties grown on the farm. Cider-making with Heirloom and High Tannin Apples

› Jonathan

Oakes

was born and raised as a fourth generation fruit farmer in Orleans County, New York. His family owns and operates LynOaken Farms, Leonard Oakes Estate Winery and Steampunk Cidery. He studied anthropology at Mercyhurst College before coming back to the family farm, where he began fermenting cider in 2003 and completed the hard cider course at Cornell University under esteemed cider educator Peter Mitchell. In 2008 Oakes graduated the Viticulture and Enology program at Niagara College in Ontario, Canada. Since then he has been the winemaker and cidermaker for Leonard Oakes Estate Winery and Steampunk Cidery. He is a board member of the New York Cider Association and is very active on the Science and Education committee. He is a member of the advisory council for Enology Extension at Cornell University and a member of the Project Work Team surrounding hard cider in New York State. He also runs his own wine and cider consulting business, Artisan Wine Solutions. Cider-making with Heirloom and High Tannin Apples

›Tom

Oliver

is the cider maker and owner of Oliver’s Cider and Perry in Ocle Pychard, Herefordshire in England. Oliver’s practices minimum intervention cider-making, using bittersweet and bittersharp apples fermented by wild yeasts. Oliver was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Gold Medal at The Royal Bath and West Show in 2015. Wild Fermentation and Other Heritage Cider Options | Climate Change in the Orchard

› Matthew

Ostrander

is chief cider curator at hardciderreviews.com, the primary vehicle for his mission to be an advocate in the craft cider movement as he travels to discover ciders from across the United States and around the globe. As part of those adventures, he’s been exposed to a diverse range of cider events and festivals, including Cider Summit, Chicago Cider Week, Colorado Cider Week, NYC Cider Week and the Pressed Conference. With professional experience in chemical engineering, he’s also racking up cider industry credentials, having completed the OSU Cider & Perry Production Foundation Workshop, is a Level 1 CCP and holds a Foundation Certificate in Cider & Perry Production (CINA). Let’s Get the Cider Party Started

Dr. Greg Peck

› is a pomologist with more than two decades of professional experience working with specialty crops in California, Washington, New York and Virginia. Following his Bachelor’s work in Comparative Religion at the University of Vermont in 1994, Dr. Peck earned a certificate in Ecological Horticulture at the University of California, Santa Cruz in 1996, his Master’s degree in Horticulture at Washington State University in 2004, and his Doctoral degree in Horticulture at Cornell University in 2009. From 2011 to 2015, he was an assistant professor of


Horticulture at Virginia Tech. Dr. Peck is now an assistant professor of Horticulture at Cornell with a focus on sustainable fruit production systems. His research addresses the challenges of sustainably and profitably producing tree fruits. Collaboration and a Shared Cider Economy | Climate Change in the Orchard | Cider-making with Heirloom and High Tannin Apples

›Alex Peckham is founder and co-director of Peckham’s

Cider. He has a science and business background, and with his wife, Caroline, set off on his cider making adventure 14 years ago when they moved to New Zealand – a land of delicious apples and, at the time, mostly undrinkable ciders. Since then they have spent their time seeking out heritage cider varieties, developing their horticultural skills initially from apple tree propagation, now to the management of mature trees. At the same time, Peckham has used his love of discovery and attention to detail, to push his exploration of cider-making in the context of their specific terroir and its influence on their wide range of cider apples. He makes only high-quality, vintage ciders, forever experimenting with new cider-making techniques.

Peckham’s Cider: New Zealand Cider Tasting | Climate Change in the Orchard | New Zealand Cider Makers Panel

› Maria

Peterson

grew up in South Africa on the family wine farm where filtration of wine with a pressure leaf filter was one of many chores as a teenager. She graduated with a B.S. Agriculture degree specializing in Enology and Viticulture from University of Stellenbosch, South Africa in 2000. Peterson made wine and managed vineyards in Australia, South Africa, France and the United States for 12 years. Eventually she landed up working for Scott Laboratories out of California and just celebrated her fourth year with them. She specializes in filtration and clarification with applications such as cider, wine, beer, distilled spirits, kombucha and cold brew coffee. Separation Anxiety: Observational Insights to Understanding Cider Filtration

Derek Plotkowski

› is a Ph.D. candidate in pomology at the University of Guelph, located in Guelph, Ontario. He had his first cider — Autumn’s Gold from Eve’s Cidery — during an introductory viticulture and enology course at Cornell University in 2010 and hasn’t looked back. After his time at Cornell he completed a Master’s degree in viticulture, enology, wine business and terroir management at l’École Supérieure d’Agriculture d’Angers in France, which included a 2015 internship at Sidra Trabanco in Gijón, Asturias. He briefly worked at Blake’s Hard Cider in his native Michigan before beginning doctoral research in Canada in 2016. When he’s not working in the orchard or lab, you can find him baking or swimming. Understanding Terroir

› Dan

Pucci

entered the cider industry after working in the many sides of the wine industry in New York City. He has spent years working on the floor as a sommelier, before moving onto to help open Wassail in 2015. Wassail quickly became an institution in the Northeast cider world, boasting some of widest selections of cider from home and abroad, but focusing on the expressive ciders of the Northeast. While at Wassail he paired and curated cider with an equally

compelling menu and was awarded Zagat 30 under 30 NYC, as well as Eater's Young Guns 2016. Wassail was a fascinating place that pushed the conversation and focus of cider in both in New York and around the world. This ground level experience informs his current pursuits and pushes the hard questions about the cider industry. Today his new venture, Wallabout Hospitality and Events, consults on hospitality projects of many sizes, shapes and missions. Regional Variations in Apples and Cider

Harry Ricker

› is an apple farmer from Turner, Maine, at Ricker Hill Orchards, which has growing apples since 1803. He holds an Agricultural Economics and Pomology degree from the University of Maine and Cornell. Ricker Hill operates 380 acres of IPM-grown apples, 55 acres certified organic apples and 28 acres are cider varieties. The orchard is a member of the Northern New England Hard Cider Apple Marketing COOP, a cooperative of 25 farms spread over eight towns and three counties in Maine. Ricker Hill produces 500,000 gallons of cider, 15% hard cider last year, growing 25% annually. Growing Bittersweet Apple Varieties for Cider

› Emily

Ritchie

is the executive director of the Northwest Cider Association. She supports a group of nearly 100 cider makers in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and British Columbia, acting as the catalyst to bring cider up from a niche market into the mainstream. She lead a group of 10 NWCA members through Europe in May 2017 to take a deep dive into keeving for 12 days. Leave it to Keever

Marcus Robert

› joined Tieton Cider Works in 2010 as the cider operations manager, orchard manager and cider maker. He is a fourth generation farmer in the Yakima Valley of southern Washington. He is a former board member of the Northwest Cider Association. He joined the United States Association of Cider Makers Board of Directors in 2017. Climate Change in the Orchard | Growing Bittersweet Apple Varieties for Cider

›Zachary Robins is an associate in the corporate and trans-

actions practice group at Winthrop & Weinstine in Minneapolis. His extensive experience in the areas of business and finance, mergers and acquisitions, strategic partnerships, equity raises and debt financings provides clients with comprehensive counsel and representation when strategic growth is a focus of your business plans. How to Crowdfund Your Cidery

› Brian Rutzen has been selling cider and growing the mar-

ket in Chicago for the last six years. He has spent the last two years working as the cider director at The Northman, Chicago’s first cider pub. A longtime steward and judge at the Great Lakes International Cider and Perry competition, he now participates in cider events all over the world. Currently serving on the Certified Cider Professional Advisory Board for the United States Association of Cider Makers, he also teaches classes on the history of cider and the cider-making process. Rather than declaring ciders as either “good” or “bad” to guests, he likes to match ciders with particular tastes and help create moments of discovery. Heritage Ciders on the Menu

CIDERCON 2018

33


PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES

Doug Schmidt

› has been a beer, mead, cider and kombucha homebrewer since 1996. Part of the Boston Wort Processors Homebrew Club since 2012, Schmidt is also in the Boston Wort Processors Beer Judge Certification Program study group and a certified Cicerone and certified BJCP judge. Nutrients: Additions or Subtractions and What Happens with Both

Holly Schmidt

› is a protein biochemist, focusing on bacterial, yeast and mammalian cell cultures. She is also a home fermentations brewing assistant working with beer, mead, cider, yogurt, lactobacillus, kombucha and Kefir. Nutrients: Additions or Subtractions and What Happens with Both

Jody Scott

› Jody was born and raised in the cider regions of the United Kingdom. He has a first class honors degree in winemaking and over 10 years of wine- and cider-making experience, having made wine and cider for some of the biggest brands throughout Europe, the United States, Australia and at home in the UK. He leads Zeffer’s production team and has won a number of prestigious cidermaking awards since his time with the company. He has been a judge at the International Wine and Spirits Competition, International Wine Challenge, Air New Zealand Wine Awards and is currently a judge at the Brewers Guild of New Zealand Beer and Cider Awards. Zeffer: New Zealand Cider Background and Tasting | New Zealand Cider Makers Panel

›Eric Shatt, along with his wife Deva Maas, manage five acres

of holistically managed orchards and produces cider at their farm cidery under their label, Redbyrd Orchard Cider. They have engaged in cider apple growing for over 10 years and just finished production of their eighth vintage of commercial cider. With a specific focus on dry cider, they produce still, carbonated and Champagne-style ciders from the apples they produce and from other small local orchards in the Finger Lakes region of New York. Shatt is also employed as the research farm manager for Cornell University’s Ithaca-based research orchard. Champagne Method Cider | Holistic Orchard Management

› Lauren

Shepard

is the cider manager for Shelton Brothers Importers, a premier artisanal beer and cider importer. She manages Shelton Brothers' cider and mead selections, working closely with producers and distributors alike. Shepard stumbled upon a passion for cider, beer and mead while working at West Lakeview Liquors, a world-class beer and cider shop, and as a freelance theater director in Chicago. After leaving Chicago for Boulder, Colorado, she joined the Shelton Brothers team and now manages the importer’s cider and mead selection nationally, and has successfully convinced many a’beer drinker to branch out to cider, so to speak. She has dedicated her work to expanding the variety of ciders available in the United States and exposing Americans to a broad spectrum of cider-making traditions and flavors. She is proud to be able to work with and for some of the kindest and most talented cider makers in the world. Horizontal Tasting | Distributor Panel

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CIDERCON 2018

› Sara

Sherrer

, a Baltimore native, attended the University of Oklahoma as a Division I athlete in crew. She started Graft Cider with her brother, Kyle Sherrer, in November 2016, developing a new style of hard cider. Graft launched in Newburgh, New York, in the Hudson Valley. She currently manages sales and distribution for the states of New York, Maryland, Virginia, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Washington, D.C. Her day-to-day encompasses managing Graft’s sales force and wholesale distributors, while acting as a brand ambassador and event planner in Graft’s territories. Sherrer also plays a role in opening new territories for Graft and the development of future markets. She is not new to cider, she was formerly of Millstone Cellars, started by her brother and father, Curt Sherrer, located in Monkton, Maryland. She was responsible for sales, within Millstone’s tasting room and regional sales, as well as event planning. In addition to her position in sales, Sherrer worked with the Baltimore Orchard Project and in the Millstone Orchard at Genesee Valley. Women in Cider

› Kellie

Shevlin

is the creator of the Craft Beverage Expo. Founded in 2013 to unite the entire craft beverage community, the Craft Beverage Expo (CBExpo) is the leading trade exposition and conference for the entire craft beverage industry, with the primary goal of creating and defining a cohesive independent wine, craft beer, cider, mead and spirits producing market. CBExpo offers education, marketing strategies and turnkey solutions for the challenges facing independent beverage producers today. CBExpo 2018 will take place December 4-6 in Louisville, Kenturkcy. For more information, visit craftbeverageexpo.com. Cider, Beer, Wine and the Spirit of Collaboration

› Jenn

Smith

is the founding executive director of the New York Cider Association. In 2009, during her tenure as Astor Wines & Spirits' marketing director, she produced the first cider-centric event held in New York City and hasn't looked back. Champagne Method Cider | Developing a Dryness Scale | Wild Fermentation and Other Heritage Cider Options | Let’s Get This Party Started

Marc Sorini

› is a partner in the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP, based in the firm's Washington, D.C., office. He is the leader of the firm’s Alcohol Regulatory & Distribution Group. Recognized as one of the leading lawyers in his field by Best Lawyers and the Chambers USA directory, he advises cider makers, breweries, distilleries, wineries and importers on regulatory, litigation, licensing, distribution, advertising product formulation and taxation issues. The Legal Side of Distribution

Amanda Stewart

› is an assistant professor of Enology and Fermentation at Virginia Tech. She has taught courses in wine production and wine styles/wine appreciation, and has presented on practical topics in winemaking and fermentation at wine and cider industry meetings in several states throughout the eastern United States. Her enology research focuses in on the role of nitrogen in fermentation and polyphenol chemistry in wine and cider. Stewart is currently collaborating with other Virginia Tech faculty, staff and students to conduct research and extension work related to hard cider production, from the orchard to the cidery. Fruit Chemistry, Yeast and Fermentation: A Complicated Relationship


› Autumn

Stoscheck founded Eve’s Cidery when she

was 21 with her waitressing savings, as a way to prune apple trees for a living. She does get to be a pruner, but also a plumber, label designer, accountant, tractor operator and tank cleaner among other jobs. For Stoscheck, growing apples and making them into cider is the intersection of creativity and labor. It’s these two ideals that motivate her work: to make beautiful cider and to farm in harmony with nature. Champagne Method Cider | Holistic Orchard Management | Heritage Cider Keys to Success in the Next Growth Category | Cider-making with Heirloom and High Tannin Apples

Leif Sundström

› began Sundström Cider after nearly 10 years of working in the wine industry. Beginning in Portland, Oregon, he worked as the opening beverage director for Le Pigeon restaurant before transitioning to more intimate aspects of the wine industry; first, as a harvest assistant and cellar hand at Boedecker Cellars and later moving to New York City to work as the portfolio manager of Terry Theise Estate Selections at Skurnik Wines. After leavwing Skurnik, Sundström worked at Weingut Leitz in Rüdesheim, Germany, where the aspirations to pursue cider really took hold. Upon returning to the United States, he moved to the Hudson Valley to endeavor the challenge of producing cider, and the impacts of terroir and agriculture on its ultimate potential. Wild Fermentation and Other Heritage Cider Options

›Dave Takush has earned a Master’s degree in food and

fermentation science at Oregon State University and has over a decade of experience in the craft beer and wine industry. His passion led him to join two childhood friends in starting 2 Towns Ciderhouse. Now one of the largest craft cider producers on the West Coast, 2 Towns has over 60 employees and produces a wide variety of heirloom, traditional and new world modern ciders using 100 percent fresh-pressed Pacific Northwest apple juice, all without added sugars, essences or concentrates. Leave it to Keever

Josh Townsend

› ‘s entrepreneurial drive led to him joining Zeffer early in 2011 while playing professional rugby in New Zealand. Since joining, he has led the growth of the business from a small farmers’ market brand to the largest dedicated cider producer in New Zealand, and is now the company’s executive director. Townsend manages all external aspects of the business including sales, exports, brand direction, marketing strategy and key business relationships. He is now focusing more of his time on driving Zeffer’s export growth and works closely with key stakeholders in Zeffer’s export markets. Zeffer: New Zealand Cider Background and Tasting | New Zealand Cider Makers Panel

Paul Vander Heide

› graduated from Hope College in Holland in 2000 with a Bachelor’s in Business Administration and Economics. He worked in his family’s business, Holland American Wafer, until 2005. Vander Heide and his wife Amanda started Vander Mill in 2006. Vander Mill’s hard cider brand expanded in 2012 and a new production facility and

taproom were opened in 2016. He is also a member of the United States Association of Cider Makers and has been elected to the board of directors where he serves on the executive committee as the board’s secretary. He also sits on the finance and cider conference committees. Vander Heide initiated the creation of the Michigan Cider Association in 2015 and is currently this organization’s president. Cider, Beer, Wine and the Spirit of Collaboration

› Nat

West

is a single-minded cider evangelist and die-hard craft beer revolutionary who started Reverend Nat's Hard Cider in his basement in 2011 and continues to dedicate his time there as cider maker and president. Known for his unusual American ciders and love of experimentation, West has created some of the most unusual ciders than no one else will make, including unique products like the multiple-fermented Revival, dry-hopped Hallelujah Hopricot, quinine-bittered Deliverance Ginger Tonic and many barrel-aged and one-off ciders. In the past six years, he has grown the business from one employee operating out of his basement to 23 employees with distribution along the West Coast and all the way to Japan. Reverend Nat’s is a Marketing Company, Not a Cider Company

Dan Wilson

› owns and operates Hicks Orchard and Slyboro Ciderhouse in Granville, New York where he produces heritage cider. He is on the board of the New York Cider Association. He joined the USACM board of directors in 2014.

Stephen Wood

› has been with Poverty Lane Orchards since 1965. He has participated in the University of New Hampshire Apple Integrated Pest Management Program and began grafting trials of English, American and French cider varieties in 1979. He is the past president of the New Hampshire Fruit Growers Association, past director of the New England Fruit Growers Council on the Environment and served on the United States Apple Association’s Environmental Affairs Committee. Wood was awarded the American Fruit Grower Apple Grower of the Year award in 1991. He is a past member of the United States Association of Cider Makers Board of Directors and he currently sits on the association’s legislative/regulatory committee as well as the director of the New England Tree Fruit Growers Research Committee. Climate Change in the Orchard | Growing Bittersweet Apple Varieties for Cider

Kevin Zielinski

› ’s occupation is in the production, packing and sales of apples, pears, peaches and, more recently, hazelnuts and cider. His first attempt at fermentation was in 1994 with the Pinot Noir grape and was advised by a friend using a very low intervention method. A winemaker proposed that he propagate and grow European bittersweet apple varieties for cider, and his first planting was made in 2000. After trialing several techniques, Zielinksi settled into a method that he found respected the fruit, again focusing on low intervention. E.Z. Orchards Cidre 2009 was his first commercial release and they now currently offer several styles of cider, a perry and a dessert wine styled on Pommeau. Wild Fermentation and Other Heritage Cider Options | Growing Bittersweet Apple Varieties for Cider

CIDERCON 2018

35


NOTES

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CIDERCON 2018


Putting our orchards into the glass...

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