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MICHELLE L. MAXWELL


Resume

p. 05

Professional

p. 07

Occupation

p. 13

Highland Park Library

p. 25

Infill

p. 31

Mallett’s Creek Library

p. 39

Grosse Pointe Public Library

p. 43

Cut_Away

p. 47

Piazza del Popolo

p. 49

Visual Abstraction

p. 53

Invisible Cities: Phyllis

p. 61

Scalar Analysis

p. 65

Photography

p. 69

Michelle Maxwell 20 Chippewa Court South Haven, MI 49090 269.214.7844

03


experience

Robert Gibbs Architecture, Richland, MI Oct. 2012 - Present Graduate Architect Transfer hand-drawn design work into Google SketchUp as a tool for clients to physically see and understand the proposed spaces with aid of a 3D model. Work through the design sequence using both the logic of construction and of design, aesthetically and practically. Take part in site visits to help measure, document, and meet with the client and/or contractor to discuss design questions, wishes, intentions, and budget. Assist in office work including but not limited to: both electronic and manual filing, labeling, preparing invoices and researching new construction techniques and/or interior design features. Projects predominately in high-end custom residential, both new construction and renovations, but also contain middle-class residential, small commercial offices and some smaller consulting jobs. Beeches Golf Club, South Haven, MI Summers: May 2011 - Present Bar Manager Serve customers both food and drink, answer phones, make tee times, operate a cash register and credit card machine, socialize with customers, clean and maintain the facility, and stock supplies. Promoted to Bar Manager, Spring 2012. Accutek Home Inspection Service, South Haven, MI Summers: May 2011 - Oct. 2012 Intern Obtained knowledge in home analysis of: systems, water, heating and septic; testing for radon; and construction methods including both current and potential failures of the home. Other duties included confirming all reports were sent to clients and filing the reports alongside the notes taken on site. City of South Haven, South Haven, MI Summers: June 2007 - Aug. 2010 Marina Staff, Trainer Gained excellent experience while operating alongside 13 other staff members through answering phones, making reservations, operating a cash register and credit card machine, interacting with customers, cleaning and maintaining the facilities and docks, and docking vessels. Promoted to Trainer, Summers 2009-2010. This position entitled acclimating new staff to the job. Christ’s Outreach for the Blind, Mt. Vernon, KY July 2005 Volunteer Helped design and build parts of both a 10,000 square foot barn and the charity leaders’ new home by placing exterior walls and laying trusses alongside 11 other volunteers. Landscaped around the camp by placing retaining walls and planting trees.


education

University of Michigan, Taubman College of Architecture, Ann Arbor, MI Sept. 2008 - May 2012 Bachelor of Science in Architecture GPA: 3.5 / 4.0 Recipient of the Michigan Promise, Guido Binda and Tower Pinkster Scholarships. ‘Special Topics: Architecture’ Travel Studio: Rome, Italy. Spring 2010. The study abroad studio focused on sketching techniques and Roman history; provided travel opportunities to Florence, Venice, and Sorrento.

membership

American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS), Ann Arbor, MI Sept. 2010 - May 2012 Member, Mentor This University of Michigan program helps students stay connected with current worldly news relating to architecture and provides networking opportunities. Through the mentorship program, advised a prearchitecture student about applying to the architecture school, becoming involved with extracurricular activities, choosing classes, and developing proper study habits. Alpha Rho Chi (APX), Ann Arbor, MI Sept. 2010 - Dec. 2011 Member, Fund-raising Committee Chair Professional fraternity of the University of Michigan chapter for students of architecture and the allied arts. Responsible for raising money to fund both professional and social excursions and helping organize biweekly meetings to coordinate fund-raising opportunities with fellow sub-committee members.

software

Google SketchUp, Rhinoceros 3D, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Shaderlight, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Power Point, both Mac and PC software. Minor experience in Grasshopper and Vray.

skills

Years of experience coordinating with others as well as 3 years of leadership positions. 6 years of exceptional customer service, assisting the needs of others to receive desired result. 3 years of design experience; two years educational, one year professional. Proficient in applying design skills to produce both digital and physical models, digital renderings, and photography. Recognized for problem solving, having excellent communication skills, learning easily, honoring commitments, meeting deadlines, and building loyal relationships with employers, employees, and customers. www.linkedin.com/pub/michelle-maxwell/30/6b9/435/

05


>>PROFESSIONAL<< Robert Gibbs Architecture Richland, MI Fall 2012 - Fall 2013 Pictured: DeNooyer Residence

07


Existing

Proposed


>>FINCH RESIDENCE<< Along the southern bay of Gull Lake in Michigan is a home that was in dire need of some TLC. The newly acquired summer home of a doctor and his two children, the property needed to fit the agenda of its new occupants which became outlined in a 3-phase schedule: Phase 1 consisted of exterior landscaping and clean up including updating the deck, adding a patio, trimming shrubbery, leveling the dock steps, placing caps along the dock edge and installing a sprinkler system; Phase 2 will consist of a remodel on the entry in order to create much better circulation from exterior to interior; Phase 3 is a renovation with its sole purpose being an addition above the main level living spaces to house a master suite. It will also reshape the exterior; the facade facing the lake will completely switch roofing styles to create one much more balanced and welcoming, and the many roofs that follow the sidewalk to the water will be cleaned up to create a much simpler and more effective system.

09


Foundation Plan

Beginning Walls

First Level

Second Level

Carriage House Addition


Roof Level

Doors / Windows/ Trims

Final

>>TILBURY RESIDENCE<< Along Doubleday Drive in Richland, MI on 1.5 acres is this almost 11 thousand sq. ft. East Coast Shingle and Traditional Style home. The residence was designed to fit the property which boasts two hundred feet of waterfront to the east and as such, many apertures were placed for visual access. Having six children, five bedrooms were designed, each with its own bathroom, on the upper floor, while the master suite is on the main floor with its own private deck. The clients wished for a rather formal, yet welcoming, entry system that could accommodate many vehicles. The home features much consistency, whether it be through its window sizes, trim details, or material use, and holds a strong sense of balance and harmony in its rhythm. The interior has an open floor plan on both the main level and the lower level in its living spaces to fit the amount of interaction they enjoy.

11


>>OCCUPATION<< Undergraduate Design Studio IV [Wallenberg Studio] Instructor: Ellie Abrons Winter 2012

13


>>OCCUPATION<< This project amplifies the multisensory experience of architecture in order to engage the body at multiple scales and illustrate how children and adults experience the same world differently. A childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s museum of the five senses, the project uses fluid form and curated materiality to create realms of sensory experiences that interact and fuse into one another.

15


“The composition of space, the movement of bodies within it, the character of the interior’s visual field, and the ‘proper’ or efficient unfolding of program (all typical architectural values) are largely determined by the things inside architecture and their disposition.” -Sylvia Lavin “Architecture in Extremis” Log 22, Spring/Summer 2011. p. 58


>>OCCUPATION<<

Sight Hear

Sight Touch

Sight

Hear Touch Sight

Taste Smell

Senses Diagram

Touch Sight

Located in downtown Manhattan, next to the New Museum, is this three-story sensory museum. Inside, a progressive sequence leads one through spaces that heighten a singular sense over all others into other spaces that are delicious in multiple. Curvature is used both as an opportunity of engagement, allowing space to melt from one to another giving a continuity to the project, and also as something that takes on a form. Moments of visual aid offer glimpses of a previous space as a physical connection between two spaces. Materiality acts upon the specific nature of each area, both heightening and dampening certain senses. Actions within the spaces are not set but rather allow its inhabitants to occupy as desired, whether it be jumping, laying, walking, crawling, sitting or standing.

Circulation Diagram

17


Domed Room

Lobby

BOWERY

A

W 8 x 40 wide flange column

GROUND LEVEL SCALE: 1’0” = 1/4” Level 3 Floor Condition

1 LOBBY 2 COAT/STROLLER CHECK 3 ECHO ROOM 4 PAINT-IT ROOM 5 CAFE N


BOWERY

STANTON ST.

NEW MUSEUM

PRINCE

ST.

SITE PLAN SCALE: 1’-0” = 1/32” N

B

C

foam mounds 5” concrete walls

1/2” triple glazing

4

1

1” plastic slide

concrete walls coated in paint

flooring: concrete with epoxy resin-treated terrazzo finish

3

9” concrete walls flooring: 3” foam mat

2

steel rail

5 1-1/2” diameter steel bar 2” concrete treads; no riser

4-1/4” insulation

B

plastic chair and table

A

2-3/8” concrete 2-3/8” concrete

C

19


B

C

1/2” triple glazing

flooring: tightly woven nylon fibers

slide entry

9

7

A

flooring: polished concrete

8

BOWERY

french oak parquet flooring

flooring: polished concrete

LEVEL 3 SCALE: 1’0” = 1/4”

UP

A

B

C

B

C

7 ELASTIC NETTING 8 OFFICES 9 OBSERVATION DECK N

cedar-panelled wall up stair

flooring: polished concrete

solid poetry concrete

cedar rail

6

stair: cedar tread

A

railing: glass panel with steel rod top

1/2” triple glazing

5” concrete

BOWERY

scintillating wall finish

A

B

LEVEL 2 SCALE: 1’0” = 1/4” 6 DARK ROOM N

C


SECTION BB SCALE: 1’-0” = 1/4”

SECTION CC SCALE: 1’-0” = 1/4”

21


SECTION AA SCALE: 1’-0” = 1/4”


>>OCCUPATION<< A childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s museum is one that is interactive, colorful, and filled with both programmed spaces and spaces that are programmable by its guests. It is a place that builds voice, ignites the imagination, nurtures the creative process and encourages innovation. The project illustrates how architecture itself can enrich oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knowledge through its interaction with all five senses.

23


>>HIGHLAND PARK LIBRARY<< Undergraduate Design Studio II Instructor: Jennifer Maigret Winter 2011

Highland Park, MI March 2011

25


>>HIGHLAND PARK LIBRARY<< Multiple zones including developing commercial, receding industrial, and an educational center, all connected by Woodward Avenue, encompass the site in Highland Park, MI. The long edge facing Midland Avenue is also a residential neighborhood so as to suggest this site as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;melting potâ&#x20AC;? of a site, one that can and does benefit each zoning type as a resource for knowledge. The project highlights four dichotomous thresholds and their effect on site decisions: northern vs. southern light, high vs. low ground, residence vs. industry, and Woodward Avenue vs. landscape retreat. The five-story library, the auditorium and afterhours spaces of entertainment, and the landscape of serenity are each accessible individually for efficiency and logistics. All three programs serve both the surrounding residential and the evolving commercial through the power to shape the community by making one feel engaged in its spaces instead of imprisoned.

27


Midland Avenue

Midland Avenue

Floor Plan 1 Highland Park District Library Highland Park, MI 1/16” = 1’-0”

Woodward Avenue

Woodward Avenue

N

N

Floor Plan 2 Highland Park District Library Highland Park, MI 1/16” = 1’-0”


Woodward Avenue

Midland Avenue

N

Floor Plan 5 Highland Park District Library Highland Park, MI 1/16” = 1’-0”

Woodward Avenue Woodward Avenue

Woodward A v e n u e

N

N

Floor Plan 3 Highland Park District Library Highland Park, MI 1/16” = 1’-0”

N

Floor Plan 5 Highland Park District Library Highland Park, MI 1/16” = 1’-0”

Floor Plan 4 Highland Park District Library Highland Park, MI 1/16” = 1’-0”

Woodward Avenue

N

Floor Plan 4 Highland Park District Library Highland Park, MI 1/16” = 1’-0”

29


>>INFILL<< Undergraduate Design Studio I Instructor: Tony Patterson Fall 2010

Depot Town, Ypsilanti, MI October 2012

31


View from site looking to depot station and farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market


>>INFILL<<

Sections and Site Plan

The project in Ypsilanti, MI began with an interest in the rail and how it divides two completely different venues: the farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market and the depot station. Likewise, I implemented the walkway from Cross Street to the Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market to split apart the two rather dissimilar primary program spaces that only share the service of recreation: theater and reading room. The two forms are separated at ground level and re-connect at both the subterranean and upper-most level, keeping separated physically while remaining programmatically and visually connected via long shopglass windows. While formally contrasting the context, materially the project is in harmony through the use of brick on its exterior. Natural light is admitted into the interior primarily along the central walkway, but the reading room in addition receives natural light from above by way of a deep light well; the theater is positioned partially submerged to the north of the site so as to receive less natural light.

View between depot station and farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market to the site

33


Section A-A

Level -1

View from Cross Street facing site

Ground Level 0


Site context maps showing rail line and river >

Section B-B

Section C-C

Level 1

Level 2

35


37


>>MALLET’S CREEK LIBRARY<< Undergraduate Design Studio II Instructor: Jennifer Maigret Winter 2011

Mallett’s Creek Public Library, Ann Arbor, MI February 2011

39


1 Pace = 2.5 ft.

2 Pace

3 Pace

4 Pace

5 Pace

6 Pace

7 Pace

8 Pace

9 Pace

10 Pace

11 Pace

12 Pace

13 Pace

14 Pace

15 Pace


>>MALLETâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CREEK LIBRARY<< Using the scalar tool of the body metron, the class was able to proportionally measure this public library located in Ann Arbor, MI. Drawing techniques included quick sketches of details with most emphasis placed on the unfolded section. The unfolded section chosen shows the progression sequence upon arrival at the library to a prime reading location, a seating area adjacent to floor-toceiling windows.

5.125 Height = 26.9 ft. 5 Height

4 Height

3 Height

2 Height

1 Height = 5.25 ft.

16 Pace

17 Pace

18 Pace

19 Pace

20 Pace

21 Pace

22 Pace

23 Pace

24 Pace

25 Pace

26 Pace

27 Pace

28 Pace

29 Pace

30 Pace

31 Pace

32 Pace

33 Pace

34 Pace

35 Pace

35.9 Pace = 73.3 ft.

41


>>GROSSE POINTE PUBLIC LIBRARY<< Construction I Instructor: Lars Graebner Fall 2010

>>CUT_AWAY<< Construction II Instructor: David Moon Winter 2012

Grosse Pointe Public Library, Grosse Pointe, MI October 2010

43


Code Number

Code Specifications

Grosse Pointe Public Library Specifications

303.1: Occupancy Type

A-3, Assembly Group

Intended for recreation.

503: Height and Building Area

For other than unlimited area buildings, limits the aggregate area of a building to 3 times the area allowed by table 503 plus the area increases allowed by section 506. This allows 104.8 occupants per floor.

Height: 27.5 feet Building Area: 10,487.3 sq.ft./floor (2 floors)

602.2 Construction Classification

Minimum allowable is Type VA with its height, number of floors, and square footage.

Type IA. Structural Elements of non-combustible materials; 3 hour rating; unsprinkled and protected.

1003.2: Ceiling Height

Means of egress shall have ceiling height of greater than or equal to 7.5’.

The main vestibules have ceiling heights of 10’8”.

1004.2.4: Exit Travel Distance

Requires that, for the path of an exit access that includes an open stairway, the travel distance is to include the distance of travel on the stairway.

See below.

1004.3.2.2: Minimum Corridor Width

1. In areas serving employees only, the minimum aisle width shall be 24 inches, but not less than the width determined as specified in 1003.2.3. 2. In assembly occupancies without fixed seats, the minimum clear aisle width shall be 36 inches where seats, tables, furnishings, displays and similar fixtures or equipment are placed on only one side of the aisle and 44 inches where such fixtures or equipment are placed on both sides of the aisle. The required width of aisles shall be unobstructed. Library: Reading Room: 50 net sq. ft. Stack Area: 100 gross sq. ft.

1004.1: Maximum Floor Area Allowances 1005.1: Minimum Requirements of Egress Width

The space between the wall and the front desk is 3’11”, serving only employees. In the assembly occupancies between the main bookshelves of the main room there is a aisle width of 3’7-3/4”

Areas without fixed seating. Total square footage of 10,487.3 per floor. With an occupancy of 100 gross square feet, this allows for 104.8 occupants per floor. Interior Stair: 31.5”

1008.1.1: Door Size

Stairways (inches/occupant) = 0.3 and 48” minimum width. Must be greater than or equal to 32” but less than or equal to 48”.

1009.1: Stairway Width

Must be greater than or equal to 44”.

Left Stair: 3’10.5” Main Stair: 4’2-1/8”

1011.1: Exit Signs

Must be readily visible from any direction of egress travel; no point in a corridor is more than 100’ from a sign.

Signs located at (but not limited to): room 100, 101, 102, 112, 206.

1019.1: Minimum Number of Exits for Occupancy Load

(persons per story) 1-500: 2 exits per story parking minimum = 2 exits

2 exits from main stacks room, 1 exit from adult room, 1 exit from loading dock.

1016.1: Travel Distance Limitations

From the most remote point within a story to an exit: Occupancy A- without sprinkler system- 200’

No point is greater than 172’6-1/2” away from an exit.

Door leaf: Emergency Exit, First Floor: 3’1/8”

20’ 9.5” 98’4-1/2”

109

108 205

107 112

111

209

110 106 104

95’6.5”

208 207 206

105

204

102

20’10-1/2”

103

202

37’1/2”

203

210

100 101

200

201

20’5-1/2”

Grosse Pointe Public Library 10 Kercheval Avenue Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan architect: Marcel Breuer constructed: 1953

Code Analysis Drawn by: Michelle Maxwell and David Whinfrey

A.067


>>GROSSE POINTE PUBLIC LIBRARY<< Putting together a construction document set, the studio was designated a library in Grosse Pointe, MI to intricately measure. My assignment was to compose the first level floor plan (below) as well as collaborating with a partner on the code analysis (facing page).

157'-3 3/8" 6'-8"

1'-6"

6'-8"

1'-6"

6'-8"

1'-6"

6'-8"

1'-6"

1'-3"

6'-8"

1'-6"

6'-8"

1'-6"

6'-8"

1'-6"

28'-10 3/4"

51'-4 1/4"

11"

5'-10"

6"

6'-0"

12'-3 3/8" 8"

B A.014

3 A.006

8'-10"

3 1/8"

1

6"

10'-7 1/2"

Loading Dock

Children’s Reading Room

Adult Reading Room

Offices

Storage 1 A.008

6"

17'-5 1/4"

1 A.008

13'-8 3/8"

4 A.005

4'-4"

1'-6"

27'-8 1/4"

8'-6 1/4"

6'-8"

16'-3 1/4"

2

1'-6"

6" 13'-10"

2 A.007

6'-5 3/4"

Offices

Computer Room and Offices

6"

1'-6"

3

70'-0"

18'-0 1/4"

Book Elevator

2 A.007

6'-8"

1'-6"

Janitor’s Closet

6'-7 3/4"

1'-6"

Offices

1'-6"

6'-3 1/4" 5 3/8"

6'-9 1/8"

31'-6 1/8" 27'-6 1/2"

1'-6"

16'-9 3/4"

6'-11 1/8"

28'-8 1/2"

4

1'-6"

6'-11 1/8"

1'-6"

16'-6 3/4"

6'-5 5/8"

C A.014

Offices

Main Reading Room

Book Chute

5

Grosse Pointe Public Library 106'-1 7/8"

A

27'-3 3/8"

25'-11 3/8"

B

5'-8 3/8"

5'-9 3/4"

20'-2"

5'-11 7/8"

C

2'-6"

5'-10"

5'-10"

20'-5"

3'-0 1/8"

D

6'-0 7/8"

3 A.006 5'-9 3/4" 157'-3 3/8" 20'-5"

5'-10 3/8"

E

A A.014 2'-5 7/8"

5'-10"

5'-10"

20'-3 1/2"

1'-0" 2'-10 5/8"

5'-10 1/8"

1'-0 7/8"

6'-2 1/2"

F

6"

4 A.005

G 21'-6"

10 Kercheval Avenue

34'-2"

H

50'-2 1/2"

21'-0 1/4"

I

Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan architect: Marcel Breuer

6'-4 1/4"

constructed: 1953

Plan - Floor 12 Drawn by: Michelle Maxwell Scale: 1’=1/8” 0’

16’

A.03


CUT_AWAY

Cap

T.O. Slab +51’

AUTHORS: JOE CHEMELLO, MICHELLE MAXWELL

Parapet Wearcourse

Roofing Membrane Insulation Vapor Retarder Reinforced Concrete Roof Slab

Mullion Vapor Retarder

TYPE OF BUILDING: OFFICE FOR A MARKETING AGENCY

Pressure Plate

Balcony Railing

CONSTRUCTION TYPE: CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION

T.O. Slab +34’

Balcony Entry

Reinforced Concrete Floor Slab

Drop Ceiling

FACADE: CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM, OPAQUE AND GLAZING INFILL PANELS MAIN STAIR: CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION, WOOD TREADS

T.O. Slab +17’

Interior Concrete Columns

INTERIOR WALLS: LIGHT FRAME STRUCTURE WITH CEMENT FIBER BOARD FINISH

CAP Main Entry

FLASHING PARAPET

FLOOR CONSTRUCTION: CONCRETE SLAB, PARQUET FINISH CEILINGS: DROP CEILING

Polished Concrete Floor Slab

T.O. Slab +0’

ROOFING MEMBRANE

VAPOR BARRIER 9” RIGID INSULATION 8” CONCRETE CEILING SLAB 4” RIGID INSULATION DROP CEILING FRAME

OPAQUE INFILL PANEL 1’X2’ CONCRETE BEAM #6 REINFORCING BAR 2’X2’ CONCRETE COLUMN PRESSURE PLATE PARQUET FLOORING PRIMARY MULLION SECONDARY MULLION 8” CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB 4” RIGID INSULATION 1’X1’ STONE PAVERS DROP CEILING FRAME BALCONY DRAINAGE 1’X2’ CONCRETE BEAM #6 REINFORCING BAR PARQUET FLOORING 2’X2’ CONCRETE COLUMN SECONDARY MULLION PRIMARY MULLION

8” CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB 4” RIGID INSULATION DROP CEILING FRAME

OPAQUE INFILL PANEL 1’X2’ CONCRETE BEAM #6 REINFORCING BAR PRESSURE PLATE

PARQUET FLOORING

Second Floor Scale: 1’-0” = 1/8”

Michelle Maxwell Joe Chemello

Ground Floor Scale: 1’-0” = 1/8”

Michelle Maxwell Joe Chemello

MAIN ENTRANCE

8” CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB 4” RIGID INSULATION VAPOR BARRIER GRADE

1’X2’ CONCRETE BEAM #6 REINFORCING BAR FOOTING KEY CONCRETE FOOTING

scale: 3/8” = 1’0”

scale: 1/64” = 1’0”


THE USAGE OF CONCRETE IS PREVALENT THROUGH MOST OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE DESIGN BECAUSE OF ITS ECONOMICAL MEANS AND AVAILABILITY. THIS GETS COUPLED WITH A CURTAIN WALL FACADE WHICH MIMICS THE BANDAGE OF THE INTERIOR FLOOR PARTITIONS. THE CURTAIN WALL GETS TREATED WITH AN ALTERNATING PATTERN OF TRANSPARENT GLAZING AND OPAQUE INFILL PANELS SO AS TO ALLOW ENOUGH NATURAL LIGHT INTO THE BUILDING WITHOUT OVERPOWERING WITH DIRECT SUNLIGHT. THE MAIN STAIR BECOMES A SPACE ROOFING MEMBRANE OF GATHERING WITH ITS EIGHT-FOOT WIDTH AND OCCUPIABLE UNDERSIDE.

Scale: 1’-0” = 1/8”

>>CUT_AWAY<< After working with a partner on various construction principles throughout the semester, the final project was to tie it all together by being given a basic “shell” of a building in both a structural plan grid and a schematic section. This meant determining the structural system, facade design and placement of two main features: the balcony and the grand staircase. Using the cutaway technique one can identify each layer of the structure from footing to parapet including but not limited to the exterior cladding, insulation, interior finishes, slab, ceiling, and primary, secondary and tertiary structure. Our design entailed using concrete coupled with a curtain wall facade that utilizes both opaque and glazed infill panels.

9” RIGID INSULATION

VAPOR BARRIER

1’X2’ CONCRETE BEAM 8” CONCRETE CEILING SLAB 4” RIGID INSULATION #6 REINFORCING BAR DROP CEILING FRAME PARQUET FLOORING

1’X2’ CONCRETE BEAM 8” CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB 4” RIGID INSULATION #6 REINFORCING BAR DROP CEILING FRAME

2’X2’ CONCRETE COLUMN

1/4” GLASS RAILING CONCRETE STRINGER WOOD STAIR TREAD

PARQUET FLOORING

1’X2’ CONCRETE BEAM 8” CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB 4” RIGID INSULATION VAPOR BARRIER #6 REINFORCING BAR

FOOTING KEY CONCRETE FOOTING

GRADE

scale: 1/4” = 1’0”

scale: 1/64” = 1’0”

ADVANCED BUILDING CONSTRUCTION, ARCH 417/427 WINTER 2011 DAVID MOON JOE CHEMELLO, MICHELLE MAXWELL TAUBMAN COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 04.25.2012

47


>>TRAVEL ABROAD STUDIO<< Course: Sketching Techniques Assignment: Piazza del Popolo Instructor: Stephanie Pilat Spring 2010

Piazza San Pietro, Vatican City May 2010

49


>>TRAVEL ABROAD STUDIO<< Assigned a tourist attraction, each student, through sketching, was to redefine use of the space, whether it be through adding, subtracting, complete demolishing, or simply repurposing. With the Piazza del Popolo, it was proposed that more of a spectacle should ensue in order to slow one in the space, or to even go as far as to make one stop and relax and both memorize and be mesmerized; this meant adding grass to allow one the comfort to interact in more ways with the ground, rather than only walking. Water was also inserted, encircling the piazza to act in conjunction with the present fountain; the two would join together for a water spectacle synchronized to music for a water and light show.

51


>>VISUAL ABSTRACTION<< Undergraduate Design Studio I Instructor: Tony Patterson Fall 2010

53


Torches Mauve. Franz Kline, 1960

Subtractive Model: Cardboard


>>VISUAL ABSTRACTION<< PHASE 1: FINDING SPACE Depth, movement and mystery are explored through isolating zones of color and zones of black in Kline’s ‘Torches Mauve’. This contrast allows for a clear visualization of positive and negative space. The relationship is translated into a solid/void relationship in three dimensions with the stacked model in both cardboard and museum board. The form was established by volumetrically mapping the painting through wrapping it upon itself creating a trapped central space. Zones of white found in the painting are used to locate small pores that allow light and visual access into it. Cast models further explore the additive and subtractive space while continuing to work with the solid/void as they also manifest dynamic and contrasting tendencies.

Final Subtractive Model: Museum Board

55


Cast Model: Basswood Formwork


Cast Model: Plaster/Rockite Mix

57


>>VISUAL ABSTRACTION<< PHASE 2: INHABITING SPACE [THE UNDERGROUND LIBRARY]

Transverse Section facing east through book space

Transverse Section facing west through reading space

“...I try to create public spaces that will encourage dialogue. This might be an individual’s dialogue between himself, nature, and time -- or it might be a dialogue between people. I can’t dictate how people will use these spaces, but I want them to be aware of the possibility of dialogue. Space cannot dictate to people, but it can guide people.” -Tadao Ando

Longitudinal Section facing north connection

The design is comprised of two major spaces, a reading room for no more than two readers at a time, and a 200 book display/ storage room; each envelop natural light. The reading room, placed level with ground, is open to the sky and filled with direct sunlight with the option of a shaded indoor retreat. The storage room, at the undermost level, receives indirect natural light both from deep vertical light tunnels above as well as through a punctured wall and a natural back-lit book storage wall. The central passage operates as a transitional space, providing an easy flow while also serving as a connection to both the lightness of the exterior above and the darkness of the interior below. Using the shared face to two adjacent studio member’s libraries, a physical connection is needed on both the north and south faces fifteen feet below ground.

Longitudinal Section facing south connection

59


>>INVISIBLE CITIES: PHYLLIS<< Virtual Studies Instructor: Dawn Gilpin Winter 2010

Natural Science Building, Ann Arbor, MI February 2010

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Translation 1 ^

^ Translation 2

< Translation 3 Translation 4 >


â&#x20AC;&#x153;To translate is to convey. It is to move something without altering it...I am now talking about transportation...the blind spot between the drawing and its object, because we can never be quite certain, before the event, how things will travel and what will happen to them on the way...I retain this inane parable, as it gives some idea of what I believe to be the largely unrecognized possibility within drawing. -Robin Evans, Translations from Drawing to Building 1986

>>INVISIBLE CITIES: PHYLLIS<< Given the chapter Plyllis in Italo Calvinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Invisible Cities, initial reactions were to freehand the personal interpretation of how the city exists spatially. After several iterations, a final translation from two-dimensional drawing into a threedimensional object showed the full capabilities of abstractly reading the text. The translations from passage to drawing was re-imagined and revised in order to be comprehensible and useful while the three-dimensional model is meant to portray the essence of the text even more clearly. Returning again to the second dimension through use of the camera, one is to see between the dimensions and find that space previously hidden behind precision. The entire project centers around reconstructing the imaginary passage into a rigorously defined spatial experience.

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>>SCALAR ANALYSIS<< Undergraduate Design Studio II Instructor: Jennifer Maigret Winter 2011

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>>SCALAR ANALYSIS<< With the study of three different scales: urban, personal and abstraction, one was asked to interpret the abstraction from two dimensions into three using 100 basswood sticks. Building upon the densities and color of the image, a relationship between the two was formed. The spatial qualities of the image were interpreted through a series of intersecting lines distinguished through density and line weight. The hybrid drawing was analyzed much like a topographical map with the lighter and smoother areas becoming built low and flat while the denser and darker clumps were treated as mountainous zones.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

Farnsworth House, Plano, Illinois July 2010

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New York City, NY July 2013


New York City, NY July 2013

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New York City, NY July 2013


The High Line, New York City, NY July 2013

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South Beach, South Haven, MI June 2013

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Beeches Golf Club, South Haven, MI August 2012

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Aqueducts, Rome, Italy June 2010


Piazza San Pietro, Vatican City, Italy June 2010

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Piazza San Marco, Venice, Italy May 2010


Venice, Italy May 2010

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Professional / School Portfolio