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MICHELLE LAHNEMANN m.lahnemann@gmail.com 570 851 8928

E D U C AT ION Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 2014

Bachelor of Architecture Electronic Arts, minor Cumulative GPA: 3.50 Arch Studio GPA: 3.73 Dean’s List 2009-2014

EXPERI ENCE “An Armory Show”

2013

Capital Region CANstruction

2013-2014

Installation + Fabrication Team

Design Captain: Team RPI

Constructed a full-scale army tank replica which included 2x4 framing and gypsum board cladding of the tank, a turret, and a gun. “An Armory Show” featured over 150 local artists and paid homage to the The Armory Show of 1913. The 4-month long exhibition took place at the Opalka Gallery of the Sage College of Albany.

Part of the only student team among professional architecture and engineering firms in the Capital Region; a design-build competition that gathers canned goods for donations to local food pantries.

The Machine Starts 2013 Fabrication + Production Crew Contributed to the fabrication of The Machine, a flexible tensegrity structure measuring 15’ tall and 20’ in diameter. Also assisted the stage manager and production crew in lighting, sound cues, and stage setup/breakdown throughout the performances.

2014 Entry: Alice in Wonderland “We’re All CANS Here” 2nd place International People’s Choice Winner 1st place Capital Region People’s Choice Winner 2nd time Structural Ingenuity Winner over 4,000 cans used 2013 Entry: Wizard of Oz “We’re Not in CANsas Anymore” Structural Ingenuity Winner over 3,000 cans used

PIP Interdisciplinary Studio

2011-2012

Team Leader/Designer of Dynamic Wall Surfaces

Habitat for Humanity 2013 Construction + Painting Volunteered for the Albany Capital District’s Habitat for Humanity program. Expanded skills in painting and carpentry at the Morton’s Walk Housing project in South Albany.

Designed an interactive installation and performance, titled S(around)OUND, pronounced Surround Sound, at the historic Gasholder Building in Troy, NY. Responsible for the design, production, deployment, and rigging of a moveable wall system measuring 30’ tall and 130’ wide. Also operated audience-inhabited scissor lifts and lighting cues during the performances.


AC H IE V E ME N T S Selected for the Bedford Traveling Workshop: 1 week architect/engineer collaboration in Paris 2014 Recipient of the Faculty Award for High Scholastic Attainment in the Study of Architecture 2014 Recipient of the Faculty Award for Outstanding Service to the School of Architecture 2014 Recipient of the Community Choice Award for RPI CANstruction’s “We’re All CANS Here” 2014 Two-time recipient of the Structural Ingenuity Award for Capital Region CANstruction 2013-2014 Published in the Journal of Architectural Education: Material Manifestations Article 2013 Recipient of the Rensselaer Grant for strong academic and extracurricular achievement (90k) 2010-2013 S[around]OUND Commissioned Installation and 3 day Performance with 1,500+ attendees 2012 Published in the Capital Region Metroland for S[around]OUND 2012 Recipient of the Polish Women’s Alliance Undergraduate Academic Scholarship 2011-2012 Recipient of the Wegmans Academic Scholarship (7.5k) 2009-2012 Published in Material Manifestations 2nd Edition Publication, RPI Student Work 2011 Selected as WVIA Artist of the Week, Television Segment 2009

SKIL L S Digital:

Visual:

Fabrication:

Theatre:

Materials:

Other Skills:

Rhinoceros 3D

Adobe CS5:

Lasercutting

Rigging

Basswood +Wood

Mac + PC

Grasshopper

Photoshop

3D Printing

Hydraulic Lift

Acetate + Acrylic

Microsoft Office

V-Ray

InDesign

CNC Milling

Epoxy + Resin

Painting

3DS Max

Illustrator

Woodshop Tools

Lighting

Plaster + Clay

Collage

AutoCad

Dreamweaver

Ceramics

Set Building

Paints + Pastels

Photography

Operation

E MPLOYME NT Falling Anvil Studios

2013-present

Large scale gallery/installation projects Part of a select group of architecture students chosen to work on exhibition projects under artist Michael Oatman.

Wegmans Food Markets Inc. 2007-present Cashier/Customer Service Developed excellent communication, people skills, and money handling within a fast-paced work environment.


URBAN A A N A B N R URBAANN A A U B AN R N URBAN FARM + MIXED USE

PARIS, FRANCE


PLANTS

PLANTS

LABORATORIES

LABORATORIES

EXPO

EXPO

RESTAURANT

RESTAURANT

BOUTIQUE

URBAN FARM

PLANTS

RESTAURANT

LABORATORIES

BOUTIQUE

PLANTS

BOUTIQUE

PUBLIC PROGRAM

LABORATORIES PLANTS

URBAN FARM

RESTAURANT LABORATORIES

CAFE PLANTS

EXPO RETAIL

EXPO

RETAIL CAFE

PUBLIC PROGRAM

URBAN FARM

PLANTS

LABORATORIES

PUBLIC PROGRAM

1:50 Section Model


URBANANA redefines the principles of traditional farming by introducing urban agriculture into the heart of Paris, France. URBANANA exists as a truly local agricultural practice, bringing the aspect of harvesting fruit into an urban setting and producing quantities large enough to sustain an entire city. This reduces the need for relying on imported foreign produce, thus diminishing the cost and energy of transporting these products thousands of miles. The building becomes a hybridization of mechanics + biology, integrating the method of growing bananas into a building specifically designed to support this process.


Main Circulation

Circulation within Ribbons

The building is divided into 3 shifting ribbons that let light, air, and people circulate through the interstitial spaces. Though the growing bananas are physically separated by glass curtain walls, the offset levels allow for visual integration of the urban farm within the public program.

Exploded Ribbons


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GLAZING TYPE I

SLANTED CEILING

PUBLIC ZONE METAL FRAMING GLAZING TYPE II

WOOD FLOORING WOODEN SLEEPERS METAL DECKING

WATERPROOF MEMBRANE STEEL BEAM RAISED PAVER PAVER PEDESTAL POUR STOP RIGID INSULATION

VENTILATION

OFFSET BEAM SUPPORT/KICKER FASTENING CLIPS CONCRETE PANEL MULLION ATTACHMENT

METAL DECKING

RETRACTABLE LIGHT HYDROPONIC MIXTURE

CEILING HEIGHT IN BACK VIERENDEEL TRUSS

RECESSED LIGHT BANANA PLANT

SILICONE JOINT

GROWING MEDIUM

GYPSUM WALLBOARD

SPIDER JOINT BANANA FARM CIRCULATION ZONE MULLION 2" TOP COAT CURTAIN WALL 1 FLOOR VENT CAULK BACKER ROD STEEL STRUCTURE

CONCRETE PANEL RIGID INSULATION STEEL ANGLE WOOD CEILING HVAC UNIT RECESSED LIGHT BUILDING EDGE

PLANT TROTH


The transparent facade permits light to penetrate the structure allowing vegetation to mature over cycles and seasons. Perhaps more importantly it allows the community to witness the growth of the plants over the duration of its production. Over time, the transparent void becomes denser as mature plants fill the space and surround other programmatic elements such as laboratories, exhibition space, cafes, and retail. When these aspects come together as a dynamic whole, a new way to sustain, educate, and inform the city of Paris about urban agriculture is presented.


EARTH +SKY OBSERVATORY + EDUCATION CENTER

ALBANY, NEW YORK

Situated atop the John Boyd Thacher Park lies the DUDLEY OBSERVATORY, Sunken into and cantilevering over the cliff’s edge, the observatory takes advantage of the views not only toward the sky, but the horizon as well.


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of the building, allowing them to observe the ground and sky for miles. Attractions such as the historic Pruyn Telescope and Planetarium are located at the corner intersections of the building with exhibition space connecting them throughout.


View of Entrance and Lobby Area

View Up Circulation Core

Interior Exhibition Space


HOU S I N G VISITING SCHOLAR HOUSING

TROY, NEW YORK

With a rich academic history and a flourishing art scene, this project creates housing for visiting scholars in Troy, New York. Situated between the edge of the city and the bank of the Hudson River, this complex houses both temporary and permanent residences, as well as social amenities and retail space for the Troy community.


COMPLEX(ITY)


Each apartment faces west and takes advantage of the river view, while the eastern side is completely transparent, allowing both the public to see in and it’s residents to look out into the heart of downtown Troy. The form of the building resembles that of a game of Tetris, where each unit fits perfectly with the next, but also allows for opportunities of exterior space through covered patios and balconies. Natural vegetation covering the roof-top terraces helps to reduce the urban heat island effect, while also providing more places for residents to gather and relax.

West Elevation

12 Studio Units 6 Double Units 6 Triple Units


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1/8”=1’ model: River Side

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1/8”=1’ model: Street Side

East Elevation 50’ 20’


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CAMO BENCH URBAN PARK FURNITURE

TROY, NEW YORK

CAMOBENCH was designed as a family of urban furniture pieces that blur lines within its programmatic and iconographic identity. The fixture family falls at the center of the functional spectrum of urban furniture, performing both as a play-scape as well as conventional seating. Discovery of the programmatic functions at the user’s end provide opportunities for lounging, sitting, climbing, reclining or playing. Additionally, the pieces visually refrain from suggesting preconceived ideas about furniture use, blending in to the surroundings as organic sculpture or landscape elements.


Party Table

Initial Studies

Solo Table

Camobench Family: Final Designs

Safety and comfort considerations, as well as extensive prototyping, informed the material choices and details including the 1” round holes punched into 1/8” steel with ¼” rolled corners used in constructing a full scale prototype of the finished product. The hole pattern is both aesthetically interesting as well as functional, allowing rain water to easily drain off the surfaces. The bench is divided into 7 sections, where each section is cut and rolled from one sheet of steel. Each section is then welded together, allowing for easy transportation and on-site assembly.

15’ Solo Table Elevation

1/2”=1’ Solo Table Scale Model

Solo Bench


1:1 Solo Table Section Prototype

Solo Table: Unrolled Surfaces


A proposed lighting design concept detailed a diffuse internal LED illumination system that would transform the furniture pieces into lanterns, creating an event of interest at sundown. The lighting scheme provides a sense of safety in the park without the need for a designated security lighting system.

Interior Lighting Study Model

Interior Color Concept


The integration of the studio’s work into the Riverfront Park in Troy, NY, prompted several scenarios to incorporate the community including the commissioning of graphic content by local artists for the pieces’ interiors, as well as the envisioning of the furniture elements being utilized by vendors at the weekly Waterfront Farmers Market.


SWAS UBL I M E TELANDS SUBTERRANEAN ECO-MUSEUM

POCONO MOUNTAINS, PENNSYLVANIA On some of the last remaining industrially untouched land in the state, aptly named Promised Land Park, this project proposes a subterranean ecomuseum located in the “wilderness” of Pennsylvania’s Pocono Mountains. Underground, the typical museum program is surrounded by four distinct biospheres that each houses a different ecological wasteland condition. These conditions represent the new “urban wilderness”, leaving behind the wastelands that are a direct result of our own industrial processes. The goal of the project is to increase awareness of the damage that man is forcing upon nature.


Land Pollution This biosphere deals with land pollution, something that humans contribute to every day. Whether its in the form of creating waste that goes to landfills, or something more visibly destructive such as oil or gas drilling, this is not a habitat that people would want to live in --even though we already do.


Terraced Hardscape Terraced Hardscape

Museum Entrance Museum Entrance

Raised Grass Hills Grass Hills Raised Waterfront Picnic Areas Waterfront Picnic Area

Top SurfaceSurface Top Subterranean EcoMuseum Ecomusem

Wasteland Wasteland Biospheres Biospheres Air Pollution Air Pollution Exhaust fumes Burning fossil fuels Chemical off-gasing Radiation spills Smoke Smog

Ground Pollution Ground Pollution Mining runoff Drilling/fracking Raw sewage Waste water

Land Pollution Land Pollution

Litter/Trash Waste dumping Inland Oil spills Pesticides/Chemicals Mining and logging debris

Acrylic Model

Water Pollution Pollution Water Chemical dumping Illegal dumping Raw sewage Industrial waste spills Oil/Radiation spills Biological contamination

3D Printed Model Underground Biosphere

Exhibition

Land Biosphere

Lecture Hall

Water Biosphere

Gallery

Air Biosphere

Gift Shop/Cafe

Entrance/Circulation

Lobby Program Diagram

The site is located on the lake front of Promised Land Park. On the surface, it’s unclear as to whether anything is even below ground. As visitors progress across the site, areas of grass allow for picnicking, playing, and relaxing, while the hardscape allows for walking and biking. As visitors explore further, they discover a literal hole in the ground, which is the entrance to a subterranean ecomuseum found below. Stadium-like stairs allows one to slowly progress down into the hole until an elevator platform is discovered. From there, they descend down 300’ into the belly of the museum.


Air Pollution Smog and CO2 emissions from industrial factories and power plants are often to blame, creating an atmosphere that is difficult to breath in, let alone live.

Ground Pollution Just because something isn’t inherently visible doesn’t mean there’s nothing wrong with it. Water runoff and sewage easily pollute the soil lying underneath. This biosphere brings visitors underground to experience the polluted geological layers.

Water Pollution Water is often the first thing to become polluted in nature, whether it be directly from humans, run-off from factories, or waste being dumped into water bodies.


MODULAR THINKING:

CERAMICS SLIP-CAST CERAMICS WORKSHOP

TROY, NEW YORK

With an emphasis on hands-on exploration, this workshop aimed to merge low and high tech approaches to developing critical and creative investigations of different casting techniques and materials. The main focus was on mold design/making and slip-casting methods as a way to think about “vessel space”, the void shaped by the mold and the continuous surface of the slip material. The final goal was to develop a three-dimensional building unit that challenged the idea of what a “brick” could be.


There was a multi-step process involved in making each piece. A digital model became a physical reality through CNC milling of the piece to create a “positive” form in foam, which was then cast in plaster to create a mold. When the foam piece was removed, the negative or “vessel space”

Initial piece made from plaster

Mold-Making Process

3D scanning of plaster piece

Computer generated model

Slip-cast piece made from plaster mold

3D prints made from computer model, used to test different wall configurations


became the area where liquid slip would be poured into to cast each piece. Time was an extremely important factor in each step of the process, whether it be during pouring, casting, drying, or firing of the pieces.

The entire process from start to finish was very intricate and time consuming. Attention to detail during each step was key in order to prevent issues such as cracking, breaking, uneven drying, or exploding during firing. At the end of the workshop, the process of slipcasting and a material expertise of both ceramics and plaster was acquired.


N D O ( AR U ) S OUND INSTALLATION + PERFORMANCE

TROY, NEW YORK

Troy’s historic Gasholder Building is one of the last remaining coal gasometers in the United States. A gigantic kinetic storage system, the sleeved interior mechanism would rise and fall, literally breathing in and out the coal gas that illuminated Troy’s streets at night. Students from the PIP class (Production, Installation, Performance) collaborated with experimental violinist Todd Reynolds in an effort to return the phenomena of buoyancy, illumination and passage to the building. Working with local heavy equipment specialist MAC Tools and the owners of the Gasholder, Sage Bros. Painting, the students created an environment that is kinetic and projected, displacing the audience skyward while projecting video animations on the new material interior. The work, entitled S[around]OUND (Surround Sound), occurred in three stages over 90 minutes. In the first stage, viewers explored the Gasholder on the ground and experienced the acoustic wonder of the space. In the second stage, viewers moved upward into new contexts and began to hear Reynolds’ signature improvised looping compositions. In the final stage, viewers were transported vertically and listened to new music several stories above ground, taking in a never before experienced view of the iconic Troy landmark.


S[around]OUND was a collaborative project between RPI architecture and art students, violinist Todd Reynolds, as well as the Troy community. Over an 8 month period, our class of 14 tackled everything from design, production, and installation of the performance to advertising, directing, and handling of the ten thousand dollar budget sponsored by the late Chris Jaffe, ‘49. This spread gives a brief documentation of the design development phase prior to the finalized design and actual installation of the performance.


As part of a team of four that designed the original scheme for the project, my individual role was that of major designer of the dynamic wall system, including its fabrication and rigging, as well as overall director and coordinator of the performances.

sage bros. office

inflatable A iA inflatable B iB enter

inflatable C iC

Visiting Artist Todd Reynolds blower 2

10

POWER 8-plug

SB1

LIFT lt, l1-l6

1

sound station

SB3 p*4 p*1

p*1

speaker: -secured in vertical channel at 15’ (2nd ‘shelf’)

9

2

l6

blower 1

l5

amp for instrument -on floor, left side aligned with right side of vertical channel when looking at vertical channel.

Dynamic Wall System

air supply instrument -in vertical channel

air supply

iB

MERCH Z air supply

VERTICAL CHANNELS

l4

l3

8

3

TODD

1

2

3

4

6

7

8

9 10

5

Playable Instruments

light can, no gel -in vertical channel, on 1st shelf -angled up + towards wall.

lt light can, colored gel -in vertical channel, on 1st shelf -angled up + towards wall.

l2

p*1 p*1

l1

PROJECTOR-- projector, proj power, vga cable, laptop

iA iC COMP

PROJ KIN

POWER 6-plug

4

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KB1

-VGA CABLE -KINECT CABLE -POWER CABLE extension cord

light extension cord

sound extension cord KB2

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5

KB1

Inhabitable Inflatables

KB1-3 : KINECT BUNDLE -1 KINECT -1 PROJECTOR -1 COMPUTER -TABLES/STAND??

sound power strip

xlr cable

Kinetic Scissor Lifts


Hand-cutting and Folding of Wall System

For this project, the design of the advertising and marketing scheme was equally important as drawings, renders, or models. The posters and flyers helped to attract an audience to the performances.

Installation in the Gasholder


Close your eyes, open your ears, extend your reach. Explore the sound and surfaces. Finally, rise. - Michael Oatman, artist and Professor of Architecture, Rensselaer


S(around)OUND Performance


The event attracted over 1,500 members of the architecture community, the RPI student/ faculty population, and local Troy residents. featured in Huffington Post, Times Union, Metroland


Linking performance, space, and audience through choreographed changes in spatial and temporal zones establishes a platform for improvisational interaction in the Gasholder Building. The installation of flexible and dynamic structures references the historical expansion and contraction of the original gas-holding volume, reacting to both preset and improvised movement. Horizontal circulation of the audience is guided by the physical separation of the wall system, either limiting or exposing the audiences views. The 50’ tall large-scale instruments allow the audience-produced sound to be part of the performance and also challenge Todd Reynolds’ traditional performance methods. Inhabitable inflatable structures serve many roles, including obscuring one’s view on the ground and hiding objects, while also acting as a blank canvas for lighting and animations to be projected onto. Vertical movement of the audience is defined by the use of mechanical lifts. The goal of the lifts is to give the audience a completely new experience: moving both them and the performer vertically throughout the performance, forcing new views and variations of sound. Collaboration of these elements, with allowance for a certain level of improvisation, shaped the audience experience through respondent undulation of space, sound, and visual stimuli.


Michelle Lahnemann Art/itecture  

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Portfolio 2014

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