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Jim Walters: Looking back, thinking forward


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HOME Living

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What’s Inside

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16 Inside Every Issue 6 36 41

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From the Editor Calendar Around Town

Business 8 Moore’s Wealth Management has been providing Hall County and the

surrounding region with financial advice and personal wealth guidance for many years. Find out how they got started and what you should know about your money.

Health

On the Cover Jim Walters is both a man big and small. Statuesque and broad shouldered, you can’t miss him when he makes an entrance. But when it comes to his humble nature, he thanks those greater than himself for his many blessings and this great country he lives in. His impact on the community is monumental while his soul is gentle. Page 16. Photo by Michelle Boaen Jameson 4

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10 Spring brings with it the lush lawns and beautiful flowers. But did you know it also brings homeopathic ways to soothe burns, cleanse sinuses and ease upset stomachs? Your yard is like a medicine cabinet, if you know what to look for.

Fashion 12 Toss out that latest issue of Elle, ladies. The runway was in full bloom as the Women of Northeast Georgia presented a fashion show fundraiser HOME Living

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24 10

newest pediatricians in town, but don’t be fooled because he’s not your average doc. Malcom has a few eccentric talents that make him a hit with his tiny patients, and with the rest of the staff at Longstreet Clinics.

for the Emergency Services at Northeast Georgia Medical Center Braselton.

Recreation 24 The Chattahoochee river offers more than just tubing. For the real sportsman, there is ample opportunity to try fly fishing.

Get to Know 28 Dr. Curtis Malcom is one of the homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Charity 34

GainesvilleTheatre Alliance provides the Hall County community with more than just entertainment. Young actors, set designers and costume makers get to show off their skills while

the rest of us get to enjoy a touch of culture and see some incredible visiting professionals.

Taste of HOME 32 With summer nearly upon us,

there’s no better time to start talking ice-cream. Sure, you wait for that musical truck to come past your house or pick up a bucket from the grocer’s freezer, but why not try some made fresh from cows in Clermont? May | June 2014

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From the Editor Editor Michelle Boaen Jameson Advertising Director Sherrie Jones Advertising Sales Trent Sexton Melissa Sizemore Graphic Design Michelle Boaen Jameson Chris Campbell Chelsea Tench Production Support Katherine Hake April Seymour Kerri Ivie Dana Erwin Betty Thompson Contributing Photographers The Times staff Sarina Roth Kirk Jockell

Rockin’ our way through Hall Well, sort of. On our way through Lula to interview our cover feature, Jim Walters, my reporter Savannah King (pictured above) got to see the giant rocking chair for her first time. This rocking chair, larger than life (much like Mr. Walters) sits on the corner of Ga. 52 and the road leading to the Walters Barn. You can tell where folks pull up and have a seat in the chair. I imagine many a youngster has been forced to sit next to his siblings and say cheese for a quick family memory. Hall County is full of interesting, be it slightly odd, artifacts and monuments. And they all make for wonderful family memories. One of those places is Mountain Fresh Creamery in Clermont. Never mind the freshout-of-the-cow milk and home-churned ice cream, there’s a giant fiberglass dairy cow that welcomes visitors to the creamery. Nothing like a photo op with fake bovine to get the kids excited about driving through the countryside. While you are out, take a look at those roadside weeds, they may be more than weeds (see Health, p. 28). And if you are feeling really adventurous, learn to tie a fly and cast a line over the rocks of the mighty Chattachoochee. (p. 24). So enjoy this issue of HOME and pass along any memories you may have. We’d like to hear from our readers!

M

J

ichelle ameson

Michelle Boaen Jameson mjameson@homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

HOME Magazine, a division of: The Times Gainesville, GA The Paper Hoschton, GA A Morris Multimedia Inc. property 345 Green St. | Gainesville, GA 30501 | 770-718-3421

www.homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

HOME: Living in North Georgia reserves the right to refuse advertisements for any reason. Acceptance of advertising does not mean or imply the services or product is endorsed or recommended by HOME: Living in North Georgia. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by an information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from Morris Multimedia Inc. Although every precaution is taken to ensure accuracy of published materials, Morris Multimedia cannot be held responsible for opinions expressed or facts supplied by its authors. Manuscripts, artwork, photography, inquiries and submitted materials are welcome.

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home business

Moore’s Wealth Management Helping guide people through the maze of money Story by Brandee A. Thomas By the time they were 30, Scott and Carla Moore were married with five children. And although they knew how to make money, they didn’t know how to make sure their retirement and their children’s futures would be secure. That lack of knowledge scared them. A lot. “In our late 20s, we became very concerned about money and understanding how to do better with it. I started reading books about investing and I became very intrigued. I started taking courses part-time to learn more,” says Scott Moore, a former computer engineer, who co-founded Moore’s Wealth Management in Gainesville with his wife Carla Moore. “I realized that I can’t be the only dummy out here that doesn’t know about money. I became licensed in the states of Louisiana and Mississippi, where we were living at the time, and began to market investment and insurance products early on.” Eventually, Moore would leave the computer industry behind completely to immerse himself in the brokerage field. Using the typical broker investment model for his 20- and 30-something-year-old clients, Moore helped those young adults build their retirement incomes. Then one day, he realized he needed to shift his focus. “As you grow with your (existing) client base, you realize their needs change and we didn’t want to lose a client because their needs changed,” says Scott Moore,

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whose Gainesville-based financial firm specializes in products for retirees and individuals nearing retirement. “I realized that the brokerage model that I had them in was not going to serve them well as they got closer to retirement. They needed something more conservative. They needed their money to last longer.” “We didn’t think they should have to settle for the model that probably worked well in their younger years when they had plenty of time to withstand the ups and downs of the market, but wasn’t as good of a fit once they started getting closer to needing that money to provide a retirement and peace of mind. Most people can’t afford that type of volatility at this age.” So in 2008, Moore left his brokerage firm in order to become an independent fiduciary advisor. His firm specializes in retirement income planning, which includes offering services like: estate planning, asset protection, 401K rollovers and wealth accumulation. “Through (industry) regulations, a fiduciary advisor has to only offer what is in the best interest of the client. A broker does not have to adhere to the same standard,” Moore says. “A broker basically has to give the client a portfolio that fits their risk tolerance, but they don’t have to offer what’s in their best interest. For instance, if you have an individual with a conservative tolerance for investing, a broker can offer them a low-risk portfolio, but there may be high fees involved.

“Our job is to give our clients a conservative portfolio that also has some safety within it. Our average client over 5 to 15 years may get a 6 or 7 percent return. It’s not as exciting as the 15 to 20 percent (return) years you get in the stock market, but those years (in the stock market) can also turn into negative years. “Our clients enjoy sort of a steady growth without the same risk associated with a lot of the other portfolio options.” Trusting your financial future to someone else can be scary, but at Moore’s Wealth, trust is a two-way street. The family firm also puts its future in the hands of its clients. “Something else that makes us unique too is that we are served by a client advisory committee, which is the committee that we formed a couple years ago. We wanted to make sure that we were putting our efforts in the right areas to grow our business and even more importantly to make sure that we weren’t putting our efforts in the wrong area by doing something that wasn’t helpful to our clients,” Scott Moore says. “How would we know if we aren’t told? The advisory board consists of 10 or 12 of our clients and it rotates out every year. Those are clients that have either been with us for quite a while or they had some experience in their previous career with executive management, public relations, or another related field. “We get together about 3 or 4 times a year and have a nice working lunch.” From newsletter content to community outreach, all topics are open

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“I realized that I can’t be the only dummy out here that doesn’t know about money. I became licensed in the states of Louisiana and Mississippi, where we were living at the time, and began to market investment and insurance products early on.”

for review and discussion with the client committee. “We were thinking about enhancing our logo a little bit and we brought it to the board,” Carla Moore says. “They said, ‘Well, why would you want to change it when it’s been working for you?’ And we thought, well, you’re right. It has.” So no change was made. “Our client advisory committee is a great source for us to bounce ideas off of before we implement them if we haven’t already gotten that answer from within our own industry,” Scott Moore says. “Naturally, everything goes through a very unique compliance department before any changes are made representing the public, but how nice is it to have a board of folks that really care that are clients?” “They have a genuine interest in the success of the company,” Carla Moore adds. Moore’s Wealth regularly goes out into the community and college campuses to teach classes on relevant topics like Social Security and retirement — an idea that was generated by the client advisory

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

The Moore Family poses for a photo in the mid 1990s. Photo courtesy Scott Moore. committee. “Certainly everyone is welcome to attend, but it’s hard to be everything to everybody, which is why we specialize,” Scott Moore says. “Our target demographic, just like with our firm, is retirees and individuals nearing retirement.” In addition to their online presence (www.mooreswealthmanagement.com) and their office on the square in downtown Gainesville, the family-firm also has an office on Deerfield Parkway in Alpharetta. “Money isn’t everything, but it is important to people. If someone is going to trust you with that, that’s something they’ve obviously prioritized,” Scott Moore says. “We’re here to help them. We’re not a 1-800 number. We’re not a call center. Money concerns are one of the biggest concerns that people have. People fear running out of money (to support themselves and their families). “If we can help either eliminate or greatly reduce that fear through proper planning and use of the proper (financial) vehicles, then we’ve helped change a life generationally because they’ll be able to

perhaps pass on resources to their children and grandchildren.” And when those future generations are ready to plan their own retirements, it is very likely they will be working with a Moore. Running a family business can be challenging — the Moores brought in a leadership coach to help them navigate the waters between family and business — but it helps provide a line of succession that provides stability to their clientele. “Three of (our children) are with us fulltime and the other two work with us part-time,” Scott Moore says. “And the three that are with us (Chris, Brian, and Kyle) all have a series 65 license that requires a Fiduciary Standard of Care for the clients.” “One of our biggest dreams was to be financially independent and to have a family business that our children could grow into,” Carla Moore added. “You always want them to be a part of the family business because they want to be, not because they feel like they have to be. Each one of them came to us on their own and that made us feel really good.” “Our dream is here now and we couldn’t be more thankful.”

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home health

Growing a Cure Using herbs to heal naturally Story by Michelle Boaen Jameson

Certified Herbalist Jean Schilling says there may be a way to feel better and it may be growing right in your own backyard. Schilling and permaculturalist/homesteader Jeff Steigerwald recently taught a four-part series at Cedar Hill Enrichment Center (www. discovercedarhill.org) in Gainesville about herbal cultivation and use in the home environment. Schilling says many people would be surprised to know the power of healing herbs. She has taken many courses on Appalachian forms of herbal and holistic healing, noting that North Georgia is full of plants that hold many uses. One of those is a longtime remedy for many ailments — dandelion. The root can be made into a tea and used to cleanse the body of toxins. It can also be used as an antiseptic. The greens, says Schilling, can be used in salads as they are full of amino acids. Mint, which tends to grow vigorously in these parts, when steeped as a tea or chewed outright, can calm an upset stomach. “People are making a more conscious effort to learn more in case they have to fall back on their own design to help their family,” said Schilling. She said the Cherokee Indians used many

types of plants for healing salves, and those learned traditions carried over into the Appalachian culture. Plantain (not the banana) looks like an ordinary weed in the yard, but Schilling says, made into a salve it has an antiitch property. Comfrey leaf is said to be anti-inflammatory and can speed wound healing due to its natural concentration of allantoin. In folk medicine, it is sometimes referred to as “knitbone” for its ability to speed wound healing. The best use is using the soft leaves to moisten dry skin and heal blemishes. Even culinary herbs are useful says Schilling. Thyme, oregano, apple cider vinegar and honey together as a steeped hot beverage can loosen congestion for colds. And most people know echinacea can be used to build immunity, but so can elderberry. Most of what Schilling and Steigerwald

Dandelion

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taught were about making salves, tinctures and cold remedies. But she emphasizes that these only be used as a supplement to daily health under the guidance of a doctor. Some herbs can actually interact with statins and other prescribed medications.

Blue Comfrey

Mint

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home fashion

Dressed to the nines Fashion show helps raise money for area hospital Story by LeAnne Akin Photos by Sarina Roth Every age can wear jeans; you just have to make the look uniquely yours. Several models showed how colored jeans including orange and pink and even patchwork styles could be paired with tees and blouses, canvas jackets and print and striped blouses on April 3 at Chateau Elan Resort and Winery. Women of Northeast Georgia hosted a fashion show —arranged by Sonia Says — and luncheon to raise money for emergency services at Northeast Georgia Medical Center Braselton.

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home fashion

The models proved that a jean jacket is a must for your spring and summer wardrobe. Tunics and leggings and maxi dresses in colorful, comfortable fabrics will also be highlights through the upcoming seasons. Vests, ponchos and a stretch of bright toile can add a splash of color to accessorize your garments. High-low skirts are big again this year, as are shift dresses and coat dresses. The fashion show closed out with some formal and special occasion designs including a blush mermaid gown and a champagne gown. homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Photos continued on page 14 May | June 2014

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home fashion

Photos continued from page 13

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home fashion


Pulling back the curtain on a man of greatness

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HOME Living

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Story by Savannah King

J

im Walters rummaged through a stack of papers on his desk, looking for a letter his 93-year-old aunt sent in the mail a few days earlier. The letter was first written by his aunt in the early 1930s when his late father, Dan Walters, was a senior in high school in the small town of Waxhaw, N.C. In the letter she detailed his father’s efforts to purchase a class ring at the cost of $9. He sold everything he could from his family farm to raise the money. “It just brought me back in time,” Walters said, filing the letter away in a stack on top of his desk. “We think we’ve got it hard now. Back in those days it was hard to find work, much less make money. It was humbling.” Walters, 77, grew up in Matthew, N.C., “right after the depression” with his parents and three younger brothers. “Things were still tight and tough economically,” Walters said. “I grew up with three brothers; there were four boys in our family. I was the eldest and my dad died when I was 13. He was 37. It was a struggle for kids to make it back then. I never have forgotten that, the ‘What if?’ That made you grow up in a hurry. It was a matter of survival.” After his father died, his mother attended a business school and eventually found work as a secretary. While their mother was at work, the household chores and responsibilities fell to Walters and the younger boys. “We had to maintain the household while all of this was going on,” Walters said. “It was an interesting lifestyle.” Though Walters struggled in childhood, he forged an appreciation for hard work and has made a name for himself as a keen businessman and philanthropists. Walters attended North Carolina State University studying mechanical engineering but didn’t graduate before going to work for a short time as a methods engineer. “I started comparing my paycheck to some of the guys in the finance business,” Walters said, smiling. “I said ‘I’m in the wrong business.’ So I changed careers and got into the finance business in 1960.”

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Jim Walters and his wife, Peggy, sit on the back porch of their Gainesville home overlooking Lake Lanier. Photo by Michelle Boaen Jameson Walters worked his way up the company ladder and became the CEO of a multi-chain consumer finance company. But in 1975, he decided to go into business for himself and founded Walters Management Company in Statesboro, Ga. Today the company has grown to provide oversight and management for over 112 consumer finance companies in four states. Walters is the president and CEO of Walters Management Company and has offices on Green Street in Gainesville. While he’s a highly-regarded businessman in Georgia, he’s also one of Gainesville’s most recognizable philanthropists — though he’s not one to take all the credit for his giving. “Somebody asked me ‘Why do you give money away?’ I said ‘It’s real easy,’” Walters said. “It’s not my money. I’m just carrying the bag

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for the big man. He has blessed me with the opportunity to decide who gets it. But it’s not my money. Like all of our gifts, it comes from above.” Like any good businessman, Walters said he takes a hard look at how charitable organizations manage their budgets and help the community before he makes a contribution. He also considers the people the organization is serving. Children make the top of his list. Walters said he’s always known he wanted to make sure he did whatever he could to help children when he was able. “I think kids are our future and those kids that don’t have a chance, deserve a chance,” Walters said. “For that reason I’m certainly very involved in Boys and Girls Clubs and the YMCA and any program that benefits kids, especially those that are underprivileged or need a break.”

Rick Hamilton, chairman of the board of directors of the JA Walters YMCA, said the Hall County organization that serves thousands of children through its Howard Road facility and afterschool programs would not exist without Walters. Hamilton said Walters seems to especially resonate with programs that benefit children and families. “Any community based need, you could go from A to Z in the alphabet and Jim has provided something for a need in our community anywhere you can look,” Hamilton said. “Any rock you turn over, you’ll find his name there.” Both the J.A. Walters YMCA and Walters Club of the Hall County Boys & Girls Clubs, are named in honor of his philanthropic contributions to the organizations. HOME Living

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home cover story

“As the good Lord blesses you, you can give more and more. ... I think there’s an old saying that goes ‘To whom much has been given, much is expected.’”

Photos by Michelle Boaen Jameson 20

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Steven Mickens, CPO of the Hall County Boys & Girls Clubs, said he often calls on Walters “just to pick his brain.” Mickens said Walters is a generous donor who is genuinely excited to see how the investment pays off for future generations. “He’s a person who has a genuine heart for helping young people,” Mickens said. “I think more than that he really gets it when it comes to investing in our youth. The greatest thing is that it produces a tax revenue … These young people are going to grow up and some are going to go to college and others are going to get jobs after they graduate from high school. They’re going to buy houses, rent apartments, and buy cars and groceries. That’s how you help sustain a community. He has a unique perspective about how to improve the community.” While Walters is generous with his time and efforts, he also encourages others to give back — though it can be a HOME Living

In North Georgia


home cover story

challenge to convince people to invest in their community. “It’s a habit you get into,” Walters said, of philanthropy. “To give away that hard earned money, you’ve got to get over the fact that it ain’t your money. Once you do and you get into the habit of giving away money you see the good it does. You get the warm fuzzy feeling from that, it just becomes a habit.” Walters said giving back doesn’t always mean donating money. He said it can be as simple as volunteering time or using specific talents with the goal of improving the community or helping a person. “As the good Lord blesses you, you can give more and more,” Walters said. “I think there’s an old saying that goes ‘To whom much has been given, much is expected.’” Walters also lends his know-how and perspective to many other organizations. He has also served on the Georgia Department of Natural Resources board, the northeast Georgia Medical Center Foundation, Elachee Nature Center and the Texas Consumer Finance boards. He’s also the secretary of the Brenau University Board of Trustees. Walters said he’s very excited about his recent appointment to serve as the vice chairman for the Georgia Ports Authority board. Though no one would fault him for wanting to retire, he said he’s not interested in slowing down. He said it’s far too fulfilling to see how a little effort can make things happen. Opposite page top: A view of the rebuilt Walters Barn owned by Jim Walters. Below: One of a few ponds surrounding the barn which make for a picturesque landscape.This page top:Walters stands on the balcony of the barn. Below: A handmade barstool is one of the few surviving items from the fire that burned the originial barn.

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“I just thought whatever is going to be is going to be. It’s best to keep a positive attitude and just keep moving.” May | June 2014

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Peggy Walters looks at family photos at their Gainesville home. Photo by Michelle Boaen Jameson

Family photos courtesy Jim Walters

“From an early age (I) had to get up early and work hard and go to bed late,” Walters said. “It’s just habit. In my work life I started working 70 hours a week, at least. I just stayed in that same habit.” He said he didn’t even slow down when he was being treated for cancer twice — once in 1997 and again in 2008. “You can let it bother you if you want it to,” Walters said. “But I never missed a meeting or work. I was positive about it the whole time. I just thought whatever is going to be is going to be. It’s best to keep a positive attitude and just keep moving.” While he keeps a full schedule, he does at least pencil in some time to relax every now and then. He often visits his picturesque farm in Lula. The farm is a popular wedding and event venue with a 3,600 square-foot barn. He said he’s been playing golf for the last 30 years in an effort to relax, though it has little effect. “To this day, I have a problem playing golf,” Walters said. “It bothers me to think I’m taking off time when I could be working.” As much as Walters enjoys his work, his pride is in his family. He and his wife of 52 years, Peggy Walters, share a lakeside home in Gainesville. The couple have two daughters, Jackie Walters and Kelly Robinson, five granddaughters and one great-grandson. Each room in the couple’s Gainesville, lakeside home is beautifully decorated with painted portraits of his daughter and granddaughters. Family photos cover the

Clockwise, a family photo of Jim Walters, his mother, and two if his brothers at sunset during a beach vacation; Walters on the front porch of his Green Street business posing with four of his granddaughters; a family photo taken at the marriage of one of Jim’s three brothers. His mother and her date are to the right of the bride and groom, Jim and Peggy are at the far left. Opposite page: Jim and his mother celebrate her birthday. 22

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entirety of a wall in one of the spare rooms. Most of the windows in the home afford a view of Lake Lanier. “What a country,” Walters said, looking out from his living room window.

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The phrase is something of a mantra for Walters. He uses it often as an inclusive expression of appreciation for people, situations and locations. “We love Gainesville absolutely,” Peggy Walters said. “We traveled around with Jim’s job quite a bit but when we heard about Gainesville through some friends and we came to see it, it just felt like home. Gainesville just offers a world of opportunities.” Jackie Walters, his eldest daughter, said her father has instilled an understanding of the importance of giving back to what you love. She said she’s never seen him refuse to help someone who needed it and his example has encouraged the younger generations to continue in his footsteps. Jackie Wallace said she believes that a person’s actions will reveal what is important to them and it’s easy to see what matters to her father. “I grew up with him saying ‘It is your obligation if you live in a community and therefore you’re receiving back from the community some level of support and investment by living here, you have to give back to it,” Jackie Walters said. “You have to pay it forward. If you like to live in a nice city in this country it’s important that you continue the work that the people did before you to put some energy back into the city or country that you live in. Everyone has that obligation.”

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home recreation

fishing on the fly

Photo courtesy Russell Vandiver

Story by Michelle Boaen Jameson

Russell Vandiver shows off a rainbow trout he recently caught while fly fishing.Vandiver, from Hall County, loves the rivers of North Georgia for wading and casting flies.

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Hall County resident Russell Vandiver has been fishing for a long time, but only recently did he get into fly fishing. In fact, he just competed again in the Helen Trout Tournament. H: What got you started in fly fishing? RV: I got started fly fishing several years ago because a fishing buddy of mine did nothing but fly fishing, and he was very successful in certain types of water that I could not fish with a spinning reel. I really got serious about it when I retired in 2012. I discovered that there are water conditions, as well as the type of water you fish in, that are more conducive to a fly rod more than a spinning rod. H: What is it about the sport that you love so much? RV: The thrill of catching a trout on their natural food source mimicked with a fly, and of course, the amazing colors of the fish and the natural beauty of a stream. H: How does it differ from say, bass fishing? RV: Bass fishing is a great sport if you enjoy riding in a boat and casting all types of lures in a lake, but there is something incredible about wading in a stream and feeling the cool water temperature through your waders as well as the aroma of wild flowers on a spring day. I also love the mountains, and trout fishing provides me with a connection with the mountains. HOME Living

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home recreation

the Helen trout tourney? RV: I fished the Helen Trout Tournament for all but one year of the 25 years that the tournament has been held! That one year was when I was out of state watching my son play college baseball. My son, Josh, fished most of the 25 tournaments with me except when he had college baseball games at Georgia State. We both have caught the $500 grand prize fish over the years as well as numerous other fish valued at $50-$250. learning when they first start fly fishing? H: How did it go this year? RV: Selecting the proper weight and length of RV: The tournament this year was a fly rod is key to learning to fly fish. Also, choosing tough fishing with the rain and cold. a stream that fits the equipment can make it much easier when learning to cast a fly rod. It takes room to There were some great fish caught as well cast a fly rod and even the best fly fisherman with the as some big fish that got away. My son managed to catch a tagged fish that was wrong rod on the wrong stream looks silly. worth $50 and we caught several fish that H: What advice do you have for the novice? weighed 4-5 pounds but were not tagged. RV: Identify what you want to accomplish Overall the tournament was a lot of fun using a fly rod and grow your equipment as you and well run by the Helen Chamber of gain success instead of spending a lot of money Commerce. on equipment that you may never use. There is no H: What’s your favorite fish tale? magic fly fishing equipment that fits everyone. RV: I have been trout fishing for more H: How many years have you participated in than 50 years so there are a lot of fish tales but one that stands out is a trip to the Toccoa river. Russell Vandiver, right, and his son Josh, show A friend and I were fly off a brown trout they recently caught while fishing in late spring and on fly fishing in the Chattahoochee. a very warm afternoon and the fish really were not hitting well at all. A thundershower came up and we went back to the truck to wait until it was over. When we got back in the river, the rain had made the water somewhat dingy but the fish were more active after the shower. There were several fish feeding on insect hatches so we decided to try a dry fly. I hooked a small fish on my first cast and started to retrieve it and all of a sudden a huge brown trout engulfed the small fish on my line and I was able to catch and release a beautiful 5 pound male brown trout. Lesson learned: brown trout love dingy water and small bait fish after a rain.

Tying a fly is an art

H: Why is North Georgia a good place to fly fish? RV: Georgia has 4,000 miles of trout streams! The state DNR (Department of Natural Resources) provides an aggressive “put and take” stocking program which provides an abundance of fish in our trout streams. There is also a very diversified fishery from small to large rivers and streams. H: What do people have the hardest time

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home recreation

Growing with theCommunity

During 2013 Moore’s Wealth Management added their third, fourth, and fifth Fiduciary Advisors to the firm. Brian Moore, Christopher Moore, and Kyle Moore joined Mark Peterson and Scott Moore showing a continued commitment to grow and serve the North Georgia region.

As well as continuing the already successful educational seminars and classes that the firm conducts throughout much of NE Georgia, in 2013 their Gainesville office space doubled in size and they added 2 employees to the practice. Plans for this year are to continue growing the firm at a rate of about 100 clients per year, while also adding two In addition to adding three Fiduciary Advisor more administrative positions throughout 2014. Certifications to their practice last year, they implemented the Rejuvenate Your Retirement Call to get more information on how Scott Moore College Courses now taught at 5 Universities and his team of Fiduciary Advisors can assist you in the area (UNG Dahlonega and Gainesville, in planning and preparing for retirement. They can Lanier Tech in Cumming, UGA in Athens, and be reached at either their Gainesville office at 770Georgia State University in Alpharetta), and also 535-5000 or their Alpharetta office at 678-566implemented Social Security Classes held at 2-3 3590. You can also learn more about the firm at local universities. www.mooreswealthmanagement.com. Investment advice is offered by Horter Investment Management, LLC, a Registered Investment Adviser. Insurance and annuity products are sold separately through Moore’s Wealth Management. Securities transactions for Horter Investment Management clients are placed through Pershing Advisor Solutions, Trust Company of America, Jefferson National Monument Advisor, Fidelity, Security Benefit Life, FC Stone, and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.

Moore’s Wealth Management Staff include: Scott & Carla Moore pictured in the center, from left to right Michelle Moore, Karly Moore, Kyle Moore, Brian Moore, Chris Moore, and Liz & Mark Peterson.

“We help our clients protect their financial future through a fiduciary standard of care that puts their interests first” 26

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MOORE’S WEALTH MANAGEMENT CONTINUES TO EXPAND IN 2014!

home recreation

MOORE’S

WEALTH MANAGEMENT

“Protecting Your Future”

Visit us online at www.mooreswealthmanagement.com

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

210 Washington St NW, Suite 106, Gainesville, GA 30501 770-535-5000

12600 Deerfield Parkway, Suite 100, Alpharetta, Georgia 30004 678-566-3590

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home get to know

Dr. Curtis Malcom: A real Patch Adams Story and photo by Michelle Boaen Jameson It’s an old cliche, but there may be a touch of truth in the saying “laughter is the best medicine.” Dr. Curtis Malcom knows this first hand. The pediatrician recently started practicing in Gainesville and understands what it takes to put a child at ease when treating little patients. It takes a special touch to calm a fussy infant or distract a toddler from an incoming needle. But these are an everyday part of the job for pediatricians. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Malcom was a kicker on the football team and, as a classically trained violinist, played in the school’s orchestra. Malcom went on to earn his medical degree at St. Matthew’s University School of Medicine in Grand Cayman. He recently completed pediatric residency training at Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah and is eligible to serve with the American Board of Pediatrics. Among his many interests are horseback riding and traveling. He’s even climbed Mount Kilimanjaro. But while most of that may impress parents, a sick and scared child could really care less. That’s where Malcom displays his true talents. Malcom, who grew up in Roswell, Ga., with three brothers, credits a trip to the carnival with one of his siblings as sparking the interest in unicycle riding and juggling. “Just like little boys, we convinced Mom and Dad to buy us juggling balls and a unicycle,” Malcom said. I got my first unicycle when I was in second grade. My older brother, Patmon, who was 16, had been riding for a few years and I finally convinced my parents to get one my size. I had already learned to juggle because of Patmon’s, and my other brother Ed’s, interest as well. Second grade is also when the violin lessons started. That’s not something either of my brothers can do though. He honed his skills in college with a group of student jugglers who performed for groups of children with disabilities. Malcom said typically you see people juggling while on a unicycle. He thought it would be fun to throw in the violin as well as a way to combine two things he loved. “Carrying my nieces and nephews while I’m riding has to be the most fun, though. I have six that range in age from 6 months to 8 years old, so some of them are little too big now. My son is 5 months old and I’m looking forward to taking him for rides soon, too. Watching him get his unicycle rolling back and forth while juggling, or more impressive, playing his violin is indeed smile 28

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We wanted somewhere with opportunities for us to serve outside of our professions as well. And we wanted somewhere with good schools, an easy commute, a Starbucks and a Chick-Fil-A. Gainesville was perfect.

inducing even to adults. The staff at Longstreet also get a kick out of his act. Was he teased for his “talents” as a youth? “Well, it's definitely not what would typically impress the girls, for sure. But actually, no I wasn't really teased. When I was little, people were usually entertained, and thought it was cute. I did some volunteer work performing for kids with special needs and it went over pretty well there. Now, when people see me riding around Gainesville, I usually get a few double takes, smiles or a thumbs up. Kids are usually not shy about pointing and expressing their enthusiasm.”

home get to know

Malcom plans on passing his abilities down to his own children someday. “I think its important to find something that you can do with your kids that both of you enjoy. My 5-month-old seems to be entertained when I play the violin for him. And I can't imagine anyone not liking to ride a unicycle. (Malcom laughed sarcastically). I also played football (place kicker) in high school and college, so maybe that will be something I teach them. But, if my kids have other interests, then I'll have other interests.” “And it comes in handy as a pediatrician.” It helps kids forget about the bad and just laugh a little. Once they’ve been entertained, they warm up to Dr. Malcom much easier. So what made Malcom choose pediatrics as his medical practice specialty? “I just enjoy that environment,” Malcom said. “Kids are happy. I like to see them change, grow and develop.” What does he find most appealing about the Gainesville community? “My residency was in Savannah. I'm from Roswell, and my wife is from Louisville, GA. We

both bleed red and black (go Dawgs!) and wanted to stay in Georgia. We wanted to live somewhere that was large enough to provide for all our needs, but small enough that we could really become a part of a community. We wanted somewhere with opportunities for us to serve outside of our professions as well. And we wanted somewhere with good schools, an easy commute, a Starbucks and a Chick-Fil-A. Gainesville was perfect. We've only lived here since mid-December but already feel so welcomed by The Longstreet Clinic and our new church family at First Baptist Gainesville. My wife has never met a stranger and has already made friends with our realtors, at the hair salon, the furniture store, and getting all those “jon jons” monogrammed for our son.” So does he and Christy ever see themselves calling Hall County home permanently? “Oh definitely, the decision to move here and join The Longstreet Clinic was not to be temporary. We prayed about where we should settle and wanted it to be somewhere we would stay to rear our kids, make great friends and grow old. I think we've found it.

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Norman D. Peets DDS, FAGD May | June 2014

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home garden

Patio trends How to create a relaxing outdoor area for the body, mind and soul Story by Amy Moore Photo by Michelle Boaen Jameson

A

s the spring sun warms the days leading to summer, it’s time to enjoy Mother Nature and make a relaxing escape to a serene location. With the right help, that destination can be found in your own yard. Green-thumbed landscape architects can bring to life the dullest patio, terrace or patch of grass with their knowledge of the best ways to make the most use of whatever green — or brown — space you want to refresh or rebuild. The professionals at Gainesville’s Living Art Landscapes believe that trees, flowers, shrubs, and grass all contribute to creating landscapes into “people spaces” that “are functional and provide an enjoyable, comfortable, and entertaining experience for the homeowners and neighbors alike.” From small vegetable gardens to entire outdoor living spaces, landscaping is known to add value to your home as well as your life. Some favorite landscaping trends this year are for both sustainable and low-maintenance designs suited for entertaining and relaxing. 30

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“They’re interested in livable, open spaces that are both stylish and earth friendly,” said Nancy Somerville, executive vice president and CEO of American Society of Landscape Architects, of homeowners. The Fockele Garden Company, based in Gainesville and headed by Mark Fockele, has developed a strong emphasis on sustainable landscaping practices. In its 20-year history, the company has steadily built the capability to provide a wide range of services, including construction of unique and imaginative ponds, streams, and fountains; fences, decks, pergolas, and gazebos; and masonry components such as steps, walkways, walls, and terraces. Each of those brings its own element of style to a landscaping scene, but the most popular outdoor living feature for this year is lighting, according to a survey by the American Society of Landscape Architects. Adding lighting to your landscaped patio provides the opportunity to enjoy the views of all the elements of your design during both day and night. Experts say when it comes to lighting an outdoor space a little goes a long way – using a lower wattage improves aesthetics and often

provides enough illumination for safety. It’s also important to aim the lights and use dimmers or motion sensors so they’re only used when necessary. The best areas to use lighting are paths, entries, gazebos or pergolas, as well as decks and patios, which are ranked at the second most popular landscaping features. Creating that outdoor living space with seating, kitchens and entertainment areas allows you to share the experience of your design with friends and family in a comfortable setting. Add a decorative water element, such as ornamental pools, waterfalls or grottos to the patio area or even a fire pit or fire place to keep warm on those cooler spring and summer nights. Eco-friendly garden elements are sought after, too, as permeable paving and using recycled materials help reduce environmental footprints. Native and drought-tolerant plant and gardens are also very popular for the coming year. To help with that, Clermont’s Full Bloom Nursery is a true nursery with more than four acres of perennials, landscaping shrubs and trees in stock, and six greenhouses. The nursery also has vegetables and herbs and Talavera Pottery, a colorful addition to any garden. HOME Living

In North Georgia


home taste

We scream for ice cream

Mountain Fresh Creamery takes freshness to a new level Story by Sandra Warwick Photos by Michelle Boaen Jameson

On a warm sunny Saturday morning, the week before a much needed spring arrives in winter weary North Georgia, Jennifer Glover awaits the soonto-be arrival of her second child. The soon-to-be new addition to the Glover family has the good fortune of reaping the tasty benefits of the family’s Glo Crest Dairy Farm, located in White County. Mountain Fresh Creamery, the offspring of Glo Crest Dairy, first began to form in the mind of Scott Glover more than 4 years ago. Mountain Fresh Creamery opened its “silo” doors and welcomed eager customers in July 2011. Jennifer and Scott were passionate about bringing their unique spin on dairy products, and their healthier way of life and food, to the community. And they wanted to give back to the community in the “way God intended.” Milk runs through the veins of Scott Glover, as he hails from a long line of dairy farmers. A 4th generation dairy farmer, Scott followed in the dairy farm footsteps of his father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. Scott and Jennifer’s Glo Crest Dairy is home to around 80 cows. Jennifer is a strong believer in the humane treatment of the dairy cows that call Glo Crest home. “You take care of the cows and the cows will take care of you.” she said. The Glo Crest cows are allowed to graze and they are fed healthy meals recommended by their personal dairy farm nutritionist. The Glo Crest cows

Above right: A giant fiberglass cow stands outside of Mountain Fresh Creamery in Clermont. Left:The daily specials at the creamery, which makes homemade ice cream, butter and of course, milk. Far left: A waffle cone full of chocolate ice cream made daily at the creamery. Opposite page: A place for kids to pose as cows and learn how to milk a dairy cow. have no antibiotic or hormone regime. The antibiotic hormone-free cows produce milk that is healthy, natural, tastier and fresh. The milk, and the Glo Crest way of life, is how “God intended” Jennifer emphasizes. Mountain Fresh Creamery’s red “silo” sits across from green country pastures on Cleveland Highway in Clermont. A replica of a Holstein cow, with a bucket underneath, sits out front greeting customers. One smiling man remarks, “That cow is ready for me to milk.” With food safety such a scary issue in our modern world, the folks around North Georgia are flocking to Mountain Fresh Creamery. In the three years since the silo doors opened, the creamery could easily boast being a beloved hot spot. A steady stream of customers file in and out, choosing from an array of delicious goodies. The milk, of course, is a hot commodity. The Glover’s also carry locally made jellies, sausage, Nadine’s pimento cheese, all-natural ground beef from their cows, fresh eggs, buttermilk, fresh cream and, the desired treat of many, hand-scooped homemade ice cream. With warmer days fast approaching, ice cream lovers can rejoice. Jennifer touts salted caramel ice cream as a worthy try for ice cream lovers. She said chocolate is probably the most popular customer pick, while Butterfinger is the newest flavor to tempt the taste buds. The standard flavors — strawberry, vanilla, chocolate, butter pecan — can be enjoyed every day at Mountain Fresh Creamery. You can also buy your ice cream by the pints,

“You take care of the cows and the cows will take care of you.” 32

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quarts, and ½ gallons, to take home and savor. By the end of summer, the Glovers have plans to relocate to a new dairy farm. This one will be located off Clarks Bridge Road on Bowen Bridge Road. School field trips, farm tours, and education will be a big focal point for this farm. The Glovers want people, especially the younger generation, to know that you don‘t just grab your milk from the Ingles or WalMart dairy section coolers; there’s a healthier and natural way to get your milk from farm to family. There’s a process to the milk you drink, the ice cream you savor on summer days, the food you consume and the life you live. There’s a healthy and natural way of bringing these things to fruition. At Glo Crest Dairy Farms and Mountain Fresh Creamery, the Glovers believe in doing things the way “God intended.”

Mountain Fresh Creamery Peanut Butter Ice Cream 1 ½ cups sugar 1 ½ cups creamy peanut butter 1 Pint of Mountain Fresh Creamery Cream Mix all together. Fill to the line with Mountain Fresh Creamery Milk Follow directions of ice cream maker. And enjoy! Mountain Fresh Creamery is located at 6615 Cleveland Hwy., in Clermont. Or you can call 770-983-1MOO. Store hours are Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sundays 1-6 p.m. Twenty five different grocers in and around North Georgia and neighboring states sell Mountain Fresh Creamery Milk. Jaemor, Betty’s Country Store and J&J are just a few. Visit www.MountainFreshCreamery.com for more information.

Celebrating Over

Years of Service 1983-2014

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

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home charity

Gainesville Theatre Alliance Bringing the best actors and shows to Hall

South of Broadway and just north of the fabulous Fox Theatre in Atlanta resides the Gainesville Theatre Alliance, possibly one of the best kept secrets of the northeast Georgia mountains. The theatrical organization – which is on the cusp of its 35th anniversary season – is a collaborative venture between the University of North Georgia and Brenau University. “It is supported by about 15 counties in northeast Georgia that call GTA their home theater. Last year, we produced 15 productions, totaling 156 performances throughout the year,” says Jim Hammond, artistic and managing director. “We performed to a total audience of about 25,000 individuals.” In its decades long history, the alliance has had only two artistic directors – founder Ed Cabell from 1979 to 1989 and Hammond, a student-actor turned leader, from 1990 to present day. “Back when the program started, the two schools were known as Gainesville Junior College and Brenau College. Both schools have grown dramatically since then,” Hammond says. “I was a student in the program when it formed in 1979. Our first show was The Crucible and our next show, ‘Hello Dolly’ opened up the Georgia Mountains Center (which is now the Brenau Center Downtown). “When I was in college, I didn’t think theater would be my future, but I just got hooked by theater and its power to build community.” Community among its actors and supporters at-large has been critical to the organization’s success over the years. “Basically we have two universities that in most other communities would be fierce competitors, but these two universities looked at each other and said, ‘What can we create if we work together,’” Hammond says. “Neither university has a football team. We’re their football team. They support the arts the way many universities support their athletes and athletics. That’s very farsighted. “And then we have an incredibly supportive 34

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Photos courtesy Simpson Custom Photography

Story by Brandee A. Thomas

community that has embraced the alliance for 35 years with sold out show after show.” The community’s unwavering support not only gives student and community thespians the opportunity to hone their crafts, it also gives the greater Hall County community the chance to enjoy bigger and better performances. “We can produce a show that costs $50,000 because we know it will generate $60,000 in ticket revenue. All of that revenue goes back into the program,” Hammond says. “As a result, people in this corridor know they can come to Gainesville and see work that is oftentimes equal in quality to productions they’d see if they travelled further away.” With the intricate sets and superior acting you’d expect on stages in big city productions, it’s no wonder why GTA has received accolades from The Kennedy Center as a “model program” or consistent praise from the Georgia Council for the Arts. Instead of its proximity to other theater programs in Atlanta creating a sense of competition, it has the opposite effect. “The fact that we’re so close to the Atlanta theater community makes it very easy for us to engage outstanding actors and choreographers,”

Hammond says. “We have auditions for every show. Every cast is typically a combination of mostly university students, but we also have community members and professional guest artists. Each one of those (groups) kind of feeds off the others. “It’s an incredible opportunity for our students and community members to be able to walk sideby-side with these wonderful theater professionals, at the same time, the professionals get their batteries charged up by working with our students and community members. It helps to remind them why they got started in the first place.” Although the curtains have closed on the group’s 2013-2014 season, the 35th anniversary season will start off with a few surprising plot twists. First up is the WonderQuest production of “Sleeping Beauty” in the Pearce Auditorium at Brenau in September. WonderQuest is the alliance’s theater for young audiences, and the interesting thing about this production is that it will be set in an Asian garden. “We were looking for a way to produce the show so that it was new and fresh,” Hammond says. “We are going to have these exquisite Asian costumes. The set will be very stylized and HOME Living

In North Georgia


home charity

traditional. Our young audiences will not only see a fresh show, but they’ll also be learning about the customs of that culture.” The MainStage season will begin in November with “Oklahoma,” a theater classic, but a first-time production for the alliance. “’Oklahoma’ is the granddad of all musicals and you’d think that we’d have done it before, but we haven’t,” Hammond said. Other season highlights include productions of “Antigone,” “The Great Gatsby”

and “In the Heights.” “We try to present something for everyone. We want to create a rich diversity of shows and theater experiences for our students and our community audience,” Hammond says. “The upcoming season will have something as traditional as ‘Oklahoma’ and then something as cutting edge as ‘In the Heights,’ which has a hip-hop feel to it and won a Tony Award on Broadway about seven years ago.” For the student actors involved, the GTA experience goes beyond simply

learning lines for a role in a play or musical. It’s also steeped in technical www.gainesvilletheatrealliance.org training and skill building. “Sleeping Beauty” Sept. 26Students can earn a variety Oct. 4, Brenau University Pearce of credentials, from a Auditorium, Gainesville. certificate in technical theater to a master’s level “Oklahoma!” Nov. 4-15 in teaching degree in theater Brenau’s Hosch Theater education. “When I came on in “In the Heights” Feb. 10-21, 2015 1990, there were 3 faculty in Brenau’s Hosch Theater and staff members and 27 theater majors. Now, there’s 17 faculty and staff and 150 “Antigone” Feb. 13-21, 2015 in theater majors between the UNG’s Ed Cabell Theatre two universities. The beauty of our program is that if you “The Great Gatsby” April 7-18, sat in on a rehearsal or class, 2015 in UNG’s Ed Cabell Theatre you wouldn’t be able to tell a Brenau student from a University of North Georgia student,” Hammond says. “They are one team and work together. “Everyone comes together with an incredible sense of this being one program with a common mission to celebrate life through the arts.”

Upcoming GTA shows

A new chapter begins...

The Waterford at Oakwood is an Assisted Living and Memory Care community that offers services including: • 24-hour staffing • Medication management • Exercise programs • Recreation and entertainment programming

• Bathing, dressing and grooming assistance • 24-hour access to licensed nurses • Spacious floor plans with full sized kitchenettes

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4251 Hudson Drive, Oakwood, GA 30566 • 770-297-6900 • www.capitalsenior.com/waterfordatoakwood homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

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home calendar

May Through October “Four Seasons” Atlanta. May through October. Atlanta Botanical Garden, 1345 Piedmont Ave., Atlanta. 404-8765859. May 1 “Imaginary Worlds: A New Kingdom of Plant Giants” Atlanta. May through October. Atlanta Botanical Garden, 1345 Piedmont Ave., Atlanta. 404-876-5859. May 1 The Brenau University Learning and Leisure Institute registration 4 p.m. Brenau University’s Thurmond McRae Lecture Hall, 625 Academy St., Gainesville. 770-538-4705, www.brenau.edu/ lifetimestudy. May 1 Wisdom in a Workshop 6:30-7:30 p.m. Crawford Long Museum, Jefferson. 706-367-5307, www.crawfordlong.org. Supplies and instruction included. $10 members, $15 nonmembers. May 1-11 “The Fiddler on the Roof ” 8 p.m., Sunday matinee 3 p.m. May 1-4 and May 8-11. Buford Community Center Theatre, 2200 Buford Highway, Buford. $8 to $25. bufordcommunitycenter.com, 770945-6762. May 2 Arcade Fire 7:30 p.m. May 2. Aaron’s Amphitheatre at Lakewood, 2002 Lakewood Ave., Atlanta. ticketmaster.com, 800-653-8000. May 2-3 Big Canoe Tour of Homes and Marketplace 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 2, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 3. Various places in Big Canoe. Benefits a variety of local charities. $25. bigcanoetour.org, 36

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706-268-3203. May 2 Hall County Relay For Life Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 1-800-849-RACE, 770967-6143, www.roadatlanta.com. May 2-May 18 Georgia Senior Follies: The Golden Age of Television Tuesday, Friday, Saturday: 8 p.m.; Sunday matinee, 3 p.m. May 3-4 Art in the Garden 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Bowen Center for the Arts, 334 Ga. 9 N., Dawsonville. 706-216-2787, www.dawsonarts. org, info@dawsonarts.org. Gardenrelated arts, spring plants, children’s activities. May 3-4 Young Harris Spring Arts & Crafts Show 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Mayors Park, Ga. 76, Young Harris. 706-400-8014. Free. May 3 Cornelia Casino Night Fundraiser 7-10 p.m. Cornelia Community House, 601 Wyly St.. $25 includes fun money, prize raffle tickets, drink ticket, finger foods. 706-778-8585, bht@corneliageorgia.org, www. explorecornelia.com. May 3 “I Hear America Singing” community concert. 7 p.m. 4833 Suwanee Dam Road, Suwanee. Free. gwinnettband.org, sugarhillschoir.org, 404-375-7882. May 3 Museum Day 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. N.E., Gainesville. A collaborative program with Quinlan Arts Center, Interactive Neighborhood for Kids and Elachee. Special Culture and Heritage Exhibit by students of Woods Mill Academy. Hands-on activities. 770-297-5900, negahc. org.

May 2 Hall County Relay For Life Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 1-800-849-RACE, 770967-6143, www.roadatlanta.com.

May 3 Nickel-Dime 5K and 10K 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rain date on May 10. Yellow Creek Community Club, 6617 Yellow Creek Road, Murrayville. $5 All proceeds donated to St. Paul’s United Methodist Church’s outreach program. 770-503-1826,

www.tonyandmarti.com/yccc, Tony@tonyandmarti.com. May 3 Sam Skelton Quintet 8 p.m. Smithgall Arts Centers, 331 Spring St., Gainesville. $30. theartscouncil.net, 770-534-2787. HOME Living

In North Georgia


LAKEVIEW ACADEMY is an independent, co-educational, college preparatory day school for grades K3

through 12 located in Gainesville, Georgia and is accredited by SAIS-SACS. Lakeview has families representing thirty countries, and foreign language is taught in every grade. Technology is integrated into each discipline, with sixth through twelfth grade students using their own laptops. All students from three year olds to seniors have a variety of elective opportunities from which to choose, including the school’s award-winning drama and arts programs. Further, over 75% of Lakeview’s Middle and Upper School students participate in at least one school-sponsored sport, as well as a fine arts activity. While Lakeview’s 591 students are offered the opportunity to excel at a higher level, an academic support program is offered to students at all grade levels when extra help is needed. Our Class of 2014 comprised of 55 students, has to date been offered over $1.3 million in non-HOPE scholarships and has 100% college placement.

Congratulations to Lakeview Academy’s Class of 2014! Class of 2014 College Acceptances

We partner with you for your child’s success

Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College (3) Academy of Art University Appalachian State (2) Armstrong Atlantic State University (2) Auburn University (13) Belmont University Brenau University Brewton-Parker College Brigham Young University - Hawaii Chattahoochee Valley Community College Clemson University (2) College of Charleston (2, including one to Honors College) Columbia College - Chicago (2) Converse College - Honors Program Emory University Florida Atlantic University Florida State University (3, including one to Honors College) Furman University Georgia College and State University (8) Georgia Institute of Technology (8) Georgia Southern University (5) Georgia State University Hampden-Sydney College Kennesaw State University (5) Louisiana State University Miami University Montana State University (2) New York University Northeastern University Oklahoma State University Parsons The New School for Design Piedmont College Purdue University (3) Randolph College Roosevelt University Chicago College of Performing Arts Samford University (2)

Savannah College of Art and Design (3) Sewanee: The University of the South (3) State University of New York at Stony Brook Stetson University Toccoa Falls College Truett McConnell University of Alabama (11, including one to Honors College) University of California, Berkeley University of California, Irvine University of California, San Diego University of Central Florida (2, including one to Honors College) University of Colorado (2) University of Florida University of Georgia (19, including 4 to Honors College) University of Illinois, Urbana Champagne (3, including one to Honors College) University of Miami University of Mississippi (5) University of Montana University of Northern Colorado University of North Georgia (2) University of Oklahoma University of Richmond University of South Carolina (5, including one to Honors College) University of the Arts - London College of Fashion University of the Arts London - Wimbledon College of Art University of Virginia (2) University of Washington Valdosta State University (3) Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (2) Webster University (2) Western Carolina University (4) Wofford College Worcester Polytechhnic Institute Young Harris College (2)

Our of 2014 2014has hastotodate datereceived received $1,326,760 ininnon-HOPE OurClass Class of $1,406,760 non-HOPE Scholarships Scholarships and these awards and recognitions: 1st place Hall County Optimist Club Essay Contest •Class A One Act State Champions • Class A One Act State Best Actor • Two Class A One Act State All Cast awards • One Act Region Champions • One Act Region Best Actress • One Act Region Best Actor • One Act Region Best Supporting Actress • One Act Region Best Choreography • One Act Region Best Stage Crew • Georgia High School Musical Theater Awards - Shuler Hensley Awards for Best Show-stopper • Georgia High School Musical Theater Awards - Shuler Hensley Awards for Best Sound • GHSA State Literary Boys Dramatic Interpretation State winner (2 years-in-a-row) • GHSA State Literary Girls Dramatic Interpretation State winner (3 years-in-a-row) • GHSA State Literary Boys Quartet 2nd Place • All State Chorus member • One of 12 students in state awarded scholarship at ThesCon • Two seniors members of the ThesCon All-State Show • 2nd Place Best in Show at 11th Annual Charles J. Thurmond Youth Art Scholarship Awards art competition • 1st and 3rd Place for 12th grade at 11th Annual Charles J. Thurmond Youth Art Scholarship Awards art competition • 1st Place and Honorable Mention for American Society of Marine Artists (ASMA), and Young Marine Artist Search (YMAS) Awards at 11th Annual Charles J. Thurmond Youth Art Scholarship Awards art competition • 1st place in the “An Artistic Discovery: Congressional Art Competition” and work will be exhibited at the U.S. Capitol in D.C. for one year starting this summer • Girls Varsity basketball finished the regular season ranked 1st in Region 8A North and played in Sweet 16 play-offs • Two seniors made Lanierland Basketball All Tournament Team • Senior placed 8th at State cross country championships • Seniors placed 1st and 6th at Chestatee War Eagle Invitational cross country meet • Senior named boys State Runner of the Week for Region 1A by MileSplitGA • One senior named to All Area Volleyball Team and another to Second Team • Senior Varsity football player named The Times Boys Athlete of the Week

w w w. l a k e v i e wa c a d e m y. c o m 796 Lakeview Drive, Gainesville, GA 30501 • 770-531-2602

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home calendar May 10 Movies Under the Stars.“Saving Mr. Banks” Activities 7 p.m., movie at 8:30 p.m. May 10. Town Center Park at the intersection of LawrencevilleSuwanee Road and Buford Highway in Suwanee. suwanee.com/ whatsnew.events.php. May 10 Tugaloo Bird Walk 9-11 a.m. Tugaloo State Park. Lavonia. Clark Jones, president of the Oconee Rivers Audubon Society, will lead a walk that is open to birders of all skill levels. Bring a water bottle and wear sturdy shoes. $5 parking. 706-356-4362. May 10 Movies Under the Stars “Wreck-It Ralph,” 6 p.m. Hancock Park, Dahlonega. www.dahlonega. org. May 10 “Mother’s Day High Tea & Cake” $20. Helen Arts and Heritage Center, 25 Chattahoochee Strasse, P.O. Box 390, Helen. 706-878-3933, helenartshc@gmail.com. May 10-11 Gardens for Connoisseurs

Tour Various private gardens throughout Atlanta. $25 in advance, $30 on the days of the tour and $20 for members of Atlanta Botanical Garden. Benefits Atlanta Botanical Garden. atlantabotanicalgarden.org/media. May 11 Northeast Georgia History Center Family Day 1-4 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. N.E., Gainesville. Free. 770-297-5900, www.negahc.org, jcarson@brenau. edu. May 11 Dahlonega Art Trail 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Live artists at work, downtown Dahlonega. Chestatee Artists, 706-867-8059, lrayneri@windstream.net May 13-July 3 President’s Summer Art Series Reception 5:30-7 p.m. May 13. Brenau University’s Simmons Visual Arts Center and Sellars Gallery. Free. 770-534-6263, amurphy2@ brenau.edu. May 13 Northeast Georgia History Center History Forum

7 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. N.E., Gainesville. Musical heritage. $3 for nonmembers. 770-297-5900, www. negahc.org, jcarson@brenau.edu.

Woods, but at Buck Shoals, a nearby unopened state park. Call for directions. Occurs every third Saturday through September. $5 parking. 706-878-3087.

May 13 Spelling Bee 2014 and Alliance for Literacy 7 p.m. Brenau University’s Pearce Auditorium, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. Adults $10, children $5. 770-531-4337, www.alliancefor literacy.org.

May 17 Full Moon Party at Sunset Cove featuring Excite! Lake Lanier Islands Resort, Buford. lakelanierislands.com, ilovetheocve.com

May 14 Full-Moon Suspension Bridge Hike 8:30-10:30 p.m. Tallulah Gorge State Park - Tallulah Falls. 1.5 mile hike down the stairs, across the suspension bridge and on the rim of the gorge under the full moon. Register in advance. $5 per a person $5 parking. 706-754-7981. May 17 Youth Fishing Days at Buck Shoals 8 a.m. - noon, Smithgall Woods State Park - Helen. Children and their special “big person” can fish in a lake stocked with catfish, bass and bream. Fish caught can be kept. Bring own bait (no corn) and rods. This event is not at Smithgall

May 17 Rubber Duck Derby Clarks Bridge Park, 3105 Clarks Bridge Road, Gainesville. Starts at $5. Benefits Boys and Girls Clubs of Hall County. rubberduckderby. com, 770-532-8102. May 17 Movie Under the Stars 8:30-9:30 p.m., Braselton Park, Harrison Street, Braselton. www. BraseltonEvents.com. Free. May 24 Summer Music Series — Bluegrass 8-9:30 p.m. Tugaloo State Park - Lavonia, The Georgia Highlanders will be at the park’s Beach Pavilion. This family friendly event is free, but the band will pass a hat for donations. $5 parking. 706-356-4362.

May 17 Rubber Duck Derby Clarks Bridge Park, 3105 Clarks Bridge Road, Gainesville. Starts at $5. Benefits Boys and Girls Clubs of Hall County. rubberduckderby.com, 770-532-8102.

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home calendar May 23-25 The Atlanta Coin and Currency Expo The Gwinnett County Fair Grounds, 2405 Sugarloaf Parkway, Lawrenceville. Free. May 24 Bavarianfest 6-11 p.m. Helen Festhalle, 1074 Edelweiss St., Helen. $7, free to active military and veterans. Live music, dancing, beverages, food. Helen Chamber of Commerce, 706-878-1908, www.helenchamber.com. May 24 Styx and Foreigner 7 p.m. Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre, 2200 Encore Parkway, Alpharetta. $19.50 and up. ticketmaster. com, 800-745-3000. May 26 Northeast Georgia History Center Memorial Day Parade and Open House 10 a.m. Green Street in Gainesville. Free admission to the center, located at 22 Academy St. N.E. in Gainesville, following parade. 770-297-5900, www. negahc.org, jcarson@brenau.edu. May 23-25 Memorial Weekend Celebration Lake Lanier Islands Resort, Buford.lakelanierislands. com May 30 Cornelia Summer Concert Series, John King Band 8 p.m., Cornelia Depot. www.explorecornelia.com. May 31 Hoschton Heritage Arts Council Bluegrass & Barbecue 6:30 p.m. Hoschton Depot. $15 per person email: hhac55@yahoo.com.

June

June 5 2014 Master of Interior Design/Master of Fine Arts Portfolio Exhibition The High Museum, Stent Family Wing, Robinson Atrium. 4-6 p.m. Master of Interior Design graduates will display their portfolios. The reception is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For information and to RSVP call 770-534-6284 or email sconn@brenau.edu. June 5–22 “Tarzan” Tuesday, Friday, Saturday: 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinee: 2 p.m. The Cumming Playhouse homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

101 School St., Cumming. 770-781-9178 www. playhousecumming.com

Poor Richard’s

June 6-8 WERA Cycle Jam Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 800849-RACE, www.roadatlanta.com June 13-15 The National Auto Sport Association Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 800849-RACE, www.roadatlanta.com June 6 Starlight Concert & Fireworks UNG Gainesville Campus CEPA-Amphitheater Area. 4:30-8:30 p.m. Music provided by Back In Time Band. There is a $10 per car and $20 for large vans/ buses parking fee with proceeds benefiting University of North Georgia scholarships. Gates open from 4:30-8:30 p.m. Rain date: Friday, June 13. ung.edu June 7 Hall Dragon Boat Challenge Lake Lanier Olympic Venue, 3105 Clarks Bridge Rd., Gainesville. www.lckc.org, 770-287-7888. The event will benefit the Hall County chapter of Special Olympics Georgia. June 7 Hoschton Heritage & Arts Fest 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hoschton Depot. Artists & artisans will sell their items. Artists and photographers may also enter a show and competitions. The theme is a Salute to Native American Art. Donna Bailey, local bead, gourd and pottery artist will be featured and Michael Jacobs, an award winning recording artist, will be one of the featured entertainers. Info on http://www.hoschtonheritageartscouncil.com/ or email hhac55@yahoo.com. June 7 Close Encounters of the Bird Kind Amicalola Falls State Park Lodge - Dawsonville. Meet the feathered legend and other non-releasable birds of prey during this entertaining program. Meet at the Lodge Lobby. $5 parking. 706-265-1969. June 7 Siege on Fort Yargo Trail Challenge and Adventure Race 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fort Yargo State Park - Winder. Teams of two or three will travel on a mandatory course with a three-hour limit. Teams will face multiple challenges and obstacles as they travel through the course..The race will include trail challenge, mountain biking and a six-hour cutoff for the Adventure Race. www.siegeyargo.trailblazerar.com. Fee plus $5 parking. 770-867-3489.

R

ichard and Bonnie LeCain moved to Gainesville over 40 years ago and opened up Poor Richard’s in 1977.Over the years they have expanded. They are still located at 1702 Parkhill Drive N.E. in Gainesville. Currently they can accommodate 220 in their restaurant. Poor Richard’s is a true American cuisine restaurant and offers a great selection on the menu. They offer Steak, seafood, fish, ribs and prime rib, chicken, veal and combo platters.- 14 appetizers from which to choose-soups, salads, sandwiches-specialty drinks, featured wines And More! The cooks at Poor Richard’s make all the sauces and dressings from scratch and age their beef for at least 60 days for tenderness and flavor. The seafood arrives twice a week from Florida and the produce is delivered daily to ensure freshness. Poor Richard’s is open five days a week. Tuesday – Thursday 5pm to 10pm Friday & Saturday 5pm to 11pm The lounge, accessible through the rear entrance, opens Tuesday through Friday at 4:30p.m Reservations are accepted Tuesday through Thursday, for parties of six or more on Friday and Saturday. Richard and Bonnie invite you to experience Poor Richard’s. “Come See The Difference!”

770-532-0499 1702 Parkhill Drive N.E., Gainesville, www.prgainesville.com

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home calendar July 12-13 SCCA Double SARRC The Sports Car Club of America Region will host multiple events at Road Atlanta in 2014. Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 1-800-849-RACE, www.roadatlanta.com June 13 Twilight Hike 8-9 p.m. Amicalola Falls State Park and Lodge - Dawsonville.Join Amicalola’s naturalist for a twilight hike to explore the beauty of our waterfall, the sounds of the mountain’s nocturnal inhabitants and the history of Amicalola and some of the local moonshine lore. $3 or $10 for family. $5 parking. 706-344-1500. June 14 Kids Day at the Park 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.Smithgall Woods State Park - Helen. Hands-on exhibits in outdoor sports, recreation and environmental education give kids a chance to learn ways to stay healthy and appreciate the great outdoors. Kids can earn a badge through active participation. Archery, animal exhibits, compass games, air rifles, stream critters and more. 706-878-3087.

June 14 Southern Invitational Regatta Lake Lanier Olympic Venue, 3105 Clarks Bridge Rd., Gainesville. www.lckc.org, 770-287-7888.

8 p.m. Arts Council Smithgall Arts Center Lawn. $35 Adults, $28 Students;$32 Seniors (65+), $80 Series (3 performances); $320 Table (8 people) www.TheArtsCouncil.net

June 14 Movie Under the Stars 8:30-9:30 p.m., Braselton Park, Harrison Street, Braselton. www.BraseltonEvents.com. Free.

June 21 Youth Fishing Days at Buck Shoals 8 a.m. to noon Smithgall Woods State Park Helen, Children and their special “big person” can fish in a lake stocked with catfish, bass and bream. Fish caught can be kept. Bring own bait (no corn) and rods. This event is not at Smithgall Woods, but at Buck Shoals, a nearby unopened state park. Call for directions. Occurs every third Saturday through September. $5 parking. 706-878-3087

June 14-15 Full-Moon Suspension Bridge Hikes Saturday, 10 p.m. Sunday, 10:15 p.m. Tallulah Gorge State Park - Tallulah Falls, 1.5 mile hike down the stairs across, the suspension bridge and on the rim of the gorge under the full moon. Register in advance. $5 plus $5 parking. 706-754-7981. June 20 and 27 Summer movies under the stars 7-10 p.m. Place: The Historic Cornelia Depot. Free. Concession stands with goodies for sale at each location. corneliageorgia.org June 20 Arts Council Pearce Series: The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

June 21 Canoe Races 10 a.m. to noon, Tugaloo State Park - Lavonia. Celebrate the first day of summer with canoe races. There will be multiple races for ages 12 and up. Racers will be divided into age groups and we will end with a family canoe race. Prizes will be given for the winner of each group. Arrive by 9:30 a.m. to sign up for the race. All equipment is provided. $2 plus $5 parking. 706356-4362.

Highly skilled medical professionals offering the most advanced spinal treatments available

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May | June 2014

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COMING SOON: OFFICES IN BRASELTON! 2695 Old Winder Hwy, Suite 150 Braselton, GA 30548 HOME Living

In North Georgia


home around town Belk Girls’ Night Out March 27, 2014 Local ladies were treated to goodies, fashion advice and facials during the Belk Girls’ Night Out event at Lakeshore Mall in Gainesville.. Scavenger hunts took shoppers around the store with prizes worth up to $1,500 being handed out. Music and refreshments as well as one-on-one consultations concluded the evening of relaxation.

Photos courtesy Belk

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home around town

Jackson County 2014 Fur Ball March 28, 2014 The sounds of 1920 tunes as well as hip classics from other decades brought the Braselton-Stover House to Speak Easy life during “The Great Catsby.� The Fly Cats provided the music for the evening. The Humane Society of Jackson County fundraiser found babes decked out in their feather boas, headbands, beaded frocks and pearls and the guys sporting classic threads from gangster days.

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Exceptional Medical Care with a Human Touch Gastroenterology Associates of Gainesville is the largest gastroenterology practice in Northeast Georgia. Our highly qualified physicians utilize cutting-edge technology to diagnose and treat a wide variety of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, pancreas, and gallbladder. Many people find discussing concerns related to the digestive tract embarrassing. Our physicians and staff understand the sensitive nature of digestive problems and are specially trained to handle any questions and concerns.

We ARE the experts.

Main Office 2324 Limestone Overlook Gainesville, GA

770-536-8109 Toll Free 1-877-683-9410

Braselton Office 5875 Thompson Mill Rd. Suite 310 Hoschton, GA Lavonia Office 355 Clear Creek Pkwy., Suite 1007 Lavonia, GA

Habersham Office 638 Historic Hwy 441 N Suite B Demorest, GA Dawsonville Office 108 Prominence Court Dawsonville, GA

www.GastroGainesville.com


home around town

Brenau University’s 2014 Gala March 29, 2014 Brenau University opened its new “Manhattan Gallery” at the recently renovated Brenau Downtown Center in Gainesville, a key component will be a showcase of the works from the famed Dorothy and Herbert Vogel collection of modern art. The gala was attended by Dorothy Vogel and featured live music by Nu Soul and refreshments. The gala was also a celebration of Brenau University’s 135th anniversary.

Photos courtesy Brenau University

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home around town

University of North Georgia second annual Scholarship Ball 2014 March 28, 2014 The “Great Gatsby� themed gala was held at the Forsyth Conference Center and attented by Cumming Mayor H. Ford Gravitt who recieved the UNG Presidential Leadership Award. Live music and dancing rounded out a night of fundraising with nearly $1M raised for student scholarships from 2013 to 2014.

Photos courtesy UNG

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everyday sounds…

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digital hearing aids expires 6/30/14. Not to be combined with any other offer.

www.hearGA.com homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

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home around town

Quinlan Visual Arts Center’s 36th annual Gala Art Auction March 1, 2014 The extravagant black tie event had both a live and a silent auction. Gala 2014 artist guest of honor was nationally renowned artist Gregory Johnson of Cumming. Johnson’s work was most recently featured in the Art Basel in Miami Beach where 75,000 international artists, collectors, gallerists, curators and art enthusiasts were in attendance. The event featured a catered meal and was the opening of the 2014 exhibition season, juried by acclaimed art appraiser Robert Morring of Atlanta

Photos courtesy QVAC

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home around town

Gateway Domestic Violence Center annual fundraiser April 18, 2014 An evening to benefit Gateway Domestic Violence Center was held at the Chattahoochee Country Club in Gainesville with silent auctions, dinner and entertainment.

Photos by Times staff

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Produce

Baked Goods Plants Fridays • 4-7 p.m. May 16 - October 10 On Harrison Street • Downtown www.DowntownBraselton.com

Home Living in North Georgia magazine  

May/June 2014

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