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Michelle Votruba MindFrames™ survey completed September 3, 2011

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The Revelations of Self-Knowledge What makes you different? How do people see you? Who you are has a lot to do with your personality. Your habits of mind and behavior, called mindframes, are deeply ingrained from years of dealing with the challenges of life and work. Based on forty years of brain research, MindFrames analyzes eight patterns of thought and action to give you an in-depth, completely individualized description of your personality.

Michelle Votruba

Your advanced MindFrames analysis gives you an unprecedented level of self-awareness. The revelations and recommendations in this report will help you identify and take advantage of your strongest patterns, learn how to stretch beyond your comfort zone, and achieve more success in all areas of life. First, check Your Mindframe Scores. Notice which mindframes are in your comfort zone. These are the most often used, most visible features of your personality. To find out what your scores mean, start with Your Winning Combination and Your Way of Doing Things. Then consider what may be easy or difficult for you in life and work. For more revelations about your personality, check Focus and Flexibility. Curious about possible “watch-out” areas? Check if you have any overused mindframes or underused mindframes. Four Success Strategies gives you a commonsense way of using all this information. It suggests how to take advantage of your strengths and work around the difficult areas. For more information and other helpful programs, see Related Resources. Here are the report sections in sequence: 1. Your Mindframe Scores 2. Your Winning Combination 3. Your Way of Doing Things 4. What’s Easy, What’s Difficult: LIFE 5. What’s Easy, What’s Difficult: WORK 6. Focus and Flexibility 7. Do You OVERUSE Any Mindframes? 8. Do You UNDERUSE Any Mindframes? 9. Summary: Four Success Strategies 10. Related Resources


1. Your Mindframe Scores The thinking part of your brain has four main areas. Each area functions differently, producing its own unique kind of thinking and behavior. The four ways of thinking and four ways of behaving are called mindframes. These eight mindframes are a part of every healthy brain. Michelle Votruba

Yet, no two people think and act exactly alike. You probably use all eight mindframes every day, but you use some areas more often than others, which contributes to your one-of-a-kind personality. Your most visible characteristics are the result of your highest-scoring mindframes. Your eight mindframe scores are based on the answers you gave. For privacy, your scores are kept confidential. Only you can access them—and only in this report. A higher score isn't necessarily better—it simply indicates a greater use of the mindframe. A lower score means you engage the mindframe less often. Michelle, your comfort zone includes:

98 97 94 94 90 88

These mindframes are OUTSIDE your comfort zone:

84 80

The rest of this report explains what your scores mean. Look for these revelations: Why you think and act the way you do How to take advantage of your strongest characteristics Ways to compensate for the uncomfortable areas


2. Your Winning Combination When you’re aware of your strengths, you can use them more deliberately. Your leading personality strengths involve your two highest-scoring mindframes. Michelle, your highest-scoring mindframe is

SOCIABILITY.

Michelle Votruba

SOCIABILITY involves seeking contact and initiating casual conversation; expressing feelings; making friends; enjoying the company of others; acting and reacting spontaneously; and getting involved in group activities. Because it’s so comfortable for you, you’re likely to use SOCIABILITY first and more often than any other aspect of thought or behavior. As a result, it will be the most visible characteristic of your personality. Your second highest-scoring mindframe is

SENSITIVITY.

SENSITIVITY involves noticing and remembering faces, images and personal details; experiencing emotions; delighting in the here and now; making instinctive judgments; deciding based on likes and dislikes; and working with your hands. When dealing with one of life's challenges, you'll usually begin by using both SOCIABILITY and SENSITIVITY together in a characteristic pattern we call "your winning combination," which involves these behaviors: Getting people excited about doing something fun together Staying in touch with your feelings as you experience what's happening around you Recommendations: Think of your SOCIABILITY-SENSITIVITY combination as a major strength. Study these mindframes. Become more aware of the activities associated with them. Confidently get involved in situations that require these activities. Acquire more knowledge and skills related to your winning combination mindframes.


3. Your Way of Doing Things Every person has a highly individualized way of communicating, doing tasks or handling one of life’s many challenges. In all these situations, people employ aspects of learning, problem solving and decision-making. Michelle Votruba

Learning may involve two kinds of information. The first is perception, which deals with specific images, feelings, facts and data. These are formed in the back part of the brain. The second is the meaning of perceptions, such as basic principles, concepts of the future, personal beliefs and values, which are formed in the front part of the brain. Problem solving on the left side of the brain is based on reason: language-based, critical and logical. Problem solving on the right side of the brain is based on feel: nonverbal, creative and intuitive. All this brainwork contributes to decision-making. Decisions can lead to more thought or to action. Each of the eight mindframes involves a different combination of learning, problem solving and decision-making. For example, when you use the PROACTIVITY mindframe, you focus on meaning based on reason while in the action stage of decision-making. You would use PROACTIVITY to explain why it's smart to buy a new car instead of making repairs to the car you already have. By contrast, SOCIABILITY involves a much different combination of learning, problem solving and decision-making. It focuses on perception based on feel while in the action stage of decision-making. You would use SOCIABILITY to express your enthusiasm for a spur-of-the-moment decision to go somewhere to have fun. When you look at your highest-scoring mindframes in sequence, you can see your approach to learning, problem solving and decision-making: In Your Comfort Zone Learning

Problem Solving

DecisionMaking

Frequency of Use

SOCIABILITY

Perception

Feel-based

Action

Very often

SENSITIVITY

Perception

Feel-based

Thought

Very often

CHARISMA

Meaning

Feel-based

Action

Very often

INSIGHT

Meaning

Feel-based

Thought

Very often

LOGIC

Meaning

Reason-based

Thought

Often

ORDER

Perception

Reason-based

Thought

Often

Learning

Problem Solving

DecisionMaking

Frequency of Use

PROACTIVITY

Meaning

Reason-based

Action

Sometimes

CONTROL

Perception

Reason-based

Action

Sometimes

Mindframes

Outside Your Comfort Zone Mindframes


3. Your Way of Doing Things (cont'd) Your way of learning is to focus on "perception" information two ways—SOCIABILITY and SENSITIVITY—before you get interested in "meaning" information, using CHARISMA. So while you're likely to focus often on practical, experience-based, here-and-now details, you'll also pay attention to analysis, explanations, ideas and projections. Your way of problem solving is to rely first on four feel-based mindframes—SOCIABILITY, SENSITIVITY, CHARISMA and INSIGHT—before you engage a reason-based mindframe, using LOGIC. So while you'll almost exclusively use instincts, intuition and hunches, you may not balance this way of thinking with a structured, calculated approach to dealing with problems. Your way of making decisions is to be action-oriented. That means you usually prefer to get things in motion right away and think about what's happening as you move forward. You'll tend to do something primarily one way—SOCIABILITY—before you think about what you've done using the SENSITIVITY mindframe. While you usually begin with action, you'll also evaluate what you're doing in a timely manner. Conclusions and recommendations: When sizing up a situation, you usually do a good job of paying attention to details and checking your information; plus, you typically consider the big picture and the future implications. Consider both: "Do I have a grasp of the facts?" and "Do I know what they mean?" When dealing with a challenge, you tend to rely on feel-based problem solving a great deal. Clearly, this is an uncommon strength, but taken to an extreme, this tendency could keep you from thinking rationally and being practical. Trust your ability to operate based on logical, ordered thinking, as well as sensitive, intuitive thinking. When making up your mind, you use a good balance of thought and action. To be effective, you need to think things through. Still, you don't want to put off doing something until it's too late. Ask yourself: "When is the best time to take action? Have I given this enough thought?"


4. What's Easy, What's Difficult...in your LIFE A happy, fulfilling life doesn’t just happen. You make it happen. When activities suit your personality, they feel natural and comfortable. You do them willingly, and you do them well. On the other hand, activities that don’t suit you may seem tedious. If these things are important, and you avoid them or don’t give them your full attention, you could create problems for yourself and others. Consider the following typical life activities, which are organized according to your MindFrames scores. While you're likely to find the most often used activities comfortable, you'll probably be interested in only a few of the less frequently used ones. Very often SOCIABILITY Relating to outgoing, fun-loving people; initiating friendly conversation; talking about personal experiences and feelings; telling jokes and stories; lending a helping hand; spontaneously getting involved in parties, shopping and trips; participating in team sports that require quick reactions. SENSITIVITY Relating to gentle, caring people; being loyal to friends; sympathizing with their needs; noticing the little things; reacting instinctively; showing emotions easily; observing and learning by trial and error; going with what feels comfortable; remembering sensory impressions; seeking hands-on activities that involve the senses, such as gardening, cooking, crafts, etc. CHARISMA Relating to people who have similar values and beliefs; sharing wisdom and insights; discussing moral or ethical issues; encouraging friends; devoting time to worthy causes; helping create change or improve conditions; collaborating with committed people; speaking with animation and flair to promote and persuade; performing in front of audiences. INSIGHT Relating to sincere, imaginative and intuitive people; appreciating culture; listening to understand behavior, motives and feelings; reflecting about right and wrong; enjoying stories about character; seeking insights from art, literature and religion; trusting hunches; spending time in meditation or prayer; pursuing improvement of mind, body and spirit. Often LOGIC Relating to serious, realistic people; listening for the purpose; evaluating thoughts before speaking; analyzing cause and effect; seeking answers; wanting to know why—explanations and principles; reading books and articles to acquire new knowledge; enjoying stories about science, technology or problem solving; playing games of strategy.


4. What's Easy, What's Difficult...in your LIFE (cont'd) Often ORDER Relating to down-to-earth, practical people; remembering names, dates and other details; being precise and thorough; following rules and instructions; assembling, constructing and fixing things; taking a step-by-step approach; learning to use tools, gadgets and machinery; participating in activities that use such gear. Sometimes PROACTIVITY Relating to accomplished, professional people; speaking with a purpose; cultivating a network of supporters; discussing business and scientific issues; sharing opinions and theories; debating opinions, concepts and ideas; explaining and critiquing; negotiating; operating with a goal and a plan; playing competitive games to win. CONTROL Relating to bold, action-oriented people; speaking in a matter-of-fact way; staying calm, cool and collected and handling emergency situations; taking charge and going with what works; doing what's required and being on time; being the expert in using equipment, gadgets and technology; showing others how to do practical tasks; pursuing physically challenging activities.


5. What's Easy, What's Difficult...in your WORK Do you love your work? Many people do. When a job fits your personality, work feels comfortable and natural—even enjoyable. You look forward to it, stay with it and perform at your best, even in adverse conditions. But when you do work that doesn’t suit you, you may wish you were doing something else. You may not stretch to do the hard things, stick with a task, or do your best. Consider the following typical work activities, which are organized according to your MindFrames scores. While you're likely to find the most often used activities comfortable, you'll probably be interested in only a few of the less frequently used ones. Very often SOCIABILITY Greeting and making introductions; initiating conversations; maintaining relationships; making business calls and visits; coordinating and hosting social events; giving personalized service; serving as announcer or master-of-ceremonies; performing on stage; generating enthusiasm and excitement; participating in group activities and team sports. SENSITIVITY Remembering personal details; providing care for animals and people; raising plants or crops; creating comfortable work spaces; driving vehicles; packing, loading or storing items; doing construction work; preparing food; using simple tools; working with materials; making crafts; playing a musical instrument; practicing and participating in individual sports. CHARISMA Directing or giving artistic performances; facilitating discussions and cooperation; communicating a vision for the future; brainstorming ideas; building support for ideas; giving inspirational talks; taking a stand for beliefs; persuading people to commit to action; facilitating, coaching and encouraging others; building harmonious relationships; resolving conflicts. INSIGHT Imagining future improvements; making ethical and aesthetic judgments; arranging workspaces and displays; creating works of art; writing fiction; designing objects, concepts or layouts; drawing sketches, pictures, designs or graphics; interpreting statements, behavior, moods or feelings; conducting interviews. Often LOGIC Determining the significance of events; identifying trends; creating explanations; evaluating opinions; defining problems; designing systems; doing scientific research; making logical analyses, judgments and decisions; creating strategies, goals, objectives and action steps; evaluating performance; writing essays and reports; developing lesson plans.


5. What's Easy, What's Difficult...in your WORK (cont'd) Often ORDER Following rules, instructions, schedules, maps, blueprints or diagrams; inspecting for compliance; reading gauges and meters; researching facts; collecting, sorting and storing information; organizing workspaces; performing calculations; managing money; writing technical reports and proofreading text; operating and repairing devices and machines. Sometimes PROACTIVITY Starting projects and ventures; organizing work units; assigning goals and priorities; implementing plans; managing systems; negotiating agreements and contracts; conducting meetings; giving convincing justifications or arguments; presenting formal briefings or speeches; explaining problems and theories; teaching scientific subjects. CONTROL Taking charge, assigning responsibilities and coordinating activities; giving orders; taking action in emergency, fast-paced or high-pressured situations; enforcing rules and regulations; directing movement or traffic; instructing in skills, tasks or procedures; giving status reports and constructive criticism; describing practical or technical features.


6. Focus and Flexibility Depending on how close your eight mindframe scores are to each other, your personality will be very focused or very flexible—or somewhere in between. The fewer the mindframes in the comfort zone, the more focused the personality. The more mindframes in the comfort zone, the more flexible the personality. Michelle, you have six mindframes in your comfort zone. This indicates a VERY FLEXIBLE personality. SOCIABILITY

Very often

SENSITIVITY

Very often

CHARISMA

Very often

INSIGHT

Very often

LOGIC

Often

ORDER

Often

Because you find a broad range of activities appealing, you’re more versatile than most people. It’s easy for you to enjoy doing a variety of things—even shift quickly from one kind of task to another. Because of the flexibility of your personality, you relate easily to different kinds of people. Flexibility is beneficial when life requires doing different kinds of activities. Unlike specialized work, “generalized” work involves a variety of tasks. Examples of activities that require flexibility are nursing, parenting, teaching, coaching, leadership, supervision, sales and customer service. Recommendations: Seek activities that require the generalist—someone who enjoys doing a variety of things. Also, recognize the times when you have to focus on one kind of activity for a sustained period. A typical day can sometimes challenge you to focus on only one or two mindframes. Use self-discipline to stay focused on a task until it’s completed. To get an important job done, “just say no” to distractions, no matter how appealing. Otherwise, you may not be able to concentrate on just one thing. You might give up too quickly or start doing something else before the task is done.


7. Do You OVERUSE Any Mindframes? Your highest-scoring mindframes can become personal strengths, if you consciously use them to your advantage. But if you rely on your strong suit too much, it can become a liability. You might begin using your favorite mindframes in most cases, even when other mindframes would be much more effective.

Michelle, the mindframes you're most likely to OVERUSE are your highest-scoring mindframes: SOCIABILITY

Very often

SENSITIVITY

Very often

SOCIABILITY involves seeking contact and initiating casual conversation; expressing feelings; making friends; enjoying the company of others; acting and reacting spontaneously; and getting involved in group activities. Because you very often use SOCIABILITY, you may: Let fun activities distract you from fulfilling requirements Do what feels good without thinking about the consequences Find it hard to set a budget and stick to it Make impulsive decisions Fail to consider how suddenly changing your plans will affect others Get involved in so many activities that you neglect some of your relationships Have trouble being on time and exercising self-discipline Tell lengthy stories when others need you to get to the point When you're upset, react with an outburst of emotion SENSITIVITY involves noticing and remembering faces, images and personal details; experiencing emotions; delighting in the here and now; making instinctive judgments; deciding based on likes and dislikes; and working with your hands. Because you very often use SENSITIVITY, you may: Focus on the present so much that you fail to consider what could happen in the future Favor pleasant activities over important tasks React emotionally in a crisis Let negative feelings escalate without dealing with the problem Have a hard time talking logically about touchy issues Avoid difficult people and conflict situations Accept what people say without questioning their reasons or motives Try to maintain harmony instead of confronting an important issue Depend too much on the approval of others to feel good about yourself Recommendations – Make a concentrated effort to: To make your point, first identify what it is and organize your arguments in support of it Take a "time-out" and calm down before expressing anger or frustration Identify your most important goal for the day and get it done before starting anything else Create a step-by-step plan to achieve what you really want Tell others why you disagree and what you want Compare the pros and cons of different options before making a decision


8. Do You UNDERUSE Any Mindframes? Life can surprise you with unexpected situations and challenges, large and small. You may need to engage all eight mindframes several times a day. But will you actually do it? If your lowest mindframes scores are significantly lower than your lead mindframe score, you may find them uncomfortable to use. At such times, you could fail to respond appropriately or do what needs to be done.

Michelle, none of your lowest-scoring mindframes was significantly lower than your lead mindframe, so you shouldn't find any of them that difficult to use. All these mindframes will involve a stretch that doesn't require much effort. Therefore, you're not likely to underuse any one mindframe. This reflects a special kind of strength in your personality, because no matter what situation you encounter, you're likely to feel little or no hesitation using any of the eight mindframes.


9. Summary: Four Success Strategies Your advanced analysis contains a great deal of feedback and numerous recommendations. To fully appreciate what it says about you, you may need to read through it again and give the analysis some careful thought. The biggest benefits will come from action. You may want to stretch outside your comfort zone from time to time to be effective and successful, but that’s going to require a concentrated effort. It isn’t easy to go against ingrained patterns of thought and behavior. Here are some tips that will help you implement the report’s recommendations.

1. Rely on your winning combination. It will always feel natural and comfortable to rely on your lead mindframe, SOCIABILITY, supported by your second mindframe, SENSITIVITY. Recommendations: Think of your winning combination—in fact, all comfort zone mindframes—as a source of strength. Confidently seek activities that require these mindframes. 2. When it counts, stretch to do the hard things. Whether you’re feeling relaxed or you’re in a high-stress situation, it’s natural to avoid anything that seems like a difficult stretch. But if you do only what’s comfortable, you may neglect something important. Recommendations: For someone with a flexible personality such as yours, it can be a stretch to focus—to follow through with a single activity until it's completed. If your success depends on it, concentrate on using only the required mindframes, even if it isn't your habit to do so. Learn to recognize this kind of stretch. Think about what you have to do differently. Think about what you’ll do and how you’ll have to do it. 3. Spend more time with people who aren’t like you. Life is like a party. If everyone brings ice cream, it won’t be much of a party. You may find it easy and comfortable to relate to people who think and act the way you do. But people who are different can support you with a diversity of styles, talents, perspectives and experiences. Recommendations: Encourage your friends to take MindFrames and get their free report. Discuss each other's feedback and check out their comfort zones. Seek out a variety of people. Benefit from what they bring to the relationship. Learn more about the eight mindframes. You'll be amazed how much this knowledge helps you understand the people around you. 4. Take action to become more effective. For success-oriented people, self-awareness is the first step to self-improvement. To use what you’ve learned about handling the challenges of life and work, first review the recommendations in this report and decide which ones apply to you. Then consider putting what you want to do in writing, and actually do what you’ve decided to do.


Michelle Votruba

10. Related Resources The Brain, MindFrames and the Framicon A simple, colorful explanation of how brain research paved the way for MindFrames and the Framicon. The Eight Mindframes When you can?t remember what a specific mindframe means, here?s the big picture, with examples. Frequently Asked Questions Whenever you have a question about MindFrames, here are dozens of answers. ?Communicating? Match-up Get a special one-on-one analysis of how you communicate with people you know. Identify areas of common ground and significant differences?and how to improve your relationship.


Revelations Report