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portfolio. RIBA Part II Student Portfolio

Michal Scieszka e: michal.scieszka@gmail.com i: www.michalscieszka.com t: (+44) 07916942207


Contents ________________________________

Curriculum Vitae

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Work Examples In Practice Photography Hand Drawings Printworks Live Build

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Curriculum Vitae

Education

Interpersonal

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University of Strathclyde, Glasgow 2011 - September 2012 (expected)

PgDip in Advanced Architectural Design (completed) / MArch in Advanced Architectural Design (ongoing) ■■

Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg August 2011 - January 2012

MPARC: Architecture + Urban Design, Student exchange

Erasmus Intensive Programme Workshop 2012 - Structures in Building Culture II: Skin and Bones. The workshop was based around developing an understanding of wicker as a construction material from its production through to existing uses for construction, then moving on to a direct experimentation at various scales with the material. ■■

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National University of Singapore January 2009 - May 2009

BSc (Hons) in Architectural Studies - Student exchange ■■

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow 2006 - 2011

Work Experience

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University of Strathclyde, Glasgow - Architecture Department Library | Library Assistant January 2012 - June 2012 / September 2010 - May 2011

Responsible for supervising a small departmental library during the day, dealing with queries from staff and students. Daily tasks included: cataloguing journals and architectural titles which had arrived; organising my colleagues working hours; dealing with lending and returns. ■■

Terry Farrell & Partners, London | Architectural Assistant September 2009 - July 2010

Involved in the continuing development and production of various materials for the Chelsea Barracks Competition, Nine Elms / Embassy Gardens and Bishopsgate Goods Yard Masterplans, as well as production information and detailed planning application drawings for the Lots Road Residential Development in London. ■■

SMC Jenkins & Marr, Glasgow | Architectural Assistant May 2008- October 2008

Involved in drafting production information drawings for the Glasgow Langside College project and layouts for two apartments in the Glasgow Cook Street Housing project. ■■

Antique Shop, Slupsk | Furniture Renovator July 2005- September 2005 / July 2006- September 2006

Carried out furniture renovations, daily supply of renovation materials, negotiations and sales, furniture auctions.

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Curriculum Vitae

Gdansk University of Technology + Gareth Hoskins Architects | Participant - Live Build Project - Gdansk June 2012

Live build project participant. Recladding and redesigning an old railway waggon to become an outdoor working studio for architectural students. ■■

Architecture+Design Scotland Workshop | Student Mentor - The Lighthouse - Scotland’s Centre for Design and Architecture, Glasgow November 2010

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Mentoring Elective | Student Mentor - University of Strathclyde, Department of Architecture Academic year 2007 / 2008

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Olivier Grossetête’s People’s Tower - Merchant City Festival | Preparation / Participant - Live Build Project Glasgow July 2012

Involved in the preparations of a 20 m temporary cardboard tower built as part of the Merchant City Festival in Glasgow.

BSc (Hons) in Architectural Studies - First Class Honours Adam Mickiewicz High School, Slupsk 2003 - 2006

Structures in Building Culture II: Skin and Bones - Wicker Workshop | Participant - Live Build Project - Gdansk August 2012

The aim of the Mentoring elective programme was to return advice and peer assistance to Year 1 Architecture students, simultaneously making effective contact with the true interests and concerns of the subject. Furthermore, it gave me an opportunity to test and improve my organizational and team working / leading skills. ■■

Lighthouse Educational Workshop | Student Mentor - The Lighthouse, Glasgow October 2008

Related to the Gareth Hoskins monograph show opened in September 2008 in The Lighthouse - Glasgow, aimed at young people (aged 16+), who are thinking of pursuing architecture at FE level.

Exhibitions __________________________________________________ Nordic Exodus: Moving Kiruna, The Lighthouse Gallery, Glasgow | Project Exhibited July 2012 A View From Abroad: An International Exchange Exhibition, University of Strathclyde - Main Gallery, Glasgow | Exhibition Organizer, Exchange Work Exhibited April 2011


Awards

Publications

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2012: Association for Project Safety: National Student Designer Awards 2012 - Housing for Seniors

2012: Nordic Exodus: Moving Kiruna Project Published in Blueprint Magazine - Best of Student Shows 2012 (blueprintmagazine.com)

2012: Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland Architecture + Design Scotland Urban Design Award - Nordic Exodus: Moving Kiruna - winner

2012: Nordic Exodus: Moving Kiruna Project Published in Building Design Online (bdonline.co.uk)

2012: Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland Architecture + Design Scotland Sustainable Design Award - Nordic Exodus: Moving Kiruna - winner 2011: Glasgow Institute of Architects 4th Year Design Prize Architecture Department in Porto 2010: London Architecture Festival: Make Architects Dream House Competition - winner 2009: Northern Design Competition - Architectural Design category finalist- Leeds 2008: Glasgow Institute of Architects Design Commendation - Second Year 2007: Glasgow Institute of Architects Design Commendation - First Year

2012: Student Profile published in University of Strathclyde’s International Leaflet - Engineering and Engineering Insight 5 2011: To Learn: Architecture Department in Porto project published in University of Strathclyde Architecture Department’s Convenient Benches (convenientbenches.tumblr.com) 2010: Wayang Kulit: Shadow Puppet Theatre project published in Convenient Benches and University of Strathclyde Architecture Department’s Paper space Yearbook 2009: To Rest: Drymen Youth Hostel project published in Northern Design Competition Magazine 2009: To Inhabit: Merchant City Housing project published in Paper space 2008: West End Dance Studio, Drymen Youth Hostel projects published in Paper space

2004: Nationwide Water Machines Tournament finalistPoznan, Poleko 2004, Agenda 21

2007: Edinburgh Façade project, published in Paper space

Certifications

Languages

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University of Strathclyde - BSc (Hons) in Architectural Studies | First Class Honours

Polish- native language English- fluent, spoken and written

FCE, CAE, IELTS Language Certificates | Cambridge ESOL -

References

British Council

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Computer Skills

David Reat

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Year 5 Studio Tutor, Lecturer - University of Strathclyde, Glasgow david.reat@strath.ac.uk

AutoCAD, SketchUp, Vray, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Wacom Bamboo, Windows Movie Maker, MS Office

Interests __________________________________________________

Brian McGinlay Architect at NORD (nordarchitecture.com) Year 4 Studio Tutor - University of Strathclyde, Glasgow brian@nordarchitecture.com

Sport – I enjoy a range of both individual and team based sports. In particular water sports, and have obtained sailing and lifeguard certificates. Art - I have an interest in art, not in any particular movement, but enjoy an eclectic range of artists. Travelling – I have travelled to many countries, to experience different cities and cultures. I have chosen to study abroad, in Scotland and on exchanges in Singapore and Göteborg as I believe this will give me a broader architectural education as well as widening my cultural understandings.

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Work Examples


Work Examples


Wiston Lodge MArch in Advanced Architectural Design University of Strathclyde Year 5 - Summer 2012 _______________________________________________________________

An overall development plan for Wiston Lodge analysing the existing conditions, what is currently proposed and the potential for what could be implemented within the overall estate. This master’s project should have an impact on the wider community in that it will be a proposal for a charity, Wiston Lodge, designed through an engagement with them, and will hopefully have a long term value to it. It should also help strengthen the connection between the University and Wiston Lodge and it has the potential to connect into the Year 1 curriculum which involves a design project at Wiston Lodge. This overall development plan shows the potential that exists at Wiston Lodge, which if tapped could enhance the overall viability of the whole estate.

Wiston Lodge: Current and Proposed Uses Analysis

A

B

C __________________ A. Permanent Development B. Semi-permanent / Changing C. Temporary

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge


RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Moon Prism

The UK has some of the largest areas of Dark Sky in Europe, and Wiston is situated in one such area of Dark Sky. In order to exploit this geographical phenomenon, as well as the currently unused tower of Wiston Lodge, we propose to create an installation comprising: a moon light prism on top of the tower which will refract moon light onto plates imbedded within the lawn of the formal gardens at the front of Wiston Lodge. As the light is refracted through the prism, it will hit a different plate at the differing stages of the moons monthly progression. This installation will tie into the experiential learning, upon which the activities at Wiston are based, and create a facility which has the potential to begin a new activity/learning programme at Wiston. These plates will have no impact on the existing functions or activities which occur on the formal lawn, only revealing their function at night. Looking into the night sky and contemplating the mysteries of the cosmos can be extremely thought provoking, and could create an additional dimension and scale to the personal development work which takes place at Wiston. As well as being educational in a straight forward way, teaching those who interact with it about the lunar cycle, the installation also provides scope for the consideration of oneself as part of a much bigger picture and pondering the significance of an individual in an infinite universe which could be an extremely useful learning tool.

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge

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Waxing Gibbous

Waxing Crescent First Quarter

90O

45O

135O 0O

Full

New

180O 45O 135O

Waning Gibbous

90O

Third Quarter

Waning Crescent

Lunar Phase Angle Diagram

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Crannog

A Crannog is a bronze-age wooden structure set upon an artificial island. This interpretation of the typology combines the functions of a Teahouse, Bandstand, Fireplace, Pier and Meeting Place into one compact but very flexible structure. Through a combination of sliding / folding doors and walls, an object is created which can easily be transformed for a variety of uses in all seasons. The form and materiality is respectful of the local agricultural vernacular, and the fenestration makes for a highly flexible pavilion, the openings extending the space, providing shelter, restricting / framing views or completely shutting down to become an enclosed private object depending upon the way and combination in which they are used. When used as a bandstand or space for the performance of music, it can be entirely open so that the performance is an audio visual experience or the bandstand can be only partially open so the performers are hidden from view, meaning an isolated audio experience for the audience, changing the dynamic of how they perceive the performance. With the folding walls of the structure fully opened they become an extended pier to the Crannog allowing further interaction with the pond and increasing the number of people who can be present in the structure.

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge

The construction is comprised of a timber frame, used in the round, timber clad facades with large timber sliding / lifting openings and a pitched slate roof with timber cupola on top. This small intervention creates a highly visible marker within the landscape and helps to define an area which is currently lacking in character or features of any significance. The entry sequence to the Crannog changes depending on the season, in summer access must be gained by negotiating a number of stepping stones leading from the edge of the pond to the structure, whereas in winter, once the pond has frozen, you may freely walk to and around it, and access it from any direction across the frozen water.


Crannog As Proposed

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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People’s Tower / Nomadic Sauna

People’s Tower Each year Wiston Lodge hosts a summer music festival, where a temporary set up of tents and stages is put in place for the duration of the festival. This is the perfect opportunity to add to this event through the creation of further temporary structures which need a large group of people in order for them to be realised. One such example of this type of structure is the cardboard tower which we built in the Merchant City.

Nomadic Sauna The concept for the sauna relates directly to the idea that buildings do not necessarily have to stay in one place, but that they can move or change as the situation or season dictates. The sauna would be placed next to the lake, in close proximity to the main house, wooden cabins and camping field. This is a facility which they are already interested in building at Wiston, but which could be much more than they

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge

had imagined. The sauna allows people to come together in a space where all the social boundaries of everyday life are forgotten, and this small, intimate sauna would facilitate a level of bonding between those using it which might not otherwise occur. In summer the sauna rests on the edge of the pond, which one can wade into before or after using the sauna, unobtrusive in the landscape, having a visual connection to the Crannog across from which it is situated. In winter when the pond freezes, the sauna is moved onto the ice where the relationship between it and the pond as well as the crannog changes, a hole can then be cut into the ice creating a seasonal plunge pool, completely altering the experience of the sauna from other times of the year, one can move freely across the ice between the sauna, ice plunge pool and the warmth of the fire inside the Crannog. The sauna would be of a solid timber wall construction using Sitka from within the estate, painted green to become unobtrusive within the landscape during most of the year and slowly revealing itself and the seasons start to change. As the landscape turns from the greens of spring and summer to the reds and gold of autumn and the greys and white of winter, it is only then as the sauna moves within its site that it becomes an event in itself, sharply contrasting against the winter backdrop.


Sauna As Proposed

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Cocoon

Applying the knowledge of Wicker and weaving techniques learned from the Wicker Workshop and in order to utilise the growing wicker plantation which is in place at Wiston currently, we propose the creation of some Wicker Cocoons, which should act as an informal meeting spot providing a place to sit / lay but within the openness of nature. Situated under the shade of a large mature tree, in close proximity to both the Pond and Tipi Site the intervention is close to existing activity areas which it can compliment, but far enough away from them to have its own separate distinct character as a place. Underneath the canopy of the large tree is the ideal place to stop, rest and reflect. The use of wicker for the construction of these cocoons allows the creation of fluid organic forms which blend into the surrounding natural landscape and which create a real feeling of an interaction with nature whilst being man made. This intervention creates spaces to reflect upon and contemplate either alone or as part of a group, the activities through which one has been learning / developing at Wiston Lodge. This organic form in a natural setting allows an informal interaction and communication which is not always possible in a more formal space. Being with others within a wicker structure can foster togetherness, by being

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge

connected and protected by one structure, or if alone the wicker structure can stimulate feelings of security as it encloses you from your surroundings whilst still allowing you a connection with them due to the transparency that it is possible to achieve with the material.


1

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RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Love Seat / Bonding Bridge / Swing

The Waterfall within the woodland at Wiston Lodge has a unique character, created by the mix of water, pine trees and native broadleaf trees which occur there. This unique area of natural beauty should be celebrated with some small interventions which enhance the usability of this area in relation to the learning programmes of the estate. A bonding bridge where two different paths are connected and after ascending some steps two people from these different paths are connected, a love seat which creates an intimate space where two individuals can connect and are orientated towards each other and also to nature and a swing over the waterfall which can be used alone or with another individual. These small interventions facilitate a connection not just between oneself and one’s surroundings, but also between two individuals, fostering trust and bonding, between individuals and with one’s self and nature. These structures and how they have been placed together in the landscape tie directly into the personal development and team building exercises which take place at Wiston and serve to enhance this beauty spot within the woodland.

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge

Through the use of unobtrusive natural materials sourced from within the woodland for the construction of these interventions, they can blend into the natural landscape and have a minimal visual impact whilst having a maximum functionality.


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RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Fungus

This intervention proposes a series of elevated vertical platforms set amongst the trees of the Sitka Plantation, adding to the existing adventure learning activities at Wiston, but within a different setting.

Changing from simply a platform in the trees to a habitable space as and when required, these platforms are a flexible adaptable intervention that can dramatically change the landscape at times throughout the year at Wiston Lodge, their many uses inhibited only by imagination.

The dark sterility of the Sitka Plantation with its strong vertical axis is transformed through the placement of these horizontal elements, which can be climbed up to and between and offer a unique vantage point from which to view the woodland. The ascent to and connections between the different platforms create scope for many different forms of learning to take place some requiring only individual effort and others requiring team work in order to succeed in moving between or to the highest of the platforms. The erection of a temporary tent structure over these elevated vertical platforms, transforms them into completely different objects almost instantly, changing not only the function but also visual impact of the intervention completely.

1

The temporary fungus like forms create a space, in which a new way of camping out can be experienced, elevated up above the ground and under the cover of the temporary tents set up over these elevated platforms. 2

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge


RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Camera Obscura / Wind Chimes / Maze

Camera Obscura

Maze

The camera obscura gives an inverted view of the landscape, literally turning the world upside down. This visual experience should provoke one to consider light, image and reality. Bringing an inverted image of the outside inside an enclosed room is an almost surreal event, you are completely enclosed yet you have this almost magical view to outside, is what you see real? It allows the opportunity to reflect upon the way in which we relate to our surroundings and how by looking at a place or situation from a different place or perspective our view of it can be dramatically altered, linking to Wiston’s experiential learning programme.

We were interested by the complex Victorian patterns which occur in the tiles of the listed entrance hall of Wiston Lodge, and wanted to incorporate pattern into an intervention, but in a useful way. This coupled with the ideas of getting lost in order to find one’s self and being challenged by choice, brought forth the idea of a maze. Mazes are mysterious, and people are fascinated by the unknown. By entering a maze you are consciously entering the unknown.

Wind Chimes Based on the concept of music and interaction as a catalyst for conversation and play, this intervention is at times, a nonvisual object. Hidden in the forest, it is revealed through the creation of sound either by the action of natural movement caused by the constant variation in wind conditions, or through interaction by people, allowing those who discover it to become performers and audience members.

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2

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge


Maze As Proposed

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Storyteller’s Hut

The storytellers hut adds to the existing learning programmes as well as other recreational activities which currently occur at Wiston, it has been designed specifically as a space for meeting within and telling stories, however a degree of flexibility has been designed into the plan of the space so that a maximum range of further activities may occur there also. The material treatment of the building has been carefully considered in order to blend into its surroundings, respect the vernacular architecture and to allow the use of materials sourced on site. It is designed to incorporate 12 people plus a storyteller and has been designed to incorporate a wood burning stove as well as being fully insulated, allowing it to be used all year round, creating a much needed space for the activities which Wiston Lodge currently engages in. The design for the Storytellers hut is based loosely on the traditional Scottish Cottage or Bothy, although because of its simple form it is also reminiscent of any house or cottage in a story or tale, allowing it to become whatever the storyteller and their audience wants it to be.

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge

The expressed chimney like element of the structure is in fact an aperture allowing a shaft of light to illuminate the storyteller inside the structure when in use during the day, and at night affording a view to the moonlit sky. The fenestration within the design has been treated in such a way as to make the space as flexible as possible when telling stories, individual window shutters can be opened or closed to frame a particular view, all can be opened to allow in light or all can be closed to isolate you from your surroundings. Through the use of dead hedges, made of cuttings from coppicing and pollarding from forestry activities at Wiston, an intervention can be created which is not only a maze, but also a habitat which encourages bio-diversity.


Storyteller’s Hut As Proposed

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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A

B

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__________________ 1. Roof 12 mm plywood in 600 mm width sheets internal finish 100 x 50 mm / 150 x 50 mm Timber portal frame 150 mm EPS Thermal Insulation infill 12 mm OSB in 600 mm Width sheets Bituminous Waterproofing Building Paper 25 x 50 mm Batons and Counter Batons 600 x 300 mm Untreated Sawn Larch Shingles 2. Wall 12 mm plywood in 600 mm width sheets internal finish 100 x 50 mm / 150 x 50 mm Timber portal frame 100 mm EPS Thermal Insulation infill 12 mm OSB in 600 mm Width sheets UV Resistant Wind Diffusing Building Paper 25 x 50 mm Batons and Counter Batons 100 x 20 mm Untreated Sawn Larch Boarding 3. Floor 12 mm Marine Grade Plywood in 600 mm Width Sheets 50 mm EPS Thermal Insulation 100 x 50 mm Timber Joists 100 mm EPS Thermal Insulation infill Bituminous Waterproofing Building Paper

Detailed Section / Plan_Scale 1:50

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Work Examples - Wiston Lodge


Structural Frame

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Nordic Exodus: Moving Kiruna PgDip in Advanced Architectural Design - Thesis Project Chalmers University of Technology | University of Strathclyde Year 5 - 2011 / 2012 Joint: Michal Scieszka & Dale Smith

_______________________________________________________________

The municipality of Kiruna has a clear political will to firmly hold on to and improve Hjalmar Lundbohm´s vision of Kiruna as a model city. The founder of Kiruna wanted to build a modern community adapted to the environment, the people and the special climate of Kiruna. The masterplan aspires to this idea and attempts to deal with these unique conditions which exist within Kiruna. The New City Centre is positioned to the East of the Old City and is enclosed on its limits by existing and proposed infrastructure such as the repositioned E10 motorway. The two buildings from the old City Centre which are to be moved to the new proposed one are significant buildings to the City and take position as such. Both are in elevated positions within the masterplan and act as visual markers which the citizens of Kiruna can readily identify. The positioning of these two buildings is an attempt to begin to create a context for the new city. Through an analysis of the existing city, it was possible to identify and retain its character, adapting successful ideas and repairing those which are less successful. A rationalisation of the existing City Centre has been proposed and the masterplan has been formed around two axes which intersect each other, the green route and the high street. These two axes will be the beginning of the new city, built first, linking the two repositioned buildings and being the points from which the new city will grow.

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Work Examples - Nordic Exodus: Moving Kiruna


2144 4946

Low: 0 - 30 pers / ha (64%) Medium: 30 - 100 pers / ha (31%) High: 250+ pers / ha (5%)

1

Comparison of Densities: Old City Centre / New City Centre

7090

Total Masterplan provision (+10%)

Gallery Town Hall Fire Station Police Station Commercial Library University School Hotel Office Sports Facilities Church Hospital

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Comparison of Ground Floor Uses: Old City Centre / New City Centre

Residential Community Transport Recreational

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Iron Ore Mine Green Route Major Vehicular Route E10 Motorway Repositioned E10 Virgin Nature Space Industry Airport Ski Centre Cable-Car Golf Club Tourism Economy Diversification

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Kiruna as Proposed - 2050

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City Centre Vehicular Axis

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Main Pedestrian Axis: City Hall / Public Square / High Street / Public Green Spaces

Work Examples - Nordic Exodus: Moving Kiruna

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Green Route Axis

Cable-car Axis: Airport / New City Centre / Remnants of Old City / / Ski Centre


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City Centre Strategy - Axonometric View

Kiruna Masterplan As Proposed

10

50

100

200m

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Housing for Seniors MPARC: Architecture + Urban Design Chalmers University of Technology Year 5 - 2011 / 2012 Joint: Michal Scieszka & Dale Smith

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Kiruna has an ageing population, and there is currently a shortage of certain types of housing, particularly Housing for Seniors. The municipality is beginning to address this issue by commissioning housing of this nature and so this was an appropriate typology for the first new blocks to be built within the New City Centre and to test and prove the drafted masterplan. The Housing for Seniors comprises two blocks, linked at first floor level, within the proposed New City Centre and in immediate proximity to the relocated Church of Kiruna. A strong contextual approach to the building as a whole has been developed, , where the use of timber cladding has been chosen as a consistent building material to emphasise the character of the site and to visually link the two separate blocks through a common envelope. The materials are established and long term and require little maintenance externally. Both blocks of housing are on plinths which link them to the recreational green route, deals with the change of level within the site and which contain harmonious commercial functions: nursery, offices, retail and gym, which as well as being revenue generators can serve to enhance the lives of the residents.

When considering the life cycle of housing and the fact that in the future there is a very real possibility of seniors needing to be provided with living assistance, thus the apartment layouts and zoning of the apartments have been tailored in such a way as to be as flexible as possible without compromising the primary functions of spaces. Individual apartment layouts have been zoned in such a way that the route from bedrooms to the toilet / bathroom is the shortest and most convenient route possible. Furthermore, one can enter both the bedroom and bathroom spaces without having to directly enter the living space, thus allowing residents to have help provided to them within their home without compromising their privacy. Larger 2 bedroom apartments have a separate access to one of the bedrooms from the main circulation, as well as a direct access between the bedroom and bathroom. Additionally all rooms are fully accessible with widened doors and an apartment layout with the minimum possible number of turns required in order to negotiate between spaces. A combination of both coloured doors and individual inset niches have been proscribed within the design in order to create individual visual markers within the corridor like streets and thus make identification of individual apartments easier for the occupants

Also contained within this plinth level is all the back of house functions, refuse storage, parking, plant rooms and delivery entrance. The commercial and back of house functions within the plinth on which the housing sits are delineated through their materiality being clad in precast concrete elements, which lends the building visual weight and density and helps root it to the site giving it a sense of permanency. The massing of both blocks has been sculpted in order to minimise overshadowing, maximise southerly aspects and to maximise views, towards the repositioned Church of Kiruna, proposed Public Square and Recreational Route.

Section CC

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Work Examples - Housing for Seniors, Kiruna


Massing - Minimise Overshadowing / Maximise Southerly Aspects

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6

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9

FIRST FLOOR

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1. Glazed walkway(s) linking blocks 2. Flexible communal event / activity space / day-care centre 3. Inhabited wall dividing / defining communal space 4. Kitchen 5. Communal dining room / café space 6. Communal residents living room 7. Semi-public courtyard open to green route 8. Private resident’s courtyard 9. Staff room / changing facilities 10. Public toilets 11. Entrance threshold 12. Wet room with draught lobby 13. Outdoor activity storage 14. Cleaners store 15. Horticulture areas 16. External storage 17. Fire escape 18. Link form private courtyard to green route 19. Gym 20. Gym reception / staff room 21. Resident’s entrance to gym reception 22. Resident’s reading room overlooking public square 23. Street like corridor with inset niches 24. Apartments 25. Guest Apartments 26. Arts Studios facing Green Route

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C

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First Floor Plan

Back of House / Delivery / Car Parking

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Exit Fire Lined Exit Core Dry-riser Plant Room Refuse Chute

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Ground Floor Commerical Uses / Housing Foyers

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GROUND FLOOR 3

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3

1. Kindergarten 2. Entrance to gym ( shared vertical circulation with housing) 3. Parking 4. Plant room / Electrical Sub-station 5. Binstores 6. Nursery office 7. Nursery lunch room ( linked with elderly communal kitchen above) 8. Service lift 9. Parking entrance / exit 10. Housing foyer / reception / main entrance 11. Housing office 12. Newsagents / convenience store 13. Retail unit 14. Vertical circulation core (housing) x 2 15. Office Space - rental

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9 5

2

Second Floor Plan

Double Height Communal Space Overlooking Nursery and Recreational Route

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Semi-public Courtyard View Facing North _____________ A. Zinc sheeting B. Timber shingles C. Timber boarding D. Precast Concrete Cladding

A

B

C

D

E

Internal View of Double Height Communal Space Looking Torwards Church of Kiruna

Snow / Climate / Roof / View studies

F

Materiality of Blocks Relates to Vernacular (Church of Kiruna / Existing residential)

G

Window shutters - Low Maintenance: Back Insulation / Sun Blackout / Colours Relating to Vernacular / Fibre-cement Panels on Timber Frame With Insulation Infill

________________________________ 1. Roof Construction: 2 mm zinc sheeting Bituminous vapour barrier 50 mm impact sound insulation 10 mm plywood 50 mm thermal insulation 10 mm plywood 60x500 mm I-Joists with 350 mm thermal insulation / servicing infill 10 mm plywood 115 mm thermal insulation 15 mm gypsum plasterboard finish Inset LED lights

2. Faรงade construction: 2 x 20 mm Sawn Larch Boarding (Board on board vertical cladding) 25 mm battens 25 mm counter battens UV Resistant wind diffusing building paper, complient with BS 4016 300 mm EPS thermal insulation between timber studs with thermal break 10 mm Gypsum Plaster board 3. Floor Construction: 15 mm double-ply hardwood flooring 65 mm screed over under floor heating pipes 20 mm EPS impact sound insulation 50 mm EPS thermal insulation 300 mm Reinforced Concrete Floor Slab 400mm Servicing Void with 20 mm EPS impact sound insulation 10 mm Gypsum Plasterboard ceiling finish 4. Glazing: Window System with thermally divided aluminium sections and Triple glazing (0.60 W/m2K) / Toughened safety glass specified where required

Penthouse Apartment Internal View

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Work Examples - Housing for Seniors, Kiruna

Detailed Section


Private Residents Courtyard View Facing North

Birch-ply Sectional Model

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Church of Kiruna PgDip in Advanced Architectural Design - Thesis Project University of Strathclyde Year 5 - 2011 / 2012 Joint: Michal Scieszka & Dale Smith

_______________________________________________________________

Kiruna church built in 1912 and designed by Gustaf Wickman, is an important building both locally and nationally whose movement is inevitable. Because of this cultural significance, it would be inappropriate to modify it in any significant way when it is moved. Positioned prominently within the new masterplan for maximum visibility; it can be seen when entering the new city centre from the remnants of the old City, from the motorway when entering the City and from the cable car when coming from the airport. To become compatible with the architectural principles which we have applied to the planning of the new city centre, the building would have to have added complimentary functionality. The addition under the church is sympathetic without being apologetic, it replaces an important function within the town which is being lost – music performance / production spaces. It conforms to the principles of rethinking typologies and layering functions, and is a re-imagination of the traditional church crypt / vault. The vaulted brick arches of the music performance / production spaces, reflect the character of the underground mine, the existing arches within the Kiruna church and the traditional architecture of church under crofts. By using a variation on the fill of the brick joints it is possible to alter the acoustic properties of the arched brick surface to be more compatible with the internal activities.

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Work Examples - Church of Kiruna


A

B

C

_____________ A. Zoning: Public / Semi - Public B. Independent usage of vaulted chambers C. Auditorium: Indoor - Outdoor -1 FLOOR 1. Entrance Foyer 2. Auditorium 3. Back of house 4. Artist Lounge 5. Listening / Mixing Room 6. Control Room 7. Live Room 8. Rehearsal Space 9. Secondary Entrance / Escape Exit

10. Plant Room 11. Outdoor Performance Space 12. Equipment Loading / Back of House Entrance 13. External Store

-1 Floor Plan

D

E

F

_____________

_____________

D. Hand-made Red Brick E. Hardwood Flooring F. Reinforced Concrete 20 mm double-ply hardwood flooring Vapour barrier 50 mm EPS impact sound insulation 25 x 25 mm battens, 10 mm plywood ` support 100 mm timber joists on Reinforced concrete structure with inset Ă˜ 400 mm servicing voids 500 mm reinforced concrete arches 65 mm brick as permanent shuttering, joints partially filled for acoustic reasons LED lights

1. Vaults / Church Plinth

2. Floor Construction: 20 mm double-ply hardwood flooring 65 mm screed over under floor heating pipes 50 mm foil backed EPS thermal insulation 200 mm Reinforced Concrete Floor Slab Bituminous sealing layer 50 mm EPS insulation 100 mm gravel

Detailed Section of Underground Vaults

Control Room Internal View

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Kiruna City Hall PgDip in Advanced Architectural Design - Thesis Project University of Strathclyde Year 5 - 2011 / 2012 Joint: Michal Scieszka & Dale Smith

_______________________________________________________________

Kiruna City Hall, designed by Artur Von Schmalensee, and built in 1962, is an important building both functionally and symbolically to the people of Kiruna. It was designed to be open and to facilitate the transparency of democracy. This relocation of the City Hall retains its character and functions whilst adding to them and enhancing them. By elevating the City Hall, it conveys that the building has been moved and reinforces that it has not always been in place, but in fact has been relocated. Furthermore this serves to facilitate the addition of other functions below the City hall. The City has a historic and continuing relationship with art, which we have extended to add functionality and enhance the existing City Hall, the city having a large art collection of over 2000 pieces, which includes works by Anders Zorn, John Bauer and Edvard Munch. The City Hall as existing contained space for only a small amount of this work to be exhibited, and as the collection is continually growing due to City commissioning an artist to work there and produce works for the city every year, it was appropriate to allow the provision of spaces to both exhibit this collection and also to allow those who enter the new City Hall and gallery to be able to view the process of art being created. The repositioned and extended City Hall, takes a prominent position within the new masterplan for Kiruna’s City Centre, once again being the termination of the high street as it was in the Old City, whilst no longer being disconnected.

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Work Examples - Kiruna City Hall


7 5

A

3

4

C

3

1

2 8

B

4

9 3

7 6

GROUND FLOOR 1. Ground Floor Gallery / Proposed City Hall Lobby 2. Artist Workshop 3. City Hall / Gallery Vertical Circulation 4. View / Light Funnel 5. Library 6. Office Block 7. Proposed Green Route 8. Proposed Public Square 9. Proposed High Street

Ground Floor Plan As Proposed

9

5 7

4

3

12

A

B

2 7

8 7

1 7

7

1

_____________ A. Gallety Escape Routes / City Hall Service Link to Archive B. View / Light funnels at Public Square Level

- 1 FLOOR

8

1. Gallery Cafe / Shop 2. Kitchen 3. Information / Tickets Sale 4. Cloak room 5. Service link to Archive / Escape Route 6. Link to Office Block / Escape Route 7. Gallery 8. Storage 9. Library - Basement Level - Archives

6

11

11. Office Block - Basement Level 12. Plant Room Underneath

-1 Floor Plan As Proposed

Repositioned Kiruna City Hall - Proposed Public Square View

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A

_____________

A. Birch Ply Sectional Model Through City Hall

A

B

C

D

E

5

_____________ 1. Façade construction

6. Light / Viewing Cone:

215 x 102.5 x 65 mm City Hall reclaimed brick - flemish bond, 10 mm colour matching mortar continuation of 30 mm cavity moisture diffusing sheet 300 mm EPS thermal insulation fixed on varied extruded aluminium profiles; fixed to steel structure Bottom: 200 x 150 x 115 mm welded steel sheet bracket angle / flashing

30 mm laminated safety with aluminium fixing attached to 300 mm reinforced concrete with 75 mm EPS thermal break; ploythene separation layer 12.5 mm gypsum board with matt white paint finish on 25 x 25 mm timber battens

2. Soffit Construction: 20 x 150 mm untreated larch boarding (80 mm cavity) fixed on 80 x 40 x 5 mm galvanized steel SHS fixed to steel structure moisture diffusing sheet 300 mm EPS thermal insulation LED downlights 3. Curtain Wall Construction: AGC - Stopray Safir glass 6 mm / 12 mm Low-E fill / 6 mm 0.9 W/(m²K) (used on Snohetta’s Oslo Opera House) / load -bearing linear adhesive fixing 2 x 42 mm safety glass mullions with 2 x 140 / 30 mm hidden steel plates attached to structural steel truss / concrete floor slab

4 1 2

7. Floor Construction 50 mm Roachbed Portland Stone flags laid in 40 mm bed of mortar Polythene separation layer 50 mm EPS impact sound insulation 1400 mm reinforced concrete hollow core floor slab _____________ A. City Hall reclaimed hand-made Dutch bricks B. Fair Faced Concrete C. Untreated Larch boarding D. Roachbed Portland Stone

6

4. Superstructure Primary: 1400 x 305 mm UB 487 with Ø 675 mm web openings 1400 x 700 mm / 1400 x 1400 mm (filleted cornered) Insitu cast steel reinforced concrete columns Secondary: 610 x 305 mm UB 238 5. Walk-on Glazing Construction: 8 mm toughened glass wearing layer with non-slip grid 30 mm opaque laminated safety glass restraining breakage fixed on 80 x 80 x 10 mm steel angle fixed to 180 x 100 x 5 mm steel SHS

Detailed Section

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Work Examples - Kiruna City Hall


Kiruna City Hall As Proposed

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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To Learn: Architecture Department in Porto BSc (Hons) in Architectural Studies University of Strathclyde Year 4 - 2010 / 2011 _______________________________________________________________

The project’s aim was to firstly research architectural education, how is it taught and which spaces it requires in order to form new ideas for architectural education. Following on from this research an architectural response has been developed for a new Department of Architecture in the core of Porto’s historical centre – hitherto Praça de Lisboa. The proposal on wider urban scale involves the reinstatement of Porto’s Medieval Circuit with a contemporary insertion of the proposed cloister of buildings in order to restore the historical centre’s urban fabric. The massing of buildings forming a cloister has been sculpted in order to frame vistas and create view corridors to link the different parts of the surrounding area to this public discussion hub within the centre of the proposal. The scheme relates to the surrounding context and is sensitive to its site within the historic medieval quarter; the eastern corner of the building is offset to form a public space in front of the main entrance and acts as a gateway to the start of Porto’s medieval circuit, the statue of Bishop António Ferreira Gomes has been retained and the building has been stepped back to create a small public space linking to the Cordoaria Gardens, buffer zones / public green spaces have been created on each side of the site in order to respond to the site being bounded by vehicular routes on each side, a formal edge to Rua Dr. Ferreira da Silva has been established in the form of a public gallery space.

Seeking to create cohesion between different disciplines, and create a space in which these can interact and debate ideas with the wider public, the building draws influence from the ancient Greek Agora, a place of public assembly and democratic debate, as well as the medieval typology of a monastery and the community created within. In order to be able to fully engage in the process of an architectural education one must be fully immersed in the study of architecture, much in the same way as people choosing to live in a monastery fully dedicate themselves to spirituality. Monastery denotes a complex of buildings, which house a room reserved for prayer (oratory), as well as domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics. In this capacity the proposed Department of Architecture strives to instill a similar ethos in regard to study of architecture in order to embed this ‘living and breathing’ with architecture work ethic.

_____________ A. La Tourette Monastery - Le Corbusier B. Novy Dvur Monastery - John Pawson C. Architecture Department As Proposed

Architecture Department As Proposed - Long Section

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Work Examples - To Inhabit: Merchant City Housing


_____________ A. Navarra Blue Travertine B. Blue - white Porto tile C. White render

A

B

C

View Of Tiled Walkway

Architecture Department As Proposed - Aerial View

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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To Work: BOAC Offices BSc (Hons) in Architectural Studies University of Strathclyde Year 4 - 2010 / 2011 _______________________________________________________________

The first project of the Fourth Year Architecture course at Strathclyde University was to design an atelier to accommodate three Glasgow based architectural practices. The future office were to be situated in one of four Glasgow buildings of architectural merit, pre-selected by the Architecture Faculty Panel. Taking into consideration the current economical situation, the choice of the building in which the architectural offices will held their future businesses needs to take into account three main factors:

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Firstly, the edifice must be strategically located within Glasgow’s City Centre: ideally in close proximity to city’s transport hubs (railway station, subway, bus station and bus stops etc.), as well as in junction of main vehicular, cycle and pedestrian routes – to enhance the office accessibility, to both: current and potential customers.

Secondly, the building’s selection needs to be measured against its current state / building works required and limited budged available, ideally minimizing the investment contribution and maximizing the long term profit.

Lastly, the potential of the building must expand beyond the office running framework and provide the opportunity to both: contribute to its wider / immediate contexts and create the additional profit prospect.

Work Examples - To Work: BOAC Offices


0

2

3

4

Repositioned Kiruna City Hall - Proposed Public Square View

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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To Inhabit: Merchant City Housing BSc (Hons) in Architectural Studies University of Strathclyde Year 3 - 2009 / 2010 _______________________________________________________________

‘Glasgow copper, copper Glasgow. Here is a city and a material made for one another. Think of the steamships, built from 1811, at Partick and Govan on the Clyde. Remember the locomotives built, from 1862, by Neilson Reid and from 1903 by the North British works at Springburn. Recall such characterful buildings as the Cathedral and the Church of our Lady of Good Counsel in 1964-66 by those unrepentant Modernisers; Gillespie, Kidd & Coia. All made extensive use of the full orange material that turns magically green when exposed to air.’ Jonathan Glancey ‘FULL METAL JACKET, THE SAS RADISSON HOTEL IN GLASGOW’ in gm+ad: curious rationalism (2006) The first project of the Third Year Architecture course at Strathclyde University was to design two inter-connected dwellings with workspaces, situated on undeveloped land in the Victorian-era Merchant City district of central Glasgow. The design exercise had two hypothetical clients, both of whom were architectural historians researching the history of Glasgow’s built environment. One of the clients required accommodation for a family of three people, the other younger client required space for only two people. Both clients required study and work areas.

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Work Examples - To Inhabit: Merchant City Housing

The edifice is situated in an undeveloped ad-hoc courtyard between two major thoroughfares lined with substantial Victorian Classical buildings. Overlooking this narrow, linear courtyard are tenement housing and the handsome yet derelict Stirling Library. The proposal involves restoring the Stirling Library to make it fully functional, creating a new “lane” route across the courtyard to connect the two thoroughfares, to create a new public square within the courtyard and provide the existing tenements with an external area. At the centre of this development is the proposed copper-clad Live/ Work house. The form of the house is derived from the medieval Scottish tower-houses of the 11th-17th centuries. Internally, the two houses are conceptually considered in section as two ‘interlocked’ blocks locked together by the stair-core, which is extruded on the facade into a chimney-like form. As this ‘contemporary tower house’ is so overlooked, the tower is naturally lit by numerous occuli, light-chimneys and canons. Top-lit study areas are extruded from the tall narrow body of the house, in a manner reminiscent of the cupolas and turrets of a medieval tower. The tower is clad entirely in narrow, vertical sheets of rolled, unpatinated copper. This first copper layer is then wrapped fully in a layer of heavy-gauge copper mesh. Both layers of copper will patinate at different rates over time. Therefore the tower-house, as a sculptural object within the square, will gradually but continually change in appearance. Copper was also chosen as it shares many of the characteristics of harling, the usually white render applied to medieval tower houses. The copper from a distance gives our tower with its blank facades a hard, defensive appearance; yet up-close the copper mesh has a sculptural, tactile and soft quality.


View West of House As Proposed

North-South Elevation As Proposed

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Work Examples - To Inhabit: Merchant City Housing


RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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In Practice


In Practice


In Practice Terry Farrell and Partners London - Architectural Assistant September 2009 - July 2010 _______________________________________________________________

Involved in the continuing development and production of various materials for the Chelsea Barracks Competition, Nine Elms / Embassy Gardens and Bishopsgate Goods Yard Masterplans, as well as production information and detailed planning application drawings for the Lots Road Residential Development in London. I was in regular communication with clients, contractors, planners and engineers and was often responsible for making sure each of these parties corresponded with each other.

Church of St Barnabas

St Barnabas Road

Existing Chapel

Chelsea Bridge Road

Royal Chelsea Hospital

I have gained a significant amount of knowledge of the construction industry and the role of an architect within that process. People and time management became an essential skill in liaising with various participants in the construction process, as well as developing a strong working relationship with my office colleagues.

Chelsea Barracks Masterplan Competition, London Sample of produced material

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In Practice - Terry Farrell & Partners


Nine Elms / Embassy Gardens Masterplan, London Sample of produced material

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Nine Elms / Embassy Gardens Masterplan: Underground Extension Sample of produced material

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In Practice - Terry Farrell & Partners


Lots Road Residential Development, London Sample of produced material

RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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In Practice SMC Jenkins & Marr (Archial Group) Glasgow - Architectural Assistant May 2008 - October 2008 _______________________________________________________________

Extensively involved in drafting production information drawings for the Glasgow Langside College project and layouts for two apartments in the Glasgow Cook Street Housing project.

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In Practice - SMC Jenkins & Marr (Archial Group)


Langside College, Glasgow: Sample of drafted Production Information Drawings

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Photography


Photography


Photography

I have a great passion for photography and enjoy building a physical representation of memories and places I have visited.

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Photography


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Hand Drawings


Hand Drawings


Hand Drawings

I enjoy drawing in a variety of styles and techniques and feel confident in conveying my ideas through the medium of hand drawing.

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Hand Drawings


RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Printworks


Printworks


Printworks

While I ultimately aspire to be an architect, I am — and always will be — interested in any kind of creative work, from graphical to architectural, industrial to photographic. I feel confident in producing a variety of graphical materials ranging from CD cover, booklet and poster designs to whole exhibition compositions.

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Printworks


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Live Build


Live Build


Wicker Workshop

I attended the Erasmus Intensive Programme Workshop 2012 - Structures in Building Culture II: Skin and Bones, which took place across 11 days in August. The workshop was based around developing an understanding of wicker as a construction material from its production through to existing uses for construction, then moving on to a direct experimentation at various scales with the material. The use of weaved Wicker is associated with the traditional manufacturing of small utilitarian objects. This technique stands out for its potential to build complex and resistant shapes given by the flexibility of the fibre and rigidity provided by the weaving. Based on these properties, the workshop explored the production of weaved structures in relation to the landscape and architecture, exploring the potential of a natural raw material and the application of existing weaving techniques to a new scale and type of construction.

A

B

C

__________________ Examples Of Weaving Techniques: A. Crossed, warp and weft B. Crossed, warp and weft with diagonal C. Freestyle

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Live Build


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1.

2.

__________________ Example A: 3.

4.

1. Mark out 2. Begin weaving from corners 3. Push construction up from corners 4. Enjoy your shelter

A

1.

2.

__________________ Example B:

3. B

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Live Build

4.

5.

1. Begin weaving top of dome 2. Continue to weave from bottom up 3. Pull bottom edges from outside to inside 4. Strenghten weave at base 5. Enjoy your shelter


RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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People’s Tower

Another live build project of a different nature which I attended involved constructing a temporary public structure made with cardboard. This workshop took place across 6 days in July, building up components for the construction during the first five days at the Briggait in Glasgow, then on the final day assembling and ultimately dismantling the construction on Brunswick Street in the Merchant city. It was a mostly non-skilled construction, allowing anyone to participate, fostering full inclusion. As a project, it encouraged people to engage with the built environment albeit for a short period of time, promoted working as a team – without enough people lifting the tower together it could not be built, promotes experiential learning – learning how to build construct hands on, establishes a sense of accomplishment in a short time frame, building a large marker within the landscape, dramatically altering the surroundings, highlighting the impact of man on the landscape and then finally it is dismantled.

People’s Tower Section - Brunswick Street, Glasgow

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Live Build


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1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

__________________ 1. Pre-construct complex elements 2. Divide into ergonomic sizes 3. Build from top to bottom 4. Keep adding until achieving full height 5. Enjoy your structure 6. Demolish and keep enjoying 7. Recycle

1.

2.

3.

__________________ How to join boxes?

Scan to watch video

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Live Build

1. Place boxes together 2. Tape horizontally across boxes on each side 3. Tape around boxes vertically three times


RIBA Part II Portfolio: Michal Scieszka

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Blotnia Workshop

I attended a live build workshop in Blotnia, Gdansk, run by Gary Johnson from Gdansk University of Technology, which took place from 1st – 3rd June 2012. The workshop involved the dismantling of an existing old railway carriage, and re cladding it / refitting it for a new use as a small accommodation cabin. This is the first step in an overall plan for the area of land in Blotnia, where the structure will act as a base for and facilitate future live build activities at the site. This was run alongside a workshop building a temporary structure made of pallets, by Erasmus students from Gdansk University of Technology, who also took part in the conversion of the railway carriage. Participation within this workshop provided me with some insight into the process of how a small live build project works, is detailed, can be constructed and the possibilities in regard to the re-use of an existing structure. It also helped serve as an example of how one structure could be the beginning / catalyst for a larger planned development, dovetailing into the Masters proposal at Wiston Lodge.

Recladded Railway Carriage As Proposed

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Live Build


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Recladding Potential Within Wiston Lodge Estate

Recladded Railway Carriage As Proposed

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Live Build


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RIBA Part II Student Portfolio  

RIBA Part II Student Portfolio - Michal Scieszka

RIBA Part II Student Portfolio  

RIBA Part II Student Portfolio - Michal Scieszka

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