Issuu on Google+

MediaTrainer Training course for community media work in Europe Handbook of practical media skills

M端nster 2010

Published by: Bürgermedienzentrum Bennohaus

Bundesverband Bürger- und

Arbeitskreis Ostviertel e.V.

Ausbildungsmedien e.V.

Managing director: Dr. Joachim Musholt 48155 Münster, Bennostr. 5

31275 Lehrte, Poststr. 12

Tel: +49 251 60 96 73

Tel: +49 5132 85 65 92

Fax: +49 251 60 96 777

Fax: +49 5132 85 65 93

Email: geschaeftsfuehrung2@bennohaus.info

Email: info@bvbam.de

www.bennohaus.info

www.bvbam.de

Project management: Dr. Joachim Musholt, Benedikt Althoff, Michał Wójcik Edited by: Benedikt Althoff, Michał Wójcik Authors of modules: David Balmas, Jaqui Devereux, Casy Dinsing, Helena Potthast Authors of the training course: Benedikt Althoff, David Balmas, Bill Best, Casy Dinsing, Jaqui Devereux, Georg May, Dr. Joachim Musholt, Michał Wójcik E-learning: Stefan Deltchev, Źmicier Hryškievič, Vitaliy Lipich, Layout: Źmicier Hryškievič Translation: Jaqui Devereux, Daniela Elsner, Malte Koppe, Joanna Malec, Halyna Wójcik More information about the project: trainer.europeanweb.tv – E-learning Platform www.youth4media.eu

© Münster 2010, All rights reserved Printed in Poland With the support of the Lifelong learning programme of the European Union. This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

2

Table of contents

Introduction

5

Citizen and Education Media – dissemination channels for Europe

7

Framework of the training course

13

Training course overview

25

Module A - Video journalism

33

Module B - Crossmedia journalism

119

Module C - Train the trainer

171

Project description

209

Project partners

373

Bibliography

383

Answers

384

3

Introduction In the European society of information media competences have become the key qualifications that enable active civil participation and free intercultural communication. Computers, new technologies, information and communication tools have penetrated all spheres of modern life starting from the workplace and finishing with free time activities. In contrast to the traditional mass media, which represent the one-way communication, the users of modern internet technologies can send and receive, be recipients and creators of information. The potential of these technologies has to be expended and accommodated to the educational and cultural purposes. Internet and media can become a powerful tool in facilitating political education programs and promoting intercultural dialogue in Europe. Our present challenge is to summarize different approaches, interactive methods of work and start building the foundation for media-facilitated non-formal education. The European Union and its Member States want to preserve and develop their leading position and the European economy, which is characterised by dynamic technological changes. It is important that European employees and citizens develop their ICT skills and are familiar with social and community media tools as means of self-expression and communication. Our MediaTrainer project was funded as a two years Leonardo da Vinci Innovation transfer project and ended in 2010. It realized the developmet, testing and transfer of the modular vocational training by 9 partner organizations in Cyprus, Germany, Finland, Poland, Romania, Turkey and United Kingdom. This transfer process will be sustainable conducted by the European Youth4media Network e.V. and its 36 members in 24 European countries. The Europe-wide modular training courses will result in a recognised qualification, with cross-border recognition ensuring its validity in any participating country. The handbook which you have in your hands features information and didactic materials concerning and is created for workers of civil society institutions, trade unions, community media centers, multipliers and interested citizens who want to engage in the non-formal political, medial and intercultural education.

5

Citizen and Education Media – Dissemination Channels for Europe Defining citizen media The citizen or community media in Europe support a more pluralistic media environment, cultural diversity and can be clearly defined as a distinct group in the media sector. Citizen or community media (‘CM’) can be defined as: Media that are non-profit and accountable to the community that they serve. They are open for participation in the creation of content by members of the community. As such, they are a distinct group within the media sector alongside commercial and public media. CM are addressed to specific target groups. They have a clearly-defined task, which is carried out in line with their content. Social benefit for a community is a primary concern. Citizen media create cohesion, give identity, promote common interests and preserve cultural and linguistic diversity. They are generally run by the committed, creative citizens with a strong social conscience and feeling of belonging. Citizen media contribute to the goal of improving citizens’ media literacy through their direct involvement in the creation and distribution of content. Citizen media help to strengthen the identities of specific communities while enabling members of those communities to interact with other groups in society. They therefore can play a key role in fostering tolerance and pluralism in society. Citizen media is an effective mean to strengthen social inclusion and local empowerment. CM may enable disadvantaged members of a community to become active participants in society and to engage in debates concerning issues that are important for them. Citizen media help people to overcome new challenges, because through citizen media they can more easily find others who are facing the same difficulties. In Europe there are several forms of citizen and education media, open channels in television and radio, non-commercial local radio stations and free radio stations, education and learning stations as well as university stations. The internet and the interactive web 2.0 with blogs, social networks like facebook or myspace, Youtube, Sevenload, Wikipedia, etc. has deeply changed the media scenery. The access of citizens to the world wide web will extend with the growing web extension and faster getting range. Citizens actively use the internet, build networks, get informed and create publicity. 7

Institutions, educational facilities, associations and groups are using these new possibilities of the internet to mediate media competence and citizen media institutions entrench new forms of information transfer like podcast, vidcast or streaming with the help of Web- TV. This manifold media scenery builds the third media sector whose closeness to citizens and charitable acting on the field of media education is clearly in contrast to public and private commercial television and radio. Citizen media are very manifold but there are several features which apply to all dissemination channels, namely editorial self-determination, open access and self-responsibility. In former times the function of citizen media was restrained to offering people a technical organised platform, today they support differenciated offers to mediate media competence and offer citizens a variety of possibilities to get qualified or trained. The mediation of media competence follows three aims: • First it mediates citizens a technical knowledge • Secondly journalistic basic skills. • Thirdly people need to know how they can create their own contributions and can communicate recipient – orientated with other citizens productively. Within the framework of media competence transfer seminars multipliers and media trainers get knowledge about how to teach citizens and redactional groups to create and disseminate their own broadcast appropriately on different platforms. For those citizens groups that don’t have access to open channels or other freely accessible dissemination channels a dissemination over an open web television platform - like developed in the framework of the MediaTrainer project – gets more and more important. Web-TV is a format, especially developed for the internet viewing. In case of Web-TV short movies, reports as well as broadcasts are produced according to the special criteria. Web-TV is mainly directed at youngsters and therefore has adopted dynamic way of presenting the content. Web-TV reports are usually brief and vivid. Open Web-TV is a platform for the non-commercial audio and video productions that have already been broadcasted in an open channel. Visitors can watch many of these self-made productions and everyone who wants can join the forum and become a member of it. 8

Besides television the internet is seen as a medium that nowadays is the most important way how to spread information. The accessibility of the audience can be very high: within a few days many million viewers can be reached which is vividly proved by the Youtube service. The advatantage of the Web-TV is that there is no rigid standard concerning the content and the technique, on contrary to the private and public television which follow defined formats. In Web-TV you can produce broadcasts or reports in high quality quite cheap and with few technical preconditions. WebTV is an ideal way for NGOs, institutions with low budgets to open up a media platform and also reach a wide amount of people. Web-TV is a really good tool in intercultural communication and international youth work.

9

Web-TV gives the possibility to offer self-made products “on demand”. This means that the produced video material can be uploaded on several video platforms such as Youtube, myspace and be watched by the visitors of this site at any time. • Open Web-TV offers additionally the possibility to broadcast life, in realtime, conferences, interviews; • Concerts or whole broadcasts; • In the framework of live streams it’s possible to do live reporting; • The bandwidth of users of live streams is enormously high. The new media landscape has transformed both, the structure of governance and the social function of media and communication. An interactive and mobile communication society is developing alongside traditional mass media. Young peoples’ importance as actors has grown successfully. Open Web-TV gives active citizens the chance to come up with their own media work. This mediated “youth culture” integrates several forms of media (print, internet, television) as well as different modes of expression. New innovative platforms like www.europeanweb.tv, www.owtv.de, www.youth4media.eu and other dissemination opportunities help to build bridges between popular youth culture and traditional education and develop new materials and methodologies to foster participation and sharing of contents and personal experiences of citizens. They promote tolerance, acceptance and the inclusion of other people and bring an intercultural dimension into play to create a vivid civic European society.

10

11

Framework of the Training Courses New Competences and Transparency The learning aims of the advanced training modules enable a participants to become a media trainer by utilising the newest requirements in the range of cross media communication. The development of digital technology has led to a huge change in the terrain of storytelling. For example: Web 2.0 was devised to empower citizens media for the following reason, a citizen journalist can potentially take responsibility in creating web blogs and utilising the huge variety of communication platforms on the world wide web. These changing processes have led to consequences for further training and development. To use contemporary technologies, the question therefore is, which qualifications exist and which are needed? Important areas to develop this sphere include the relevance of tools, the validity of approach, and the expansion of intelligent and professional subjects and include a criteria with respect to security and protection which is high quality. Therefore, knowledge in entertainment and press laws are indispensable, as well as knowledge about ethical principles pertaining to journalism. The investigation of different sources and the challenge of information are basic skills required to make audio or video records, and to work with them and to publish them on the net in an accessible way. A citizen journalist needs basic skills to make an interview, he must be able to prepare himself systematically and effectively and in the end he must be able to achieve technical implementation. The citizen journalist potentially gains knowledge in story telling and the art of writing for different media platforms and moreover becomes aware of the basic skills of cross media productions. The advanced module which aims to train the trainer offers understanding and clarification concerning the learning results. All learning aims and results are embedded in a competence taxonomy which enables the participants to judge the relative value of the qualification. The module enables the combination of qualifications gained in different institutions or countries. The profile and the content can be compared with other media qualifications. This is an important premise for quality protection in common and vocational education.

Create a positive Learning Atmosphere Cognitive perception and new knowledge is always sustainable if it’s accompanied by emotional feelings. The positive facilitation of affective and emotive conditions should be taken into consideration by the trainer and play an important role while planning and conducting seminars. Emotions – seen as motivation – support the 13

learning process. The interest and enthusiasm of participants are affected in an important way by the the attitude and the actions of the trainer. The creation of a positive learning atmosphere therefore is the key responsibility of the trainer. Learning together and creating something in common is a positive experience for everyone. This also includes the integration and involvement of all participants in the framework of the learning process. All people endeavour to gain new knowledge and apply it successfully. One important requirement to achieve this is the common realisation of the learning aims. On the one hand there are cognitive learning aims which aim to convey functional knowledge. It is set into contexts and adapted practically. There are the affective learning aims in which attitudes and values are experienced and become part of the personal competence. There is also the mechanistic learning aims that include the knowledge of controlling skills and knowledge on all action levels. All learning aims as a whole demand for and support creative thinking, the implementation of constructive creation as well as the ability to solve ordinary problems and conflicts during the process of media design, which when viewed holistically is a fundamental part of team work.

From the Citizen Journalist to the Media Trainer The participants which take part in Module A (video journalism) and Module B (cross media journalism) reach a new level and even a new role with Module C (trainer competences) – which addresses the competences necessary to be a trainer. If it was ones role as a journalist until this point, the new role transcends the journalist into a trainer. The journalist conveys information to the recipient, the trainer trains his participants to convey information to recipients. This new role is a huge challenge. To achieve this, a lot of encouragement and confidence is needed. Module C makes some a coach, and a media trainer for others. In the future this means the trainer will be able to navigate learning processes with social competence and to lead and motivate other people. The prospective media trainer needs a variety of competences and skills to be able to convey his journalistic knowledge further. His functional knowledge already includes skills which were required for Module A and B. Only if he possesses these skills he can create and develop his tasks professionally. He needs to possess a repertoire of methods with a logical, clear and target-aimed structure. Extraordinarily important is his personal competence. He must be able to reflect his own behaviour as a trainer. He or she requires social competence to be able to convey and build up the creative interaction in the semi14

nar and in the creative media process. The prospective trainer also needs skills to accompany and lead other people through their learning process. The prospective trainer will work on different levels while planning and leading a media seminar. He has to manage the organisation of the training courses in cooperation with the hosting organisation successfully to internalize the concept of the advanced training course.

Target Groups Staff of both school-related and extracurricular youth organisations and those working in public media can benefit from these training courses and, upon its completion, they will recognise a discernible improvement in their skills and abilities. Their communication skills in particular will have improved considerably, and they will find themselves eminently capable of supervising public groups as they take part in active media work. The course will allow both teachers and students to acquire a thematic and methodological basis for incorporating video and Internet media into their work. Students of media-related subjects and people who are active in youth and social work will receive a thorough introduction to media work with all kinds of people, both young and old. However, the course is also accessible to any other members of the public who are interested in undergoing training in media work.

Seminar Management The course can be conducted by any one of several responsible bodies and institutions operating within the field of public media work. The MediaTrainer course has been planned as an ongoing activity. The educational targets of the modules are however fixed to facilitate the certification process. There are several ways of organising the modules, and these vary according to the local conditions at the institute offering the course and the needs and requirements of the participants. In addition, each of the modules can be offered separately as a self-contained seminar. The entire training course consists of three modules, each module containing a detailed description of its learning aims, along with a timetable, and practical exercises. Individual handouts and materials that have been developed for practical use in all modules are constantly updated and expanded and are available to download from www.trainer.europeanweb.tv 15

Process Management 10 steps to becoming an online journalist, trainer and multiplier. 1.

The initial publicity stage involves leafleting and online networking to advertise the course. Potential participants view the selection criteria and the topic of the course, and send their application forms in online. 2. Their application form goes through to the MySQL database. A receipt is sent to the applicant with the date when they will be notified whether their application has been successful. The decision makers are notified of the application, and make an informed decision. 3. If the project is in a national context, the national partner and tutor will decide on who participates. However if it is in a European context, the e-learning tutor will decide. 4. A Welcome email is sent to successful applicants which explains the e-learning process,when to attend the course, and what outcomes are expected at the end of the course. This informs participants that they will receive accreditation once they complete all tasks necessary. The participant then replies to confirm and formalise his/her acceptance. 5. The E-learning tutor then sends log in and password details to applicants with specific e-learning instructions. This includes deadlines, and how many hours a day the student ought to study. 6. The unit begins and includes literature, and multiple choice questions. Also short essays and the general active engagement in e-learning, holistically. 7. Throughout the e-learning process the tutor is responsible for checking the participants’ progress, and following up if the e-learning work is not being done. When the participant completes an exercise a message is sent to the tutor. The E-learning tutor accesses this regularly to check the progress of the individual. 8. When the participant has passed all the lessons, the e-learning tutor will congratulate the participant. He will then send instructions (times, place to stay etc) of the course which will also be sent to the project partner. 9. The course then begins and continues for up to five days with forty hours of training time. The participant will apply his/her theoretical knowledge in practise. When this is completed the tutor and participants will evaluate the project in a formal and informal way. 10. After the course, the tutor will send an e-mail confirming that they passed the training course. This will also explain how to submit their future work to online TV channels. Finally the date is given of when to receive accreditation documents (certificate).

The course modules provide both regular staff and volunteers with new skills and fresh knowledge which they can apply when working together or with members of the public and typical user groups, such as school leavers, immigrants and senior citizens. The participants of Module A have to realize their own movie production and for Module B they have to create publish their own materials on-line. The learning successes of seminars in general depends to a great extent on the instructors and supervisors. If they are unable to communicate with the group and motivate its members, even extensive media use is of little help. Anyone seeking contacts to potential instructors can make use of a variety of Internet databases. Newspaper advertisements and job centres may also be helpful. In many cases, contacts can be found by way of other instructors. The Bennohaus media centre and the European Youth4Media Network association offer several advisory facilities for those interested in media training courses. A few weeks before a training course is due to begin, a meeting with the instructors ought to be arranged. The introduction and co-ordination of the methodology and the teaching structure of the course is important, and therefore requires preparation. Training concepts like just-in-time, concentric, self-directed and action16

oriented learning should be understood and also carried out. At this meeting, the instructors can also arrange to co-operate on related modules. Either standard training material can be used or other materials discussed. Some instructors prefer to work with their own materials. If and how these can be practically integrated into the seminar should also be agreed by the instructors. It is also important that personnel devise a communications structure. Instructors of successive modules, for instance, can discuss the mood of the group, problems with individual participants, organisational and technical problems, etc. in this handover phase. This preliminary meeting can also be used for last minute organisational arrangements. Equipment and room requirements can be set down on the required forms. An introductory session should take place before the beginning of the seminars. This is a good opportunity to facilitate a positive working atmosphere through relaxed group interactions. Participants and instructors in the test seminars emphasise the positive atmosphere and have described this as a key factor in the successful outcome of the training course. The general goals and the precise timetabling of the seminar are also discussed, in order to give the participants the opportunity to ask questions and to get to know each other. This initial phase where the participants come into contact is very important and plays a central role in the building of trust which is vital in forging relationships. Contact opportunities are used and individual and group appointments arranged. The supervisor also introduces the seminar diary and explains its purpose. After the introductory meeting, the first module can begin.

Entrance Requirements Entry into the field of active media work with public groups should be open in order to be inclusive of as many people as possible, particularly young adults, to this professional field. This allows them to become familiar with participatory work involving members of the public. The minimum admission requirements for Module A and B are that participants are at least18 years old and they have sufficient basic ICT knowledge. They should have communicative competences and should enjoy cooperating with other people in a team. They have to be open minded and eager to learn. Moreover, to participate in Module B they have to show a certificate of the successful attendance of Module A. Furthermore, they have to show an independently produced video report. The on-line application of the participants should 17

include a demonstration of the applicants motivation and indicate their previous knowledge in the media field as well as experience of group work. Following the initial (on-line or face to face) interview, a competence portfolio is created for the applicant, which is subsequently used to guide him through the learning process. To join Module C Trainer competences participants have to be aged 22 and they have to show certificates of their attendance of Module A and Module B. Alternatively, it is possible to prove these competences by comparable achievements or a letter of recommendation from an institution or similar training course. The written application should include a demonstration of the applicant’s motivation and the curriculum vitae. They have to indicate their background knowledge in the media field including the sector of community media as well as experience of group work. To reach the certificate of Module C the participants are required to conduct a continuous practical project of at least 40 hours, in which they themselves take on the role of media trainer.

Infrastructure and Time Frame In general, the course can be hosted by any type of training or media institution that offers courses in the fields of creativity, media competence and film design. Any institutions interested in offering the course can request the course outline. The best context in which to run a course of this nature is in a network of open TV channels and public media establishments. The course centre must be able to offer the following minimum technical facilities: several computers with appropriate word processing and Internet software, several digital video cameras complete with accessories, digital editing facilities including appropriate editing programmes, an overhead projector and TV recording equipment, plus a DVD player for demonstration purposes. The recommended group size is eight to twelve participants, plus two instructors, one of whom assists the participants in their learning. Since the training course involves groups of various sizes, one large seminar room is required for larger activities and two smaller rooms for the work in small groups. All participants are required to attend all three modules during the compulsory attendance phase. The recommended time frame is approximately 360 hours. Module A, B 18

and C have each 40 hours of e learning, 40 hours of the face to face seminar and about 40 hours of practical project. Once the module has been completed, participants are required to conduct a continuous practical project of at least 40 hours, in which they themselves take on the role of journalist or media trainer. The host institution should appoint someone to be responsible for organisational and technical questions, and this person needs to be available during the entire training course.

E-learning (trainer.europeanweb.tv) The central element of the training course is a face to face seminar, which usually lasts seven days. However, it is preceded by a longer e-learning course (20 to 40 hours). The participants, prior to arrival at the training are required to get acquainted with the material and the theoretical and practical study of a specific batch of material. It is a requirement for participation in the training. The training course involves the use of MediaTrainer platform for distance learning. In our course we use moodle platform on which various modules of training are placed. Each module is divided into lessons, and those specific chapters appear on separate slides. The structure of the material is quite transparent. Each lesson contains no more than 10 slides. Content is presented not only in the form of text, but also with lots of photos, graphics, video and animation. On the video materials a participant can see the importance of the various functions of camera, editing techniques or composition. Animations allow setting lights in the TV studio, a sample storyboard layout or type of music to fit the operative part of the video. Each lesson is followed by a set of test tasks (usually multiple choice) and open questions. Open questions require your own independent solution or extended explanation. The answers to open questions will be graded by the course tutor. Who is the tutor? The tutor is a professional instructor for the course. The tutor will monitor your online performance, grade and comment on your answers to open questions and clarify any information that may be unclear to you. At the beginning of the course you will get contact information to your tutor. The time needed to complete one lesson is a maximum of 120 minutes. The first module includes 10 lessons, in the second there are 9, and the third has 5. The content of each lesson is woven into the test questions to check knowledge of studying. 19

Incorrect answer prevents skipping to the next batch of material. Students are in fact headed back to the material covered by the question. This is to eliminate a cursory study of the material and jumping between chapters of one lesson. Navigation within a single lesson is one way. This does not mean that a student may not begin any course from the lessons of their choice. This is possible because navigation between lessons is optional.

Instructors and tutors The seminars are given by an instructor although several instructors may be needed, depending on the themes to be covered in each module. It would be advisable to choose instructors who have undergone training in the field of media teaching and have a number of years of experience in the public media or ones who have taken part in appropriate training in the field of television journalism. The main job of the tutors is to provide the participants with the necessary guidance and assessment throughout the e learning phases. In Module C participants concentrate on those learning processes that are closely linked with the role of the trainer and with shaping his or her methodological skills. This is why the supervisory activities take place during the planning, implementation and evaluation phases of the participants’ projects. This is independent of the modules, and takes place in a learning group. The participants become increasingly proficient at recognising different ways of acting through their interactions with colleagues, and integrate these new skills into their own repertoire. Tutors are people who are able to recognise the different types of learners and who can offer the right assistance for their learning strategies. They help learners to overcome learning blocks and, whenever necessary, encourage them to adapt their behaviour. Moreover, they posses basic media training competences, and are therefore able to function ideally in the field of media education.

Basic Didactic and Methodological Elements Nowadays, learning material is no longer taught but communicated. This means that greater emphasis is placed on the interests of the individual learners. It is important that participants get used to discussing the logic and purpose of what they are learning, and that they realise that this is anchored in their own actions and linked to other knowledge and practical areas. While developing the course, the project partners are themselves guided by open questions, for example, how can the subject material be structured systematically while retaining its orien20

tation to each person’s individual learning process, especially when viewed in a manner that promotes action and results? What lively and reflection-oriented learning methods are needed to develop media-educational and communicationrelevant key qualifications? During the development process, partners realise that media is a field that is perfectly suited to lively presentation, far more than is the case with many other subject areas. The didactic structure of the course combines theory with practice throughout and by applying (self-)reflection, it offers a mixture of different learning methods. One basic element of the training course is concentric learning. The learning aims are related to one another and the methods of learning are varied. For example, after outlining an idea for a film, the next step is to implement this by working with a camera, followed by editing this first practical pieces of material on a PC. This process of ‘just-in-time learning’ is based on the assumption that learning is most effective when the material is immediately relevant to the product-oriented process (i.e. film making). Even with this fixed learning structure, new fields of action are continually presenting themselves, and are always linked to what came immediately before. The task is to transfer this principle to the meta-level of the trainer qualification. The basic theory is mostly presented in concentrated and interactive e learning units on-line. The participants have the opportunity to ask questions and give their opinions to the tutor. The trainers supply materials in the form of handouts and worksheets containing the basic information. The theory is followed by a number of practical exercises, conducted either individually or in small groups. The knowledge acquired beforehand is then applied in the creation of a media product. The practice productions are then discussed, the main emphasis being placed on one’s own opinions and behaviour as a trainer. It is important to discuss the meaning and purpose of the material learned, as well as its relevance to one’s own actions and the way it links to existing knowledge and application areas. The instructors encourage participants to locate both positive and negative aspects of their behaviour in the role of the trainer. This analysis gives them a good sense of their ability to apply what they have learned. They are responsible for the consistent implementation of the meta-level. The participants should be addressed in their role as future media trainers during the practical exercises and the feedback session. They will then gain experience in adopting this role by leading the practical exercises in small groups. 21

Participants acquire knowledge in various fields, including the media market, ethics, media competence, and public media, in addition to the production and technical skills needed for designing productions for the TV and the Internet. Particular emphasis is placed on how best to convey this knowledge to others. The main aim of the course for trainers is to enable them to lead groups and enable them to receive the necessary training in practical media work. This requires a high level of methodical skill and ability. The role of the trainer as a conveyor of skills and knowledge is a constant theme of both the group discussions and the practical exercises. The training course applies the same methods and exercises that the media trainers can themselves use subsequently in their own workshops.

Practical Project Attached to each module participants conduct a practical project, where future media trainers put into practise their skills in the media work. They will initiate or lead a production group within the boundaries of a video project, which is conducted by themselves. During this practical training phase, they will be supported by a tutor. The practical projects are an obligatory part of the training course. The main aim of the practical project is for the participants to develop their role as trainers, and to provide them with the opportunity to lead public media groups and independently plan and conduct projects in the field of public media work. The practical project gives participants the chance to expand and test their skills as a video journalist, on-line journalist or a trainer. They might work for at least forty hours, for instance with an editorial group in the community media centre, NGO or an open TV channel. They can conduct a video project for academic or extracurricular youth work. The project should culminate in a film production and the weblog production. The host institution provides advice and assistance in the organisation of the practical project. Participants are also supported by an experienced supervisor during the preliminary and active phases of the group work. The preparation and attendance of the practical project is assisted by a tutor. He will arrange the supervision and the analysis of the practical phase and lead, followed by a conclusion in the form of a dialogue at the end of the project.

22

Seminar Conclusion and Certificate At the end of the training course the trainer and the participants reflect on the whole seminar by doing a review. This helps them to make sure that new knowledge and skills can be saved and practically used in the future. Questions explored may include the following: • How did the participants experience the seminar? • How did they experience the trainer? • Have their expectations been fulfilled? By doing such a review participants realise what they have learned during the seminar and how their knowledge can be used in citizens media in a practical way in the future. To enhance forthcoming steps they suggest how and which steps the further learning process and deeper individual development can take place. If necessary, tasks will be designed for the participants like creating a video or an on-line broadcast or leading a group in media design of citizens media as a future trainer. In the end, the institution hands over a certificate to the participants in which the gained learning aims are documented transparently. New Competences, Transparency ad Approbation The certification to a successful participant describes the expert knowledge, skills and social competences the participant gained during the seminar. On request, this happens on the basis of the standardised “Europass” or the “Youthpass”. The Europass is an offer of the European Commission that should help the individual to account for personal skills, competences and qualifications in a standardised and understandable form all over Europe. The Youthpass is an instrument for participants of projects which have been supported in the framework of the “Youth in Action” program and it describes what they have done and learned during the project work. Youthpass certificates can for example be handed over for European Volunteer Services, youth exchanges, youth initiatives and training courses. On the e-learning platform (www.trainer.europeanweb.tv) every participant has access to his own competence portfolio that is accessible for him as well as for the tutor/trainer so that they can update it together. A partner network is currently involved in the validation process in the framework of the European Qualification Framework (EQR), respectively of the European Credit System for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET). The learning participants gained during their training courses and practical citizen media work are documented within the individual state of knowledge (education), skills (practical media design) and competences (social interaction, work experience). 23

In summary, this leads to an individual portfolio of the learning results which are presentable and therefore transparent. Taking into consideration that the European framework of reference is only in its development phase, an evaluation and a quantitative orientation by a standardised points system is still a long way off. Based on the results of pilot projects and reference models that are currently built up as credit systems in universities and professional media education, valid relations of learning results of the MediaTrainer course will soon be made more transparent. It is important for us to make our graduates’ qualification and their productive work transparent in the future process and to draw public recognition to the certificate all over Europe. For handing out such documents different institutions will be responsible depending on the several occupational fields, and we have already contacted them concerning the certified approval.

24

Training course – overview The MediaTrainer course is a tool which facilitates the coaching of emerging media trainers. Those media trainers tend to engage in work for civil society institutions, social organisations, trade unions, think tanks and NGOs as well as community media centres and local radio stations and television. The skills acquired during the course do not relate only to one specific communication channel, for example, radio or television. The course demonstrates how to combine all these elements. This can be achieved due to the development of ICT (Information and Communications Technologies), which enables integration and the combination of different types of media. Therefore the cross media dimension is an important basis of the course.

Cross media The cross media aspect, in our understanding, means the content of something created or the story itself. These can be presented through different media forms and on different platforms. These include weblogs, information portals, internet television, RSS channels, radio stations, television stations and the printed press. In each context the transfer is adjusted to the appropriate communication channel as well as to the expectations and requirements of a recipient. Thus, the course instructs how to build the content, the delivery, the story and how to “get it across” to the viewer, reader or the audience. Acquiring the skills in question facilitates participation in communication and makes it possible to become not only a recipient of information but also its creative initiator. It also allows one to reach numerous groups of recipients, especially the young.

Informative competence, one of eight key competences The MediaTrainer course aims to improve the ICT competence of third sector employees, and to develop their knowledge in new media, video journalism, on-linejournalism as well as to improve those people’s skills and abilities as trainers. The competence in question is indispensible to be competitive on the modern labour market and it is nowadays one of the eight key competences necessary for personal development and self- achievement. Equally in employment and active social engagement as well as social integration more generally. Computer and informative competences, which are key competences comprise of the skilful and critical utilization of informative societies technology at work, entertainment and communication. 25

The European Commission publicizes that informative competence is based on fundamental ICT skills: utilizing computers to acquire, evaluate, store, create, present and exchange information as well as to communicate and to participate in cooperation channels through the Internet. Informative competence requires a comprehensive understanding and the knowledge of the nature, role and capacity of ICT in everyday contexts: including the personal and social life, as well as in ones profession. Essential skills involve the ability to search for, store and process information as well as to utilize it in a critical and systematic way. At the same time, to evaluate its suitability with proper differentiation of realistic elements from virtual ones and in distinguishing connections. People should have the ability to utilize given tools to create, present and understand complex information as well as the capability of getting to services offered on the Internet. This includes finding them and making use of them; people should also be able to utilize ICT insupport of critical thinking, creativity and innovation. Exploiting ICT requires an analytical and reflective attitude towards available information as well as the conscious and proper use of interactive media. The development of these competences in question facilitates interest in the participation of societies and webs/channels with cultural, social or professional objectives.

Support for civil sector community media Another important assumption and a mission of the MediaTrainer training course lies in supporting the civil sector. The support given to institutions of the third sector consists in providing them with qualified people (trainers of new media) who are able to offer a professional media service and to promote the operations of an institution and, more importantly, will be able to work with the members of a given community or association. These will be able to get involved in the communication of society. A media trainer is a person who will be able to tell a story, to convey it to a given recipient employing various communication channels (cross media factor). He/she will also encourage and motivate others to get actively involved in communication through the application of new media as well as communication and information techniques. He/she constitutes almost an ideal solution for non-governmental organisations or local communities which very often have limited funds to promote themselves.

26

A media trainer is also a person who will easily recognise himself/herself in the area of civil media (community media). The authors of the training course MediaTrainer were guided by the idea of improving the quality of civil programs as well as support for the development of human resources in this area. Community media has encountered the problem of limited funds for its operations. In many European countries this type of media has insufficiently developed institutionally and still lacks legal regulations for ratifying their operations. Their development can also be intimidated by an insufficient recognition within society. That’s why methodical and institutional support for this sector is central. The MediaTrainer course constitutes one of the elements of this support; it is being developed as a pilot program in eight European countries, however, it can effectively be implemented throughout Europe.

Modular nature of the training course The MediaTrainer training course constitutes a logical part (from a civil journalist to a new media trainer), however, each of its parts can also be considered as separate elements. Indeed, as an individual module. Besides its crossmedia nature, the course carries a distinctive feature of being modular. Each module is divided into three phases: • preparation in the form of e-learning • training seminar ‘face to face’ • practical project Upon completion the participant is awarded a certificate and has the right to transcend to another module. However, nobody is obliged to become a media trainer. You can confine yourself to two initial modules and acquire functional abilities solely. The other module can be completed later once one practices and gains proper experience in working with media.

3 levels of successful communication A media trainer should enable people to participate appropriately in public communication and actively create it through their participation. Appropriately means that they are acquainted with journalistic and media requirements and that they meet these requirements. Three domains must be mastered to ensure successful media communication: • The first level refers to the content and its target groups: Which topics do I want to edit using media? Who takes an active part in public communication and should have something to say – something interesting, informative or entertaining for other people. That is where the involvement of the tar27

get group starts. Before thinking about the implementation of a topic, one needs to think about who the interested recipient might be, and how they can be reached. Helpful questions are: What is the aim of this broadcast segment – if on the radio, TV or on the internet? What should the target group get, how should they feel, and what should they think? What are the people supposed to do? Why is this topic important for others apart from the programme maker? • The second level refers to the contextual conversion of a topic. Which part of a topic should be illuminated? What dramaturgy (dramatic composition) does the segment need? Which questions should be asked and answered? Should the segment aim to inform, to entertain or to document – which form should it have? How do I build it up? Which form of expression fits best? Is an interview or a magazine contribution the best? Which voices do I need, experts, people concerned, observers? What should be the golden thread? • When these questions have been fully answered the third level follows – the “handicraft level” of concrete implementation. The ability to produce a radio or TV broadcast belongs here – a broadcast that can meet the quality requirements of different media, such as a a sharp image or a well-chosen section, and quality sound without annoying sidetones, a clear cut and short loading time on the internet. Media representatives must know all these requirements, professional journalists do not differ from “normal” citizens who want to take part in public communication. The same quality requirements exist for both, only the complexity of the products differs. Therefore anyone who wants to enable citizens to participate successfully in public communication has to train and support them on all three levels. Module A (video journalism) and B (cross media journalism) serve as a basis for this aim. Module A imparts knowledge about the basics of journalism as well as competences in the area of videojournalism. Module B enlarges and deepens the learning gained in the first module, and adds the crossmedia aspects in the area of online journalism. Module C imparts the tools of a trainer (how people can be supported and helped in their learning so that they are able to take an active part in public communication and create it with the help of the media).

28

Overview of modules of the MediaTrainer course Module A: video journalism In the first module two basic elements are emphasised: the ability to tell a story (storytelling) as well as the ability to present this story in the form of a short video report. Thus, the focus is on journalist characteristics as well as technical aspects: shooting, montage and video-editing. Each participant of a video journalism course not only finds out how to make a technically correct shot or how to set the camera properly but also learns critical thinking, searching for, analysing and processing information as well as accurately identifying recipients’ needs. Module A trains the participants in video journalism, using a functional/practical approach. The functional and safe handling of a camera, a microphone and sound are taught through small tasks. The participants thereby get used to the development of their own ideas and stories. The main criteria’s include exposÊ development, storyboard, research and investigation, dramaturgy of a short segment, the shooting, and choosing the image sections and ports. By producing a short video segment the participants try out functional media work and become familiar with it. On a theoretical level they learn the basics of journalistic work. They question techniques and design a presentation (moderation). They handle guests and get to know the legal framework of public communication. The aim: Getting to know video journalism, personal competences and knowledge to play an active role in public communication. This module aims to prepare and equip you with the skills required to produce your own video film.

Module B: cross media journalism This module illustrates how to communicate a message to a given recipient, by employing different media types and on-line tools. A participant of the module formulates a message/information and later selects tools which will be used to convey this message to society. He/She can inform about some kind of social action, a specific project or an issue/problem. During the course, the participant learns various multimedia techniques (cross media) to make a trailer, vidcast, podcast, flash animation or weblog. Some elements of on-line journalism provide a firm basis as they instruct how to write suitable texts for the Internet, and how to formulate a given message. In Module B the contents of Module A are deepened and complemented. That means that the functional and practical as well as the 29

theoretical journalistic basics are deepened. On a practical level this means the production of a segment/broadcast as well as the further use of information is gained. That is what is meant by a cross media approach. Journalistic work on several levels, TV on the one hand but also channels of dissemination like audio and the internet on the other. How does a story need to be worked differently for the internet? What does it mean to disseminate on the internet? How does the hypertext principle and needs of the users need to be handled to achieve as wide an audience as possible? Which text form is needed, which pictures or links ought to be used? Module B aims to give the participants good knowledge of crossmedia work. Further learning includes different interview forms, writing for talking, target-group-specific presentations and knowledge pertaining to different journalistic forms (news, segment, report or others). The aim of Module B: To deepen and reinforce personal journalistic skills and competences in the field of video journalism, and getting to know cross media elements for an internet based public community.

Module C: train the trainer Module C – trainer competences – is a training course for trainers. Here, the participant must go his/her own way from the level of a creator (of a report, blog, trailer) to the level of a trainer who will guide a group and will show his/her own skills and competences to other people. Acquiring training skills is a totally different thing. The participant must become self-confident, far-sighted, he/she must be able to plan and control a group, set goals and methods of their implementation. Moreover, he/she must learn how to adjust the knowledge conveyed to a given recipient. The methods he/she will implement in his/her work with young people will be totally different than the ones used in his/her work with seniors. Module C of the Media Trainer training courses strictly results from the two preceding modules. The content and the main idea is still new media and ICT. However, Module C leads the participants through a role change from participant to seminar leader/ trainer. Three days working on deepening that understanding follow. The Module is built up in such a way that participants are taken from their own experiences as a participant into their new role as a trainer. This is done through an instructive process of reflection and perception of what it means to be a trainer and which competences are required on a personal level. 30

The first two days focus on the conveyance of knowledge about the project as well as on an introduction to the new role. This is done by personal reflection about one’s own learning biography from which the requirements of a good trainer are taken. Therefore topics include reflecting on one’s own values as well as increasing understanding of how participants should react as a trainer in the framework of the project. The emphasis lies on “quality in acting”. Because every competent trainer has to have knowledge about a huge variety of methods which allows them to react correctly in different situations with different people within the seminar. The second emphasis lies in getting to know and test different methods. Alongside the tools of the cross media TV journalist (which participants learned in Modules A and B) this dimension is about the methods available to convey knowledge and competences. A theoretical instruction in the areas of cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning aims and the targeted and appropriate application of methods go hand in hand with that. Also the importance of personal reflection about their own preferences and abilities is part of the seminar to strengthen the participants in their prospective role as a trainer. As well as the variety of methods a trainer needs tools for preparing an ideal seminar: Participant analysis and the sensible use of evaluation results should make the prospective trainers feel safe in their own seminar preparation. The ability to deal with participants and their products later on when teaching Modules A and B is a criteria-led quality standard for radio, TV and online products and will be developed in Module C. This done by means of the application of principles learned which can be tested, specifically by the participants within the seminar to get functional and practical experiences concerning their role. Feedback and dealing with participants in a sensitive manner is also a part of Module C, to ensure the appropriate conveyance of those standards and to gain strong feedback competences. At the end of the Module everything is brought together, with self-reflection on the trainers role and personal feedback of the actual training supervisor. Each of the modules mentioned above has its specific structure. Face-to-face training is a central element. It typically takes 7 days. However, it is preceded by an hour-long e-learning course (usually 20 to 40 hours). Before each participant begins the practical training course he/she is obliged to familiarize himself/herself with theoretical and practical material, and to study specific parts of the learning materials. This is a prerequisite for participation in the training. Upon completion of the face to face training, the participant is obliged to complete a traineeship in a local NGO or a civil media center. During 31

this traineeship he/she is supposed to make his/her own video report (module A), weblog or on-line magazine (Module B) or to organize and carry out media workshops of himself/ herself (Module C). Participants who successfully complete all three stages of each module will be granted a certificate. You can find detailed information on the structure of the training course on page 13 in the chapter: Framework of the training course.

32

Module A: Video Journalism

A Introduction

34

Introduction People in community media and civil society institutions need skills in making videos. First level of our MediaTrainer course prepares you to become a web-TV reporter. What does it mean? You learn how to write your own story, how to shoot, edit and distribute your first video. Topic? It may be everything what is interesting for the viewer and important in your community. The main aim of this module is to give people in community media institutions and other NGOs skills in making videos. They will be required to use these skills to produce videos within their own community. Module A consists of a combination of three elements: preparation in a form of e-learning, practical course (face-to-face seminar) and practical project. During elearning the participants have to get acquainted with the most important theoretical material connected with camera functions, composition of the film shots and basic functions of the video editing programs. Each lesson is enriched in video materials and animations which assist a learning process. A participant of the course therefore can not only read about „focus� but also watch a video tutorial showing its significance and correct set-up. Each lesson is finished with a test. The participants have to answer questions (either the multiple-choice questions or open ones), which verify how was the theory gained. Each participant also has to demonstrate activeness on the discussion forum of the module A. This discussion refers to the selection of the topic for the film which will be produced during the practical course as well as to the research of information necessary in the process of video production. Moreover the participants have to fulfill on practical task which refers to basic video editing. Each participant has to download material, edit, and upload the edited video sequence, which is graded by a tutor. The material can be edited on the test version (usually 30 days) of the program, which every participant can download free from the producer’s web site. The goal of this exercise is to motivate a student to individual discovering and learning of the video editing program. The practical course includes 40 training hours and assumes maximum exercises using camera and video editing. During the workshop participants work in groups of 3-4 people. The main result of the workshop is a short video film on which they work independently, but under the supervision of the trainer. Moreover the results of the practical course will also be a storyboard and short interviews recorded by the participants. Graduates of the practical course have to prove their knowledge and skills in video journalism by the implementation of the practical project in their own institution or local TV channel.

What can you learn during the video journalism course? 1. How to use a camera

°° °° °° °° °°

identify the basic functions of a film camera list the features of the camera and microphone define white balance, focus, shutter put the camera together demonstrate your knowledge of these by filming a short interview

2. How to conduct a basic interview

°° °° °° °°

A Introduction

explain the basic elements required for an interview demonstrate with your interview partner how to take an interview shoot, capture and edit a short interview analyse good and bad elements of the interviews filmed

3. How to identify a story

°° °° °° °° °° °° °°

share ideas for stories with other participants in the group (including effective listening) analyse sample films and their synopses demonstrate your own idea and research facts for the video report to the group explain topic of your video report work effectively in the group draw up the synopsis of your group’s video report present and advocate for the synopsis to the group

4. How to turn the story into a film

°° °° °° °° °° °° °°

understand the meaning of film composition operate the camera at a basic level (under the supervision of a trainer) list the equipment needed for making a video understand the elements of and produce a shooting plan for a one day work allocate roles within the shooting plan execute the shooting plan as part of the group (i.e. make a raw film footage) reflect and report on your experience of a shooting day with others

5. How to finish the film

°° °° °° °°

identify the basic elements of montage and voice overs demonstrate knowledge of editing video and audio material communicate effectively while working as part of a team incorporate graphic elements into a video

6. How to distribute the film

°° °° °° °° °°

describe techniques for finalising and distributing a video apply these techniques when finalising the film and preparing it for distribution explain your ideas and the techniques used in finalising a film to the group evaluate your work as part of the group evaluate final production

The full plan of the practical seminar you will be able to find on the pages 110 – 118.

35

A Lesson 1

Lesson 1: What is a camera and how does it work? 1.1 Introduction and definition A video camera is a piece of photographic equipment that electronically records moving images either on a magnetic videotape or digital media. The camera records single pictures at a very high speed. The human eye perceives sequences of single pictures that change at a rate of at least 15 pictures per second as coherent movement. This process can be compared to a flip-book. By flipping the flip-book, the viewer perceives the single pictures as a fluent moving image.

1.2 Film, TV and consumer cameras There are many different types of camera, for example very complex film cameras for cinema production, TV-cameras or “simple” camcorders for the wide range of ordinary consumers. They differ in design, technical characteristics and functions. With a film camera, the picture can be arranged in very detailed ways. Most of the time several people will be doing the camera work. They are responsible for different operations, for example adjusting the sharpness and the aperture, positioning the focusing effect. For TV production it is more important to have a camera that is reliable and fast to handle. Therefore TV cameras have buttons that are easy to handle so that the different functions can be adjusted very easily by one operator. Easy handling is the most important thing when it comes to consumer cameras. The non-professional user normally does not have any technical “know-how” and therefore will not want to study long manuals before working with the camera. When a consumer turns on the camera, they expect to take vivid pictures fairly immediately. This is why consumer cameras mostly work on automatic settings.

1.3 Video camera and accessories The video camcorder consists of the following parts:

36

A Lesson 1

Camera body The camera body is the main part of the camera. The camera body contains electronic elements and mechanisms that control its operations and record images on the magnetic tape. Lens The camera lens captures the light from the subject and brings it to a focus on the film or detecting media.

37

A Lesson 1

Professional cameras have a lens which is detachable, as do professional digital cameras. The function of the lens in the camera is to direct the light source to the camera sensor and also to focus the image. The lens is used to adjust the focal distance, sharpness and aperture. Hobby or consumer cameras often use a lens that is integrated into the camera body and therefore cannot be changed. Tasks such as adjusting the aperture or the focus manually may be available within certain limits or not possible at all. The camera’s automatic settings relieve the user of these tasks, however they also narrow down the scope for creativity. Viewfinder The viewfinder is what the photographer looks through to compose, and in many cases to focus, the picture The viewfinder provides control over the camera picture. Newer camcorders additionally have an LCD– or sometimes a TFT–screen. For professional camera work though, the viewfinder still is the most important control device because both LCD– and TFT–screens are not precise enough. Primarily, the precise adjustment of the sharpness is much more manageable using the viewfinder. Highquality viewfinders are often black and white because that gives a stronger contrast which then enables more accurate adjustment of the sharpness of the image. Normally, the viewfinder in consumer cameras is very small and has a low resolution. It is not best suited for picture control and so would only be used in emer-

38

gency cases when making a professional film, for example outside when the sun is shining and virtually nothing can be seen on the LCD–screen. Recorder The recorder is a system of electronic and mechanical devices that allow the video to be saved on the medium. Over the years, many different video-saving formats have been developed. For magnetic videotaping there was S-VHS, HI 8, DIGI-S, Mini DV, Beta SP, DV Cam, DVC Pro or Digi – Beta. In the future, digital media, XD-,P2- or SD cards, will take over the market and videotape will disappear sooner or later.

A Lesson 1

Microphone A microphone is an acoustic sensor that converts sound into an electrical signal. Nearly all cameras have an internal microphone, however this microphone is not sufficient for professional use. The internal microphone is mostly used for recording the surrounding sound (“atmosphere sound”). For special tasks – for example interviews in a report or dialogue in a scene – we usually use external microphones. External microphones come in a variety of types. Filmmakers choose the types of microphones according to their needs in a particular scene. 39

A Lesson 1 Microphone boom A boom microphone is a directional microphone mounted or attached to a pole or arm. Primarily used in film and television, a boom microphone frees the hands of actors or reporters while allowing them to enjoy the amplified audio of a traditional microphone. Battery / charger Batteries guarantee the power supply to the camera during field work. Batteries are also used for the work in studio because they enable more freedom of movement for the cameraman. A standard set of equipment should have at least two batteries. The charger is used both for the power supply to the camera in emergency cases and also for charging empty batteries. In production work there is a variety of equipment used alongside the camera.

Tripod A tripod is a three-legged object, generally used as a platform of some sort. Tripods are used for both still and motion photography to prevent uncontrolled and unwanted camera movement. They reduce camera shake, and thus are instrumental in achieving maximum sharpness. A tripod is also helpful in achieving precise 40

framing of the image. News reporters often do not use tripods in their work as they need to react faster. Top light A top light is used primarily in news coverage as a brightening light when there is not enough natural light and the use of spot lights is either too complicated or time consuming. The top light is attached to the camera and can be supplied with power by the batteries. Top lights that are not dimmable can create a very intensive light; the light is smoothed by the use of special filters. This might be necessary for example to avoid strong contrasts in the face of a person being interviewed.

A Lesson 1

Headphones Headphones are necessary for accurate sound recording. Beginners especially tend to neglect the sound recording and later get annoyed by the bad quality of the sound. Preview monitor The preview monitor is an external monitor connected to the camera. It is often used during shoots which require very precise control over the image. The preview monitor is also used for training purposes, to show students how different adjustments (sharpness, white balance, and aperture) influence the final picture quality.

1.4 Basic camera settings To record high quality material the operator has to adjust the basic settings of the camera for each new recording. A lot of simple consumer cameras handle this automatically so there are few possibilities to adjust some of the settings manually. Most of the following functions are only available with professional or semiprofessional equipment. 41

A Lesson 1

Focal distance The focal distance can be adjusted by turning the focussing ring on the lens. Depending on the choice of focal distance, objects appear to be either nearby (telearea) or in the distance (wide angle area). Zoom movement during shooting can be used as an artistic device. Zoom-in on an object or a person can emphasise their special meaning for the plot. Another popular device is zoom-out from a detail to a more general point of view.  Zooming is a very particular effect and should be used carefully. Movies that are produced unprofessionally are often characterized by senseless zooming. Focus The standard definitions of focus are: 1. The position at which rays of light from a lens converge to form a clear and sharply defined image on a focal plane. 2. The action of adjusting the distance between the lens and subject to make light rays converge to form a clear and sharply defined image of the subject. The focus is used to adjust the right distance between an object and a camera. Wrong adjustments – depending on the condition of light and the focal distance – can lead to blurred shots.

LESSON MATERIALS Watch video “How to use the focus” at www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial

42

Focus switch

Zoom button

Zoom ring

A Lesson 1

Focus ring White ballance

Iris

Gain To adjust the distance correctly there is a particular sequence of actions: first, the main object must be zoomed-in, then the focus ring of the lens must be used to sharpen the picture and only then should the image section be fixed to finally start the recording. When the actors are moving either towards or away from the camera, the distance consequently changes so the sharpness must be adjusted on an ongoing basis during the recording. The same needs to be done for movements of the camera. However, this is part of more highly developed camera work and thus is explained later in more detail. 43

A Lesson 1

With cheap consumer cameras it is often not possible to adjust the focus manually. Therefore the photographer has to rely on the automatic focus. For cheap cameras it is therefore recommended not to choose a near focal distance (tele-area) because in this mode, the depth of focus is diminished. Semi-professional or professional cameras mostly work with either automatic or manual focus. Most of the time, manual adjustment is more advantageous: the automatic focus on a video camera is not precise enough. Non-professional shots often have variable sharpness. Aperture: The adjustment of the aperture influences how much light comes through the lens into the camera. The more bright the object itself, the less the aperture needs to be opened (low value= big opening of the aperture; high value= small opening of the aperture). Consumer cameras mostly only have limited possibilities for adjusting the aperture manually. Professional cameras though do have a special aperture ring as part of the lens for that purpose. For many shots, the automatic function can lead to tolerable results and can at least be used to calculate an average value. When the light changes during shooting, the aperture should be adjusted manually.

LESSON MATERIALS Watch videos “Iris” and “Colour temperature”at www.europeanweb.tv/program/ tutorial Colour temperature and white balance There are three different modes of light: • daylight, • tungsten light • mixed light Each of these different modes has a different colour temperature. Colour temperatures are measured on the Kelvin scale.  Pure daylight has a colour temperature of 5600 Kelvin.  Pure tungsten light, produced by spot lights, has a temperature of 3200 Kelvin. When there is mixed light, for example in rooms with both artificial light and sunlight through the window, the Kelvin values can only be calculated by light measurement. 44

The human eye adapts automatically to different colour temperatures. That means for example the color red looks more or less the same, no matter whether in daylight or tungsten light. When using a camera, the procedure is more complicated and is regulated by the so-called white balance. If the white balance is not set correctly, the colours seem to be unnatural. The images have a blue or a red tone. White balance helps to adjust the camera to the particular colour temperature. To reproduce the colour correctly, the camera needs to be referenced to the white colour balance.

A Lesson 1

To adjust the white balance, set the aperture and focus of the camera on a white object (that should fill the whole picture frame; for example, a white sheet of paper held in front of object that is to be filmed). The director of photography pushes the button for the white balance and keeps on pressing it until the camera adjusts all colour values to the referential white value. In the viewfinder a notice appears confirming the white balance has been adjusted successfully.  As long as the light does not change during the subsequent filming, the camera reproduces all colours correctly. Many cameras have presets in addition to the manual white balance. Presets are fixed values for day or tungsten light. All cameras have an automatic white balance that can under certain circumstances lead to good results. However, manual white balance adjustment is always preferable. Gain With the Gain function, the picture can be lightened electronically when there is insufficient light. Consumer cameras do this most of the time automatically. More professional cameras permit the switch on/switch off of the Gain function. This function worsens the picture quality and so is only used in emergency cases.

1.5 Tripod A tripod is very sensitive, especially the head, which has the fluid in it. After the shoot, the screws should be loosened so that the tripod cannot be damaged during transportation (for example, the fluid could leak). Also when the tripod is in

LESSON MATERIALS Watch video “How to use the tripod” at www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial 45

A Lesson 1

use, the head must not be fixed during a movement, otherwise it can be easily damaged.

1.6 Precautions • to treat the magnetic recording head in the camera recorder compartment with care, please take out the tape after the shooting has finished • the lenses are very sensitive. Thus it is necessary to ensure you do not apply strength or any other physical pressure on it! • clean the lenses either with a soft tissue or a brush. A dirty lens diminishes the recording • after the shooting has finished, please cover the lens with the special lid to protect it from dirt • to treat the camera with care, please take out the battery after the shooting has been finished

1.7 Complete camera setup That is the end of the first lesson. It was a short introduction into the basic functions and features of a camera. This theory is important for you to produce better films in the future.

LESSON MATERIALS Watch video “Complete camera setup” at www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial

46

Test questions 1. ... contains electronic elements and mechanisms that control its operations and record image on the magnetic tape. a) recorder b) lens c) camera body d) charger 2. The lens is NOT used to adjust: a) brightness b) sharpness c) focal distance d) aperture 3. Viewfinder and LCD screen offer identical opportunities to control the image a) true b) false 4. A system of electronic and mechanic devices that allow saving the video on the medium is called: a) camera body b) viewfinder c) recorder d) sensor 5. There is one unified video recording standard: a) true b) false 6. Internal microphone is mostly used for the recording of: a) human voice b) music c) atmosphere sound d) voice over 7. What is the minimum number of batteries a set of video equipment should have: a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 8. Tripod is helpful in achieving all of the following EXCEPT: a) sharpness b) precise framing

A Test A1

47

A Test A1

c) correct white balance d) fluent movement 9. Top light should be used in the following situations EXCEPT: a) not enough natural light b) spot lights are too complicated to use c) in professionally equipped studios d) spontaneous interviews in a dark setting 10. In the form of an essay please describe what you know about basic settings of camera (8-10 sentences). Please make sure to comment on the following notions: • manual vs. automatic settings • focal distance • focus • aperture • color temperature and white balance • gain

ANSWERS You can find the answers for this test on page 384

48

Lesson 2: Graphic Design Basics The camera is not merely a technical device for recording everything as it is. It is a great tool for creativity, self-expression and spontaneous ideas. However, before trying to experiment with what the camera can do, an operator needs to learn some graphic design basics.

2.1 Lines & contrast

A Lesson 2

Lines and contrasts are elements that greatly influence the viewer’s perception of the image. Lines help to focus the view on different parts of the picture or lead the eyes along the picture. In addition, lines have an influence on the emotions of the viewer. For example vertical lines help provoke feelings of dignity, height, and strength. Contrast in photographic composition is an effective means of directing the viewer’s attention to the centre of interest. Positioning of subject elements to create contrast gives them added emphasis and directs the viewer’s attention.

Bright-dark-contrasts The most popular type of contrast is probably the bright-dark-contrast. When a white circle lays on a black square, the viewer automatically focuses on the white surface. In case of the bright-dark-contrast, the viewer’s attention is always directed to the bright area. 49

A Lesson 2

Colour contrasts Colour contrast is often used as a stylistic device in advertising. For example: when a picture consists of several squares that are all blue except one red square, the attention of the viewer is attracted to the red square. Colour contrast can often be added during post production.

50

Portion contrast The same example can be used for the portion contrast: in a variety of blue squares there is only one single square red. This difference in portion attracts the viewer’s attention to the single red square.

A Lesson 2

Contrast of form and surface When there is just one circle in between squares, the viewer’s attention is directed to the circle.

Horizontal, vertical or diagonal lines While horizontal lines create harmonic, quiet and static impressions, vertical lines seem to convey dominance, power and strength. Diagonal lines create a disturbing, disharmonious, dynamic or tense atmosphere. Horizontal lines A long shot of the sea creates a relaxed and harmonic impression due to the clear lines between beach, sea and sky.

51

A

Vertical lines A long shot of the White House gives an impression of magnitude and power, created by the vertical lines of the columns.

Lesson 2

Diagonal lines A shot of a forest with leaning trees has diagonal lines in it; thus, the image appears to be disturbing and disharmonious. The viewer will have the impression that the trees are about to fall down. Graphic and imaginary lines There are two types of lines in the picture. Graphical lines created by the objects and their position. Examples: urban canyons, landscapes, positioning of persons in a room. Virtual lines are imaginary lines that are created by movements in a picture, so called “movement vectors”. Virtual lines can be created by movements. Viewing direction, so called “view vectors”, and gestures also create virtual lines. 52

A Lesson 2

2.2 Symmetry Symmetry and asymmetry create dynamics or tension of the picture. In a symmetrically arranged image the elements are mirrored on the axis, in asymmetry the elements are randomly located. Symmetry Symmetrical pictures evoke, like horizontal lines, an impression of harmony. This type of arrangement can get boring when it is used too often.  Asymmetry To evoke interest and keep the attention of the viewer, a lot of images are arranged asymmetrically. Asymmetry in images appears to be more dynamic and more exciting.

53

A

2.3 Golden ratio As was mentioned in the previous section, asymmetrical images evoke more interest and tension. Thus, photographers like to work with the “rule of the thirds”, a simplification of the “Golden ratio” rule, also known as “golden section” or “divine proportion”.

Lesson 2

The rule implies that the picture is imaginarily divided by the two horizontal and two vertical guide lines. According to the “golden ratio” principle the depicted object should be placed either along one of the guidelines or directly at their intersections. According to this rule, a flower (orits blossom) should not be arranged right in the middle of the picture but along the right guideline.

54

2.4 Picture composition The aim of picture composition is to arrange the objects or people in the picture in the most effective and vivid way. Picture composition is based on the golden ratio rule. If you want to record an interview, you should consider the following:

A Lesson 2

Choose the appropriate camera distance (type of shot). Mostly, it will be a close-up, showing the person being interviewed upwards from the chest. Position the person in the picture Allow more space in the view direction, thus place the person in the right or left third of the picture. The person should sit/stand a little bit to the side of the camera (to avoid a head-on perspective when the person looks flat). Ensure that the space above the head is balanced (not too much, not too little).

55

A Test A2

56

Test questions 1. Graphic design basics can be described as a set of recommendations on how to a) write an effective narrative b) brainstorm an idea c) make the picture attractive, create atmosphere and convey specific message d) find relevant sources for the story 2. The viewer’s attention is influenced by all of the following EXCEPT: a) lines b) symmetry/asymmetry c) contrast d) presence or absence of static objects 3. In picture composition we often rely on “golden ratio” rule. a) true b) false 4. They key phrases of the “golden ratio” rule are: a) contrasts, lines b) guidelines, intersections c) dark, light d) dynamic, static 5. Horizontal, vertical and diagonal lines are the ONLY lines that can be in a picture. a) true b) false 6. Virtual lines are created by: a) objects b) positioning c) movement and view vectors d) shades 7. What phrase best explains effect of a symmetrical image: a) instability b) excitement c) distrust d) harmony 8. “A picture consists of several dots that are all orange except one green” – what type of contrast is it? a) bright-dark-contrast

b) portion contrast c) colour contrast d) contrast of form and surface 9. “One question mark in between exclamation marks” - what type of contrast is it? a) bright-dark-contrast b) portion contrast c) colour contrast d) contrast of form and surface 10. In essay form, please describe how you would prepare and record an interview (from picture composition perspective) (8-10 sentences). Please make sure you comment on the following: • camera distance • “Golden ratio” • viewing vector and space • head-on perspective • balanced space

A Test A2

ANSWERS You can find the answers for this test on page 384

57

A Lesson 3

Lesson 3: How do you compose shots? Apart from the technical tasks, the camera operator is also responsible for the artistic composition of the film. Every little shot should be planned carefully because it adds up to the general sequence and conveys certain information and emotions to the viewer. Cinematographic techniques such as the choice of shot and camera movement, can greatly influence the structure and meaning of a film.

3.1 Shot size Choosing the correct shot composition (size) is fundamental in camera work. Beginners need to study different types of shots and train their cinematic view. The followings are types of shots commonly used in film, video, and animation. Establisher The establisher is the biggest/widest shot and is used to introduce the viewer into the setting of a movie or to present the location. The viewer gets an idea as to the place of an action, for example a village in the mountains. Long Shot (Full Shot) The long shot presents the location a little bit more detail than the establisher. For example: a little house in a village, children are playing in front of it, someone is coming. Knee shot In this shot, the protagonists (main characters) or single protagonist are in the centre and are seen from head to toe. Example: Two persens discuss, the door opens and somebody comes out. This person can already be identified by the viewer. 58

A

American shot This shot originates from Western movies and shows the person from the head to knees (including the gun). An American shot clearly shows gestures because the hands are still in the picture.

Lesson 3

Example: Someone talks to the man who just got out of the car. The women is nervous and puts his hands in his pocket. Medium shot The medium shot shows a character’s upper-body, arms, and head. Medium shots are relatively good for showing facial expressions but work well to show body language.

Close up The close up is common in movie dialogues, interviews or news reports. The person can be seen from the head to chest. The facial expressions and emotions are easy to identify. Garments, such as shirts, jewelry or ties that give hints about the social origin of a protagonist are in the picture as well. Example: The women is talking talking to another person and smiling.. Extreme close up The extreme close-up focuses on facial expression. Even the subtlest emotions can be seen by the viewer.

59

A Lesson 3

Example: The women is obviously surprised about the course of the conversation. She tries to hide her emotions but without success because her face clenches.

Detailed shot (insert shot) Detailed or insert shots focus on objects that have a special meaning or emphasise emotions. Informative shots with more complex information are often longer in duration (slow cut) so that a viewer can connect narration with a picture. Faster cuts produce the opposite effect, create more tension and hold up viewer’s attention. The shot composition influences how the viewers perceive transitions between different shots. Depending on the intentions of the dramatic composition, transitions can be either almost “invisible” or very eye-catching. Sequence In film, a sequence is a series of scenes which form a distinct narrative unit, usually connected either by unity of location or unity of time. Scenes are built up from separate shots.

LESSON MATERIALS Watch video “Sequence” at www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial

3.2 Perspectives The camera perspective is another cinematic technique that influences the viewer’s perception.

60

A

Eye Level An eye level perspective is the most natural perspective to show people. The camera is, as the name suggest, at eye level. This is used for talks, interviews etc.

Lesson 3

View from below In this case, the camera is below eye level and films the person slightly from below. Depending on the context of a shot, this view shows either self-confidence or negative characteristics such as dominance over a person. Due to the small difference between the eye level and the view from below, viewers mostly do not pay much attention to it. Upper view An upper view is the opposite of the view from below. The camera films a person slightly from above. In certain contexts, this perspective can show a person as weak or cute. Worm’s eye view or bird’s eye view Variations of the two perspectives mentioned above are respectively the worm’s eye and the bird’s eye view.

61

A Lesson 3

The more extreme the shots of the protagonist from above or below are, the more this perspective strikes the viewer’s attention. The interpretation of such scenes depends on many other factors though. It is not always true that a bird’s eye view portrays a person as powerless and worm’s eye view conveys domination. Sometimes these types of perspectives are used for creative and experimental purposes.

3.3 Movements in the picture There are two types of movement in pictures. Type one These movements happen in front of the camera while the camera itself is fixed. Example: a person or an object moves towards the camera or in the opposite direction, from the left to the right side or the other way round. Type two These movements result from the work with the camera. Example: the camera moves towards an object or in the opposite direction. The camera tilts top down or the other way round. These types of movements are often used in combination. That means the camera follows a person or an object that moves. The camera moves freely through the room, independent from persons or objects.

LESSON MATERIALS Watch video “Movements in the picture” at www.europeanweb.tv/program/ tutorial

Types of camera movements Pans Camera moves horizontally from left to right side and other way round; Tilts Camera moves vertically from up to down or the other way round; For tracking (continuous) shots, professional film productions benefit from different technical equipment. We will briefly mention some of them even though they are rarely used in other fields. 62

Dolly A dolly is a wheeled platform on which the camera is mounted; with the help of a dolly, fluent following shots can be filmed. There are several different pathways for a dolly track: • Parallel drive: the dolly moves parallel to the object in the picture • Front drive: the dolly moves towards a person/object • Back drive: the dolly moves away of a person/object

A Lesson 3

Crane A crane is a special device used to lift the camera high into the air and film from above. The camera can float above the objects. In concerts or shows, a crane often floats over the heads of the audience. Steadicam A Steadicam is a stabilizing mount for a motion picture camera, which mechanically isolates the operator’s movement from the camera, allowing a very smooth shot even when the operator is moving quickly over an uneven surface. The dolly and steadicam are often used for a master shot. A master shot is a recording of an entire scene without a break. Example: a man goes into a building. He passes different offices and greets his colleagues until he reaches his own desk. Master shots create bigger spatial depth and spatial orientation. They require very detailed planning and a well-considered choreography.

63

A Test A3

64

Test questions 1. Composition in filmmaking is essential because it a) has emotional influence b) influences the structure of a film c) helps to convey the meaning d) all of the above 2. All of the following are the BASIC perspectives EXCEPT: a) eye level b) view from below c) upper view d) worm’s eye view 3. Worm’s eye view always conveys dominance, whereas bird’s eye view always suggests weakness. a) true b) false 4. All of the following analogies are true EXCEPT a) establisher - location b) close up – small details c) American shot - gestures d) Extreme close-up – facial expression 5. Camera movements and movements in front of the camera are often combined. a) true b) false 6. Horizontal camera movement is called a) tilt b) dolly c) pan d) perspective 7. Which of the following is the correct logical order? a) sequence-shot-scene b) shot-scene-sequence c) scene-shot-sequence d) shot-sequence-scene 8. All of the following technical devices are used for dynamic shots EXCEPT a) dolly b) tripod c) crane

d) steadicam 9. Transitions between shots must always be “invisible” a) true b) false 10. Imagine you need to make a small video clip showing how a student borrows a book from the library. In the form of “action/object/location”-“type of shot” describe your shooting plan.

A Test A3

Example: “building of the library” – “establisher”, “student walking to the library” – “long shot” Please describe at least 10 more actions.

ANSWERS You can find the answers for this test on page 384

65

A Lesson 4

Lesson 4: Light design The human eye possesses an excellent natural ability to adapt to different light conditions. Technical equipment like cameras are not so sophisticated and so needs more time and special manual adjustments to reproduce quality pictures in different light settings. Creative light design is a very complicated process that goes far beyond adding light to make a picture brighter. Light design helps to create a certain atmosphere and adds the desired mood to the whole picture. A detailed explanation of light design can take many hours and dozens of pages. The following chapter is just an introduction to the essentials of light design.

4.1 Three point illumination In TV production, three point illumination is the standard for recording people. It is used for interviews, soap operas or movies. Three point illumination presupposes three types of light: key, fill and backlight. Key light The first type of light is key light. It is the strongest one and therefore determines the shadow shape. The key light is the first one to be positioned, a little bit away from the camera and slightly from above so that the shadows cast down.

Back

Fill

Key Camcorder 66

Fill The purpose of this light is to brighten the scene. It is fixed on the other side of the camera axis and should be paler than the key light. The brightening light softens the shape of the shadows caused by the key light. With an interlayer, the fill gets smoother and therefore appears to be more natural.

A Lesson 4

Back light The back light is positioned across from the key light. The back light gives the person a sharpened outline and so they are silhouetted against the background. The shot seems to be more plastic and gives a bigger spatial depth. Background light In addition to the three point illumination, a photographer can make use of a background light. An interesting background colour for example can be created by the coloured interlayer. Outside sunlight is the key light. The sun is a natural light source according to the logic of light. The phrase “logic of light” refers to realistic and natural illumination. If the illumination appears to be unrealistic, it is called a “dramatic” logic of light. In this case the light effects are of great importance.

LESSON MATERIALS Watch videos “Head light”, “Sided light” and “Backlight” at www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial

4.2 Light design by direction The head light throws frontal light on the person. Film stars in their 40’s and 50’s benefit from this kind of light because it makes them look younger. Direct light creates no shadows so crinkles and skin problems are not that visible. Sided light directly comes from the side and is positioned at a 90°angle to the camera axis. Because it creates a very strong shadow, it emphasises the dramatic nature of the scene. In the case of backlight, the source of light is positioned across from the camera behind the object or person. The face of the person stays in the dark. Thus, this kind of light is often used in horror movies or thriller.

4.3 Quality of light When a person is supposed to be framed with less strong shadows, a smoother light is needed. Smoother light is produced by an interlayer that is fixed on the 67

A Lesson 4

wings of the spot light. The same effect is created through an indirect arrangement of light. For that, the spot light must be focused on a white area or a light reflector (bouncer). The reflected rays of light are more diffused and soft. In addition, most spots light have filters that disperse the light. To achieve sharp shadows, the light must be directed directly at a person or object. videomaker.com

68

Test questions 1. Light design deals with the following: a) sound and sound quality b) dramatic composition of the narrative c) light, light quality and effects d) film composition 2. The three point illumination presupposes the following types of light EXCEPT: a) background light b) key light c) fill light d) backlight 3. In TV production, the three point illumination has been established as the standard for filming people. a) true b) false 4. Which of the following statements is NOT true: a) key light is stronger than fill b) backlight is positioned first c) key light is positioned away from the camera d) backlight is positioned across from the key light 5. Key, fill and backlight are the ONLY types of light used in TV productions. a) true b) false 6. What do we mean by “dramatic logic of light�? a) background light b) natural light c) unrealistic, special effects light d) shades 7. In terms of direction we distinguish the following types of light: a) natural and artificial light b) head and background light c) key, fill and backlight d) head, sided, backlight 8. Backlight is often used in what types of films? a) comedies b) horrors c) Westerns

A Test A4

69

A Test A4

d) dramas 9. What is the function of an interlayer? a) concentrate the light b) bounce the light c) soften the light d) all of the above

ANSWERS You can find the answers for this test on page 384

70

Lesson 5: How to get the best sound for your film? Music, sounds and voice overs are added to all movies and videos. Even silent movies have music. Sound design is as important as picture composition.

5.1 Sound while recording During the shoot it is very important to record good quality sound., as it is hard to change something or correct mistakes later. In general, you must try to position the microphone as near to the sound source as possible. The closer the microphone is, the better it can record. The further away it is, the more noise appears on the recording. For outside interviews, we use a windscreen to avoid irritating wind noise. The wind deflector is made of foam and absorbs wind and pop sounds (sounds being produced by vocal plosives such as “B” and “P”). There are different types of microphone for sound recording. Each of them is suited for different shooting conditions and has special characteristics

A Lesson 5

Ball microphone (omnidirectional) The sound is recorded from all directions at the same intensity, but over a fairly small range. It is best suited for interviews in noisy surroundings. One has to speak directly into the microphone. Ball microphones are also used as vocal microphones. Lavalier microphone This is a special form of the ball microphone, which is small and can be attached to clothing so that it is not visible. Lavalier microphones are much more sensitive than the normal ball microphone and are best suited for interviews in quiet surroundings.  Cardioids (unidirectional microphone) These are well suited for sound recording when noise from other directions needs to be cut out. They are sensitive to sounds from only one direction, so the sound source can be focused and recorded more precisely. Cardioids can also be used for filming where the microphone is not supposed to be in the picture. 71

A Lesson 5

There are different forms of cardioids with different characteristics. Hyper cardioids: hyper cardioids have a tighter area of front sensitivity and are less sensitive to the sounds coming from the side. This helps to avoid background noises and is therefore often used for interviews in reports. Super cardioids: the front sensitivity is higher than that of hyper cardioids and excludes background noises even better. Lobe: This is a high quality directional microphone (also a noise cancelling microphone) and is suited for noisy environments. Thus, it is often used as a boom microphone. When it is directly focused on the mouth of a speaker, loud background noises (for example, traffic noise) can be avoided from a longer distance.

5.2 Off-tone and on-tone The tone in movies consists of different sound sources. Firstly, there is a difference between off-tone and on-tone. In the case of on-tone, the sound source can be seen in the picture, for example a speaking protagonist, a musician or a car passing by. In the case of off-tone, the sound source cannot be seen in the picture, for example the voice in an audio-comment. Thus, the off-tones are sound sources that do not have their origin in the situation being presented in the picture. Typical off-tones are annotators, effects sounds or music. The scenic off-tone is a special form. The sound source is a protagonist in the movie: however while s/he cannot be seen in a special shot in the movie, s/he can be heard. This can also be applied to sounds or music whose origin clearly is part of the movie action.

5.3 Music The emotional effect of music in a movie is a very important element. Often the music influences the mood of the viewer even more than the image. Music emphasises the atmosphere or the dramatic composition of the scene and creates a catching dynamic. 72

In the following videos you will see the same sequence with 4 different types of music. This example demonstrates the importance and big influence of film music. The following music aspects should be considered: Tempo When a scene needs to be scored in a pretty dynamic and peppy way, music with a fast rhythm is needed. A typical example is an action scene. Very accurate productions adapt the editing to the rhythm of the music. In contrast, slower music is used to score romantic scenes. Here, the music is intended to create a quiet and relaxing atmosphere. For informative sequences, the music should be discreet and not a distracting element for the viewer.

A Lesson 5

Instruments and moods Every musical instrument has its own tonal quality. In addition, some instruments are associated with special locations, situations, motives or genres. Example: harmonica = western/ cowboy theme; bagpipe = Scotland; smoky saxophone  =  bar; flamenco guitar  =  Spain; accordion  =  nightlife in Paris. Depending on the scenic context, these musical clichés can either have an informative, humoristic, dramatic or ironic implication. Illustrating use of music The meaning of a picture can be underlined by music in many different ways. The mood technique emphasises the mood of a scene by the use of music. Example: Happy people: happy music, sad persons: sad music. Cartoons developed the so-called “Mickeymousing” technique: each single movement in a shot is scored with a tone. Chase music is typical for chases, as the name implies. It is a kind of jazz style; several soloists do an improvisation and alternate periodically – they have a musical “battle”, similar to the battle on the screen. The accentuated use of music – other than the Mickeymousing – only scores special moments or movements that are important for the action of the film.

LESSON MATERIALS Watch videos “Illustrating use of music” and “Contrasting use of music” at www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial 73

A

Contrasting use of music To confuse the viewers, to provoke them or to concentrate their attention, contrasting use of music is used. The score is outrageously antagonistic to the image. Example: a war scene is scored with cheery music.

Lesson 5 Polarising use of music Here, a neutral image or a rather uninteresting scene is thwarted by an exaggerated score. This use of music can produce a manipulating or ironic effect, depending on the context. Example: a politician comes into the picture, by underlining the scene with sinister music, the politician seems to be weird or ominous.

74

Test questions 1. Sound design deals with the following: a) Dramatic composition of the narrative b) light, light quality and effect c) film composition d) sound, music and voice over 2. Which type of microphone records sound from all directions: a) super cardioid b) unidirectional microphone c) ball microphone d) lobe 3. In general the microphone should be positioned as close to the sound source as possible. a) true b) false 4. Sunny day – cheerful music; gloomy day – gloomy music. What music aspect is this? a) instruments and moods b) tempo c) illustrating use of music d) contrasting use of music 5. Music mood should always correspond to image mood. a) true b) false 6. Polarising use of music presupposes using: a) music improvisation b) outrageously antagonistic scores c) an exaggerated score with neutral image d) all of the above 7. A small microphone which is attached to clothing is called: a) boom b) lobe c) ball microphone d) lavalier 8. What type of microphone gives the best possibility for focussing on the source of sound from a long distance? a) Hyper cardioid b) lobe

A Test A5

75

A Test A5

c) ball microphone d) lavalier 9. What is the function of the windscreen/ wind deflector? a) amplify sound b) bounce sound c) reduce noise d) concentrate sound 10. Imagine you have a task to shoot an interview with the same artist in different locations: TV-studio, street and at his studio during the process of painting. Please describe what microphones and other equipment will you need for each interview. Please explain your choices.

ANSWERS You can find the answers for this test on page 384

76

Lesson 6: Basics of journalism Interesting ideas, sufficient time for research and responsible editorial work – these are all basic components of a good video or TV production in the sphere of citizen media. Like professional journalists, citizen media editors have to find topics and elaborate them at a high journalistic level. The production of a report is a very complex process which is done in several steps. The content is normally the responsibility of editors. They work closely together with camera teams. Conceptual preparation is crucial for success of the project. Editors have, among other things, the following responsibilities: They find suitable topics for the reports. “Suitable” in this context must be understood in the sense of “relevance”. It is crucial to estimate whether the target group is interested enough in the proposed topic and if the topic and planned realisation can generate public interest and discussion. The editor does in depth research to collect all relevant information about the topic. The editor develops an abstract and, if necessary, a treatment and a storyboard. Planning interesting interviews is also the editor’s responsibility. The editor plans the process of filming and makes sure that the content is presented in an interesting way. In this regard, the editor can follow the tradition of old storytellers. People love stories and if the editor is successful in presenting the topic with a dramatic, appealing narration, the viewers will very much want to see the report. The editor has to write the off-text and narrate it in an understandable way.

A Lesson 6

6.1 How to find a topic Finding an interesting topic is the first step of a production. In context of the citizen media work, there is indeed specific content, for example culture, politics, youth and citizen initiatives, minorities, education, seniors, children and so on. Traditional themes of tabloid journalism are of no relevance. Superficial and voyeuristic reports about criminality, red light milieu or VIPs are not usually chosen by citizen media film makers. In the process of finding a topic, the editor should concentrate on the wishes and demands of the target group. This means the editor should find a topic that is suitable for the magazine or the format in which it is supposed to be aired. The topic presentation should include new, interesting, entertaining or extraordinary aspects. Viewers are also interested to hear information that has practical application for their daily lives (health, fashion, weather, advice). 77

A Lesson 6

Editors should try to avoid imposing moral standards. They should carefully investigate and objectively present the issues but leave the judgment to viewers.

6.2 Research While researching editors collect background information and try to investigate all aspects of an issue. Having collected as much information as possible the editor can decide which aspect(s) of the issue will be addressed in the report. Nowadays editors use variety of research tools, including the internet, technical literature and newspapers. An important part of the research is personal communication with experts and the people concerned with the issue chosen. In the last 20 years, the internet has become the most important source for journalistic research. It is possible to find everything on the internet, however we should be aware that some information on internet can be biased. Thus, editors have to consider following questions: • Who is responsible for the site and what is its aim? • How reliable is the web resource? To be on the safe side it is recommended to check important facts on at least three different internet sites. Often, very detailed research is necessary to prepare an insightful report. Using biased, incorrect or unverified information in a TV report is considered to be the most severe mistake of the editor. A conversation with people concerned and experts is a good basis for a personal point of view. Editors are not omniscient and cannot know every little detail beforehand. Therefore, they should conduct in depth research. A story has two sides – comparable to a play with arguing protagonists and antagonists. A fair editor normally gives both sides the chance to speak. That is why an editor should always try to present the story in an objective and neutral way.

6.3 Written elaboration and preparation Before starting to film the report, working out a written elaboration of the report is highly recommended. Writing elaboration helps editors to structure the chosen topic, find out which aspects should be highlighted and what creative devices can be applied. When the editor is able to explain the idea succinctly and clearly to a colleague for example, it means that s/he really knows the topic. The following steps to produce a written elaboration are widely used video productions. Of course, the editor is not obliged follow all these guidelines. Elaboration of the report depends on many circumstances, like whether the production follows an inductive or deductive approach. 78

Deductive methodology means that the journalist knows the important conclusions of the report before the shooting starts. S/he has a very concrete script and searches during the shoot for suitable material to strengthen the point. When following the inductive method, the journalist deals with what comes up during the shooting. S/he builds up the reports on new findings and eventually come to the conclusion that is somehow original and unexpected. Whatever approach you take, do not start a shooting without having written out a concept. If you have an unclear concept, you will have to record more material than necessary. This will later cause difficulties in editing.

A Lesson 6

Exposé The first step of the written elaboration is the exposé. It can be regarded as an instruction for both producers and editors. An exposé clearly and briefly states the main idea of the future report and contains the following information: • Logline – the name of the project with a short description of the main ideas, if possible in one sentence; • Location and time of the action; • Important people that appear and that should be interviewed; Special aspects • Plot: how is the narration built up? • Perspective: who sees? That means, from what point of view is the report/ film being told? From the point of view of a person, from the point of view of a group etc.? Treatment In a treatment, the composition of the film is being described in a more detailed way than in an exposé. For motion pictures, a treatment gives a precise description of the scenes (without dialogues). In reference to the production of a magazine report, the treatment also gives information about the filming and editing techniques, as well as the sound design. Storyboard The storyboard depicts single shots of a movie or a scene. It visualises the script by making a sketch of every little shot and therefore looks, at first glance, like a book of comics. While making a storyboard pay attention to: • sketches with reference to the shot sizes; • positions and movements of people and objects in the shot; 79

A

• camera perspective; • composition of the picture; • equipment needed.

Lesson 6

Title

Action Dialoge

Translation Timing

80

Page

6.4 Interview An editor should be capable of planning and conducting the interview. The method of questioning should support the person being interviewed to make statements necessary for the production. Every interviewee is different and the editor should be always aware of this. Some people, for example, are talkative and do not need many questions while others are shy. Depending on the different characters, the editor must guide the interview partners through the conversation and either slow them down or motivate them to talk. Open questions help to maintain the conversation. Open questions are formulated so that the dialogue partner cannot answer with a “yes” or a “no”.

A Lesson 6

It is important to choose the right interview partners. Most of the time, a phone call is enough to figure out if the person has enough expertise and eloquence to talk about the issue. In a preliminary discussion, the editor discusses themes with the interview partners. At this stage the editor should avoid asking any specific questions. Interview partners who are not used to giving interviews can write down some answers before the shoot. However, in this case the answers will not appear to be spontaneous and authentic. Controversial questions can contribute to an exciting interview. Also personal opinions can be interesting under certain circumstances and therefore can be sought. The main purpose of an interview is to reveal the professional knowledge of the partner (expert interview) or present their personal concern. During interviews with professionals or politicians, it is alright to interrupt the person if they do not directly answer the question. In such situation the journalist should paraphrase the question and try to get a straightforward answer. During the interview, the editor tries to consider the expectations of the viewer and asks questions that might interest the viewers in the first place. Overall, there should not be too many questions asked. For a traditional TV report (2 to 5 minutes), the editor does not need so much content and therefore can limit the number of questions. Only parts of the whole interview will be used. Each part should not be longer than 40 seconds, as passages that are longer can bore the viewer. Many facts and information mentioned by the person in the interview can be better presented as comments in the voice-over.

81

A Lesson 6

6.5 Storytelling Most people like good story. Thus, it is editor’s task to present the topic in the form of a narrative. The report content is the most important thing. It has to be both interesting and reasonable for the viewer and should touch their emotions in some way. Protagonists can be people the viewers identify themselves with. In this context, protagonists are not actors as in a motion picture but people who tell their own story or somehow represent aspects of a topic. The report should be structured clearly. In the course of a good narration (with a beginning, a middle and the ending), development must be clear and reasonable. A narration attracts the viewer with the help of a catchy beginning, powerful ending and some highlights. It is possible to discuss different conflicts or obstacles in the reports. Special circumstances can contribute to the value of the story.

6.6 Voice-Over The off-text narration in a report to give additional information is called a voiceover. A well-performed voice over must be clear and understandable. It should be authentic and must match to the content of the image. It is very important that the voice over adds content to the picture instead of just re-telling it. The right pronunciation is crucial in production of a good voice-over. Monotonous talking bores the viewer. In general, the text should not sound as though it is just being read but as if the speaker is telling something to the viewer. Hint: while recording the voice-over imagine you are speaking directly with the viewer. Some notes for ways of speaking: • The speaker should pronounce all the words in a clear and understandable way. • If the speaker has not written the text, s/he should read it several times and get to know it. The speaker should narrate it in a self-confident way. • The editor or speaker should not exaggerate while speaking, s/he should sound natural. • S/he should not talk too fast but also not too slow; instead s/he should find a mid-tempo.

6.7 TV magazines - Composition of a magazine report The magazine is a compilation of different reports usually on the same topic. Single magazine reports are between 1:30 and 7 minutes long. A magazine and single 82

reports are more entertaining in character than a newscast. To attract the viewers, a magazine story does not usually start with a presentation of facts. Instead it is often started with a “case study” that is being used as a leitmotif of the whole magazine. According to Bornemann and Gerhold the standard format for a magazine story presupposes the following elements: • Intro: Images and voice-over • Info Block 1: Images and voice-over; images without voice-over • O-tone 1: Interview, for example expert A • Info Block 2: Voice-over, images • O-tone 2: Interview, for example expert B • … optionally further info blocs and o-tones • Outro: images and voice over with summary

A Lesson 6

83

A Test A6

84

Test questions 1. What are the main functions of an editor? a) develop an abstract, treatment and a storyboard b) find a topic c) undertake research d) all of the above 2. What is the initial step in the process of preparing a report? a) research b) finding the topic c) writing storyboard d) filming 3. An editor should always try to present the story in an objective and neutral way. a) true b) false 4. What is a storyboard? a) short summary of the report b) main idea written on paper c) visual representation of the script d) technical instructions 5. It is recommended to start shooting without having written out a clear concept. a) true b) false 6. All of the following are features of a good interview EXCEPT: a) is well prepared and arranged in advance b) features the person who is eloquent and has expertise c) makes extensive use of closed questions d) asks questions interesting to the viewers 7. What is a voice-over? a) musical background b) editor’s comments c) interview talk d) narrated off-text 8. It is recommended that a magazine story starts with a) a fact b) “case study”

A

c) interview d) graphical chart 9. Good storytelling is characterized by: a) opportunity for the viewers to identify themselves with a story b) interesting content c) good structure and coherence d) all of the above

Test A6

ANSWERS You can find the answers for this test on page 384

85

A Lesson 7

Lesson 7: Dramatic composition Dramaturgy is the art of dramatic composition and the representation of the main elements of drama on the stage. Dramaturgy may also be defined, more broadly, as shaping a story into a form that may be acted. Dramaturgy gives the work or the performance a structure. Every narration, no matter if it is a novel, an audio play for the radio, a motion picture or a TV report, needs dramaturgy. The purpose of a dramaturgical narration is to entertain and hold viewer’s attention. If a viewer is bored with a film than there is something wrong with the dramaturgy. There are some dramaturgical models that every editor should be aware of. Utilising the following models can help to create an interesting film.

7.1 Freytag’s pyramid This graphic represents the (ideal) dramaturgical composition of a narration. Basic elements of that structure can be found in nearly all kinds of narrations (fictional or non-fictional). Such a complex model can be adapted to short forms such as TV reports only with some restrictions. HPP: Handling – Plot – Point Exposition: In the exposition, viewers get to know the initial situation and basic background information: Who? When? Where? The conflict is approaching slowly, but steadily. Setup of the conflict: Mostly, the conflict is initiated by an impulse, for example an event or a conversation. Conflict:

86

Denouement

Resolution

Falling action

Climax

Rising action

Inciting incident

Exposition

When the conflict comes to its climax, the possibilities as to how the main characters can overcome opponents and obstacles are shown. A conflict has external

origins (for example, a ship is about to sink) or internal reasons such as self-doubt, fear or unrequited love. Turning point: Since Aristotle, a sudden change in the narration is called peripety and leads either to positive or negative solution of the problem.

A Lesson 7

Degradation of the conflict: the conflict is solved and it becomes clear whether the “good guy” wins or loses. For a viewer, the excitement decreases. Conclusion: The finale of the narration can be either closed or open ended. At the very least, an open ending needs to indicate which way the protagonists are going to go in the future. Handling – Plot – Points mark the central moments, in which new developments are about to take place. They are also called turning points because they lead the story in a different way. Very often, those HPP’s have a surprising character and the strongest effect when the viewer is not expecting it. The exposition and the conclusion often embrace the narration. This is done by letting the protagonists act at the beginning and at the end of the story in the same or very similar situations. Example: At the beginning of a narration, the protagonist Z lives happily with his family. In the course of the story he participates in a dangerous military operation. In the end he returns, with only small lesions, to his family.

7.2 Elements to build up tension Contrasts: Appeal to emotions: for example: happiness, empathy, sadness. Humour, if it fits to the story, is always appreciated by viewers. Example: poor and rich, young and old, good and evil. Retardation: The solution of the conflict or the climax is postponed. 87

A

Example: Just before a man jumps off a bridge, his cell rings, he answers and then he jumps. Suspense: Advance in information; a viewer knows more than the protagonist.

Lesson 7 Surprise: Viewers know less than the protagonist and are surprised with events that they could not have possibly foreseen. Leap in time: The narration is told not in a chronological order. The order of the scenes creates some kind dramaturgical effect; typical examples are flashbacks or future flashes.

88

Test questions 1. What is dramaturgy? a) the art of dramatic composition b) shaping a story into a form c) representation of the main elements of drama on the stage d) all of the above 2. Freytag’s pyramid presupposes the following elements EXCEPT: a) exposition b) setup of the conflict c) retardation d) conclusion 3. Dramaturgy is essential in variety of art forms (film, prose, theatre etc). a) true b) false 4. When does a viewer usually get the background information to the story? a) after conflict b) before conclusion c) in exposition d) during set up of conflict 5. Conflict is the indispensible part of the composition in dramaturgy. a) true b) false 6. A turning point leads to: a) introduction of main characters b) appearance of new facts c) solution of the problem d) all of the above 7. What elements help to build up tension? a) contrast b) suspense c) surprise d) all of the above 8. What is a leap in time? a) narration is told in a chronological order b) narration is interrupted c) narration is started with delay d) narration is told not in a chronological order 9. A narration is usually embraced by:

A Test A7

89

A Test A7

a) set up of the conflict and turning point b) exposition and conclusion c) conflict and degradation of conflict d) none of the above 10. Please compose a schematic story which has a clear exposition, set up of the conflict, conflict, turning point, degradation of conflict and conclusion. (min 7 sentences).

ANSWERS You can find the answers for this test on page 384

90

Lesson 8: Film Editing This chapter presents the basics of film editing, and an introduction into editing software (Avid Xpress Pro Basics, Adobe Premiere Pro). Film editing is part of the post-production process of filmmaking. It involves the selection and combining of shots, connecting the resulting sequences, and ultimately creating a finished motion picture. On its most fundamental level, film editing is the art, technique, and practice of assembling shots into a coherent whole. A film editor is a person who practices film editing by assembling the footage.

A Lesson 8

Editing systems There are two major editing systems: linear and non-linear. Linear video editing is the process of selecting, arranging and modifying the images and sound recorded on videotape. Originally videotape was edited by physically cutting and splicing the tape. Until the advent of computer-based non-linear editing in the early 1990s “linear video editing” was simply called “video editing.” Non-linear editing for films and television postproduction is a modern editing method which involves being able to access any frame in a digital video clip with the same ease as any other. This method is similar in concept to the “cut and paste” technique used in film editing from the beginning.

8.1 Video editing workflow An example workflow is given below: 1. Digitising: ingesting the material into a digital computer allows the video to be handled much more simply than when it is on its original tape 2. Logging: logging the shot material allows particular shots to be found more easily later 3. Offline editing a) Initial Assembly: the selected shots are moved from the order they are filmed in into the approximate order they will appear in the final cut. b) Rough cut: more shot selection, approximate trimming. The sound is untreated, unfinished, and will require sound editing. Often dialogue and sound effects will be incomplete. Titles, graphics, special effects, and composites are usually represented only by crude placemarkers. Colours are untreated, unmatched, and generally unpleasant. 91

A Lesson 8

c) Final cut: the final sequence of images and sound are selected and put in order. 4. Online editing: the picture and sound quality of the program are adjusted and brought to their optimum levels. 5. Mix: audio is finished by a specialist with equipment in soundproof rooms.

8.2 Montage and editing software Montage is a technique in film editing in which a series of short shots are edited into a sequence to condense space, time, and information. There are numerous montage techniques some of which are very complicated and require a lot of explanation. You can read additional information on the following pages: • http://www.main-vision.com/richard/montage.shtml • http://european-films.suite101.com/article.cfm/montage_eisenstein_vs_ vertov • http://faculty.cua.edu/johnsong/hitchcock/pages/montage/montage-1. html There are different types of editing software. Here is the list of most popular: • Adobe Premiere Pro (Windows, Mac OS X) • Final Cut Pro (Mac OS X) • Avid Xpress Pro (Windows, Mac OS X) • Pinnacle Studio (Windows) • Sony Vegas Movie Studio (Windows) • Ulead MediaStudio Pro • Edius Beginners can also make use of Windows Movie Maker which comes as a part of Windows OS. You can find comprehensive instruction on how to use Movie Maker on the official Microsoft web-page.

8.3 Basic functions of the Avid Xpress Pro Some of the basic functions of the Avid Xpress Pro software which is utilised by some of the community media centers in Germany (e.g. Bennohaus center in Münster) are described below. Avid Xpress Pro is non-linear editing software aimed at professionals in the TV and movie industry.

92

Start Before you start with Avid Xpress Pro, make sure all necessary equipment for example the camcorder, speakers, screens and the DV-player, is switched on. The first project After you start the program, it will ask you to open a project or to create a new one. Any project can be saved on the computer (private) or on an external medium (external). If you want to access project data via the network, chose “Shared” option. Each new user can create a new Avid-Xpress profile. The profile is used to save all user settings. The profiles can be found in the “selected project” window or in the “user profile” menu. In “new project”, a new project can be created. It is important to choose “25p PAL” (“format” menu) and assign the project name.

A Lesson 8

Avid Xpress Pro Interface When you open the software – you will see two monitors. On the left one, you can see the bins (bins = folders). They allow access to the picture and sound material. On the right monitor you can see the composer - window that is divided into two parts. The left part shows the raw material (source monitor). The right monitor shows already edited scenes (record monitor).

93

A Lesson 8

The separate parts of video are arranged on the timeline that can be found next to the bins. With Drag & Drop, the user drags selected picture - and sound clips to the timeline for further processing. To import recorded material from a camera to Avid, you should open the “capture tool” (Tools->Capture Tool). All the equipment should be switched on before starting Avid. The user sets up a name for a DV-cassette that is in the player and clicks on the red record-button on the left top of the capture tool. Now, the whole material of the cassette is played and simultaneously imported to the hard disc. The captured material is automatically available for processing in the editing software. There are two tools which allow work with the audio tracks: • The audio mixer allows the user to change the volume of the selected audio tracks • With the audio tool, the user can change the audio track by adding effects etc. Both functions can be found in “tools”. The project window contains information about possible settings, ef-

94

A Lesson 8

fects and bins. With one click on the bin-folder, a bin-window is opened containing the picture and sound clips.

The cut To cut an extract out of a clip, you should set an “in” where the extract should start and an “out” where it is supposed to end. Drag & drop the selected extract on the timeline. If you use the “red arrow” (overwrite), that is normally activated, the new extract overwrites a part of the “old” clip on the timeline. If you use the “yellow arrow” (splice-in), all clips are moved so that there is enough space for the new extract. The old clips on the timeline are not being overwritten.

LESSON MATERIALS Watch video “Avid tutorial” and “Adobe Premiere tutorial“ at www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial 95

A Lesson 8

8.4 Basic functions of the Adobe Premiere Pro How to create new project? After opening of the programme you will see the welcoming window. Click on New Project and select basic settings for the project like: Location (folder, where will your project be located on your harddrive?) and project’s Name. Your project in Premiere consists of some sequences. After creating your project you will be able to add first sequence. For easy projects you can deal with only one sequence. For more difficult and longer projects we recommend you to create more of them. Sequence settings In this window you can select video parameters manualy or just choose one of the presents. For European standards there is a need to select PAL format (DV-PAL: Standard 48 kHz or Widescreen 48 kHz recommended). Standard 48 kHz for video in the aspect ratio 4:3. Widescreen 48 kHz in the aspect ratio: 16:9.

Project window

Effects window 96

Source window

Timeline

Program window

Tools window

A

Check if there are following video settings: 25 frames/second; audio: 48 000 Hz. If you need more advanced settings, check the „General” tab.

Lesson 8

How to capture video material? In order to capture video material you have to connect your camera or tape recorder to the computer by the use of the Firewire cable (IEEE 1394 interface). It is highly recommended to plug the Firewire cable to the camera, when the camera is switched off. Now you have to open the capture window in the Adobe Premiere Pro programme (File > Capture). Switch the camera on. Your video material should appear in the capture window. You will see remote control interface. Select your capture location for audio and video. Check if appropiate device control (e.g. DV/HDV Device Control) is selected. Rewind your tape to the place from which you want to start capturing by using remore control bar. Press play and after record button in order to begin capturing. After pressing stop button you will be moved to the window, in which you can select name of the captured video material. Captured video material will be automatically added to your project. How to import video to your project? In order to import video material or another files (audio, graphic elements, pictures) to your project you have to select File > Import. All imported pieces will be placed in the „Project window”. You can organize your files by creating bins (e.g. Video, Pictures, Audio ect.). How to select video from your video material? During the process of montage and editing of your video you won’t need to add the whole captured video 97

A Lesson 8

material to the timeline. You should choose only scenes, which you put on the timeline to edit. In order to do that, you have to click double on the concrete source video material in the „Project window” and „Source” window will appear. By using the functions: Inpoint and Outpoint and Control buttons you are selecting concrete scene. Put the scene to the timeline by using the following functions: Insert or Overlay buttons. Sometimes you can just drag the selected scene to the timeline. How to adjust audio levels? Sometimes there is a difference in sound levels on your video material. To adjust it you need to select appropiate piece of audio in the timeline and select the Audio Gain option (right click). Set the audio level manualy. In this window you can also get the option Normalize, which equalize your sound automaticly. You can also use Audio mixer for adjusting audio level between several audio tracks. How to add video transitions? Video transitions can be used in order to connect two different scenes or at the beginning and at the end of your video. We do not recommend you to use many of them. Each effect has a special meaning in the movie language. Among the most popular transitions are: cross disolve, dip to black, slide, wipe or zoom. Drag the selected transition effect and drop it on the selected pieces in the timeline. In „Effects Controls” window you can adjust duration and another transitions settings.

98

A Lesson 8

How to add titles? Click File > New > Title and choose the name of the title. Select the tool you need in the toolbar (e.g. text or shape tools). Then you have to click on preview window to add text or graphic element. There are 2 important functions: Roll/Crawl Options (it enables you to add movement to the objects you created, e.g. to create credits or name straps/lower third) and Show Background Video (it allows you to check how the title looks like in the picture). How to export video? When you finish editing your video you should export it to the video file. Click on File > Export and check proper settings: Format: Microsoft AVI, Preset: PAL DV or PAL DV Widescreen (for movies 16:9). Select the output file location. Remember to export both, video and audio. How to print to tape? When you need to have edited film on tape (e.g. for archival purposes), click on „Export to tape” option in File->Export menu. If you have problems with exporting to tape check „Sequence settings” menu (right click on selected sequence) 99

A Lesson 8

100

8.5 Converting video file In order to disseminate your video in the internet you need to convert your video file. The most common format for delivering video to different web-sites or webTV platforms is FLV. Participants of our training courses use the platform of the Europeanweb.tv, which allows them to stream video on-line and post video on demand. In order to do that, they learn how to convert the file by means of any kind of software. We recommend you to use a freeware (SUPER eRight Soft), which you can get on-line. It is easy to download and install on your computer. After you finish installation process, you have to set different parameters for your output video. Main parameters are: • aspect ratio 4:3 • frame/sec: 25 • resolution: 384x288 • bitrate: 576 kbps or higher (it depends on the length of the video) • audio: 44100 sampling frequency, 2 channels, bitrate 128 kbps. Those parameters are highly recommended. You can also try with another aspect ratio or resolution if you do not necessarily need to upload your video into the Europeanweb.tv platform.

Test questions 1. Film editing involves: a) selection and combining of shots b) connecting the resulting sequences, c) creating a finished motion picture d) all of the above 2. What are the two major editing systems? a) linear - non-linear b) PAL - NTSC c) Adobe - Avid d) miniDV - DVD 3. Which type of editing system requires physical cutting the tape: a) linear b) non-linear c) non of the above 4. Which line presents the correct workflow order? a) digitising-offline editing-online editing-mix-logging b) digitising-logging-offline editing-online editing-mix c) online editing-mix-logging-digitising-offline editing d) digitising-online editing-mix-logging-offline editing 5. There are two montage techniques used in film production: a) true b) false 6. “Titles, graphics, special effects, and composites are usually represented only by crude placemarkers” – what type of cut is this? a) final b) rough c) initial assembly d) editor’s cut 7. ... is a technique in film editing in which a series of short shots are edited into a sequence to condense space, time, and information. a) logging b) story board c) final cut d) montage 8. Before starting to use Avid all necessary equipment should be switched on. a) true b) false

A Test A8

101

A Test A8

c) not important 9. Avid’s interface features the following elements: a) timeline b) source and record monitors c) bin list d) all of the above

ANSWERS You can find the answers for this test on page 384

102

Lesson 9: Dissemination of your video. Web TV 9.1 What is Web TV? Web-TV is a format, especially developed for the Internet viewing. In case of webTV short movies, reports as well as broadcasts are produced according to the special criteria. For example since a couple of years, “Ehrensenf” from Cologne presents several humorous sketches in the form of newscasts. Web-TV is mainly directed at youngsters and therefore has adopted dynamic way of presenting the content. Web-TV reports are usually brief and vivid. Every person who doesn’t have the cable TV and therefore cannot receive Open Channels and citizen television can watch movies, broadcasts and audio streams created by young producers at www.europeanweb.tv or owtv.de. One can watch not only productions of the Open Channel TV Münster from the Citizens’ centre Bennohaus, but also videos, debates, talk shows, concerts, conferences and much more from other public open channels and community media centers all over the Europe. Open Web-TV is a platform for the non-commercial audio and video productions that have already been broadcasted in an open channel. Visitors can watch many of these self-made productions and everyone who wants can join the forum and become a member of it.

A Lesson 9

9.2 Why web-TV? Despite of television, the Internet is seen as a medium that nowadays is the most important way how to spread information. The accessibility of the audience can be very high: within a few days millions of viewers can be reached which is vividly proven by the YouTube service. The advantages of the web-TV are that there is no rigid standard concerning the content and the technique, on contrary to the private and public television which follow defined formats. In web-TV you can produce broadcasts or reports in high quality quite cheap and with few technical preconditions. Web-TV is an ideal way for NGOs and civil society institutions with low budgets to open up a media platform and also reach a wide amount of people. Web-TV is a really good tool in intercultural communication and media education.

9.3 In what way does web-TV differ from the traditional television? Web-TV gives the possibility to offer your products “on demand”. This means that the produced video material can be uploaded on several video platforms such as 103

A Lesson 9

Youtube, MySpace, Vimeo, Europeanweb.tv and can be watched by the visitors of this site at any time. • open web-TV offers additionally the possibility to broadcast life, in realtime, conferences, interviews; • concerts or whole broadcasts; • in the framework of live streams it´s possible to do live reporting; • the bandwidth of users of life streams is enormously high. Example: Social organization in Italy makes a special broadcast which will be uploaded live to the internet. Several partners from different countries want to contribute to the broadcast with a live stream. The Italian partner can receive these live streams made by the partners from the internet and can bring them into the broadcast in the form of live broadcasts. A live stream broadcast produced in cooperation with several countries come into existence. It is important to note that with the help of the adequate software, the live streams can reach a quality nearly equal to television.

9.4 What kind of criteria are important for us? Composition Due to the little dissolving of the videos and the conversion of the video material in different formats you can’t avoid loss of quality. That’s why there are some basic rules on which one should pay attention to produce a coherent video for the spectator, with regard to contents as well as to techniques: Working with the camera one should basically make sure to use a tripod to receive a steady shot without shaking, especially in interviews. Because of the fact that the dissolving and therefore also the size of the video, pay attention not to use too much other settings. One should often use close-ups and from time to time more detailed recordings. The spectators can thus recognize the pictures presented more easily and faster. They don’t get distracted from the content of the report. The motive must be directly noticeable for the spectator. It is important to accentuate it artistically with light, perspectives and shot dimensions. Please avoid back light when recording for the internet, unless it has a dramaturgic background.

104

One should necessarily film more than needed and select afterwards while editing. It is worth to repeat a scenic setting several times (3-5 times). Concerning a report, feel free to film a motive out of several perspectives and shot dimensions. Every setting should be at least 10 sec. long, because while editing you need some time before and after the proper material with in- and out-points. Panning and zoom rather have a dramaturgic background and shouldn’t be used that often. In case of using this settings, stay statically in the beginning and in the end of the recording. When you convert, also the quality of the audio signal decreases rapidly. Thus, you have to think about the sound design and how the scene could be presented to the spectator most conceptional. The loss of the audio quality implicates the decrease of dynamic audio signal. • In interviews one should only use the sound of the interview and leave out the atmosphere. In this way you can avoid annoying sidetones. • The implementation of music should support the content of the video and set a course. It is not necessary to highlight a whole report with music. • Music which is too loud can also be recognized as distracting. • Using off-text (voice over) and music, one should set the volume deviation high, in order to understand the off-text clearly. Avoid using music which has a recognition value because of advertisement, movies, video clips, series or broadcasts. Otherwise the spectator would connect your report with something completely different. • Also the speed and kind of music are decisive for the perception of the video. Although you can watch a video in the internet several times, you can act on the assumption that the spectator at mostly watches the video once. That’s why it is important to pay attention while editing. • You should cut out pictures without any message, that do not confirm to the content. • You should be able to resign from your favourite pictures, as long as they don’t fit to the contents • With every change of picture, the setting, the perspective or the contour should be changed. In this way you avoid that the spectator consciously realizes the changes of pictures or the different cuts. This is important because then the concentration of the spectator isn’t disturbed and he gets accordingly more Information.

A Lesson 9

105

A Lesson 9

Content Concerning the content there are numerous rules that are decisive for a successful product. Many persons coming from the field of media know instinctively the principles of the refurbishment with regard to content. Nevertheless, it happens often that journalists don’t stick to the easy principle of journalism but harden too much on the basic rules. You don’t make a report for yourself but for the spectator. This means that you have to put yourself in a viewers’ place.

9.5 Europeanweb.tv Europeanweb.tv is a platform for streaming on-line and watching on demand noncommercial video productions. The motto of the platform is ‘community media Europe’. It means that it is an open web-TV channel for dissemination of content made by citizens or local communities from different European countries. The channel serves as a web-TV platform for youth organizations, NGOs and community media centres across Europe. The mission of the Europeanweb.tv is promoting solidarity, tolerance and cooperation. Moreover it is also raising European citizens’ consciousness. European web-TV team initiates debates about important European issues, presents different point of views, different solutions of social problems and different opinions of European citizens.

106

Europeanweb.tv is mostly made by young and active people in Poland, Germany, Ukraine, Belarus, Romania, United Kingdom and Turkey. But it is open to everyone, to every local or national community media broadcaster. Interested organizations can join the platform and disseminate their programme.

A

Web-TV channels and programmes

Lesson 9

The platform allows to create diverse channels (e.g. Channel Lublin, Channel Mßnster, Channel Bucharest), which are designed for local community media centers, which want to broadcast their content and video productions on-line and do not have enough ressources to create and run their own web-TV platform. The content presented in local channels is in the national language versions. The best or the most relevant videos have English subtitles. It is also possible to create thematic channels (e.g. citizen’s debates, youth TV, video tutorial, economic forum), which are devoted to one event or specificaly thematic videos and web-TV magazines. Video products in such a programme are broadcasted in English language version or with English subtitles. Each one can get its own web-TV channel and stream its productions on-line. Multipliers, media trainers, NGOs, community media centers, civil society institutions can apply to get access to the Europeanweb.tv free of charge. The only requirement is that they have to broadcast content relevant to the European matters or videos made by citizens for the citizens. Everyone can sign up and upload his own video reports. Community media centers can get its own channel for video streaming. Local community media centers can broadcast in their national languages. The main Europeanweb.tv channel broadcasts only in English. The best productions from our national partners are translated and streamed in the main channel.

How to upload a video- step by step At first you have to sign up and afterwards log into the platform. You will enter a dashboard, which is an internal content management system. 1. Upload your video Click upload video near the VIDEO icon. Then you have to click the Select button and browse the video file in your computer. You can upload only .flv files (up to 100 MB). Bigger files (more than 100 MB) can be uploaded thanks to the FTP client only by the administrators. 107

A Lesson 9

After selecting your video click ADD button. It starts uploading. Be patient. It will take you automatically to the page, where you can edit the video. Don’t click anything. Just wait and it will take you automatically to the next page (editing panel). In the panel of editing video you can do following things: a) change your video title b) write short description of the movie c) put some keywords referring to your video d) make the slug (e.g. video_report_from_London) e) choose the thumbnail of the video (in the ‘Thumbnail’ tab you will see the video player. Let the video run. In the box ‘Select frame in player window’ you will see the current frame of your video. Select the frame by stopping the video. Click: ‘Update thumbnail’. f) put your video on-line by changing it’s status to ‘Published’ one.

Remember: always click “Update status.” 2. Add your video to the specific programme or channel Under the icon ‘Programs’ you will see the ‘List of programs’. Click on it. You will see the ‘main’ list. In the Operations click the first icon. This is the playlist in the main player on the starting page. Please put your video in the right order. It goes very fast, because here you have a drag&drop function. 108

Drag your video from the left column to the right one and put in the order. Then clik Update playlist. 3. Your video is on-line. You can start watching it. 4. Disseminate your video You can disseminate your video by using different social network tools. Each video has its own page. Here you can rate it or comment it. You can also get the embed code, which you can easily post to your blog or web-site. You can also share the video with your friends by sending them e-mail or posting it to Facebook or Twitter.

A Lesson 9

European web-TV team: “Bringing the audience in the midst of the event” European web-TV team is a group of young people skilled in the field of video, audio and internet broadcasting technologies offering the comprehensive media solutions for conferences, summits and other large scale events. We have qualified people: camera operators, audio/video technicians, IT & broadcasting specialists, journalists, editors and production mangers. We are trained to work at large international scale events creating high quality productions in English, Polish and German. European web-TV team can work effectively under time pressure. We provide live stream (internet broadcast) from the events, integration of viewing tools into event’s web-page, archiving broadcasts on tape, DVD, hard drives, arranging interviews, producing documentation of the event, creating on-line video gallery with recorded broadcasts available on-demand, producing DVD with the broadcasts and documentation. European web-TV team services allow you: dramatically increase the number of audience, effectively disseminate the content of the conference, possess recordings of panel discussions, receive documentation of the conference, distribute conference materials to the participants immediately after the event. Contact the Europeanweb.tv If your institution is interested in getting your own web-TV channel or cooperating with us, feel free to contact us. If you have any questions, also in case of technical problems you can always contact us at: office@youth4media.eu 109

110

getting to know each other and the programme

reinforcing interview techniques

reinforcing the e-learning about camera and microphone features

first recording by the use of camera

getting to know editing software

analyzing good and bad elements of the interviews filmed

Introduction to the seminar

Interview

Basic functions of camera

Operating the camera

Introduction to editing

Feedback round

Participants watch their interviews and try to analyze it.

Participants capture video material of the interview and do the first raw cut. They get to know basic functions of the editing software.

they liked and didn’t like.

• watching and evaluating the material. Trainer ask them what

of the camera.

• exercise: recording short introductions of participants in front

• participants build up a camera

out in e-learning

• trainer picks up and reinforces the points participants missed

camera basic

• trainer is interacting with participants to get them to explain

• reflection and elaborating first questions for an interview

• energizer

• integration game

Day 1

Methods

Seminar plan

and microphone

Objectives

Topic

60 min.

120 min.

120 min.

90 min.

30 min.

60 min.

Time

A

Objectives

Methods

Time

Idea, topic, research

introducing to different research techniques elaborating idea of the movie

• analyze good and bad elements of the interviews filmed

• shoot, capture and edit (row cut) short interview Day 2 • reflection about basic of journalism Reflection on good TV production. Why TV is interesting for viewers? This question shall bring the trainees to the idea of which target group may be interested in their video report.

• demonstrate with an interview partner how to make an interview

• explain the basic elements required for an interview

• demonstrate the knowledge of operating a camera by filming a short interview

• put the camera together

• define white balance, focus, shutter

• list the features of the camera and microphone

• identify the basic functions of a film camera

• unit 9: lesson 1 - editing: understanding editing Participants have to learn today:

• unit 7: lesson 4 - basic of journalism: how to construct an interview?

• unit 1 - what is camera and how it works

90 min.

First day introduces camera and interview techniques to participants. They are working in small groups of 2 people. Equipment needed: 5 cameras, 5 computers with editing software, microphones, tripods. The result of the day are short interviews between participants (an exercise). E-learning units obligatory for this day:

Topic

A

Seminar plan

111

112 • work in small groups (pairs) Trainers are preparing trainees to find out good topic for a video report. Defining target group. Finding out intercultural dimmension of the video report. Dividing group in teams of two people.

Methods

180 min.

Time

Research on topic

Reflection round

• different research techniques Participants make research for their video using different techniques.

deciding upon common topics • participants decide about their topic and present it in front of of a video report the group Trainees have 90 minutes for presenting their ideas to the others. After that the whole group decide, which 2 topics will they use for video report production. Trainees are divided in 2 groups.

120 min.

90 min.

Sometimes we conduct the video journalism training course in a completely new place for participants. Going out to find a topic can be connected with a sightseeing and exploring the city. It is important for the shooting day. Trainees working in pairs are looking for topics for a video report. After two hours they meet for a reflection round.

Objectives

Seminar plan

Find out topic for first video

Topic

A

help the participants to learn what will make a good video

help the participants to choose stories based on content, difficulty and time constraints

Telling a picture story

Exercise

• presenting and advocating for the synopsis to the group

• drawing up the synopsis of the group’s video report

• explain the video report topic

• watching video Looking at two different very short films. Participants decide which of the synopses are they going to make.

own story Reflection on e-learning material: basic of journalism and composition.

Day 3

• demonstrate their own idea and research facts for the video report to the group

• sharing ideas for stories with other participants in the group

• unit 7 - basic of journalism Participants have to learn today:

30 min.

60 min.

Time

• participants reflect on composition, narrative and telling their

Methods 8 hours

Objectives

Second day introduces research techniques to participants. As the result of the day they work out idea and topics for their video report and decide upon 2 topics for video report production during the seminar. Equipment: flip-chart, paper, pencils, pens, markers, computer with internet access. E-learning units obligatory for this day:

Topic

A

Seminar plan

113

114 As a practice for the shooting next day participants make street interviews. They ask people if they like their topic they have come up with? Participants reflect if the goal will be achieved to produce something interesting for the viewers. Every participant should have asked a question and operate the camere during making interviews.

Exercise - camera work

60 min.

Trainees are practicing under the supervision of their media train- 120 min. er. They practice different shots and angles they have choosen for their storyboard.

45 min.

180 min.

Camera work

groups. Storyboard and a shooting plan is worked out. Participants discuss with their trainer and choose shooting locations, the chronology of shooting and the roles in group. Participants are working under the supervision of a trainer and co-trainer.

the video. Planning shooting for the next day. Dividing roles in

• participants together with their trainer work out storyboard for

Time

Participants present their storyboard.

learning how to turn the idea into a detailed description (script, shots, equipment needs)

Storyboard

Methods

Seminar plan

Feedback round

Objectives

Topic

A

Objectives

Methods

reinforce the need for good planning

practical learning

Pre-shooting meeting

Shooting

• allocate roles within the shooting plan 60 min.

Time

• participants are shooting with their trainer 360 min. During the shooting media trainers have to make sure that everybody has operated the camera. The participants are only allowed 3 takes of each shot (participants have to concentrate and prepare every single shot very well). Everything should be shot effeciantly, so that no time is wasted during editing.

• making sure that everyone has the correct equipment Each group look at the shooting plan and prepares the equipment needed.

• working out who is doing what

• quick feedback about the plan for each video

Day 4

• understand the elements of and produce a shooting plan for one day’s work

• list the equipment needed for making the video

• understand what film composition means

• analyze sample films and their synopses

• unit 7 - basic of journalism: fictional and non-fictional formats, storyboard Today participants will learn how to:

• unit 3 - how do you compose shots?

• unit 2 - how to build up pictures?

Third day introduces research techniques. As the result of the day participants work out the storyboard for each video report. Equipment: paper, pencils, camera, tripod. E-learning units obligatory for this day:

Topic

A

Seminar plan

115

116

reinforcing the e-learning about camera and microphone features

Feedback from participants • participants share their experience of shooting day

Methods

Seminar plan

preparing voice over

Capturing video and

Montage

help the participants to learn what makes a good video

Trainees capture video material and gather ideas for text and voice over. Trainees capture their video material and write down text for voice over. They record voice over and start editing video.

• brain storming Trainees with their trainer reflect on montage, writing text and voice over.

• reflection on e-learning

Day 5

• reflect and report on their experience of the shooting day with the others

• execute the shooting plan as part of the group

• unit 8 - dramatic composition: what is it and how to do it? Today participants will learn how to:

Today participants focus on shooting and executing the shooting plan. They operate the camera under supervision of their media trainer. It is allowed to split the team into sub-groups, but there must be a supervision of a trainer or co-trainer in each shooting group. The result of the fourth day are shots gathered for each video report. E-learning units obligatory for this day:

Objectives

Topic

60 min.

60 min.

8 hours

60 min.

Time

A

getting to know and practicing knowledge of editing video and audio material

sharing experiences and communication effectively when working as part of a team

Editing

Feedback from the

• presentation in front of the whole group Each group presents and shares their experience of editing.

trainer. Media trainer has to make sure that every participant tired out editing software. Co-trainer is working with other participants on recording voice over and writing text.

• trainees edit their movies under the supervision of media

Methods

Text and graphic in the movie

Finalize

getting to know techniques for finalizing and distributing the video

• incorporate graphic elements into the video

• communicate effectively when working as part of a team

• demonstrate knowledge of editing video and audio material

• identify the basic elements of montage and voice over

• unit 9 - editing Today participants will learn how to:

60 min.

120 min.

Trainees add text (credits, subtitles) and graphics to the video.

8 hours

60 min.

300 min.

Time

Participants reflect on how to finalize the video.

Day 6

Today participants focus on capturing and editing the video material. Trainees starts to edit their video. It is important to divide tasks in the group. One can capture the material and another can write text and record voice over. The result of this day is row cut of the video material and recorded voice over. E-learning units obligatory for this day:

participants

Objectives

Topic

A

Seminar plan

117

118 At the end media trainer gives short forecast on next module (module B - cross media journalism).

• apply techniques for finalising and distributing the video

• unit 10 - dissemination of your video Today participants will learn how to:

Today participants focus on distributing the video for web-TV. They will finish editing the video report and upload it to web-TV. The result of the day is ready video report for each group as well as final presentation and evaluation of the seminar. E-learning units obligatory for this day:

participants

Feedback from the

sum up and evaluating the work in group as well as the whole seminar

• presentation of the web-TV platform and uploading of video

Uploading to web-TV report to the Internet

At the same time trainees are preparing short text promoting the video on-line on web-TV (title, description).

movie

Converting media files

Methods Trainees create the final video and export the file. They print the video to the tape.

Objectives

Seminar plan

Finalizing and exporting the

Topic

9 hours

180 min.

30 min.

60 min.

90 min.

Time

A

Module B: Cross media Journalism

Introduction

B Introduction

During the last 20 years the increased importance of the internet and its increased usability and accessibility has changed the media environment substantially. In the past so-called spin-offs had only arisen from TV series, but the same principle has now been applied to other media. For example, newspapers are available on the internet in addition to the print edition, radio broadcasts are available as listen again podcasts, TV broadcasting as videocasts and other additional offers which cannot or would not be available in the original format, creating an increased audience, generating new target groups, at least theoretically – all this has led to the increasing popularity of the internet. But the internet has not yet reached its potential. For example, the assumption that the print reader will automatically access the content on the web is not proven. Also the media producers wanted to put the original media onto the web totally unchanged. The advantage of this method, so they thought, would be a cheaper and easier use of their work: doubling their reach with one click to the web, less work and greater effect. However it became clear that this method was not as cheap and easy as they thought it would be. For the user to be a part of this, they needed to go through endless offers with many scroll bars, pictures and videos, which took too much time to upload and that could only be watched via special download programs available from the websites. Usability as a term took a while to be recognized and media producers were slow to incorporate it into the software and hardware. The same is true for the editing of content. Even now there are many examples of this 1:1 policy, tying users into the producers’ systems. Why? Because it is easy for the producer. However easy does not mean good.

Cross media journalism – introduction to the module Participants of the module cross media journalism gain essential skills of creating Internet content as well as technical knowledge (blog creating, uploading the created content on-line, using different types of media). Moreover the participants have an opportunity to improve their skills connected with camera work and video editing. Module B includes a so-called film deepening part which aim is to refresh the most important elements of the video journalism module and preserving gained competences and their further development. Before the practical course (face to face seminar), which includes 7 training days, the participants prepare in the form of e-learning. The material which each participant has to study introduces them to the world of on-line journalism. The participants mainly study the theory and get abreast with the most essential terms 120

such as: podcast, vidcast, news, editorial, gloss, comment, hypertext principle, different cut techniques. The most important element of the e-learning is reflection on the most necessary definitions and meaning of the on-line journalism and cross media techniques. The participants of the course have to study the materials which are presented on the e-learning platform and scan web-sites and internet platforms. After that they will be able to make conclusions about the difference between the written text for the newspaper and the text published in the internet. Understanding these differences will simplify the later practical work connected with writing for internet. During the e-learning the participant has to reflect and prepare the following issues for the practical course: • what kind of project / idea/ problem do I want to present by means of different cross media techniques? • the outlook and construction of my blog/ my web-page and what information do I want to share? • which type of the video promoting my project/ idea/ problem do I want to create? Moreover the participants have a task to prepare and make a video material for the promotional clip (shots of my town, my NGO ect.) during the e-learning. While the practical seminar there is not much time for preparation and shooting. Workshops ‘film deepening’ are dedicated to different types of editing and sequence building as well as editing a concrete promotion clip. Practical seminar includes about 40 training hours during which participants create multimedia groups. They have to agree on common topic / problem / idea / project, to which they will prepare the whole cross media coverage using different methods and media. The main outcomes of the module are: weblog presenting the message with the use of different type of media as well as social video advertisement or promotional clip.

B Introduction

121

Lesson 1: What is real cross media?

B

Maybe this question most easily be answered by elimination, firstly showing an understanding of quality. Cross media work does not mean that the contents of the original media, whether print, audio or film, are put on websites unchanged. In addition true cross media work does not make use of leftovers from articles, pictures and films stored in archives and – because online space seems to be endless – put in the internet in a random fashion. Cross media work means issuing the original information, the message, the content of the original statement in a way that meets the requirements of the medium and target group for the particular medium being used.

Lesson 1 De facto in the current media landscape this means the use of the internet as a platform for the publication of a variety of media: print, audio, video, podcast, picture galleries, interactive elements, etc. Someone who wants to work across media effectively has to deal with different levels which are: 1. Internet platform 2. Journalistic forms 3. Variety of media: print, audio and video 4. Journalism and editorial issues Cross media journalism has mainly developed because of the medium of the internet, as it offers a platform for a multimedia presentation of journalistic and other content. Therefore in the following module the medium of the internet will be looked at more closely. Following that we move from the platform to the content. Content means the original information; one might say the raw material: this raw material can be put into different journalistic forms, therefore these different forms will be introduced. Finally we will look at the producers, the cross media journalists who are, through their editorial work, at the intersection between the raw material and the information given to the recipient.

122

Lesson 2: Platform and Media The internet is the medium which has enabled the blossoming of cross media journalism. Prior to that, individual journalists rarely made use of more than one medium. The scope of duties was clear cut; there was a journalist who wrote for a newspaper, a radio journalist and a TV journalist. But times have changed and the academic training has had to be remodeled, because the internet brings together all media forms.

2.1 The Hypertext Principle One of the main advantages of the internet is the hypertext principle which offers the user non-linear consumption. When reading a printed newspaper the reader has to follow an analogue range of information. However in the online world, the user can decide their own order for online reading because of the way information links are structured: users can choose content through association and find content and information that interests them. For journalists this creates an expectation that they can – beside creating and producing the content – more closely orientate their work towards the expectations and needs of the target group and create a close linking structure.

Facts and figures

B Lesson 2

Background Topic

Gallery/Pictures to this topic Download/ Print/Podcast/ etc.

Links: Video for this topic Comments:

Other news/posts 123

2.2 Internet Users’ Expectations

B Lesson 2

During its rapid development the internet has attracted an audience which expects certain things. For example: • That the offer is up to date • Depth (to meet the information needs of the user) through associated links and further content • Dynamics (methods and speed of access) • Multimedia content (Use of different modules that fit the topic), e.g. °° Text °° Pictures, photos (Galleries) °° Audio sequences (Podcast, RSS-Feeds) °° Video sequences (Videocast) °° Animations °° Downloads • Cross-linkage (Service, additional links, etc.) • Interactivity °° E-Mail °° Blog °° User-commentaries, etc. All these expectations mean a journalist has responsibility for creating a logically designed portal and choosing the right content elements from the mass of possibilities so that these fit the goal of the piece and the needs of the target group. Thereby the journalist needs to take care of certain things such as: • Offering orientation through clear structures and a logical form • Small click rates • A form that fits the content • A meaningful relationship between text and pictures • Uniform hyperlinks • Short uploading time (pictures, videos, audio data). The boundless possibilities of the internet and its mass of information often lead to frustration and disorientation. Finding the right information can be difficult and time-consuming. Therefore the online journalist also has to ensure there is a sensible structure, not just for the content but also the whole of the online presentation. That is how the user is safeguarded. The German TV channel n-tv is a news channel. Its target group is business men and women in upper and high management positions, people interested mainly in the economy, stock market and politics. Therefore n-tv’s online offer concentrates on these interests. It offers a clear structure on the main page, showing those top-

124

B Lesson 2 ics that the target group expects and a multimedia offer, text and picture ensembles, videos and podcasts on past and current topics. The internet presence of a newspaper, e.g. the New York Times, has another focus. The typeface resembles the one used in the printed newspaper and the focus is clearly on text, pictures are only used sparsely. Here the user gets a layout that resembles the newspaper in its original format. Information is mainly transferred through the text, pictures are secondary.

125

The internet main page of the biggest German private radio provider also shows its focus. Pictures and text are secondary. What counts most is the label and a navigation aid which uses radio language, e.g. “on air” or “off air”.

B Lesson 2

In contrast this shows the internet presence of the biggest US American radio station, Clear Channel. Also here pictures and text are secondary with the focus on the main medium, radio.

126

Comparing these websites’ home pages shows they all have a strong orientation and focus on the original medium, both visually and in the media offer. The TV program website concentrates on multimedia content, the daily newspaper’s one on text content, the website of the radio station concentrates on the original audio medium even on the internet. But without question they all have one thing in common: no matter the chosen emphasis, the most important thing is to know which journalistic forms to use and how to use them well.

B Lesson 2

127

Lesson 3: Journalistic forms 3.1 Research and References

B Lesson 3

Video journalism module covered the topic of research, so it is not explained in detail again here. Someone researching a topic should work with a minimum of three references. A journalist is there to inform professionally, therefore why the references used should do likewise. References used should be made clear so that the reader can check them if they want to. Investigative journalists often hide behind the assertion that references cannot be named. However this should only be the case if publication of the references used could be dangerous (to individuals or organisations). But in daily journalism this is rarely the case. Also, the journalist should avoid naming a reference as “well-informed circles” - that is often a sign of unprofessional research.

3.2 Journalistic forms The most important journalistic forms of presentation are: • news • reports • editorial • comment • gloss • interview • opinion poll Basically they are divided into two categories: informing and commenting. A journalist must know about this dichotomy and must know how to use it in the right way; it is the division between opinion forming and creation. Journalists who put their own opinions into an objective form are manipulating their audience. News and reports especially fall into the informing category. The journalist uses forms such as interviews and opinion polls to collect information, although the later form is used to collect opinions and not information, or the opinions themselves are the information collected. News News is the objective presentation of an event without any subjective comment. It is therefore one of the informing forms of presentation. News must be up-to-date and the content must be unknown and new. It is important when choosing news topics to make sure that the content is of general interest. It must be easy to understand, objectively formulated and usually short. 128

The structure of news focuses on the classical w-questions: Who? What? Where? When? Why? What for? Which reference? And there is another “w� that is not part of the news but still essentially important: For whom? Focus on the target group is important. News reports are usually written in present perfect (It was raining while he walked along the street), the unfinished past, it follows the law of decreasing importance of information. The structure of news follows the form of a reverse pyramid:

Main information: Who/What? When/Where? How and why? What for? Which reference? Additional information Less important

B Lesson 3

Shorten from below

Report The report provides more depth on the news report information. The report gives not only short new facts but also background information, previous history, different aspects and additional information about the topic. Quotations are rare but can also be a part of a report if they are important. Therefore a report is more extensive than news. It is usually written in the past tense (finished: it rained‌). Here also the reverse pyramid form applies, but about whole passages, not just single sentences. The report should always offer an objective and chronological presentation of the events. Editorial The editorial is one of the most difficult forms of journalism as it is both informing and commenting. It adds detail to an important current topic from different perspectives while at the same time offering certain conclusions to the recipient. In 129

the editorial the boundaries between informing and commenting merge together. The editorial forces, illuminates for and against arguments and supports the recipient’s opinion-making without manipulation. It is extensive and usually the main article on the main page in large publications. It follows the need for up-todateness, clear structures, replicability and intensive research.

B Lesson 3

Comment The comment takes a stand on a current topic. The author’s opinion is thereby clearly marked as an opinion and not as a fact. Therefore the comment always reflects the personal opinion of the author, it is subjective and aims to create push the recipient to a certain opinion. A good comment always contains a justification for the opinion being put forward, which can be argued when the author brings forward their arguments and evidence for this. Alternatively, if there is no clear position from the person commenting, they may compare different views and the reasoning for these and make suggestions as to which is the best, or if there is any best. Whoever writes a comment must be sure that the original message is known to the recipient because a comment does not repeat the presentation of the event, it is just commenting. Typical comment formats are therefore (whether in newspapers or on radio or TV) shown and named close to the current news piece. Gloss Formally a gloss is nothing other than a comment. It does not differ in content, but linguistically. What counts is the style. A gloss is something like the high art of commenting. It takes a playful attitude to the topic and tends to be kind of mean and ironic. It seems to force the recipient to build an opinion. Humour and knowledge are the main criteria for a good gloss because it is more than just stating an opinion. Almost any topic can be used for a gloss. Interview The interview is the best known and most widely used journalistic form. It can have different aims, but there are two main forms which apply for all media: • The topic-centered interview which is also called expert talk. Here the function of the interview partner is clearly defined to talk about the topic as an expert on it. If for example a journalist wants to talk about the construction

130

and safety of a special dam they will try to interview the engineer responsible, as their knowledge and function mean they are the person who can deliver the most accurate and in depth information – what is not important is he became an engineer. • However in the second interview form how he became an engineer could be more interesting: the person-centered interview. Here the guest is focused on what he has done, his life, what he has achieved. In the case of the engineer this would for example be an interview named “My dream job”. The recipient would get to know why the profession of engineer is so interesting for him as a person. However, the same discussion with the engineer and a career consultant would be a topic-centered interview again. Survey

B Lesson 3

The survey is a typical journalistic instrument, to generate a certain number of opinions and sentiments, for example to get a greater range of positions on a particular topic. Thus, a survey is normally included within different formats and is only very rarely used as an independent element – one exception to this rule is the spoof survey, which is not intended to convey any depth. With regards to content often used to represent a general opinion, the survey can be adapted to break up different radio and TV formats, to illustrate a certain thesis or to facilitate a casual introduction into a topic. There are no boundaries as to what can be asked for in a survey: political questions like “What do you think about the Prime Minister?”, questions that refer to daily life such as “What would you change about your district?” or questions like “What’s the name of Europe’s longest river?” to test general knowledge and so forth. A basic rule for surveys is that the topic should be newsworthy or controversial, profound or amusing. Do not do a survey if the recipient can already think of the answer beforehand. 131

B Lesson 3

For a legitimate survey it is very important to ask exactly same question every time, without any changes: every variance in a survey tampers with the result. This also comes in handy from a practical point of view: it is impossible to edit the answers in a logical way if they were given in response to different questions. But the same question should be addressed to different groups of people to get a heterogeneous pool of answers. For example, in a survey concerning the rebuilding of a train station, not just the travelers should be asked but also the station staff, the business people, the security and the homeless people that can usually be found in a train station. This ensures a broad and multi-perspective representation on that topic. Often interesting approaches for the following report result from multi-faceted surveys. Other forms There are also other journalistic forms with different levels of importance that are used in the media. The live report in radio for example is a popular instrument for sport events because it is built on the animated perspective of the reporter. Another example is the “composed” reportage (the text of the reporter is narrated in the studio) as a format that is very popular for infotainment shows (both radio and TV), for example popular science documentaries. Also the radio-feature is often used; it connects elements of the audio book and documentary, mostly through music and sounds. Given that these forms are more complex and artistic, it is advisable to first learn how to manage the basics of journalistic and media forms.

3.3 Question forms An interview concentrates on questions and answers. Therefore the moderator should know about the common forms of questioning and know when to use them. These are: • Open questions • Closed questions • Alternative questions • Suggestive questions Open questions Open questions are designed to elicit extensive answers.

132

Example: “Why did you choose this way?” “What exactly did you do then?” The respondent has to answer in full sentences. This form is especially useful to invite the guest into the discussion and to get them to contribute to the content. It should make the guest talk. Closed questions Closed question in contrast only allow the answers “Yes” or “No”. Example:

B Lesson 3

“Are you in favour of the death penalty?“ “Did you join the demonstration?” This form is used to focus an attitude. It is a good device to stop people who tend to talk too much because it limits the number of words in the answer. Alternative questions Alternative questions give possibilities for different answers. Example: “Do you want wine or water?” “Are you electing the Democrats or Republicans?” This form is also used for shorter statements which do not include a “Yes” or “No” answer. Suggestive questions The suggestive question offers or includes the expected answer. Example: “Why do you prefer living in Germany than in Switzerland?” “Aren’t you against the death penalty either?” 133

B Lesson 3

134

These questions aim to manipulate the dialogue partner’s answer. When asking them it is important to be aware that the dialogue partner will surely realise that they are being manipulated and may decline to answer. With the inner attitude of an open moderator/journalist suggestive questions often don’t work. Further question formats include for example rhetorical questions which does not require an answer, ironical questions which aims to provoke controversy. Neither are used often in interviews. Golden rules The presenter/moderator has to keep the discussion in their control, but it must not appear to be hung only on their questions. This means they must listen intensively and filter the aspects of the discussion which will be attractive to the audience. This only works if the presenter is willing to get totally into the topic, the discussion, the guest. There are certain things to avoid: • Working from a rigid list of questions (it is better to have a flexible range to choose from) • Telling the guest who or what he/she is • Presenting oneself as an expert • Not listening to the guest. Therefore here are the golden rules for a successful interview: • Be well prepared with in depth research • Find an interesting entry point to the topic • A question catalogue is better than a question list • Take care to have the right guests • Take care that the guests feel comfortable because only then will they be relaxed and talk fluently which is particularly important in radio and TV interviews • Clarify your own position. On whose behalf is the presenter asking questions? In other words, who is target group? The presenter should be clear who the target group is and not pursue their own personal interest • Never say something that the guest could say better. That is what they are there for • Have a clearly defined aim, to prevent irrelevant discussions.

Lesson 4: Diversity in media: print, radio and TV Along with the opportunities that come with the diversity of modern media, for example a wider reach, there are also some risks: every medium is being used “somehow” and no medium is being used in the right way. Every single medium follows its own laws, as below. Due to the fact that the medium of television and its specific standards are central to module A, module B concentrates more on the internet as well as print and radio.

4.1 Writing for Reading: Print and Online Writing for both print and online media is combined for a reason. In the last few years those two categories were strictly divided because online research and journalism was regarded as being an independent genre. However, nowadays it is well recognised that good writing and the dominance of journalistic forms is a must have, no matter where the text is being published. The specific standards for the hyptertext principle and journalistic forms have already been explained, so now the emphasis is on the writing itself. Anyone wanting to write for a reader, whether of a newspaper or on the internet, has a double commitment. On the one hand to the journalistic form used, on the other hand to the reader and their expectations. The target group of the BILDnewspaper (a popular German tabloid) is very different from that of the Financial Times. Both papers do inform their readers about the same events, but with different depth and complexity, reflected in the length of an article, the choice of words, the sentence structure and, last but not least, the journalistic attitude. The basic principle of accuracy and clarity should be considered in both ways of writing, because every article should be understandable on first reading. Thus if the writer is too complex, too long-winded or too interlaced, they lose the reader. The argument that the reader could re-read what they did not understand the first time is not useful. Research has already proven for a while that this is exactly what the reader does not do. If they cannot understand something, they do not re-read but just abandon it.

B Lesson 4

A journalist should consequently follow the rule: “Keep it simple and short.” This also means organising the content hierarchically. The reverse pyramid applies to both and online text – the content should be ordered according to the law of declining importance.

135

The online writer benefits from the structure of the internet and the ability to link the content. This allows non-linear reading but in doing so does not reduce the damand for quality. Example: literary language

B Lesson 4

“The gothic construction of Cologne Cathedral began in 1248, a realisation of the plans of the first Cologne architect, Gerhard von Rile, who was of either French or German ancestry and who died in 1260, only twelve years after the building of the cathedral started.”

Example: online text “The gothic construction of the Cologne Cathedral started in 1248, a realisation of the plans of the first Cologne architect Gerhard von Rile. Von Rile was born in France or Germany and died only twelve years after the building of the cathedral started.”

4.2 Radio and writing for spoken text One of the three main media forms in cross media journalism along with TV and print is radio, or, in a broader sense, any audio-file found for example as a podcast on an internet platform. The main difference between a podcast and radio is the on-demand-function: the listener can use the podcast whenever they want to; and if subscribed via RSS feed, the podcast is downloaded automatically to their computer. However, new possible ways of consuming do not change the artistry required to make good radio. The main difference between radio and other media is in the editing of content. Editing for radio does not only mean the dominance of the journalistic forms but also the ability to transfer content into spoken language. Basic skills required are writing for spoken text, the clear articulation of text and technically correct editing. Writing for spoken text is characterised by the avoidance of complex sentence structures, rather it imitates spoken language. Also, there is a distinction between 136

the writing for free speech, as in presentations, or the writing for text that is supposed to be read out, as in the news. In general, the following basics should be considered: • One sentence - one message • Verb at the beginning • No nested sentences • Only few or no foreign words at all • No synonyms (synonyms are confusing; repetitions create understandability) The listener must be able to understand the sense immediately; they cannot stop or rewind and a spoken text must allow for this. Example: literary language

B Lesson 4

“The gothic construction of the Cologne Cathedral started in 1248, a realisation of the plans of the first Cologne architect Gerhard von Rile, who was of either French or German ancestry and who died in 1260, only twelve years after the building of the cathedral started.”

Example: spoken language “The construction of the Cologne Cathedral started in 1248. The first Cologne architect was Gerhard von Rile. It is not for certain if Gerhard von Rile was born in France or Germany. He died in 1260, twelve years after the building of the cathedral started.” In the last example, every sentence is a message. The messages are connected without any nesting and without synonyms. Example: Audio- news (source: WDR 5) “In Burma’s disaster area, UNO experts want to prepare the start of international aid. The military government of the country in South Eastern Asia has assured freedom of movement to all helpers in the field. The dimension of this natural catastrophe cannot be measured at this point of time. Chinese media report at least 15,000 deaths. China is Burma’s closest ally. 137

B Lesson 4

Last Saturday, a flood wave of a few metres height drowned the coastal area of the country. The enormous wave was a result from the cyclone “Nargis”. More than 100,000 people became homeless. In the south of Burma, the power and water supply collapsed. In the meantime, management of the crisis is being criticised. It is said that the warning to the population concerning the cyclone has been deficient.” In this example it is clear that the information is built up in a logical way. The news as a typical journalistic format starts with the current event and points out the background information only later in the piece. In this example, the current event is the preparation for international aid. Following that, what exactly is supposed to happen and what problems may result are explained. Then, the causal event (cyclone) that happened a few days ago and therefore is not new, is mentioned to make a connection to the current news. The best way to write a spoken text is to actually read the text out before it is being recorded. Often, deficiencies in style and structure only become noticeable through the act of listening. Example: Audio-news (source: WDR 5) “The former director of the German Post Zumwinkel has made a confession concerning the charges pressed against him. In front of the district court in Bochum he admitted that he deposited parts of his fortune in a foundation in Liechtenstein. Thereby he supposedly evaded 970.000 Euro of taxes. Zumwinkel called his action the biggest mistake of his life for which he would bear the consequences. The former director also said that his family and himself sorely suffered due to the spectacular searching of his house in Cologne last year. Probably, the prosecution will file for a suspended sentence. Observers expect Zumwinkel to be spared a jail sentence.” In this example, the particular new information in each sentence is underlined. Also the information is built up in a logical way: for each main piece of information, a more specific explanation is given in the following sentence.

4.3 Rules of emphasis Awareness of what is important in a text is the foundation for giving reasonable emphasis. If the speaker totally understands what in fact they are telling, they can emphasise the content in an appropriate way. This is important because the 138

speaker guides the listener through the content by emphasizing particular parts of the text. Emphasising the spoken language “against” the meaning of the news creates bewilderment. Delivering the text without any emphasis makes it extremely boring for the listener, who has to do the job themselves - hence the need to emphasise the text with reference to both the content and target group. The nature of the text determines the attitude of the speaker and the means of interpretation. News should be pronounced in a clear and objective way, without judgment. Comments are characterised by a clear emphasis of judgment. Moderation is the personal address to a listener and means free speech; it does not mean to “give a speech”. Poems: not the rhyme but the content determines the accentuation. Line breaks and rhyme schemes are not guidelines for the reading of poems, it is only the content that counts. Narrations are being told, not read out. In this case, the attitude of the speaker is important, like for example the old woman telling fairy tales or someone relating a crime etc. Reading a drama is acting. Someone reading a text with different speakers has to assign a certain voice to each character and has to stick to that. To decide the approach to the context of the text, the following questions can be helpful: • Who speaks to whom? • What is the mood of the conversation? • What is the essential message? For reasonable emphasisation of a text, these criteria need to be considered: • To be emphasised: °° The new °° The perpetuating °° The contrary (for example employer and employee) °° Nouns or verbs that push the narration °° Things that belong together • Whereas, not to be emphasised are: °° Things that have already been mentioned °° Adjectives without any relevant reference The following means can be established alongside the pure meaning of words. • Speech rate (tempo), for example in insertions, or to create a dynamic mood • Variation of tone pitch • Caesuras, or audible pauses, (for example to emphasize something important; irony)

B Lesson 4

139

B Lesson 4

• Mood/ emotions • Melody/ rhythm • Volume Punctuation marks are a part of literary language. Without those marks, speaking can be easier, especially when it comes to commas. Only the context itself is to be emphasised. Example: emphasis “The construction of the Cologne Cathedral started in 1248. The first Cologne architect was Gerhard von Rile. Whether Gerhard von Rile was born in France or Germany is not certain. He died in 1260, twelve years after the building of the cathedral started.” Everything that is about to be emphasised is underlined. The first sentence can be read “à point” and thus marks one unit of meaning. Between the second and the third sentences though, the voice is not lowered because the meaning relates to both sentences as both sentences refer to the same noun, Gerhard von Rile. The last sentence again can be read “à point”, this means, the voice is lowered because the meaning and the text as a whole are finished.

4.4 Quality criteria audio: the checklist When doing audio productions it is imperative to stick to certain standards that guarantee high quality. Three areas are crucial: the quality of the content, technical quality and the quality of communication. These qualities can best be guaranteed by answering the following checklist: Quality of content • • • • • • •

What is the essential message? Do the listeners learn about something new? Are they entertained? Is the information out of the ordinary, unique or unexpected? Does the report have a central theme? Does the report have a defined goal? Is the report constructed in a logical way?

Quality of communication • To whom is this audio report interesting? What is the target group? 140

• • • • •

Why is this report interesting to the target group? How is the report related to the target group? How does the report mediate the content? Is the format of the report an appropriate choice for the content? Is the attitude of the report/ the moderator/ the speaker adequate for the topic and to the target group?

Technical quality • Recording without distracting outside noise • A constant volume during the recording • Clean cuts and transitions • Clear boundaries, for example between a jingle and a sound bite • No over modulation • Understandability of language and emphasis This checklist is not only helpful when producing audio-reports, but is very useful in general when approaching a certain topic and not wanting to lose track of the result you want to achieve. The main concern of a journalist should always be to inform the target group in an appropriate way or to entertain them and at the same time to make sure that the chosen topic is in fact interesting, even so interesting that the topic is questioned critically.

B Lesson 4

4.5 Audio techniques: Audacity Someone wanting to work in a cross media way and starts a report for example with a camera, can simultaneously use the recorded material to generate a photo stream for a website and use the recorded sound to create a podcast with the essential messages. Therefore, independent of TV techniques or film editing, it is useful to know at least one program that only concentrates on editing audio material; for example for the editing or revision of material that was only initially recorded via a microphone. There are a number of such programs that are very good, for example “Cool Edit” or “Samplitude”. These programmes are well suited for more complex editing of audio material, for example if effects need to be included or several tracks are being revised (for a feature or a jingle this may be the case). However, those programmes are expensive. A programme perfect for simple audio editing is “Audacity”, a freeware editing program. At this point, the introduction into the programme will be quite short. The programme can be directly downloaded on http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ The programme is multilingual, after the download is done, the user can chose between 27 different languages. 141

“Audacity” is a fairly plain, but most of all quite well-arranged editing programme.

B Lesson 4

The start page just shows the conventional menu as well as the recording functions. A click on the red record button is enough to start the recording, as long as the right audio source is adjusted. The latter can be found in the menu under “edit/ preferences”.

142

Afterwards, the recording can be started by the rec-button. The audio track is generated during the recording and thus can be immediately controlled.

B Lesson 4 Audiotakes, whether in mp3- or wave- format, can easily be imported. Also MIDItracks for music editing are importable. For this, choose “File->Import->Audio” As soon as an audio track is imported, it can be replayed and edited. To edit the audio track, for example to cut, it is sufficient to click the cursor on the track and to mark by dragging the selection. The marked selection can be deleted by the delete button. “Audacity” works non-destructively, that means, every working step can be undone. The audio track that has been worked on can be either saved as a project, for example if the editing is not yet finished, or can be exported as an audio file (mp3- or wave format) and then be saved in any folder.

4.6 Podcast and RSS Feed The aim of creating independent audio files is to provide them as podcasts on an internet platform and therefore to follow the cross media approach. The term podcasting (a connection between iPod and broadcasting) means exactly: creating and providing media files via the internet. There is a distinction to be made between a user who downloads the data and a user who subscribes to it. The latter procedure is called “RSS feed”, for example for sections that are updated on a regular basis such as news and then are downloaded automatically on the user’s server. To read subscribed podcasts, it requires a so-called feedreader that is being activated automatically when the RSS feed is clicked on. The following chart exemplifies the journey of the news from the maker, the podcaster to the subscriber, the user: 143

B Lesson 4

144

As well as Audacity as a general audio editing programme a number of other podcasting-programmes, mostly not freeware, do exist, for example “Podhost” or “Podmaker”. By contrast, the programme “Podproducer” (www.podproducer.net) is a freeware program. In general, it is sufficient to be able to handle one edit program. The following technical part, the converting of audio files compatibly to platforms and feeders as well as the upload and placement on the platform, is normally the responsibility of the online editor. The same can be said of course for uploading and converting TV-reports for videocasts.

Lesson 5: Journalist and editorial office Anyone who wants to work in cross media, is confronted with a challenge - to edit whatever content in such a way that it fits into the medium in which it is supposed to be published. Also, the content has to fit to the target group to which the medium and of course the content are addressed to. It should be mentioned that the exclusive right of knowledge does not belong to journalists any longer (if it ever belonged to them). Western society can be called a scientific one; knowledge is nott an exclusive right, the internet has become a sort of world library. For the journalist, this means they have to edit the content in such a way that the publication meets the taste of its target group: their competitor is only one click away. Whereas before the consumer had only a few choices as to how to get information, nowadays this has changed completely and therefore has to be considered by those behind the media. In the beginnings of cross media working, the wish to be present in every sort of media led to a trend that accomplished journalists suddenly converted into allrounders without really being able to handle “all�. The print journalist was supposed to read out the news for the podcast, research some pictures for the photo stream on the homepage and, on top, to create an online layout and online publication. The times are gone in which journalists were specialists and thus allowed to do their research and do their writing. Fast-food-journalism and its favorite employee, the all-rounder, moved in into the editorial offices and has not moved out yet. Also, it must be added that the modern journalism has to be seen as a dialogue with its consumers: blogs and comment-functions on news websites are evidence of this phenomenon as well as newer platforms such as Twitter or Facebook, which are being used by both media and users.

B Lesson 5

What does that mean for the practitioner? It means that modern journalists still have to be proficient at the job. To compare this for example to a painter: The minimum requirement to do the job is to be able to do a straight brushstroke whereas the painting of a ceiling is artistry. For an editorial office this has the following consequences: it must hire either a pool of specialists for the particular medium or has to train its journalists in a cross media way right from the start. Thereby, a minimum standard must be agreed on and mandatory quality criteria have to be developed which can be used as guidelines for both content and media implementation. This applies to professional journalists as well as to people in the civic medial world. 145

Everyone who works in the journalistic field and is addressing their work to the public, makes a contribution to the formation of opinion. Every journalist must be aware of that, no matter what level they work on. With this comes a responsibility for one’s own work, a need to reflect on one’s personal motives and the ability to deal adequately and appropriately with information.

B Lesson 5

5.1 Quality concept Everyone speaking out in a journalistic format or taking part in the formation of public opinion, should have a basic quality concept for their work. For that purpose, it is necessary to work very thoroughly when doing research, coming into contact with guests and using journalistic formats. Example: anyone presenting a comment in the form of objective news cheats the audience and transforms the presentation of facts into a statement of facts even though their validity is not proven. Example: someone in search of good soundbites who “secretly” starts the microphone during a conversation, breaches confidentiality and incurs – at least according to German law – a penalty. Providing unbiased coverage, giving the recipient the space to form their own opinion through information and not manipulation, are the result of reflection and internalisation of the concept of personal responsibility. Content Good quality thus defines itself in many different ways. Firstly there is the content, which determines accordingly the choice and editing of the topic. Helpful questions are: • What topics are there of interest and why are they interesting? • Is the topic of current interest? • Does it offer challenging aspects? • Is it interesting for the majority of readers, viewers or listeners? • Is the topic based on careful research? • Is every aspect presented correct? Recipient A second category is the recipient: • What is the target group for the chosen topic?

146

• What is necessary so that the target group absorbs the information presented? A report that is addressed to children for example has to be conceived differently from a report for adults. According to the educational level of the audience, the address must be designed differently taking into consideration complexity, choice of words, diversity of features and so on. Technical quality The third category relates to technical quality. Features such as correct sound bites for the radio, well constructed reports, successful design/ layout for online presentations, short upload time for videos, podcasts, images etc., clear camera work for video reporters, well-emphasised language of the presenter or off-speaker all belong in the technical category. In short, this category deals with the whole array of cross media tools a journalist can deal with.

B Lesson 5

Cooperation Finally, the fourth category is around cooperation. Good and professional journalism is the teamwork in an editorial office, is the continuing encounter with alien people, for example during research, in an interview, in a survey or when searching for sound bites. A concept of quality should be the basis for all cooperation. This includes diligent use of common resources (camera, computer, microphone etc.) when working in an editorial office, as well as keeping to the conditions of agreements or being fair and honest with potential guests. These aspects of the different categories are just some that can be used as a motivation for self-reflection of one’s personal role as a journalist and one’s own work.

147

Lesson 6: The Perceptive Faculty of Viewers The main point of this part of Module B deals with defining sequences in a journalistic film or a movie. To facilitate the viewer the right message. A reporter/filmaker needs to know the image description language, regarding to the human way of thinking.

B

Fact 1: Pictures and spoken text are not equal when it comes to the attention of the viewer. You can be sure that at least 70% of the viewers attention lies on the picture. The rest of the percents are divided to the sound and/or the spoken text (voice over).

Lesson 6 “People believe more in what they see than what they hear.”

Conclusion: The spoken text should be kept simple to understand. The sentences should be short. The content should fit to what one sees in the picture. The reporter/filmaker should transport his message through the pictures and support it by the text. Using the wrong pictures can have the effect that the viewer understands a totaly different message than what was intendet. Fact 2: One of the human basic needs is having fixed “orientation”. A starting point must be given for the viewer to be attentive for the following information. This information he filters with the motto “What is important for me?” After 20 seconds this information is sent to the next rememberance, to the “short memory” Conclusion: A good TV-report supports its viewer within their learn effects. That is why several reports deal with general known (public) topics, the required time for processing information becomes shorter. When information comes to fast in a row, the viewer is not able to remember and understand it. He should have the possibilty to bring the information into effect for at least a few seconds.

148

Lesson 7: Dramatic composition For all kinds of mediums there is the same rule, the recipient has to be entertained. So he keeps on watching, reading, listening... For this, dramaturgy is a must in every production. Before you write your storyboard you need to have an idea about your tension curve.

Conflict

Constitution of conflict 2. PP

Exposition

Peripetie/ Plot point

Relief

3. PP Conclusion

Event 1. PP

4. PP

B Lesson 7

Model of “Franzschen Pyramide” The “Franz’s pyramid” is a simple model for the graphical demonstration of dramatic processes. It consist of five parts. The introduction (Exposition) is used as a basic orientation. It gives information about the most important aspects of the plot. Example: “There are a woman and a woman with a boy on the street”. The set up (Constitution of Conflict) gives arguments for a conflict. The tension rises. Example: “The women meet each other and they have a conversation. The boy is bored and just goes away.” The top of the Franz’s pyramid attends to the real conflict. Example: “The woman realizes that the boy has gone away. They look for him. The boy goes for a walk alone”. 149

In the final part of the movie (Relief) the conflict gets dissolved and the tension of the story goes down. Example:

B Lesson 7

“The women find the boy. He sits in a bistro and orders ice- cream”. The end (Conclusion) of the story is also known as a “kiss off”. This parts aim is to relax. It releases viewers from the story. If it is an Open end the viewer is given a suggested perspective to build his own idea how the story could end. Example: “All of them are in a good mood and laugh about what has happend. The women sit down next to the boy and are probably going to order ice-cream as well”. Please note: This is a simplified version of different kinds of curves. This curve can be adapted to different formats, length, ... ! A story can also have several conflicts, or the introduction comes later in the story to raise the tension and wake the couriosity of the viewer.

150

Lesson 8: Sequence building 8.1 Montages, shots and sequences A shot is the smallest element in film making. It is a continiuos recorded piece of film which is limited by a cut. A sequence contains several shots. The shots in a sequence have to be combined in an logical way when it comes to content and optic so the viewer recognizes it as one related sequence. Shots are consequtive combined, mostly they are appendend to each other when it comes to graphic, time, place, theme, etc. Like that several shot can build an unit (sequence). The common way to combine shots: In the editing the shooted material should be arranged logically and consistently: 1. A full shot introduces the situation 2. A medium long shot introduces a person or an object of interest. 3. A close up with the main focus on a person/object The main rule: From common to special. This structure also works vice versa. To show a detailed shot in the beginning instead of the intoducing full shot can stir up the couriosity of the viewers, like in the following example.

B Lesson 8

Example: Art exhibition 1. A shot of a portrait (strong starting picture) 2. A visitor in front of the portrait, 3. The visitor in the whole room 4. and so on... The way you realize your sequence, should fit to the content. In film and TV you can find different types of sequences. When you have a couple of shots and you combine them in your editing programme, you want them to have a certain impact on the viewer. To achive this impact you can use different types of montage techniques that require some basic knowledge of montages.

8.2 Summarizing montage Summarizing montage (also known as “Elliptic Storytelling”) leaves out unnecessary information of the plot. Example: • Full shot. A street in a big city is being shown • Medium longshot. A car stops in front of an office building. The driver gets out of the car and walks towards the entrance.. 151

B Lesson 8

• Medium longshot from the inside. The man walks to the elevator and presses the button. • American shot. The door opens, and he walks inside • Medium longshot. The door opens on the 15th floor, the man leaves the elevator and walks into an office. In the movie this sequence only takes up approximately 15 seconds while in reality it would take up more minutes. Thats why its called “Summarizing Montage”. Visual style patterns of a Summarizing montage • Often shown pictures: typical: calendar/ clocks as an indicator for past times • Frequent blends: as a sign for passing time • Concept of the typical and definite (clear picture content, simple symbolic e.g. Heart for Love) • Repetition and variation of single positions (e.g. Someone who’s about to go training every morning, you see him getting up several times,the picture does not differ much (alarm clock, him getting out of bed) when the alarm clock goes off, first he’s tired and bothered, few weeks later he’s fast and motivated) these positions can be shortened as well to avoid boring repititions. • Pars Pro Toto: a part (picture detail) stands for a great whole (e.g. Trainingshoes indicate the course of a whole year,(A detailed shot of running Trainingshoes getting from new and white to dirty, running on green grass, rurunning in leaves, running in snow,- rain-dust, etc. The viewer understands that a whole year has passed since the protagonist started training.) • Accoustic brace: on going music or commentating voice over speaker

8.3 Describing montage Describing montage (also known as “Impressions”) represent a general emotion or situation, no concrete plot. Time and continuity usually doesn’t play a big part. The pictures of the sequence are arranged according to theme or motive. The editor needs to be sure about what he wants to describe before he edits. Example: The editor wants to describe a normal day at the beach, he will edit random shots of sand, kids, sunbathing, ice cream parlor, Lifeguard, birds, surfer etc. Shots arranged chronological: • sunrise at the beach • people coming with towel/surfequipment 152

• people preparing • ands so on, until sunset at the beach Example: shots arranged after theme • shots of people eating, ice cream parlor, drinking • shots of children playing, building castles in the sand, crying, bathing • shots of windsurfer, kitesurfer Visual style patterns of a Describing montage: • • • •

Positions described through musical brace. Blend = Harmony/silence. Significant pictures, symbols. An arrangement of order should become clear, after the positions are put together.

B Lesson 8

8.4 Parallel montage Parrallel montage (also known as “Simultanious montage”): Two or more plots will be shown parallel to each other which will be connected through “Cross Cutting”. “Cross Cutting” is the technical term for cutting alternate from one plot to another. This is a good way to build up tension. In the end of a paralell montage the different plots mostly meet. Example: • • • • •

Full shot: Train slowly comes into the train station American: X is walking hectically through the station Medium Longshot: Train slowly comes to a stop Bird perspective: X dashes up the stairs Medium Longshot: people get out of the train, the doors of the train close, the train leave • Medium shot: X is angry and exhausted, because the train left without him Visual style patterns of Parallel montage • Cut frequency increases throughout the sequence. Shots are longer in the beginning, but getting shorter towards the end • Narrowing down the shotsizes ( e.g starting with a full shot; ending with detailed shot) • Match cuts 153

• Each Plot got his own rythm (slow incoming train/ man rushing to reach the train) • Accoustic brace • Every plot strand has its own motiv in form of music

8.5 Clip montage

B Lesson 8

The main priority of a clip montage is the creation of an image/look or emotion. To achive that they contain plenty of attractions and pictures.This kind of montage is typical for music videos. Example: A trip from New York to London is being told in 5 seconds through pictures and sound effects. • Medium shot: Cab door closes • Long shot: Airplane takes off • Detail shot: Passport is being stamped • Detail shot: Cab sign in London This example is similar to a summarizing montage. In general one can say, that a clip montage doesnt have to follow any rules. Its only aim is to touch, tell, provoke or entertain. But it has also typical style patterns, that are used often but are not obligatory. Visual style patterns of a Clip montage: • • • • • • • • •

High cutting frequency, short positions Camera style is very dynamic Extreme camera work Special effects Alienated pictures (color effects...) Picture design und graphic aspects stand in the foreground Dominating music Cut to the beat Bold/daring/risky pictures (symbols), sexuality , religion etc..supposed to create • Emotions (disgust, sorrow ,happiness, compassion...) • Plot fragments

154

Lesson 9: Aspects of montage 9.1 Cut In As you know from Module A at the beginning of a scene or a report you usually have an establisher to introduce a situation or location. The Cut In is the approach to this (location or situation). It shows the Object or Person in a closer shot. To do the Cut In you should not move the camera from its position. You only need to zoom in and choose the right frame for your closer shot. Example: Cut In

B Lesson 9

9.2 Cut Back The opposite of the Cut In is the Cut Back. Both Cuts lead in or out a location, situation or emotion. Be careful with using these cuts in scenic sequences. They get a strong meaning in certain contents. If you use them wrong, they can effect a different perception from the viewer than what you wanted to achieve. Example: Cut Back

9.3 Motivated Cut When using a cut to another shot - you should always have a reason, and a common method is to take a cue from the environment. This could be a visual cue, or 155

B Lesson 9

a sound cue, or even an emotive cue (to encourage an emotional response from your viewer). An example of a cue from the native environment would be to cut to a shot of a telephone when you hear a phone ring. This would be a sound cue. Another example would be to cut to an individual who has just walked into the scene in the background. This would be a visual cue. These rules are flexible - and can be changed according to your style, themes and ideas. In Drama - it is easy and simple to use your common sense to take cues from the environment that your viewers might expect. Remember, this is a narrative device to support your film making - so use the technique to your advantage so it works for what you want. Every Cut should have a reason. To cut a shot can be motivated by an Sound impulse or an Picture impulse. Whenever something is referend to outside of the picture, it will be a motivation to cut to the picture that respond on that. Example: Picture impulse

Example: Picture impulse. X is looking at something which is out of the picture. X is acting like he’s excited or afraid of something, here you always have to respond. In some cases these responses are not given, this can be done to raise the tension, for example in Horror movies you will not see the monster directly. Using Sound impulses to cut a shot can be nearly every sound, most common are: doorbell, telephonebell, a voice, explosion, gun shot... So the picture you cut on will be the picture that shows the sound origin. Example: Sound impulse. The sound of the falling glass is the point where the viewer gets to see it. 156

9.4 Cut in a Movement The best way to cut from one shot to another is to cut in a movement, this cut is invisible for the viewer, he will not recognise the cut. This guarantees a fluent sequence. The viewer can concentrate on the happening.

B Lesson 9

You need to shoot a scene from 2 camera positions. For this you need 2 cameras or you have to film each action at least two times from different positions. If you do this you have to be very precise and the actor (moving object) as well needs to act similar in each take. It is the most common way of cutting in scenes of movies, or TV Series. Example: Cut in a Movement

9.5 Insert Cut A closer shot is inbetween two wider shots. Inserts are a common editing technique used in Interviews or Scenes. In interviews it is used to cover a cut which would be irritating if it isn’t covered. Also to show a special movement of the persons hands or feets. Mostly used to show the nervousness or the emotional feeling. (e.g. wavering hands). In scenes the Insert Cut gives a closer view on something to the viewer.

157

Example: In a Crime thriller: the viewer gets to see a scene in a kitchen, then there is a detailed shot of a knife on the desk. Like this, the viewer gets a hint, that something special will happen with this knife. It doesn’t always have to have a reason. It can also just make a scene more dynamic.

B

Example: In an interview

Lesson 9

Example: In a scene

158

9.6 Irritating Cut Similar to jump cuts, but should be avoided. When two shots are too similar to each other the viewer will feel iritated. Irritating cuts happen for example, when you cut out some words or sentences from an interview. The being shot person will jump just a little bit in the picture. This lasts only for 1/25 second , but still is visible and irritating for the viewer. Example: Jump in contours

B Lesson 9

If you want to skip time during a interview, you could either use white flash (like often seen in the news) or you can shoot an interview with two cameras from different perspectives, so you are free to cut from one shot to the other and the person seems to talk fluently. When interviewing on location - if you make sure that you shoot “cut away� shots of the location, or close ups of who you are interviewing and even different angles that can be seamlessly cut into the interview - you can use these shots to mask the transition or cut, as well as making the interview more interesting, dynamic and less static. Would you want to watch a long interview using just one shot? Sequent shots should be a combination from different camera positions and different shot sizes.

9.7 Centred Cut In Module A you got to learn how to lead the look Centre of the viewer. The look center is an important thing you have to keep in mind while editing your material. The flow of shots is more fluent and comfortable, if you cut on the look Centre: How to: Shot 1 ends with the Look centre (can be Person, Object...) in the left part of the picture. 159

Shot 2 starts with the look centre at the same left part of the picture. Example: Centred Cut

B Lesson 9

If you create fluent cuts like this, it is more comfortable for the viewer to watch. If it is the same object you are cutting to, you have to use a different shot size or camera perspective. Otherwise you will have an irritating cut.

9.8 Linear Shot Alliance Another way to avoid hard cuts or jumping cuts is to match dominant lines. A strong graphic line in the first shot also appears in the second shot. Example: Linear Shot Alliance

9.9 Jump Cut Jump cuts are often used in movies or short films, they can be used to skip time during an action, that would take to long in reality. Furthermore they raise the dynamic of a video especially when it is done with music and cut to the beat. When you have a shot, and inbetween you cut out a few frames, so that the Person (moving object) is jumping from one part of the picture to another.

160

You can use a jump cut to skip time, but you must make a special effort to ensure that your camera position remains on the same spot. You should also ensure that you lock off your camera on the tripod. This also extends to the background of your shot - as you should try to be aware of what is moving. For example, if you are filming on a street and a car is driving by in the backround and you use a jump cut - the car may disappear. You could avoid these situation by careful choosing your location - if you think you may use jump cuts, try to find a location that is not too busy.

Example: Jump Cut. The frame of the picture remains excactly the same , only the object is jumping around

B Lesson 9

9.10 Match Cut The same shotsize and a very similar image content are combined. The Match cut is a nice way to cut from one scene into another. Example: Match Cut. The first scene is about one girl, to lead to the other girl (who can be in a totally different environment/room/time/etc.) The first shot of girl 2 looks the same than the last shot of girl.

161

B Lesson 9

There are two kinds of Match Cuts: This one is a motivic one. Meaning that the motifs of both shots are matching. The other one is the technical Match Cut. That means that the technical realization is similar. For example the first shot is a zoom on an object and the following shot is also a zoom, but on another object.

162

reinforcing the e-learning first reflection from user to maker

On-line journalism

help the participants to learn what will make a good article / comment / news

getting to know editing software

introducing to cross media work reinforcing e-learning about cross media and modern media technologies

Journalistic writing Practical exercises

Journalistic writing Reflection and feedback

Cross media – what is it?

Basic journalistic writing Journalistic forms

what is it? • reflection on the hypertext principle

• reface the hypertext principle

• focus on the web

• motivational speech, plenum discussion

• energizer

• integration game

Day 1

Methods

magazines, podcast, internet platforms, mobile platform

• explaining different media: radio, television, daily newspaper,

• lecture

• participants present their texts and try to analyze it

one of the journalistic forms and try to write his own text.

• participants practice basic journalistic work. Each one choose

pers and on-line magazines

basic knowledge • lecture, plenum discussion reinforcing different journalis- • trainer explains the most important journalistic forms (new, editic forms torial, gloss, comment) and shows their examples in print newspa-

getting to know each other and the programme

Introduction to the seminar

Form and content –

Objectives

Topic

B

Seminar plan

163

30 min.

120 min.

60 min.

60 min.

30 min.

60 min.

Time

164

learning how to turn idea into the concrete ‘cross media’ concept

stimulating the learning process

Cross media – research and

Feedback round

• writing for reading: print&on-line

• journalistic forms

• hypertext principle

• what is cross media work?

E-learning units obligatory for this day:

Day 2

• sum up of the whole day work

media group

• participants share their experiences about working in the multi-

short TV draft)

sticker, internet announcement, print comment, leading article,

• working out details of some specific components (write a new-

• building a concept covering all types of media

whole cross-media coverage using different methods and media

They have to agree on common topic, to which they will prepare the

• group work: participants create two multimedia groups (MG).

Methods

Seminar plan

drafting the concept

Objectives

Topic

B 8 hours

30 min.

60 min.

Time

concept elaboration for the media coverage of the topic / project / idea / problem

Crossmedia II –

confirm sustanaibility of the concept

secure the learning process

help the participants to learn what makes a good blog / web-site learning how to turn the idea and concept into a concrete cross media coverage

Crossover to the afternoon

Crossmedia III – practical

Feedback

work

(reflection round)

Crossmedia concept

drafting the concept

Objectives

Topic

Time

240 min.

30 min.

Multimedia groups presents their work and try to analyze it. Feedback from all groups and from the trainer.

• video and audio recording

• writing for internet

• creating weblog, vidcasts, podcasts ect.

• group work

30 min.

Participants continue working in the multimedia groups under the supervision of their trainer.

60 min.

• plenum discussion

dia groups feed-back themselves, coaches are supporting.

ponents in the plenum, feedback on the basic criteria. The multime-

• presenting and acknowledging the individual concepts and com-

according to the topic, which questions, where and who?)

• video material (e.g. interview with XY, questionnaire or survey

• structure of the blog or web-site

of media consumed)

• concept covering all types of media (what is where in which kind

Participants elaborate the concept under supervision of the media 120 min. trainer. They write a newsticker, internet announcement, comment, leading article, short TV report draft. Mark a link, draft the content of each link. On the whiteboard:

Methods

B

Seminar plan

165

166

Objectives

How to build up a sequence?

deepening

Introduction to the film

Feedback

pages

refreshing knowledge from the first module – video journalism reinforcing the e-learning about film deepening

practicing knowledge of writing for internet and posting content on-line

es Participants work in groups. They have to record a sequence to the topic, which is interesting for them. They have to write storyboard and record a sequence properly. In this exercise they refresh camera basics skils gained in module A.

• practical exercise, planning and realization of different sequenc-

• discussion

• plenum

• feedback from other groups

• presentation in front of the whole group

Each multimedia group present their concept and their work:blog or web-site with integrated different types of media.

• participants finish their work on their blog or web-site

• group work

Day 3

Methods

Seminar plan

sound and video on web-

Integration of text, pictures,

• journalist and editorial office

• how to create podcast?

• writing for radio

E-learning units obligatory for this day:

Topic

B 90 min.

60 min.

60 min.

240 min.

8 hours

Time

Shooting

Feedback

Idea/ storyboard

Aspects of montage

Film Sequences

• aspects of montage

• sequence building

practicing skills in making video

learning and practicing how to turn the idea into a detailed description

learning about the variety of montages reinforcing the e-learning

E-learning units obligatory for this day:

ad or promotional clip)

• participants make shots for their video production (social video

sage?)

• analyzing of the idea (does the choosen technique fits to the mes-

• presentation of their ideas

• developing idea / storyboard

• participants decide on types of montage they want to realize

Participants work in their groups (multimedia groups). They have to decide about the idea / topic / problem they want to present in their short social video ad or promotional clip.

pants in a previous day

• gathering ideas for improving sequences recorded by the partici-

• presentation of different examples of sequence bulding and cuts

• lecture

Day 4

• discussion

• feedback from other groups

video productions

Methods • presenting the results of the exercise

Objectives

Watching and evaluating

Topic

B

Seminar plan

167

270 min.

30 min.

60 min.

120 min.

8 hours

30 min.

Time

168

Objectives

Updating web-site / blog

internet

Finalizing the work on the blog or web-site. Updating content.

Participants upload their social video ad or promotional clip to the internet. They use the Europeanweb.tv platform. Additionally they can upload video to other services. They learn how to embed video to their web-site or blog.

practicing techniques for distributing the video

Uploading video to the

Participants add text and graphic to their video. They finalize the whole project and export the file. Participants convert video file to flash in order to distribute the video in the internet.

practicing techniques for finalizing the video

Day 6

Converting video file

Final editing

• aspects of montage

• basics of editing (module A)

E-learning units obligatory for this day:

• editing video material

• group work under supervision of the media trainer

Editing video

Participants refresh their knowledge about basics of editing. By using different cut techniques they practice and gain more skills.

• participants capture their video material to the hard drive

Day 5

Methods

Seminar plan

Capturing video material

• aspects of montage

• sequence building

• dramatic composition

E-learning units obligatory for this day:

Topic

B 120 min.

60 min.

30 min.

150 min.

8 hours

420 min.

60 min.

8 hours

Time

evaluation and sum up of the work during the seminar sharing experiences and communication effectively when working as part of a team

Final presentation of the

results. Feedback

Objectives

Topic

Time 120 min.

Methods Participants of the training course present their work in fron of the whole group. Feedback from other groups and from the trainers. DIscussion. Evaluating the content of the seminar. Short forecast on next module (trainer competences).

B

Seminar plan

169

Module C: Trainer competences

Introduction

C Introduction

This module is designed for people who on the one hand have the contextual media knowledge and competences which were imparted within Modules A and B. On the other hand it fulfills other requirements as detailed below: 1. The prospective participants need to show that °° They are equipped with adequate knowledge in the area of media/TV, whether achieved by the successful participation in the Modules A and B or in other ways, for example by proving they have a qualification. °° They are very experienced in the area of leading seminars/seminar scheduling. 2. The prospective participants need to have the following competences: °° Being open and curious °° Having fun working with people °° Communication competences °° Handling others respectfully °° Being willing to self reflect °° Having understanding for the role as a multiplier (personal competence) °° Process competence (structured working) 3. The prospective participants must write down their motivation and reasons for wanting to do Module C. 4. The prospective participants must at least be aged X. Anyone who wants to impart knowledge as a trainer in addition to these competences needs to have the right “tools of the trade” which are knowledge about learning aims, methods, group dynamics processes, seminar planning and knowledge in organising seminars. The communication of this knowledge is the content of Module C. Module C – Overview of Contents 1. The change from doer to multiplier – Developing an understanding of the roles 2. Reflection of the tasks and responsibilities as a media trainer, approach to the future role 3. Theoretical basics of the whole concept MediaTrainer 4. Inclusion and position as a media trainer within the project 5. Exact knowledge of the Modules A and B and their requirements 6. Seminar scheduling and design 7. Didactics: Cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning aims

172

8. Methods: Choice of appropriate methods to achieve learning aims, participants and trainer 9. Understanding of quality in dealing with participants and products Module C – Multiplier training 1.

Change of Roles, Task and Attitude

Learning aims

• • • • •

Contents

• • • • • •

Understand the role of a media trainer and create an awareness for the requirements of this role: from doer to multiplier Reflection of attitude concerning the new role Work on attitude concerning learning Create an awareness for the different requirements of the project concerning the media trainer Understand the task of the media trainer in the framework of all facets of the project The media trainer as trainer, coach, teacher, learning partner, authority: role and attitude Reflection of own learning biography Value systems and images of humanity as a basis for contact with participants Content requirements of the project Reflection of a basic understanding of quality on the level of products and participants Exact knowledge of Modules A and B at the trainer level /Theoretical basics of the whole concept MediaTrainer

Methods

Fitting to the affective, cognitive and psychomotor learning aims, for example theory input, working in small groups, plenum, presentation, reflection

Learning aim

Presentation, presentation of results, role plays, etc

C Introduction

control Duration

2 days

Resources

Presentation techniques (meta pinboard, flip chart, presentation cards, pens, colored pencils, etc.)

Learning

Curriculum / project description MediaTrainer, handout on pictures of humanity

material

173

2.

Trainer tools: Didactics and Methodology

Learning aims

• • • • • • • •

Contents

C

• • • • • •

Introduction

Getting to know different learning aims (cognitive, affective, psychomotor) Getting to know methods that fit with each learning aim Getting to know the methods that fit with trainer and participants Getting to know the participants’ needs and taking them into account Creating an awareness for heterogeneous groups Handling possible discrepancies of participants’ needs and the given learning aims of the Modules A and B Deepening the knowledge about cross media characteristics Getting to know feedback methods for media products Definition of learning aims, assignment of experienced methods concerning the learning aims Methodical implementation of the Modules A and B considering ones own trainer personality and different participant groups Analyses of participants (children, seniors, migrants, etc.) Quality criteria for TV/ audio/ print products Reflection on the responsibility of civil participation in public communication Criteria sponsored feedback on products of Modules A and B as a trainer

Methods

Fitting to the affective, cognitive and psychomotor learning aims, for example theory input, working in small groups, plenum, presentation, reflection

Learning aim

Presentation, presentation of results, role plays, etc

control Duration

2 days

Resources

Presentation techniques (meta pinboard, flip chart, presentation cards, pens, colored pencils), CD-Player, TV

Learning

Handout learning aims, handout methods, handout seminar design, handout quality criteria, handout feedback rules

material

3.

Seminar reality: The trainer and their participants

Learning aims

174

• • • • •

Strengthening the new role as a multiplier Acknowledgement of the responsibility of this new role Getting to know feedback methods for dealing with participants Getting to know how to respond to feedback by the participants Clarifying final questions

3.

Seminar reality: The trainer and their participants

Contents

• • • • •

Methods

Fitting the affective, cognitive and psychomotor learning aims, for example theory input, working in small groups, plenum, presentation, reflection

Learning aim

Presentation, presentation of results, role plays, etc

Feedback role play Giving short seminar sequences Feedback by participants Response by the trainer Open space for participants’ topics

control Duration

1 day

Resources

Presentation techniques (meta pinboard, flip chart, presentation cards, pens, colored pencils)

Learning

Online and audio examples as well as TV examples from Modules A and B, www.europeanweb.tv platform, Johari window, Handout on self-perception and external perception

material

Module C – Structure Module C leads the participants through a role change from participant to seminar leader/trainer. Three days working on deepening that understanding follow. The Module is built up in such a way that participants are taken from their own experiences as a participant into their new role as a trainer. This is done by an instructive process of reflection and perception of what it means to be a trainer and which competences are required on a personal level. The first two days focus on the conveyance of knowledge about the project as well as on an introduction to the new role. This is done by personal reflection about one’s own learning biography from which the requirements of a good trainer are taken. Therefore topics include reflecting on one’s own values as well as increasing understanding of how participants should react as a trainer in the framework of the project. The emphasis lies on “quality in acting”. Because every competent trainer has to have knowledge about a huge variety of methods which allows them to react correctly in different situations with different people within the seminar, the second emphasis lies on getting to know and test different methods. Alongside the tools of the cross media TV journalist (which participants learned in Modules A and B) this part is about the methods available to convey knowledge and competences. A theoretical instruction in the areas of cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning aims and the targeted and appropriate application of methods go hand in hand with that. Also the importance of personal reflection about their own preferences and abilities is part of the seminar to strengthen the participants

C Introduction

175

in their prospective trainer role. As well as the variety of methods a trainer needs tools for preparing an ideal seminar: Participant analysis and a sensible use of evaluation results should make the prospective trainers feel safe in their own seminar preparation. The ability to deal with participants and their products later on when teaching Modules A and B is a criteria-led quality standard for radio, TV and online products and will be developed in Module C as the application of the principles learned can be tested by the participants within the seminar to get functional and practical experiences concerning their role. Feedback and dealing with participants in a sensitive manner is also a part of Module C, to ensure an appropriate conveyance of those standards and to gain strong feedback competences. At the end of the Module everything is brought together, with self-reflection on the trainer role and personal feedback of the actual training supervisor.

C Introduction

176

Lesson 1: Change of Roles: Task and Attitude 1.1 Competences Anyone who works as a trainer should have different abilities and a reflective attitude concerning their tasks and role. Four competences are crucial: • Personal Competence • Social Competence • Professional Competence • Methodical Competence Personal Competence Personal competence centres the person, their self-conception, ability to reflect their own competences and their role. Someone with personal competence reflects on their actions, their position and personal attitude towards different contexts. For a trainer this means to fulfill the role of a trainer, to think about the requirements and about the question as to how far one can fulfill those requirements (which abilities are missing, what else must be done to achieve them). The term “standing” has been developed to describe all these actions. A trainer who has “standing” fulfills the role appropriately, functionally, professionally and is good when dealing with other people. The other three competences are also important here.

C Lesson 1

Social Competence Social competence shifts interest from the individual to the group. Social competence means the sum of personal attitudes and abilities that are necessary for a successful social interaction between the individual and the group. Because a trainer often works in a group in teaching/learning contexts, this competence is a very important one because it influences the atmosphere within this context. Who does not remember a teacher who did not have this competence and got into trouble with the whole class? Successful learning for the participant is not possible unless the trainer has social competence. In economic contexts the term soft skills is often used, but in this sense that term does not capture all that is necessary. Professional Competence Professional competence means on the one hand the trainer has the necessary knowledge and skills they need to convey, but further and alongside the knowledge of the content it means the ability to order and explain it within a wider context. Alongside the detailed professional and functional context a trainer should 177

always be able to think in wider contexts and to possibly transfer them into other contexts. They should be able to “think out of the box” and realise where they can use which of their abilities best. Methodical Competence

C Lesson 1

Someone who works as a trainer must have knowledge about a huge variety of methods which allow them to convey learning content appropriately. That means that beside having the knowledge of different methods they must be able to realise which method is best in which context. Not every method fits every context, topic or participant. Competence therefore means the knowledge of the appropriate choice as well as of the appropriate method. The methodical competence is important before going into teaching/learning situations, when a trainer has to plan seminar and workshop units and has to choose the methods to use to ensure an ideal learning environment. The trainer must be clear about and let participants know the learning aims beforehand and must recognise the learning processes of the participants as well as the framework of the teaching/learning context (huge groups, small groups, homogeneity/ heterogeneity of the group, much space, little space, which material can be used, what needs to be bought in advance etc.) to choose the right methods. If all this is delivered the trainer demonstrates methodical competence. Feedback Competence This competence means the ability of a trainer to give appropriate feedback to the participant concerning their personal learning process and learning result. An example: A participant has written and recorded a presentation and wants to know if it is alright. Within the feedback process the trainer uses their own professional competence and can answer the question with regard to the content. The feedback competence means HOW the feedback is given, i.e. how the trainer explains to the participant what is already good and what could be done better. The trainer’s personal feedback competence is always based on their attitude concerning themselves and others - am I constructive and appreciative in giving feedback or am I more instructive and arrogant?

1.2 Task and Attitude of the Trainer From these four or five core competences the task of a trainer can be derived: to find oneself in the role and to reflect one’s own competences, to build up abilities and being open and willing to learn (also in the role of a teacher). Within personal 178

reflection dealing with one’s own actions and the image of humanity these are based on is inevitable. Images of Humanity “Which image one has of oneself or others depends on the position (and the others’ positions) in society and reflects from the others.”1 Every human being – and with that also every trainer– has a certain picture drawn of the world and the people, a picture which is dominated by questions like: Who are we, what is a human being, which values do we have, what do we believe in, etc.? This picture and the resulting attitude, an inner attitude, dominates the view of people, their actions and – as a trainer – also the choice of methods when dealing with learning participants. The image of humanity as a basis of thinking and acting is not always reflected and conscious but can come up in certain appraising situations. When people are rubricated in the categories strong/weak this gives evidence of a more biologistic image of humanity. Even today in many contexts – especially in the western world – the value of a human being is connected with accomplishments. This leads people who have not achieved much or cannot achieve much to a feeling of inferiority, a phenomenon that often happens with unemployed people. This connection can also be seen in learning contexts and can lead to the same feeling of inferiority for example with school children with bad grades who then do not gain the same selfconfidence as others or even get afraid of school and failing there. Someone who works as a trainer therefore must be aware of their own image of humanity which they take into training. They must be aware of how this personal image of humanity influences them and the participants. That is why an understanding of some of the most famous images of humanity is important:

C Lesson 1

Humanistic Image of Humanity Humanism describes the entirety of ideas on humanity and the longing for a better human existence. It includes the following basic beliefs: • Human dignity, personality and life must be respected. That means on the one hand to respect others being different (E. Levinas) and confers on the other hand the concept of “personal sovereignty”2 • The human being has the ability to educate himself and to develop himself. 1

(cf. Förster, Wolfgang: Humanismus. In: Hans J. Sandkühler u.a. (Ed.): Europäische Enzyklopädie zu Philosophie und Wissenschaften, Band 3, p. 358 f.) 2 (cf. Hilarion Petzold).

179

• Creativeness must be able to unfold. • Human society should ensure dignity and freedom of every human being in a preceding higher development.3 Biologistic Image of Humanity Classification system of quantitative and qualitative criteria Example: Basics for racism:

C

• Master race (following criteria) • Principle of strength (The strongest survive) • Psychic disturbances (divergences from defined norms) are handled as biochemical problems and treated as such (electroshock or medication instead of psychotherapy or acceptance, for example the definition of homosexuality as a disease and treating it like that) Mechanistic Image of Humanity • The human being as a machine (with disturbing factors) • The human being needs to work, it is going to be disturbed, it has a disturbance • The human being is determined and predictable in his task and function • Aims at a technical domination of nature

Lesson 1

In which image of humanity do you see yourself?

1.3 Who am I as a Trainer? How does a trainer lead a group? How do they behave? How do they want to be looked at? Where do they see themselves in this group dynamic mesh? Someone who works as a trainer has a certain image of self and how they act, a so-called self-image. Also the participants have an image of the trainer, the so-called “image of the other”. Often these images do not coincide which means that the individual has a different image of how others see them. The easiest example is a shy guy who others

3

180

(cf. Kuhn, Hansmartin: Menschenbild. In: Hans J. Sandkühler u.a. (Ed.): Europäische Enzyklopädie zu Philosophie und Wissenschaften, Band 2, p. 560 ff.)

think is arrogant. The more consistent both images are, the higher is the feeling of personal security, the trainer knows how they are seen and can trust in that. The other way round every participant has an image of themselves, which can of course also collide with the “image of the other�. Example: A prospective presenter feels that they are already very confident and wants to get in front of a camera. The trainer however thinks that there are still gaps in knowledge and advises the participant to take at least five test presentations before getting in front of the camera. The social psychologists Joseph Luft and Harry Ingram put the phenomenon of self-perception and external perception in a chart: Known to me

Unknown to me

Known to others

Public person A

Blind spot B

Not known to others

My secret Private person (What I hide from others) C

The unconscious knowledge (talents, abilities, aptitudes) D

C Lesson 1

A: Public Person: shows a behaviour that is known to himself and others. Here we are feeling safe, there is no gap between the two perceptions. B: The blind spot of self-perception shows manners and habits, prejudices, affection or aversions which are not known to the person but perceived by others. For example one can identify certain peculiarities like tapping toes but not realising it. C: Private Person, also called The secret or the Area of Hiding, includes things and events a person willingly hides from others, secret wishes, opinions and attitudes. The private person allows only chosen people to know, for example their partner or close friends. There is also a limit/border no one is allowed to cross. There are often hidden fears, shame or guilt, wishes or passions the person keeps hidden. D: The Unconscious: This area is not known either to the person or to others. With the help of depth psychology it can be explored, sometimes one finds unknown hidden talents here. For the trainer it can be helpful to check self-perception and external perception for coherence or discrepancies. A very good instrument for this is for example feedback papers which are given to the participants after the seminar. If there is an explicit question on how people tended to perceive the 181

trainer in their role and competences (personal, social, professional and methodical competence), the trainer gains valuable material for their own self-reflection. If a trainer for example thinks that a seminar went very well but the feedback papers tell the opposite, this gives them concrete hints on their blind spots and self-estimation. But there is no absolute truth. Feedback should therefore always be seen as what it really is: personal, individual estimations, not truth or facts.

C

Feedback is not only helpful for the trainer, but also for the participants, so that they can estimate their own learning and progress. This feedback is what happens in a workshop when the trainer gives compliments, instructions or reproaches. Sometimes it can also be helpful to invite people into self-reflection, for example with the help of the following chart. It is important to recognise that this chart is only meant to help participants’ learning if they want to use it. Reflection is a personal and voluntary action which cannot be ordered or enforced. The trainer can only invite participants to reflect.

Lesson 1

Ensuring estimation What do I know / What am I able to do?

Professional competence For example: • Having fun to experiment Being able to describe • Handling techniques • Knowing different forms of presentation

182

Developing Estimation What do I still need to know?

Ensuring estimation What do I know / What am I able to do?

Developing Estimation What do I still need to know?

Social competences For example: • Having a sympathetic ear for what’s going on around • Being willing to communicate / Radio is communication • Being interested in other people • Being respectful to others who seem to be different • Being able to get involved • Working together with others and having fun doing this (trust the team) Personal competences For example: • Curiosity • Appetite for storytelling • Eagerness to experiment • Creativity, let creativity happen • Awareness of one’s own role – Why do I do media work? • Willingness to learn, to get to know new things • Being able to touch other people, to transport moods

C Lesson 1

After all a trainer should of course also have detailed ideas of their own competences and potential gaps – better to do this before they start to give a workshop or a seminar.

1.4 Different types of trainers Who am I while I am teaching? Content has to be conveyed, participants are supposed to learn, this part of the job is clear. But how do I want to be perceived? In economy, three different management styles are differentiated, based on the research of Kurt Lewin, a social psychologist. These three styles are presented below because they can be transferred to the role of a trainer to some extent.

183

The authoritarian or hierarchic management style Here, a very distinct top-down structure exists: the chief, supervisor or trainer gives instructions and distributes assignments without asking the recipient (employee or student) for their opinion. The hierarchic system is evident to everyone involved, the inferior has to follow orders. If someone makes a mistake, punishment instead of help is the consequence. Acceptance of failure does not exist. This kind of leadership was very much the style teachers used to teach up until almost the end of the 20th century. Utter allegiance and respect was demanded from the students – harsh criticism, detention and the exploitation of fear of failure were the methods to secure that. The democratic or cooperative management style

C Lesson 1

Leading this way means to include inferiors in the process of decision making. It means to search for exchange and to support the involvement of co-workers in the formation of constructive ideas and proposals. By including co-workers, their motivation as well as their commitment rises. Also, a higher identification with the work/ the company can result. However, there is still a distinct regulation of competences, meaning that this style of leadership also has a profound hierarchic basis. What does this mean for a trainer? It means to supervise the students in their process, to be willing to let the students decide about the pacing and to accept their right to get the maximum methodical support. Simultaneously, the trainer is bound to the general conditions (as stated by the client) and the objectives as agreed upon (what has to be taught by when?) and has to do justice to those different aspects. The laissez-faire management style As the name suggests, this style is the complete opposite to the authoritarian style, namely, it allows maximum independence to the co-workers by letting them decide about their work and their organisation. There are only few regulated operations, everything functions somehow, the boss refuses to play their role and does not take responsibility. In the course of the last century, this style as well found its equivalence in certain education systems: anti-authoritarian education, schools without teachers as authorities and the refusal of a performance principle were the answer to the authoritarian style.

184

There are some other management styles that represent, more or less, hybrid forms of the latter three. One style especially becomes important when it comes to training issues: The supporting style The centre of attention is the performance of the trainer themselves who, on the other hand, very much focuses on the students. Ideally, the trainer is a person that supervises, supports and demands in a well-balanced way and who knows what is necessary at which point in time, a person who enjoys working with people and who concentrates on the process as well as on the results. This kind of trainer takes the needs of the students seriously, deals with a variety of methods and possesses a high personal sovereignty in their role. Otherwise, this style could easily transform into the laissez-faire-style. It is the trainer’s responsibility to create an atmosphere that allows both teaching and learning to succeed without losing track of the given assignments and goals.

C Lesson 1

185

Lesson 2: Trainer – tools: didactics and methods 2.1 What defines a successful teaching and learning experience?

C Lesson 2

Trainers and students encounter each other in a teaching-learning-context to which high quality standards apply. • How is successful teaching and learning defined? • How does a trainer evaluates the outcome of their work? Traditionally, as we know from academic systems, teaching/ learning objectives are developed and then provided. Whether these goals are actually achieved is tested through control measures such as tests and exams. This kind of knowledge transfer is based on the trainer and her or his objectives. The trainer defines what a student has to know and tests the required knowledge or skills, at a certain point in time. But no conclusions with regard to the quality of the learning process itself can be drawn out of this way of teaching. For a fuller evaluation, certain questions help. Example: Did the student enjoy it? Was s/he motivated? Was s/he able to follow? Was the trainer sensitive to individual needs of the students? Some of the indicators of a successful learning environment will include, for example: A high or low drop-out rate, students that later become active in the media (as in our case) or became mediators telling other people about their experiences. This point of view creates a distinct difference to traditional systems of teaching because it focuses on the individuals and accepts that they are entitled to do get the best education they can possibly get. Thus, it dissociates itself from the antiquated belief that one teaching method suits every learner and that the teachers’ only responsibility is the mediation of content without taking particular needs of the students into consideration. Consequently, next to clearly defined educational objectives, the trainer has to have systematic and didactical competences and skills to guarantee design and support of the learning/ teaching process that is established in theory and effective in practice. Module C deals with the mediation of those kinds of skills.

2.2 Educational objectives Educational psychology or pedagogical psychology have been researching the different levels of learning processes for some time now and it would go too far to address this topic at this point.

186

Modern knowledge transfer means to support the student in her or his individual process, to allow her or him to learn independently instead of just absorbing what the teacher says. In practice, this can be fulfilled by providing a variety of different methods, by carefully planning and structuring seminars and workshops, by precisely defining educational objectives and choosing the appropriate methods. Defining educational objectives is to actually phrase the goal that is supposed to be achieved by the student. There should be a balance between those objectives and the needs of the participating students. Naturally, educational objectives that do not consider the present skills and competences of students run the risk of never being realised; on the contrary, those objectives could meet with a refusal on the students side because the latter could feel for example overburdened. Thus, the defined educational objectives have to take both levels into consideration, on the one hand the content in question, on the other hand the students’ need (in our case the mediation of competences in the field of video journalism –module A – and crossmedia journalism – module B). Educational objectives can be divided into three different categories: • cognitive • affective • psychomotor educational objectives. For the teacher/ trainer it is crucial to know to which category their objective belongs as each category demands a different method when it comes to the mediation of contents.

C Lesson 2

Cognitive educational objectives Cognitive educational objectives are based on pure knowledge and intellectual skills (cognitive comes from the Latin word cognoscere: to know, to experience, to perceive), thus they are accessible through the mind, through intelligence. The student is able to trigger and also use knowledge. Example: the participants of a training course are dealing with video journalism. Doing so, they get to know some quality criteria that assist them how to judge if a movie is a good or a bad one (framing, dramaturgy, sound, quality etc.). As a consequence, the students adopt a knowledge that allows them to give a qualified judgement and at the same time to conform their own work to this professional knowledge. 187

Affective educational objectives

C Lesson 2

Affective educational objectives refer to intrinsic values, opinions, interests and attitudes of the student. Those are to be reflected, to be manifested and/ or to be changed. A modified behaviour can result. A convenient social example is the modern attitude towards the learning process: whereas 50 years ago, caning students was a standard method to make the students learn, nowadays it is common sense that effective learning is not promoted by fear of punishment. Quite the contrary, a non-threatening atmosphere is essential for a successful learning process. Based on this new awareness, a change of values, a change of evaluation took place; it is not only the result that matters but also the individual progress. The abolition of corporal punishment in schools was the mandatory consequence of this social revalidation of education. If someone is afraid of spiders and therefore kills them, there is no reason for such behaviour on the cognitive level. Spiders are neither dangerous nor life-threatening. But on the affective level, the spider is being judged: disgusting, scary, dangerous, threatening etc. Different patterns result: a strategy of avoidance (leaving the room till someone takes the spider away) or a more practical strategy (kill the spider). Reasonably, neither pattern fits the situation. One educational objective can be to overcome fear of spiders, meaning to change personal attitudes towards those animals and to change the judgement of such kind of situation. Thus, the person is not afraid any more and the spider survives. One purpose of modules A and B is to invite the participants to reflect their own medial impact. The students are supposed to deal with the responsibility that comes with public communication and to develop an individual position towards their own journalistic work. Themes of these educational objectives are for example the reflection of the conflict between formation and creation of opinion, handling the possibility to manipulate in media just by deciding which information is included in a report and which information is left out. Another affective objective is to think about commitment to journalistic quality. While the students learn on the cognitive level about quality criteria for their journalistic work, on the affective level they should reflect if and how these criteria become quality standards for their own journalistic actions. Psychomotor educational objectives The third category, the psychomotor educational objectives, combines intellectual competences with physical skills. A simple example: the ability to write. Writing is the connection between knowledge of the written letter and the actual ability to

188

write. Modules A and B contain a variety of psychomotor objectives such as using a camera, correctly holding a microphone or handling an editor program. Methods Being aware of different educational objectives is important because different methods are needed to communicate these. The use of a certain method conforms to the favoured objective (cognitive, affective or psychomotor) but also to the trainer and the target group, namely the participants. Example: Learning to drive a car cannot be learned just by theory; without driving lessons and therefore practical experience a student will never learn how to drive (a typical psychomotor objective), whereas the traffic regulations represent a typical cognitive objective and thus can be acquired without any practice. What kind of a driver I am in the end, a more defensive or aggressive one, depends on my personal attitude; hence the possible learning objective is an affective objective. Each educational objective needs an adequate method. Thus, as a trainer it is of utmost importance to know at all times what kind of objective s/he wants to achieve to then choose the correct teaching method.

C Lesson 2

A method (Greek: the way) is a scheduled and justified guidance to achieve a certain educational objective. This means that the use of a method is thought out in its realisation and accomplishment before it is actually used.

2.3 A short compilation of methods It makes sense to add one’s own personal experiences to this compilation to have a pool of methods at hand when starting to plan a seminar. Round of introductions (with individual preparation) The trainer poses three or four questions that each participant should answer individually, during a limited amount of time. In the following, the answers are presented in the plenum. To ask for wishes, expectations or apprehensions is typical for these kinds of questions. In addition, the trainer asks the participants to shortly present themselves. Objective: positioning, presentation, getting to know each other, foundation of the group 189

Speech Theoretical input, appropriate to cognitive objectives; typical means are flipchart, beamer, overheads, handouts. If possible, speeches should not be presented after the lunch break. Objective: all participants should quickly get to the same state of knowledge; normally, further inquiry of the audience follows. Presentation of results (Intermediary) results are presented to the whole plenum or smaller groups. Prior to that presentation is normally group work. Group work

C Lesson 2

Working in groups can be a helpful instrument to work on different topics and ideas. Smaller groups benefit from the different point of views of each participant. Typical means are file cards, overheads and flip charts for the following presentation. Group work needs a distinct assignment as regard to topic and timing. It comes in handy for affective educational objectives. Group work with change of perspective Here, the first part of an assignment is distributed among two groups which then swap to work on the second part of the assignment. This change of perspective leads to a new interest (because the assignment is new) and completes the final result because all participants have to deal with every topic. Moreover, this way of group work strengthens the feeling of togetherness and an attitude of “everyone for everyone”. Dyad (partner work) This method is perfect for creating a more intimate and intensive working atmosphere and also supports the exchange between the participants. A dyad is a very convenient follow-up e.g. to the active imagination element. Individual work Individual work depends on topics and assignments clearly instructed by the trainer. The student has to work uninterrupted. The main objective is concentration on oneself or on experiences, a reflection of one’s own behaviour.

190

Peripatetic stroll Two participants go for a walk, within a certain time limit, and discuss an assigned topic. A typical topic for such a kind of stroll is to discuss the satisfaction with the process and the results. The objective is, amongst others, reflection, exchange and comparison. Breaks Next to the necessary, breaks allow not only informal communication but also the possibility for informal group formations. Also, breaks can be used as an intervention, e.g. to finish a certain topic and to start a new one when re-entering the room. This can be a very helpful solution for particularly tense situations. However, in that case, the break should be used to clear conflicts outside the classroom so that it will not stress the following phase. Flashlight Every participant gets the chance to say something about how s/he feels about a certain topic or situation – in just one word or sentence. The audience does not give any comments, and neither does the trainer. The trainer guides this method by assigning the topic and the rules. Objective is to catch momentary moods of the group (anger, joy, weariness etc.) or to make possible issues such as weariness or excessive demands transparent.

C Lesson 2

Mood level Similar to the flashlight, the mood level can be used as a follow-up to a finished unit/ exercise to make certain moods transparent so that the trainer can react to these. With the help of self adhesive circles the participants can visualise their mood or their satisfaction on a prepared scale. The participants should stick up their circles at the same time to guarantee anonymity after which there should be a short discussion about the mood level. Change of perspective A change of perspective (e.g. on the meta-level) can be effected by the trainer. It is a helpful approach to clarify things that have just been learned on the meta-level. The objective is to enlarge methodical competences of the students to facilitate new points of view on oneself and on the group. The change has to be announced, either verbal (“I change to the meta-level�) or through an action (e.g. by putting on a hat). 191

Role-play In role-plays, real situations are simulated in a safe context. A role-play needs clear instructions and a distinct role allocation, a leader who takes care that the rules are observed and last but not least rules that are evident to each player. The objective of a role-play is so the participants can try out different roles and therefore can learn to diversify their actions and competences. Typical role-plays are used e.g. in the prevention of conflicts. Group division

C Lesson 2

192

There are many different ways to divide groups. It depends on the objective, e.g. to mix the participants again and again to create a team feeling or, on the contrary, to separate certain participants to break up some constellations. A free and independent division of groups demands a high level of social competences from the participants and should therefore only be chosen if the trainer is certain that the result will not have counterproductive effects on the assignment to follow. • Method 1: enumerating 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, ....or 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, ...etc. • Method 2: allot the participants °° Variation: allot the participants with the help of different chocolate flavors (arrange the participants in groups according to their preferred chocolate flavor: happy, nice, perfect after lunch when you need something sweet..) °° Variation: sound-memory: vessels (e.g. film canisters) are filled with different things, two (or three etc.) with the same filling. Each participant gets a vessel and has to “hear” the other member(s) of the group. • Method 3: division of groups by “leader”. This method is only advisable in groups that have a healthy social base, otherwise some members could feel excluded (e.g. when they are chosen as the last...).

Lesson 3: Reality of a seminar: trainer, participants, objectives During a seminar, people meet who want to achieve a given objective in a limited amount of time. During the MediaTrainer the participants are supposed to learn in a short time period how to express themselves in a medial world, how to create media products and how to use them for public communication. For this to be a success it needs a responsible intercourse with the students (feedback), a distinct quality of the objectives (quality management) and a plan that considers all these things (seminar design).

3.1 The feedback The feedback to the student is one of the most important methods in a teachinglearning context because it offers the students a personal and individual judgment of their own level given by the trainer. Often, students value highly this feedback from the trainer because s/he is the expert and therefore should be able to give a professional judgment. However, feedback can not only help but also do some damage if it is hurtful, for example shattering the self-image of the student or being so far from the student’s own self-perception. Hence some rules that have to be considered when giving feedback: It should: • be phrased in the I-narrative • be measured properly • be anticipated by the recipient • be immediate and not be phrased out of memory • be concrete and precise • be phrased as perceptions (“I see you as a...”) and not as statements (“You are...”) • (feedback is only a subjective perception and does not represent the “truth”) • be descriptive and not judgmental • express esteem and empathy.

C Lesson 3

3.2 Quality management based on criteria To evaluate a product, clearly defined and known criteria are needed. For instance, if a videotrailer is the product in question: there must be criteria which allow a distinction between a good and a bad trailer. Division into different categories is useful.

193

Example:

C Lesson 3

1. Category: techniques How good is the technical quality of the trailer? How are the takes, the editing, the sound, the colours, the contrasts etc.? This category is only about artisanry. 2. Category: content What is the trailer about? How is the content being transferred? Is there a leitmotif? Does the realisation of the topic work? How good is the dramaturgy of the trailer, is it coherent? 3. Category: communication To whom is the trailer speaking? What is the target group? And does the trailer actually reach the target group? What is the purpose of the trailer, to inform or to entertain? What effect is the trailer supposed to have? The three categories techniques, content and communication offer a basis to evaluate every media product, no matter if video trailer, movie, podcast or an internet article. Each product must have clearly defined criteria to evaluate the quality of the segment. Without those criteria, any feedback by the trainer degenerates into a personal expression of taste. This can have an effect of insecurity for the student. Criteria should be independent from personal taste so that the product quality can reliably be compared. Consequently it is not a question of whether a trainer personally likes the product of one of the participants or not but whether the product meets the qualitative requirements. In a workshop, it makes always sense to work on the criteria for a media product together with the participants. This creates liability and clarity and serves the orientation of the production.

3.3 Design of a seminar A seminar is determined by different aspects: most importantly, by the subject, the number of participants and their homo- or heterogeneity, the conditions and the infrastructure, the trainer and her or his preferences and the required equipment. Many of these factors can be calculated by the trainer prior to the seminar, e.g. by analysing the participants. This can be helpful to be prepared for possible expectations, problems or challenges, e.g. by making a short questionnaire the interested participants have to fill out when they apply. For concrete planning of workshops and seminars, the following categories are of help:

194

Timing

Topic

Start and end of What exactly is unit? my topic?

Objective

Method

Medium

What do I want to achieve? What is supposed to be learned?

How do I proceed? What methods do I use for what reason?

What do I need? What equipment do I need?

The topics and objectives for Modules A and B of the MediaTrainer are already determined. However, each trainer will have different methodical preferences. The group can be either very homogeneous or very heterogeneous, thus the trainer has to be quite flexible to react in an appropriate way. A successful seminar is characterised by a variety of methods, diversion, learning results, consistency and clarity. Especially for inexperienced trainers a detailed seminar plan comes in handy to make them aware of blind spots and possible difficulties during the planning period instead of being confronted with those in the seminar and having to react ad hoc. Usually, participants also do have wishes that go beyond the pure content of the seminar. For instance, they want to meet new people, have fun, present themselves, exchange interests etc. A good trainer lives up to those expectations by taking them into consideration when planning the seminar and choosing the methods. To compare: who does not know those endless, never-ending Powerpoint presentations read out by the trainer, even better after lunch break when you just really would like to take a nap... That is not a very helpful structure. Also in pedagogy it is common knowledge nowadays that long teacher-centred presentations do not secure the educational objectives but on the contrary have the effect that students just lose interest. In educational psychology, the term liable memory exists. Objectives, varieties of methods and a feeling for the special needs of students are the weapons of a good trainer. Or, to speak with Confucius:

C Lesson 3

“Tell me – I will forget it! Explain to me – I will remember! Allow me to do it myself – I will understand!”

195

196 Understanding, comparison and back-up of the Participants’ knowledge about the objectives and ideas in the project

short break

The qualification Module C

The project

11:00-11:15

11:15-11:40

11:40- 12:40

13:20-13:30

Evalating the mood

Orientation within the seminar

Round Robin Presentation participants • Name & function • Why here? • Expectations, wishes, speak-out

10:15-11:00

How is it going?

Participants get to know each other, trainer evaluates the group

Introduction Welcome by trainer and host, organisation, general regulations

12:40- 13:20

Orientation

10:00-10:15

Day 1

Objective

Topic

Flash light: a word, a sentence, no comments by the others

Presentation of results

Three groups collect the most important characteristics of civic commitment within public communication and then name the objective of the project in this regard

Presentation Questions

Plenary, discussion

Presentation

Method

Seminar plan

Time

C Flipchart, pens

Curriculum EUtrainer for ICT and Media/Descripton of the project/

Flip chart with an overview of Module C

Welcome flip chart

Media

Systematisation of the participant’s expectations

Comparison of theoretical results with own experiences To deepen the insights of the morning session First reflections on teaching & learning

The participant

Expectations

Category:

14:30-15:00

15:00-15:15

15:15-16:15

17:30-18:00

File cards with headlines

Within the plenary, results are systematised using the following categories: trainer, atmosphere, participants, content, joker (for those results that cannot be assigned)

Day 2

Detailed reflection on the first day Discussion within the plenary

The day

Learning

Teaching &

Reflection

Flipchart, pens, file cards

Discussion in the plenary What participants’ expectations (Modules A & B) can be deduced from that

Meta plan chart

Memory of own learning biography: Green and red file What did help, what didn’t? cards Leading through the biography with the help Pens of Active Imagination; single work 5 minutes, making notes Work in pairs: 30 minutes of exchange about experiences, later collection of results on cards For each question one colour

Media

Method

Exchange and intensive reflection Presentations in groups of 2 about teaching-learning situations

short break

16:15-16:30

16:30-17:30

Learning

Teaching &

Reflection about possible expectations on the project

lunch break

13:30-14:30

Objective

Topic

Time

C

Seminar plan

197

198 Arrival and introduction to the topic Approach to ones own role

Getting to know and reflect own attitudes and those of others

Reflection on the morning Getting to know some methods

The trainer

break with an assignment Make yourself familiar with your own role

Welcome

Self-awarness

Image of a

How is it going?

lunch break

10:00-10:30

10:30-11:15

11:15-11:50

11:30-11:50

11:50-13:00

13:00-13:15

13:15-14:15

trainer

Objective

Topic

Mood level: How did you experience the morning session?

Discussion within the plenary: What is your most important realisation when it comes to different types of trainers? Transition to the topic - Idea of Man

Walk by yourself: What kind of trainer do I want to be? How do I want to deal with people?

Discussion within the plenary Change of perspectives from the participant to the trainer: what do the results of yesterday mean for a trainer? Collection on flip chart

Discussion within the plenary: what do you remember from yesterday? Are there questions? Etc.

Method

Seminar plan

Time

C Flip chart, mood chart, self adhesive circles

Handout trainer characteristics

Flip chart etc.

Media

Practical approach to the project

Detailed reflection on the first two Discussion within the plenum days

Negotiated

Trainer in the project

The day

16:15-16:45

16:45-17:30

17:30-18:00

Day 3

Reflection of the role as a trainer and strengthening self- awareness

short break

16:00-16:15

agreement

Reflection on the role as a trainer and strengthening of self-awareness

The perfect trainer

15:00-16:00

Media

Flip chart with the agreement

Presentation of the negotiated agreement in front of the plenary, comparison and enacting of the agreement; everyone signs it

Discussion within the plenary about conseCurriculum Mediaquences that result out of the modules A and B Trainer through the mingling of project and negotiated Project description agreement

Moderation techniques

PT’s work out, based on their insights, in two groups a negotiated agreement: 1. What kind of trainer do I want to be? 2. What do I want to avoid as a trainer?

Silent work: working sheet Idea of Man, as a Handout - Idea of follow up discussion within the plenary about Man ideas of man (humanistic, biologistic, mechanistic..) and their consequences Discussion: what values influence my actions as a trainer? Reminder: personal learning biography: expectations towards the trainer

Reflection on own values

Values

14:15-15:00

Method

Objective

Topic

Time

C

Seminar plan

199

200 Reflection on methods, training on the trainer role

Getting to know cognitive, affective and psychomotor educational objectives Gain security

short break

Methods in

Educational

Objectives &

11:00-11:15

11:15-12:00

lunch break

Empathy

14:15-14:30

mood level

Being a trainer &

methods

13:15-14:15

13:00-13:15

12:30-13:00

objectives

Sensibility for each other

Strengthening of the role as a trainer, mood level

First collation of methods

Methods

10:30-11:00

12:00-12:30

Arrival and introduction to the topic

Welcome

10:00-10:30

practice

Objective

Topic

Game: 21

1 participant leads the group to a „flash light“ regarding the topic: My insight into the topic Methods

Self-organised assignment of the collated methods to the objectives; trainer keeps out, time limit: 30 minutes

Silent work: working sheet Ecucational Objectives, later a disussion within the plenary

PT present their results: 1 PT guides two other PTs concerning the way how to present the results with the help of the chart

3 Groups: what methods do the participants already know? What methods do they already know from module C?

Discussion within the plenary: what do you remember from the day before? Are there questions? Etc.

Method

Seminar plan

Time

C Meta plan chart, prepared file cards with the objectives

Hand out Educational Objectives

Meta plan chart with compilation of methods, file cards

Flip chart, meta plan chart, file cards

Media

Strengthening of the trainer role, security of educational objectives

Reflection on the role as a trainer

Make sense of using different methods

Reflection on the trainer role Complete the compilation

Detailed reflection on the day

Security of methods

Role as a trainer

short break

Use of methods

Role as a trainer

Methods

The day

14:30-15:15

15:15-15:30

15:30-15:45

15:45-16:30

16:30-17:00

17:00-17:30

17:30-18:00

Day 4

Objective

Topic

Time

Media

Discussion within the plenary

Discussion within the plenary: what methods have been added today? Reflections of methods and their use

Important individual insights into the role as a trainer are collected within the plenary

„Assuming“ acceptance of extreme methods 1. Presentation of 3 extreme methods: • Tapping each other • Active Imagination with painting • Throwing of balls and transporting moods 2. Formation of 2 or 3 groups (4,5 or 3 each) Each two (or three) assume about the other one what they think about the methods, taking 5 minutes per person, in the end the „assumed“ person has to reveal what they do think

Feedback from the trainer concerning the presentations of the participants

Meta plan chart with the compliation of methods, file cards

Self-organised presentation of the assignments Meta plan chart, file with justifications in front of trainer cards with the educational objectives of the morning

Method

C

Seminar plan

201

202 Getting to know the process of analysing participants to prepare for own seminars Creation of awareness of the variety and heterogeneity of participant groups Ability to evaluate knowledge gained

Participants &

10:30-11:00

short break

Participants II

11:00-11:15

11:15- 12:25

Back up of results

Arrival and introduction to the topic

Welcome

10:00-10:30

design of a seminar

Objective

Topic

Groups present their results within the plenary Reminder: competences of presentation for the trainer, 15 minutes per group incl. questions

Theoretical input: assign categories on flip charts 4 groups, participants answer the questions in the plenary and collate on flip chart: • particpants can be analysed using which factors? (age, gender, profession, position, culture, relationships between participants, expectations..) • how can this information be collected? • how can you work with this information, how is it important? What results did I actually get?

Discussion within the plenary: what do you remember from the day before? Are there questions etc.

Method

Seminar plan

Time

C Meta plan chart

Meta plan chart with preparition Individual/ Personal data Feelings/ (wishes, motivation, expectations, fears) Professional competences (job, role, further education) Group (number, gender, age, educational level, gangs, relationships)

Media

Strengthening of role as trainer, mood level

Being a trainer &

13.10-14:10

12:55-13:10

Reflection on the connection between the expectations of participantaryand choice of methods

Participants &

12:25-12:55

lunch break

mood level

methods

Objective

Topic

Time Meta plan chart with the compilation of methods Meta plan chart with the PT-analysis

Discussion within the plenum

1 participant leads a „flashlight“, concerning the topic: My insights into the topic „expectations of a particpant“

Media

Method

C

Seminar plan

203

204 Finding and naming criteria that describe the quality of a product particpants reflect on the quality of the products that are supposed to be produced in module A and B Objective: finding criteria that allow the participant to give professional feedback

Presentation of results

Quality of products

Quality of product I

short break

Quality of product II

14:10-15:10

15:10-16:10

16:10-16:25

16:25-17:25

Presentation of results

Objective

Topic

Media

Two groups present their results within the plenary, 30 minutes per group including comparison with the plenary

Two groups present their results within the plenary, 30 minutes per group including comparison with the plenary

Flip chart

Trainer assigns fixed categories, according Flip chart, moderato which the 4 groups should find subitems. tion techniques Some examples below in brackets (not to be disclosed to participants!) 1. Criteria regarding content: (what topics do we have and why? How are they realised? Dramaturgy? Leitmotif, objective?) 2. Communicative criteria: (how do I speak to the target group? What is the target group? How do I guarantee that I reach them?) 3. Formal criteria: what do I have to consider from a legal point of view? What needs to be considered in the frame of the project? What is allowed, what isn’t? 4. Technical criteria: (clean editing, clean shoots, use of technique, quality of offtexts and moderations etc.)

Method

Seminar plan

Time

C

First approach to the mediation of the criteria that have been worked on Reflection on the day

Arrival and introduction to the topic

Feeedback

competences

The day

Welcome

17:25-17:45

17:45-18:00

10:00-10:15

Day 5

Objective

Topic

Time Flipchart with rules for feedback Handout Rules of Feedback

Theoretical input of the trainer concerning the topic of constructive feedback, discussion within the plenary about the use of feeback

Discussion within the plenary: what do you remember from the day before? Are there questions?

Flashlight: most important individual insight of the day

Media

Method

C

Seminar plan

205

206

short break

Trainer feedback I

11:30-11:45

11:45-12:45

Training on constructive feedback following the criteria Strengthening of the role of a trainer

Training on constructive feedback following the criteria Strengthening of the role as a trainer

Feedback by the

10:15-11:30

trainer

Objective

Topic

2 different role plays

Trainer input to self awareness and from the outside by JOHARI Follow up: 2 role plays (30 minutes per play) Exercise including welcome by the media trainer 2 participants play the media trainer role, 1 participant plays a participant of module A/B Together: viewing of a short tv-report (audio file etc.), then the two media trainers give professional feedback following the criteria that have been worked on The plenary is only viewers/ listeners Follow up: change of roles/ meta level The participant that has received the feedback gives their own feedback about their feelings during the feedback. ATTENTION: no critique of behavior, only pure expressions of perceptions No comments to be made, the role-playing media trainers give their thanks for the feedback Finally the trainer gives comments

Method

Seminar plan

Time

C As above

Flip chart with rules for feedback

Meta plan chart with the criteria

Short examples (audio, and TV), using website of openweb-tv

Flip chart with JOHARI-WINDOW

Media

Individual feedback by the trainer Short personal discussions between trainer to each participant and participant (max 5 minutes) concerning the role as trainer In the meantime, the plenary collects last questions for the final discussion Answering open questions Feedback & farewell

Me, the trainer

short break

Me, the trainer I

Open space

Over & out

14:15-15:30

15:30-15:45

15:45-17:00

17:00-17:30

17:30-18:00

Strengthening of self-confidence as a trainer

lunch break

13:15-14:15

Participants give written feedback, follow up: final discussion and handing out of the certificates to participants

Open discussion in the plenary – participants can ask any and every question they still have

Role-play: Each participant has to open a seminar, max. 5 minutes (entering the room, greeting the group, presenting) Trainer gives short feedback

Flashlight: individual insights made during the role plays

Naming insights

Ideas on insights

Feedback-sheets, certificates

Meta plan chart of the compilation of methods day 3

13:00-13:15

Media

Questions to the plenary: what methods have been added in the last two days? Completion of the method chart

Enlargening of knowledge of methods when being a trainer

Methods

12:45-13:15

Method

Objective

Topic

Time

C

Seminar plan

207

Project description Digital technologies of information and communication are gaining more importance in our work and everyday life. In the contrary to the traditional mass media which is a one way communication, the internet includes participants who are transmitters and receptors at the same time. Users of the new media are so-called «Produsers», a term and content synthesis of «Producers» and «Users». Everyone can become «a produser». Our training courses across Europe will help you to develop your skills in effective usage of ICT and new media. You can become web-TV reporter, new media journalist or even a trainer. The new digital resources and production tools are available for the citizens, give a chance to use them creatively, to make video productions and publish them online. Proficiency in use of information and communication technologies are indispensable in the modern working world. People, who have only limited knowledge in this field, have also a big disadvantage at the labour market. Therefore media education is a key element to their success. There is a need in Europe to teach these skills and qualify workers in this area. If the European Union and its Memeber States want to preserve and develop its leading position in general and in its economy characterised by dynamic technological changes, it is important that employees and citizens develop their ICT skills. So far there was a lack of training concept and learning materials that are available free of charge to everyone. Thanks to our project a MediaTrainer concept has been created. It may be used in the vocational education institutions, open TV and web-TV channels, NGOs, community media centers and media education institutions. These non-commercial media institutions (community media) perform an important social function. They allow citizens participation and communication in the field of political and socio-cultural education. They offer the possibility of making their opinions public. They give them a chance to design their own radio, TV or web-TV program. They are open for all citizens, for their ideas and views.

Background, objectives and needs Web 2.0 together with social media and community media have taken up new forms of communication, opening up new distribution channels on the web. This was made possible by the constant innovation in digital technology. Digitalizaton has also contributed to the changes in the journalistic work. The journalist today requires knowledge of the media telling and writing for various media platforms, radio, video, newspaper and Internet. They have to know the basics of cross media production as well. 209

This new requirement calls for appropriate concepts in education and training. The skills that are in demand by the cross-media production in the civic and educational media belong to the integral part of our educational concept MediaTrainer. The concept of the MediaTrainer course has been developed in the framework of a two-years project. The project aims at developing, testing and transferring of modular vocational education to MediaTrainer as well as the implementation of this vocational education in professional development systems of the partner countries – Cyprus, Germany, Finland, Poland, Romania, Turkey and United Kingdom. This process is conducted by the European Youth4media Network e.V. in other European countries. The project develops a Europe-wide modular vocational education with a recognition concept, which assumes that the qualifications gained abroad will be recognized, used and made transparent. Methodological and didactic elements of the course were created in the debate between partners from across Europe. During the concept development, it was an advantage that the partners have brought different approaches and priorities of their media work. Each partner had a specific background connected with the objectives of its institution, its personal experiences and the context of the national media and education system. The joint coordination and presentation of the contents of the training concept has been maintained over a period of almost a year. It is based on the experiences of best practices that have been collected systematically at the beginning of the project. In terms of a new teaching and learning culture a variety of aspects have been taken into consideration. The modular design of the course allows us to implement only parts of the training and to make flexible time patterns depending on individual possibilities of participants. Moreover e-learning tool and distance learning reduce the training only to the practical and the most required part. It gives also a chance to access learning materials to the visitors from all over the world. In autumn 2010 a two years project was finished. The realisation of the project was possible thanks to the financial support of the Lifelong learning program of the European Union. Three modules of the training course were tested several times in all partner countries on local and international level. The MediaTrainer is now being offered continuously with many new partner institutions in other EU countries. Employees of the civil society and community media sector can benefit from it. They can become trainers of new media and they are able to teach basic skills in the creative use of digital audio-visual media to their target groups. Competences obtained by the participants are transparent and recognized abroad. 210

MediaTrainer for Europe European Youth4media network association, one of the project partners, holds regular training courses at European level and cooperates with its 32 member organizations in 24 European countries. The network promotes the participation, communication and media skills of young people. Priorities of European cooperation include trainers qualification, exchange of specialists in youth media work, political and intercultural education and the implementation of innovative mediapedagogical concepts. The network has made its task to involve citizens for active media work, to motivate them and guide. They learn to express themselves and to analyse media critically in order to participate in the formation of public opinion with their own contributions. For successful communication the quality of media message plays an important role. Design and communication elements must be brought together in a way that the viewer can absorb and understand well. During the training course participants create media productions to cross-cultural, political or entertainment topics and broadcast them to the public using web-TV (europeanweb.tv and owtv.de). Training courses on European level gives the participants an opportunity to get not only media, but also intercultural and social competences. Participants from different countries work together and learn from each other. National borders are no longer relevant and intercultural communication takes place naturally. In this way, young people develop a common European identity. They obtain extensive informal knowledge in the field of intercultural and civic education. This learning content is not taught, but developed action-oriented. The interests and views of students are perceived and open individual approaches to the learning content. Important is the exchange of meaning and value of learning, the anchor in their own actions and links with other knowledge and applications.

Transparency and recognition Participants of the training course MediaTrainer receive a certificate, which identifies the learning content they have been processed successfully and the skills they acquired. It describes the knowledge, skills and social skills that they obtained during the training. The graduates will make it easier to use the skills learned to profit for the further planning and design of their careers. As a style for the competence of the evidence currently an Europass and the Youth Pass is used. Those tools designed by the European Commission are helpful to prove the competences, skills and abilities in a clear and easily understood form, which is also recognized at the European level. 211

A recognition process, which regards the European Qualifications Framework (EQF or the European credit system (ECVET) will be developed. The learning outcomes of the participants are documented in the individual stock of knowledge (education), in individual skills (practical media design) and skills (social interaction, work experience). This creates a portfolio for each participant’s learning outcomes, it is verifiable and transparent. In the future, a European reference framework for skills in the field of cross media journalism and a valid assessment of the training MediaTrainer in the form of ‘credit points’ will be implemented

212

MedienTrainer Trainerqualifizierung f端r die europ辰ische B端rgermedienarbeit Ein Handbuch zur Vermittlung praktischer Medienkompetenz

M端nster 2010

Herausgeber: Bürgermedienzentrum Bennohaus

Bundesverband Bürger- und

Arbeitskreis Ostviertel e.V.

Ausbildungsmedien e.V.

Geschäftsführer: Dr. Joachim Musholt 48155 Münster, Bennostr. 5

31275 Lehrte, Poststr. 12

Tel: +49 251 60 96 73

Tel: +49 5132 85 65 92

Fax: +49 251 60 96 777

Fax: +49 5132 85 65 93

Email: geschaeftsfuehrung2@bennohaus.info

Email: info@bvbam.de

www.bennohaus.info

www.bvbam.de

Projektmanagement: Dr. Joachim Musholt, Benedikt Althoff, Michał Wójcik Redaktion: Benedikt Althoff, Michał Wójcik Autoren der Ausbildungsmodule: David Balmas, Jaqui Devereux, Casy Dinsing, Helena Potthast Autoren des Trainingskurses: Benedikt Althoff, David Balmas, Bill Best, Casy Dinsing, Jaqui Devereux, Georg May, Dr. Joachim Musholt, Michał Wójcik E-learning: Stefan Deltchev, Źmicier Hryškievič, Vitaliy Lipich Layout: Źmicier Hryškievič Übersetzung: Jaqui Devereux, Daniela Elsner, Malte Koppe, Joanna Malec, Halyna Wójcik Infos über das Projekt: trainer.europeanweb.tv – E-learning Plattform www.youth4media.eu – Laufende Trainingskurse

© Münster 2010, All rights reserved Printed in Poland Mit der Unterstützung des Programms für lebenslanges Lernen der Europäischen Union. Dieses Projekt wurde mit Unterstützung der Europäischen Kommission finanziert. Die Verantwortung für den Inhalt dieser Veröffentlichung trägt allein der Verfasser; die Kommission haftet nicht für die weitere Verwendung der darin enthaltenen Angaben.

214

Einleitung In der europäischen Informationsgesellschaft ist Medienkompetenz der Schlüssel zu aktiver Teilhabe an der zivilen Bürgergesellschaft und freien interkulturellen Kommunikation. Neue Technologien, Computer, Informations- und Kommunikationswerkzeuge durchdringen die Lebenswelt vom alltäglichen Arbeitsleben bis zur individuellen Freizeitgestaltung. Im Kontrast zur Ein-Weg-Kommunikation über die traditionellen Massenmedien können Nutzer des Internets sowohl Sender als auch Empfänger und damit Kommunikator oder Rezipient von Nachrichten und Informationen sein. Die Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten und die Inhalte der neuen Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien müssen in allen Bildungsbereichen präsent sein. Bildungskonzepte sind stetig mit neuen Anforderungen abzustimmen und müssen weiterentwickelt werden. Die Neuen Medien bieten vielfältige Chancen, die soziale und politische Teilhabe sowie den interkulturellen Dialog der Bürger in Europa zu fördern. Will die EU eine Führungsrolle in einer globalen und durch einen rapiden technologischen Wandel geprägten Wirtschaft sichern und ausbauen, so gilt es, die IKT-Kompetenzen von Bürgern zu fördern. Für die Vermittlung dieser Kompetenzen besteht europaweit ein dringender Bedarf an Fachkräften. Im Rahmen des Projektes MediaTrainer liegt jetzt ein europäisches Fortbildungskonzept mit offen zugänglichen Lehr- und Lernmaterialien für die Fortbildung von Fachkräften vor, das in der Berufsbildungspraxis im Bereich der Bürger- und Ausbildungsmedien in unseren Partnereinrichtungen in den Transferländern Deutschland, Zypern, Finnland, Polen, Großbritannien, Rumänien und in der Türkei angewendet wird. Der Transferprozess wird nachhaltig weitergeführt. Das Netzwerk European Youth4Media e.V. wird die Fortbildung mit seinen 34 Mitgliedern in 24 Europäischen Ländern im Jahr 2011 und darüber hinaus regelmäßig durchführen. Das Handbuch enthält alle wichtigen Informationen und didaktischen Materialien zur Fortbildung MediaTrainer und richtet sich speziell an Jugendarbeiter, Multiplikatoren und interessierte Bürger, die sich aktiv in der non-formalen politischen, medialen und interkulturellen Bildung fortbilden wollen.

215

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Einleitung

217

Bürgermedien in Europa

219

Das Rahmenkonzept der Fortbildung

223

Überblick über die Module

235

Modul A: Videojournalismus

239

Modul B: Crossmedialer Journalismus

293

Modul C: Trainerkompetenzen

339

Projektbeschreibung

369

Die Projektpartner

373

Bibliographie

383

Antworten

384

217

Bürgermedien in Europa Die Bürgermedien und „Offenen Kanäle“ in Funk und Fernsehen bereichern seit mehr als zwanzig Jahren die europäische Medienlandschaft und sind ein wichtiger Beitrag zur Vielfalt in Europa. Sie fördern die Teilhabe der Bürger an der öffentlichen Meinungsbildung und tragen zur Demokratisierung der Gesellschaft bei. Ein wesentliches Merkmal der Bürgermedien (community media) ist der freie und gleichberechtigte Zugang zum Rundfunk für alle Bürger. Ein Schwerpunkt ihrer Arbeit liegt auf der Vermittlung von Medienkompetenz und auf der handlungsorientierten Medienarbeit in lokalen Netzwerken mit Schulen, Jugendeinrichtungen, Hochschulen, lokalen Initiativgruppen und Migrantenorganisationen. Die Bürgermedien bieten ein Praxisfeld berufsorientierender Maßnahmen für Jugendliche sowie Ausbildungsplätze als Mediengestalterinnen und Mediengestalter. Die Bürgermedien in den Ländern Europas (Offene Kanäle, nicht kommerzielle Lokalradios und community media wie local TV und local Radio) mit einer Vielzahl von multinationalen Interessenvertretungen sind kaum zu überschauen. Die Internetseite www.communitymedia.se/cat zeigt in einer Übersicht mehr als 600 Verweise auf Offene Kanäle und Community TV-Stationen weltweit. Insbesondere in Australien sind die Bürgermedien in ihrem öffentlichen Auftritt sehr gut aufgestellt www.openchannel.org.au). Für Europa werden public-accessSender in Belgien, Dänemark, Deutschland, Finnland, Frankreich, Großbritannien, Irland, den Niederlanden, Norwegen, Österreich und Spanien genannt. Die rechtlichen Grundlagen sind in den einzelnen Ländern sehr verschieden: Während es in Großbritannien eine klare Lizenzierungsregelung gibt und eine Vereinigung, die interessierte Gruppen beim Lizenzierungsverfahren unterstützt (Community Media Association – CMA), ist in Spanien (dort gab es nach einem Zensus im Jahr 2002 fast mehrere hundert lokale Fernsehstationen) der ganze Sektor wenig reguliert. Neben rein kommerziell ausgerichteten Lokalstationen gibt es dort das Bürgermeisterfern­sehen ebenso wie medienpädagogisch oder auf publicaccess ausgerichtete Projekte. Mit dem Modell der deutschen Offenen Kanäle am ehesten vergleichbare Sender gibt es in Schweden, Norwegen und Belgien. Dänemark und Finnland haben eine ganze Reihe von lokalen TV-Sendern, die im Vergleich mit den deutschen Offenen Kanälen ähnliche Elemente innehaben, im engeren Sinne aber keine Offenen Kanäle sind. Ähnlich verhält es sich in den Niederlanden, die allerdings eine sehr reiche und weit aufgefächerte Landschaft von lokalen, nicht kommerziellen Radio- und Fernsehstationen haben. 219

In vielen Ländern, die der EU 2004 und 2007 beitraten, hat der Sektor eine spezielle Geschichte. Zur Zeit der kommunistischen Machthaber waren dort Piratensender als Kommunikationsinstrumente von Bürgerrechtsbewegungen betrieben worden, um gegen autoritäre Regierungen zu protestieren. Ein Beispiel ist das slowenische Studenten-Radio, das 1969 gegründet worden war. In Slowenien gibt es gegenwärtig ungefähr 30 nicht-kommerzielle lokale - von Ortsverbänden gegründete und betriebene - Radio und TV-Sender. In Zentraleuropa und auf dem Balkan existieren Strukturen und Einrichtungen, die man aufgrund ihrer Tätigkeit durchaus als Bürgermedienzentren bezeichnen kann: Sie qualifizieren Bürgerinnen und Bürger im Umgang mit Aufnahme- und Sendetechnik, leisten organisatorische Hilfe, helfen bei der Vernetzung von Gruppen untereinander.

Bürger- und Ausbildungsmedien in Deutschland In Deutschland hat sich in mehr als 20 Jahren eine der vielfältigsten Bürgermedienlandschaften Europas entwickelt. Offene Fernseh- und Hörfunkkanäle, nicht kommerzielle und Freie Radios, Campusradios, Hochschulfunk und Lernradios, Aus- und Fortbildungskanäle und unterschiedliche Ausprägungen von lokalem Bürgerrundfunk bilden einen dritten Mediensektor, dessen Bürgernähe und gemeinnütziges Wirken auf dem Feld der Medienbildung sich klar von öffentlichrechtlichen und privat-kommerziellen Rundfunkveranstaltern abheben. Bürgermedien gibt es als Offener Fernseh- und/oder Hörfunkkanal (OK), als nicht kommerzielles Lokalradio (NKL), als »Freies« Radio, als Bürgerkanal und als Bürgerrundfunk. Trotz aller Unterschiede gibt es mindestens vier wichtige Strukturmerkmale, die die Bürgermedien in Deutschland übergreifend kennzeichnen: • Bürgermedien gewähren grundsätzlich einen offenen Zugang zu Sender und Programm, wenn auch die Zugangsregeln im Detail unterschiedlich sind. Damit tragen sie zur Verwirklichung des Grundrechts auf freie Meinungsäußerung in elektronischen Massenmedien bei. Hier liegt der zentrale Unterschied zum traditionellen öffentlich-rechtlichen oder privat-kommerziellen Rundfunk. • Die Sender und Programme sind bürgernah. Das wird durch die lokale, allenfalls regionale Verbreitung der Programme unterstrichen, aber auch durch einen lokalen Programmauftrag, den eine zunehmende Zahl von Ländern mediengesetzlich formuliert. • Die Bürgermedien vermitteln umfassende Medienkompetenz, indem sie jedermann dabei unterstützen, nach eigenen Vorstellungen und in eigener Regie ein Rundfunkprogramm zu schaffen. Diese Form der Schaffung einer 220

direkten Öffentlichkeit ist ihre vornehmliche Aufgabe und zugleich zentrale Leistung. • Die Sender sind gemeinnützig und nicht kommerziell, sie sind dem Gemeinwohl verpflichtet und frei von wirtschaftlichen Interessen. Täglich schalten schätzungsweise mehr als 1,5 Mio. Hörer/Zuschauer in Deutschland ihren lokalen Bürgersender ein; täglich produzieren und senden die Aktiven in den Bürgermedien bundesweit rund 1.500 Stunden Programm, das entspricht mehr als 60 Vollzeitprogrammen. An der weitgehend ehrenamtlichen Programmproduktion beteiligen sich im gesamten Bundesgebiet regelmäßig (und stets wechselnd) mindestens 20.000 bis 30.000 Personen. Fachleute schätzen, dass jedes Jahr bis zu 10.000 Bürgerinnen und Bürger erstmalig die Produktions- und Sendemöglichkeiten ihrer Bürgermedien nutzen. Viele tausend Praktikanten nutzen die Bürgermedien für ihre erste Berufsorientierung, und eine wachsende Zahl von Auszubildenden wählt Bürgermedien ganz bewusst als Ausgangspunkt der beruflichen Karriere, um sich beispielsweise zum Mediengestalter Bild und Ton ausbilden zu lassen. Um das politische Gewicht des dritten Mediensektors zu erhöhen, ist im November 2007 in Bremen der „Bundesverband Bürger- und Ausbildungsmedien (BVBAM)“ gegründet worden. Sein Hauptziel ist die gemeinsame Vertretung der Interessen der Bürgermedien unter einem Dach. Vor dem Hintergrund der großen Umbrüche in der Medienwelt ist eine gemeinsame Interessenvertretung wichtiger denn je.

Bürgermedien profitieren von der neuen Fortbildung Damit die Bürgermedien in ganz Europa auch in Zukunft ihre Aufgaben erfüllen und den Herausforderungen des medialen Wandels gerecht werden können, brauchen sie eine engere Zusammenarbeit auch auf europäischer Ebene und eine verbesserte Aus- und Fortbildung, die diese Zusammenarbeit über Grenzen hinweg unterstützt. Das Fortbildungskonzept „MediaTrainer“ greift genau dieses Anliegen auf. Es bietet einfach handhabbare Seminar-Tools für das Erlernen von IKT- und Medienkompetenz und verknüpft in den Tools die klassische Arbeit der Bürgermedien mit den neuen Kommunikationsmethoden der Internetgesellschaft. Zugleich bieten die europaweit einsetzbaren Trainingskurse eine verbesserte Transparenz und Vergleichbarkeit von Kompetenzen und ermöglicht mehr berufliche Mobilität in Europa.

221

Das Rahmenkonzept der Fortbildung Die Lernziele der modularen Fortbildung zum MediaTrainer berücksichtigen die neuen Anforderungen und Lernbedürfnisse im Bereich crossmedialer Kommunikation. Die Entwicklung der digitalen Technik hat dazu geführt, dass sich die Arbeitsabläufe im Journalismus in den letzten Jahren sehr gewandelt haben. Web 2.0 hat in die Bürgermedien Einzug gehalten. Der Bürgerjournalist beteiligt sich an Webblocks und nutzt vielfältige Kommunikationsplattformen im Netz. Diese Wandlungsprozesse haben Konsequenzen für die Aus- und Weiterbildung. Es gilt Antworten auf neue Fragen zu finden. Welche Qualifikationen sind heute im Bürgerjournalismus gefragt und welche neuen Kompetenzen werden benötigt? Bewährte Inhalte und Kenntnisse im Bürgerjournalismus behalten auch weiterhin ihre Gültigkeit, wie beispielsweise die Fortbildungsinhalte zu den qualitätssichernden Kriterien Aktualität, Relevanz, Richtigkeit, Verständlichkeit und Professionalität. Ebenso unverzichtbar bleiben Kenntnisse des Medien- und Presserechts sowie der ethischen Grundsätze des Journalismus. Die Recherche unterschiedlicher Quellen und das kritisches Hinterfragen von Informationen sind Grundfertigkeiten, die erforderlich sind, um Audio- oder Videoaufnahmen zu erstellen, zu bearbeiten und ins Internet zu stellen. Der Bürgerjournalist benötigt grundlegende Kenntnisse in der Interviewführung. Er muss in der Lage sein, sich systematisch und effektiv auf das Interview vorzubereiten und schließlich auch dessen technische Umsetzung zu realisieren. Der moderne Bürgerjournalist sollte Kenntnisse im mediengerechten Erzählen und Schreiben für verschiedene mediale Plattformen haben und sich über die Grundlagen crossmedialer Produktionen im Klaren sein. Die modulare Fortbildung zum Medientrainer bietet Transparenz bezüglich der Anerkennung der Lernergebnisse. Die Lernziele und Lernergebnisse sind in ein Kompetenzraster eingebettet, das den Teilnehmern der Fortbildung den Inhalt und Umfang der erworbenen Qualifikation deutlich macht. Die modulare Fortbildung ermöglicht, dass die in unterschiedlichen Einrichtungen und Ländern erworbenen Kenntnisse und Fähigkeiten kombiniert werden können und anerkannt werden. Das Profil und die Inhalte können mit anderen medialen Qualifikationen verglichen werden. Dies ist eine wichtige Voraussetzung für die Qualitätssicherung in der allgemeinen und beruflichen Bildung.

Positive Lernatmosphäre gestalten Kognitive Erkenntnis und neues Wissen ist immer dann nachhaltig und bleibend, wenn es von emotionalem Empfinden begleitet wird. Die positive Ge223

staltung von affektiven und emotionalen Zuständen sollte von den Trainern berücksichtigt werden und bei der Konzeption und Durchführung der Seminare eine wichtige Rolle spielen. Emotionen als Motivation unterstützen den Lernprozess. Das Interesse und die Begeisterung der Teilnehmer werden entscheidend durch die Haltung und Handlungen des Trainers beeinflusst. Die Gestaltung einer positiven Lernatmosphäre gehört zu einer Schlüsselaufgabe des Trainers. Miteinander lernen und miteinander gestalten ist für jeden Teilnehmer eine wichtige Erfahrung. Dazu gehört, dass die Wertschätzung aller Beteiligten im Rahmen des Lernprozesses Ausdruck finden kann. Alle streben danach neues Wissen zu erwerben und dieses Wissen auch erfolgreich anzuwenden. Voraussetzung dafür ist die gemeinsame Realisierung der Lernziele. Das betrifft zunächst die kognitiven Lernziele, in denen fachliches Wissen verstanden werden soll. Es wird in Kontexte gesetzt und in der Praxis angewendet. Da sind zweitens die affektiven Lernziele, in denen Einstellungen und Werte erlebt und reflektiert werden und so zu einem Teil persönlicher Kompetenz werden. Das betrifft drittens die motorischen Lernziele, die beinhalten, dass Fähigkeiten und Fertigkeiten sicher beherrscht werden und sicher in allen Handlungsebenen angewendet werden können. Die Lernziele in ihrer Gesamtheit fordern und fördern das kreative Denken, die Umsetzung in schöpferische Gestaltung sowie die Fähigkeit, alltägliche Probleme und Konflikte bei der medialen Gestaltung und in der Teamarbeit lösen zu können.

Vom Bürgerjournalisten zum Medientrainer Die Teilnehmer, die das Modul A, den Videojournalismus, sowie das Modul B, den Crossmedialen Journalismus, durchlaufen haben, erreichen mit dem Modul C, „Trainerkompetenz“, eine neue Ebene, ja gewissermaßen eine neue Rolle. War es bis dahin die Rolle des Journalisten, so ist die neue Rolle nun die des Trainers. Der Journalist vermittelt Informationen an Rezipienten, der Trainer befähigt seine Teilnehmer Informationen an Rezipienten zu vermitteln. Diese neue Rolle ist eine große Herausforderung. Um dorthin zu gelangen bedarf es Zuspruch und Selbstvertrauen. Mit Modul C wird man Coach, Medientrainer für andere. Zukünftig heißt es fähig zu sein, mit sozialer Kompetenz Lernprozesse zu steuern, zu führen und Menschen zu motivieren. Der angehende Medientrainer benötigt vielfältige Kompetenzen, Fähigkeiten und Fertigkeiten, wenn er sein journalistisches Wissen vermitteln will. Zu seinen Fachkompetenzen zählen bereits die Kenntnisse, die im Modul A und B erworben werden. Nur wenn er diese 224

besitzt, kann er seine Aufgaben professionell gestalten. Er benötigt ein Repertoire an Methoden, deren Aufbau schlüssig, logisch, klar und zielführend sein muss. Ganz wichtig ist seine personale Kompetenz. Er muss sein eigenes Verhalten als Trainer reflektieren können. Er benötigt soziale Kompetenzen, um in der Interaktion im Seminar und im medialen Gestaltungsprozess mit anderen Menschen ein kreatives Miteinander gestalten zu können. Er benötigt die Fähigkeit, andere Menschen sicher durch einen Lernprozess zu leiten und zu begleiten. Als angehender Trainer wird er zukünftig bei der Durchführung der Medienseminare auf vielen Ebenen tätig sein. Er hat die Organisation der Trainingskurse gemeinsam mit der veranstaltenden Einrichtung erfolgreich zu bewältigen und das Konzept der Fortbildung zu verinnerlichen.

Die Zielgruppen Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter in Einrichtungen der schulischen und außerschulischen Jugendarbeit sowie Beschäftigte in den Bürgermedien können im Rahmen der Fortbildung die Qualität ihrer bisherigen Arbeit verbessern. Erweitert wird insbesondere die Vermittlungskompetenz mit dem Ziel, selbstständig Bürgergruppen in der handlungsorientierten Medienarbeit anzuleiten. Pädagoginnen und Pädagogen sowie Studierende mit pädagogischen Schwerpunkten erwerben mit der Fortbildung die notwendigen fachlichen und methodischen Grundlagen, um die Medien Video und Internet in ihrer pädagogischen Arbeit zu nutzen. Studierende aus sozialen und medienorientierten Fachrichtungen sowie Aktive aus der Jugend- und Sozialarbeit vollziehen in der Fortbildung den Einstieg in die aktive Medienarbeit mit „Jung und Alt“. Teilnehmen können auch interessierte Einzelpersonen, die sich berufsbegleitend im Bereich der Bürgermedienarbeit fortbilden wollen.

Seminar Management Die Fortbildung kann von verschiedenen Trägern und Institutionen im Bereich der Bürgermedienarbeit und Weiterbildung durchgeführt werden. Die Ausbildung MediaTrainer ist als durchlaufendes Fortbildungsangebot konzipiert. Im Hinblick auf die Zertifizierung sind die Lernziele der Module verbindlich festgelegt. Variable Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten werden je nach den Gegebenheiten des Anbieters und der Teilnehmergruppen berücksichtigt. Die Lernziele der Fortbildung sind jedoch verbindlich und grundlegend. Die Module können auch voneinander unabhängig als einzelne Seminare angeboten werden. 225

Insgesamt besteht die Fortbildung aus drei Modulen, die ausführlich mit Lernzielen, Lehrplan und praktischen Übungen dargestellt sind. Individuelle Handouts und Lehrmaterialien zu den Modulen werden kontinuierlich aktualisiert und sind als Download im Internet unter www.trainer.europeanweb.tv erhältlich. Die Fortbildungsbausteine für Multiplikatoren in der Medienarbeit bieten Mitarbeitern und ehrenamtlich Aktiven neue Fach- und Vermittlungskompetenzen für die Arbeit mit Bürgern und typischen Teilnehmergruppen, wie z.B. Jugendlichen in der vorberuflichen Orientierung, Migranten und Senioren. Teilnehmer des Modul A sollen für einen erfolgreichen Abschluss einen eigenen Videoreport erstellen. Für eine erfolgreiche Teilnahme an Modul B stellen die Teilnehmer selbstproduzierte crossmediale Beiträge online. Der Lernerfolg und somit der Gesamterfolg der Schulung hängt ganz erheblich von den eingesetzten Lehrkräften (Dozenten und Lernbegleiter) ab. Können sie die Lerngruppe nicht adäquat ansprechen und motivieren, helfen z.B. auch umfangreich eingesetzte Medien nicht. Wer Kontakte zu potenziellen Dozenten knüpfen möchte, kann in diversen Datenbanken im Internet fündig werden. Auch Zeitungsannoncen und die Arbeitsagentur helfen. Vielfach ergeben sich Kontakte auch durch Nachfragen bei bereits bekannten Dozenten. Das Bürgermedienzentrum Bennohaus in Münster und der Europäische Netzwerkverein Youth4Media bieten bei Fortbildungen im Bereich der Bürgermedien hilfreiche Beratungsangebote. Einige Wochen vor Beginn der Durchführung sollte ein Treffen aller Dozenten stattfinden. Wichtig ist die Vorstellung und Abstimmung von Methodik und Didaktik der Fortbildung. Didaktische Konzepte wie „Just in Time“-Learning, konzentrisches und selbstgesteuertes sowie handlungsorientiertes Lernen sollten von allen verstanden und auch umgesetzt werden können. Wichtig sind auch Absprachen während der Durchführung der Seminare. Dozenten können sich über einzelne Teilnehmer und über organisatorische oder technische Probleme austauschen. Diese „Stabübergabe“ ist sehr hilfreich und sollte genutzt werden. Ein Vorbesprechungstermin kann auch für letzte organisatorische Absprachen genutzt werden. Über Formblätter lässt sich der genaue Technik- und Raumbedarf festlegen. Eine Einführungsveranstaltung mit den Teilnehmern sollte vor Beginn der eigentlichen Seminare des MediaTrainer durchgeführt werden. Hier kann bereits 226

mit auflockernden Interaktionen die Grundlage für eine gute Arbeitsatmosphäre gelegt werden. Ziele und der genaue Ablauf der Fortbildung werden besprochen, damit die Teilnehmer Gelegenheit haben, Fragen zu stellen und sich kennen zu lernen. Teilnehmer und Dozenten der Testdurchführung in Münster haben in der Evaluation die gute Atmosphäre hervorgehoben und diese als wichtigen Faktor für das Gelingen der Schulung benannt.

Eingangsvoraussetzungen Der Einstieg in die aktive Medienarbeit soll möglichst offen sein, um insbesondere jungen Erwachsenen interessante berufliche Perspektiven aufzuzeigen und zum Mitmachen zu motivieren. Mindestvoraussetzungen für die Teilnahme am Modul A sind Volljährigkeit, PC-Kenntnisse und erste Erfahrungen in der Arbeit mit Gruppen. Freude am Austausch mit anderen und an der Zusammenarbeit im Team ist genauso wichtig wie Aufgeschlossenheit gegenüber neuen Herausforderungen und Interesse am Journalismus und an der medialen Gestaltung. Um an Modul B „Crossmedialer Journalismus“ teilnehmen zu können, muss das Modul A „Videojournalismus“ erfolgreich absolviert worden sein. Ebenso ist ein selbstproduzierter Videoreport vorzulegen. Bei der Online - Anmeldung sollen die Bewerber ihre individuelle Motivation und ihr Vorwissen im Medienbereich bzw. ihre Erfahrungen in der Gruppenarbeit darstellen. Online oder im Rahmen eines Eingangsgespräches wird ein Kompetenzportfolio der Teilnehmer zur individuellen Lernbegleitung und Schwerpunktbildung in den Modulen erstellt. Für eine Teilnahme an Modul C “Trainerkompetenzen” sollte das 21.Lebensjahr vollendet sein. Zudem muss eine erfolgreiche Teilnahme an den Modulen A und B nachgewiesen werden. Es werden auch vergleichbare Teilnahmebescheinigungen anderer Bildungsträger sowie Ausbildungen und Tätigkeitsnachweise aus dem Medienbereich anerkannt. Bei der Anmeldung hat der Bewerber schriftlich seine Motivation zur Trainertätigkeit sowie bisherige Erfahrungen in der Gruppenarbeit darzulegen. Ein sicheres Anwendungswissen der Lerninhalte „Videojournalismus“ und „Crossemdialer Journalismus“ wird vorausgesetzt. Um Modul C erfolgreich abzuschließen, ist im Anschluss an den Trainingskurs ein mindestens einwöchiges Praxisprojekt umzusetzen in dem der Teilnehmer 227

die Trainerrolle übernimmt. Der ausrichtende Veranstalter hat dafür zu sorgen, dass solch ein Projekt realisiert werden kann und die Begleitung des angehenden Trainers durch einen Tutor sichergestellt ist.

Infrastruktur und Zeitrahmen Grundsätzlich kann die Fortbildung zum Medientrainer von allen Weiterbildungsoder Medieninstitutionen durchgeführt werden, die Angebote im Bereich Kreativität, Medienkompetenz und Filmgestaltung offerieren. Insbesondere im Netzwerk von Offenen Kanälen und Einrichtungen der Bürgermedienarbeit ist diese Fortbildung optimal zu realisieren. Interessierten Institutionen stellt das Bürgerhaus Bennohaus das Konzept zur Verfügung. Ein Veranstalter muss für die Fortbildung zum MediaTrainer folgende technische Mindestvoraussetzungen schaffen: Zugang zu mindestens fünf Computern (Textverarbeitung/ Internet), mindestens drei digitale Videokameras mit Zubehör, Zugang zu digitalen Schnittplätzen mit Editierprogramm sowie einen Beamer und ein TV-Gerät mit Rekorder/ DVD-Spieler zu Demonstrationszwecken. Empfehlenswert ist eine Gruppengröße von acht bis zwölf Teilnehmenden mit zwei Referenten, von denen eine Person für die Lernbegleitung zuständig ist. Da die Fortbildung eine Mischung von Kleingruppen- und Großgruppenarbeit vorsieht, sollten neben einem großen Seminarraum zwei weitere Räume für die Kleingruppenarbeit zur Verfügung stehen. Insgesamt erfordert die Fortbildung einen Zeitaufwand von 360 Stunden. Modul A, B und C umfassen jeweils 40 Stunden E-Learning, 40 Stunden Präsenzphase und 40 Studen des Praxisprojektes.

Seminarleitung und Lernbegleitung Die Seminare werden von Referenten geleitet, die je nach Modulinhalt wechseln können. Es wird empfohlen auf Dozenten mit medienpädagogischer Ausbildung, langjähriger Erfahrung in der Bürgermedienarbeit oder mit einer entsprechenden Ausbildung im Fernsehjournalismus zurückzugreifen. Die Lernbegleitung wird durch den Tutor der E-Learning – Phase gewährleistet. Dieser hat die Aufgabe, die Teilnehmenden während der Trainingskurse in ihrer Entwicklung zu Medientrainern zu begleiten. In Modul C stehen dabei diejenigen Lernprozesse im Vordergrund, bei denen sich mit der Rolle des Trainers auseinandergesetzt wird und die der Ausprägung der methodischen Kompetenz als Trainer 228

dienen. Die Lernbegleitung der Teilnehmenden findet deshalb in der Planungs-, Durchführungs- und Auswertungsphase des Praxisprojekts statt. Sie wird unabhängig von den Modulen angeboten statt. Durch die Arbeit in der Lerngruppe wird die Fähigkeit der einzelnen Teilnehmenden unterstützt, Handlungsalternativen durch den kollegialen Austausch zu erkennen und ins eigene Verhaltensrepertoire aufzunehmen. Die Tutoren müssen in der Lage sein, die Teilnehmer und deren verschiedene Lerntypen zu erkennen, ihre Lernstrategien konstruktiv zu unterstützen, Lernblockaden zu lösen und Verhaltensänderungen herbeizuführen. Darüber hinaus verfügen sie idealerweise über eine medienpädagogische Grundkompetenz, die es ihnen ermöglicht, eine Lernbegleitung im medienpädagogischen Feld gezielt durchzuführen.

Didaktische und methodische Grundelemente der Fortbildung MediaTrainer Lerninhalte werden nicht mehr nur gelehrt, sondern vermittelt. Das bedeutet, dass die Interessen der individuell Lernenden in starkem Maße berücksichtigt werden. Folgende Fragen standen beim Entwicklungsprozess des Konzeptes im Vordergrund: Wie lassen sich die Lerninhalte sowohl am individuellen Lernprozess orientiert, als auch handlungs- und ergebnisförderlich und dennoch systematisch aufbereiten? Wichtig ist der Austausch über Sinn und Nutzen des Gelernten, die Verankerung im eigenen Tun und die Verknüpfung mit anderen Wissens- und Anwendungsbereichen. Durch den Einsatz welcher lebendiger und reflexionsorientierter Lernmethoden lassen sich medienpädagogische und vermittlungsrelevante Schlüsselqualifikationen entwickeln? Die didaktische Struktur der Fortbildung verbindet durchgängig Theorie mit Praxis und (Selbst-)Reflexion und bietet einen Mix unterschiedlicher Lernmethoden. Ein Grundelement der Fortbildung ist das Konzentrische Lernen. Die Lernziele stehen mit einander in Verbindung und der Lernweg ist abwechslungsreich. So wird z.B. nach der Ausarbeitung der Filmskizze direkt die praktische Umsetzung mit der Kamera eingeführt, anschließend wird das erste Übungsmaterial mit dem PC bearbeitet. Das sogenannte „Just in time learning“ baut darauf auf, dass der Lernerfolg immer dann besonders groß ist, wenn die jeweilige Kompetenzerweiterung im produktorientierten Prozess (Filmerstellung) für die Fertigstellung gerade von Bedeutung ist. Bei gleich bleibender didaktischer Grundstruktur 229

eröffnen sich den Teilnehmenden immer wieder neue Handlungsfelder – jeweils anknüpfend an bereits erworbene Kenntnisse. Die jeweiligen theoretischen Grundlagenkenntnisse der Lernziele und Kompetenzbereiche werden in kurzen Blöcken in konzentrierter Form vermittelt. Die Teilnehmer haben die Möglichkeit nachzufragen und Stellung zu beziehen. Sie erhalten Handouts und Arbeitsblätter, um die wesentlichen Informationen nachlesen zu können. Dem Theorieinput folgt die selbstständige praktische Übung individuell oder in Kleingruppen. Die zuvor erworbenen theoretischen Kenntnisse werden angewendet und in ein mediales Produkt umgesetzt. Im anschließenden Gruppengespräch werden die Übungsproduktionen besprochen. Dort liegt der Schwerpunkt auf der Reflexion von Haltung und Verhalten als Trainer. Die Referenten leiten dazu an, wichtige lernförderliche und lernhemmende Aspekte des Trainerverhaltens herauszuarbeiten. Sie gewinnen bei dieser Auswertung einen Eindruck davon, wie das vermittelte Wissen umgesetzt wurde. Sie haben für die konsequente Realisierung der Metaebene zu sorgen. Bei der Durchführung der praktischen Übungen und in der Feedbackrunde sollen die Teilnehmer in ihrer Rolle als zukünftige Medientrainer eingebunden werden. Sie erproben diese Rolle bei der Anleitung der praktischen Übungen mit den Kleingruppen. Die Fortbildung vermittelt Fachwissen in den Bereichen Medienmarkt, Ethik, Medienkompetenz und Bürgermedien sowie produktionstechnische Fähigkeiten zur Gestaltung von Beiträgen in TV und Internet. Besonderes Augenmerk gilt der Erweiterung der Vermittlungskompetenz sowie der Planung und Organisation von Trainingskursen. Ziel ist die Ausbildung von Trainern, die ihrerseits Gruppen anleiten und in der praktischen Medienarbeit qualifizieren. Dafür wird eine hohe Methodenkompetenz benötigt. Die Vermittlungsebene der Trainerrolle mit der zielgruppenspezifischen Anwendung wird in den Übungen und in den Gruppengesprächen kontinuierlich thematisiert. Die Fortbildung wendet die gleichen Methoden und Übungen an, mit denen die Medientrainer später in eigenen Workshops arbeiten können.

Praxisprojekt Die Durchführung eines eigenen Praxisprojektes ist im Rahmen der Fortbildung obligatorisch. Zentrales Ziel der Fortbildung ist die Ausbildung der Trainerrolle 230

mit der Fähigkeit, Bürgergruppen in der praktischen Medienarbeit anzuleiten und selbstständig erste Projekte im Bereich der Bürgermedienarbeit zu planen und umzusetzen. Im Praxisprojekt erweitern und erproben die Teilnehmenden ihre Kompetenzen in der Ausübung der Trainerrolle. Mindestens 40 Stunden arbeiten sie beispielsweise mit einer Redaktionsgruppe Offenen TV-Kanal oder mit einem Videoprojekt in der schulischen/ außerschulischen Jugendarbeit. Als Ergebnis soll jeweils eine Filmproduktion oder ein Webblog realisiert werden. Die veranstaltende Einrichtung berät und bietet Hilfe bei der Organisation des Praxisprojektes. Während der Vorbereitung und Durchführung der Gruppenarbeit werden die Teilnehmenden von einer erfahrenen Person als Lernbegleiter unterstützt. Das Praxisprojekt beginnt innerhalb eines Monats nach Ende eines jeden Moduls. Zur Vorbereitung und Begleitung des Praxisprojektes steht ein Tutor zu Seite. Er begleitet das Praxisprojekt, sorgt für die Auswertung der praktischen Phase sowie sorgt für das Abschlussgespräch.

Seminarabschluss und Zertifikat Zum Abschluss des Trainingskurses hält der Trainer gemeinsam mit allen Teilnehmenden einen Rückblick auf das Seminar. Er hilft, das neue Wissen, die neuen Fertigkeiten und Kompetenzen so zu sichern, dass möglichst viel von den Teilnehmern in die Praxis umgesetzt werden kann. Wie haben sie das Seminar erlebt? Wie haben sie den Trainer erlebt? Haben sich ihre Lernerwartungen erfüllt? So vergewissern sich die Teilnehmer, was sie gelernt haben und wie dieses Wissen in der praktischen Bürgermedienarbeit angewendet werden kann. In einer Vorschau werden gemeinsam Anregungen gesammelt, wie und in welchen Schritten ein fortführender Lernprozess und eine persönliche Weiterentwicklung stattfinden können. Den Teilnehmenden werden Aufgaben gestellt, wie z.B. einen Videobericht oder einen Online-Beitrag zu verfassen oder als angehender Trainer eine Lerngruppe in der medialen Gestaltung von Bürgerbeiträgen anzuleiten. Die Fortbildung endet mit der Übergabe der Teilnahmebestätigung. Dabei handelt es sich um ein Zertifikat, in dem die erreichten Lernziele transparent dargestellt werden. Der Trainer gibt ein Feedback dazu, wie er die Gruppe erlebt und was ihn beeindruckt hat. Er kann sich bei den Teilnehmern für die aktive Mitarbeit bedanken und ihnen gute Wünsche mit auf den Weg geben. Es wäre empfehlenswert, dass ein Vertreter der Einrichtung anwesend ist und sich beim Trainer und den Teilnehmern für ihr Engagement bedankt. Weiterhin werden Evaluationsbögen ausgeteilt, die auszufüllen sind und von der Einrichtung eingesammelt werden. Den Mitwirkenden werden die E-Mail-Adressen der Teilnehmer zur Verfügung gestellt, um weitere Kooperationen anzuregen. 231

Neue Kompetenzen, Transparenz und Anerkennung Das Zertifikat für die erfolgreiche Teilnahme umfasst die Beschreibung des Fachwissen, die Fertigkeiten und die sozialen Kompetenzen, die von den Teilnehmern im Seminar erworben worden sind. Dies geschieht auf Wunsch auf der Grundlage des standardisierten Europasses oder des Youthpasses. Der Europass ist ein Angebot der Europäischen Kommission und soll dem Einzelnen helfen, die eigenen Fähigkeiten, Kompetenzen und Qualifikationen in klar verständlicher und allgemein nachvollziehbarer Form auszuweisen und zu präsentieren und dies europaweit. Der Youthpass ist ein Instrument für Teilnehmer von Projekten, die im Rahmen des Programms „Jugend in Aktion” gefördert wurden, dass beschreibt, was sie im Zuge des Projekts getan haben und was sie dabei gelernt haben. YouthpassZertifikate können für den Europäischen Freiwilligendienst, Jugendbegegnungen, Jugendinitiativen und Trainingskurse ausgestellt werden. Auf der Lernplattform im Internet (trainer.europeanweb.tv) wird für jeden Teilnehmer ein Kompetenzportfolio angelegt, das für den Teilnehmer, den Tutor, den Trainer und Ausrichter zugänglich ist und gemeinsam aktualisiert wird. Das Partnernetzwerk engagiert sich gegenwärtig für ein Anerkennungsverfahren im Rahmen des Europäischen Qualifikationsrahmens (EQR), beziehungsweise des Europäischen Leistungspunktesystems (ECVET). Die Lernergebnisse, die die Teilnehmer in der Fortbildung, in Seminaren und in der praktischen Bürgermedienarbeit erwerben, verfestigen sich im individuellen Wissensbestand (Bildung), in Fertigkeiten (praktische Mediengestaltung) und in Kompetenzen (soziale Interaktion, Arbeitserfahrung). Diese ergeben ein individuelles Portfolio der Lernergebnisse und sind somit darstellbar und bieten Transparenz. Da sich der europäische Referenzrahmen für Kompetenzen im Bereich der Informationstechnologien erst in der Entstehung befindet, sind die Bewertung und die quantitative Orientierung durch ein standardisiertes Punktesystem gegenwärtig noch Zukunftsmusik. Anhand der Ergebnisse von Pilotprojekten und von Referenzmodellen, die momentan als Leistungspunktesystem in der universitären und beruflichen Medien(aus)bildung geschaffen werden, lassen sich zukünftig valide Relationen zu den Lernergebnissen, die im Rahmen der Fortbildung „MediaTrainer“ erreicht werden, darstellen. Wichtiges Anliegen für zukünftige Projekten ist es, die Qualifikation der Absolventen unserer Fortbildung und ihre produktive Arbeit in den Bürgermedien auf einer standardisierten Grundlage transparent zu machen und dem Zertifikat europaweite Anerkennung zu verschaffen. Der Zuständigkeitsbereich für die Vergabe solcher Dokumente wird zukünftig ausgewählten Einrichtungen obliegen, 232

zu denen wir bezüglich einer zertifizierten Anerkennung Kontakt aufnehmen werden.

Prozessmanagement Die Anmeldung zur Fortbildung kann online oder direkt bei der Weiterbildungseinrichtung erfolgen. Die Bewerbung geht dann durch die MySQL-Datenbank. Der Bewerber erhält eine Empfangsbestätigung mit Datumsangabe des endgültigen Bescheids, aus dem hervorgeht, ob die Bewerbung erfolgreich war. Erfolgreiche Bewerber erhalten eine Willkommens-Email, die ihnen den Ablauf des E-Learning erklärt und über den Kursbeginn informiert. Der E-Learning-Tutor versendet daraufhin Login-Daten und Passwörter mit weiteren Anweisungen. Vier Wochen vor dem Trainingskurs beginnt in der Regel das E-Learning-Selbststudium. Jede Einheit enthält Texte, kurze Essays, interaktive Elemente und Multiple-ChoiceFragen. Während des E-Learning-Prozesses ist der Tutor dafür verantwortlich, die aktive Teilnahme der Lernenden zu überprüfen und zu begleiten. Nach erfolgreicher Absolvierung der E-Learning-Lektionen (ca. 40 Zeitstunden pro Modul) ist der Teilnehmer berechtigt, am Trainingskurs teilzunehmen. Die Trainingskurse Modul A, B und C beinhalten jeweils 40 Unterrichtsstunden.

233

Überblick über die Module Die Fortbildung MediaTrainer zielt darauf ab, Multiplikatoren und Trainer im Bereich der Neuen Medien aus- und fortzubilden. Sie wendet sich an Aktive und Beschäftigte in den Bürger- und Ausbildungsmedien, in Einrichtungen der Weiterbildung, in NGOs sowie in Kultur- und Medienzentren. Wichtig ist die konsequente, praxisorientierte Fortbildung von Medienpädagogen, Medientrainern und Multiplikatoren, die jeweils neue Entwicklungen aufgreift und dazu eine geeignete Methodik und Didaktik entwirft. Das bedeutet flexible, non-formale, Modulare Qualifizierungsansätze. Das Verstehen, Lernen und Anwenden crossmedialer Medienzusammenhänge und der Einbezug und die Anwendung neuer, innovativer E-Learning-Methoden gehören zu den Schwerpunkten der Fortbildung. Die neuen technischen Entwicklungen implizieren neue Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten. Der Einsatz der neuen Medien impliziert den Gebrauch multimedialer E-Learning-Einheiten beim interdisziplinären Verstehen und Lernen. Das gelernte Wissen wird immer stärker digital angewendet. Medienkompetenz beinhaltet heutzutage einerseits, Selektionsprozesse zu beherrschen und die Komplexität von Informationen reduzieren zu können, und andererseits, Gestaltungskompetenz zu erlangen, um unterschiedliche Distributionskanäle crossmedial und rezipientenorientiert nutzen zu können. Der modulare Aufbau der Fortbildung ermöglicht aufbauend auf den Kompetenzen, die für den crossmedialen Bürgerjournalismus erforderlich sind, die Ausbildung von Medientrainern und Multiplikatoren. Durch den modularen Aufbau ist es möglich, gegebenenfalls nur Teilbereiche der Fortbildung durchzuführen und flexible Zeitmuster, je nach den individuellen Möglichkeiten des Anbieters und der jeweiligen Zielgruppe, zu bilden. Das Online-Lernen verkürzt die Präsenzphasen der Fortbildung.

Jedes Modul hat die gleiche Grundstruktur: • Vorbereitung in Form von E-Learning • Training-Seminar „face to face“ • Praktische Übungen Die mediale Kommunikation und die vermittelten Kompetenzen in den Modulen „Videojournalismus“ und „Crossemedialer Journalismus“ behandeln und thematisieren folgende Ebenen: 1. Die erste Ebene betrifft den Inhalt und die Zielgruppen: Welche Inhalte will ich über Medien vermitteln? Wer nimmt an der Kommunikation teil? Wer hat etwas Interessantes zu sagen, welche Zielgruppen will ich ansprechen? 235

Hilfreiche Fragen sind hierbei: Was ist das Ziel des Beitrags, ob in Radio, Internet oder TV? Was interessiert die Zielgruppe, wen sollte ich ansprechen? Was möchte ich der Zielgruppe mit meinem Beitrag vermitteln? Warum ist dieses Thema interessant für andere? 2. Die zweite Ebene bezieht sich auf die kontextuelle Umsetzung eines Themas. Welcher Teilaspekt sollte besonders beleuchtet werden? Welche dramaturgische Komposition wird gebraucht? Welche Fragen sollten gestellt und beantwortet werden? Zielt der Beitrag darauf ab zu informieren oder eher zu unterhalten? Wie baue ich den Beitrag auf? Welche Form wähle ich, ist ein Interview besser oder vielleicht doch ein Magazinbeitrag? Welche Stimmen brauche ich, Experten, Beteiligte, Beobachter? Wie sollte der rote Faden aussehen? 3. Wenn diese Fragen hinreichend beantwortet wurden, folgt die praktische Ebene, die Medienproduktion. Die Fähigkeit, einen Radio- oder TV-Beitrag zu erstellen, steht dabei im Vordergrund. Der Beitrag soll den Anforderungen des jeweiligen Vermittlungskanals gerecht werden und durch gute Bildqualität, guten Ton und gelungene Schnittsequenzen das Publikum ansprechen.

Module A: Videojournalismus Das Modul A vermittelt nicht nur die technischen Fertigkeiten zur Erstellung eines Beitrags oder Kurzfilms und die korrekte Benutzung einer Kamera, sondern auch die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit Inhalten, Recherchemethoden, Materialauswahl und gestalterischen Aspekten. Somit liegt der Fokus zum einen auf der Vermittlung journalistischer Fertigkeiten, zum anderen auf dem Erwerb technischer Fertigkeiten (Dreh, Schnitt). Die Teilnehmer haben die Möglichkeit, ihre eigenen Ideen einzubringen und umzusetzen. Sie erlernen die Entwicklung eines Storyboards, dramaturgische Elemente und die Filmgestaltung, indem sie eigenständig einen medialen Beitrag erstellen.

Module B: Crossemedialer Journalismus In Modul B erwerben die Teilnehmer die Kompetenzen, die für die crossmediale Produktion von Beiträgen in den Bürger- und Ausbildungsmedien gefragt sind. Sie erlernen gestalterische Elemente, die für die Kommunikation im Internet erforderlich sind, wie z.B. Trailer, Vidcast, Podcast, Flash-Animation oder WebBlogs. Wie muss ein Text aus Radio oder TV für das Internet aufbereitet werden? Was bedeutet es, Inhalte über das Internet zu verbreiten? 236

Module C: Trainerkompetenzen Modul C beinhaltet die Fortbildung zum Medientrainer und Multiplikator, den Erwerb von Trainerkompetenzen. Die Teilnehmer, die das Modul A „Videojournalismus“, sowie das Modul B „Crossmedialen Journalismus“ durchlaufen haben, erreichen mit dem Modul C „Trainerkompetenz“ eine neue Ebene. War es bis dahin die Rolle des Journalisten, so ist die neue Rolle nun die des Trainers. Der Journalist vermittelt Informationen an Rezipienten. Der Trainer vermittelt Medienkompetenz und lehrt, mediale Kommunikation zu gestalten und Bürgermedienkanäle für eigene Beiträge zu nutzen. Der angehende Medientrainer benötigt vielfältige Kompetenzen, Fähigkeiten und Fertigkeiten, wenn er sein journalistisches Wissen vermitteln will. Zu seinen Fachkompetenzen zählen bereits die Kenntnisse, die im Modul A und B erworben werden. Nur wenn er diese besitzt, kann er seine Aufgaben professionell gestalten. Er benötigt ein Repertoire an Methoden, deren Aufbau schlüssig, logisch, klar und zielführend sein muss. Ganz wichtig ist seine personale Kompetenz. Er muss sein eigenes Verhalten als Trainer reflektieren können. Er benötigt soziale Kompetenzen, um in der Interaktion im Seminar und im medialen Gestaltungsprozess mit anderen Menschen ein kreatives Miteinander gestalten zu können. Er benötigt die Fähigkeit, andere Menschen sicher durch einen Lernprozess zu leiten und zu begleiten. Um später als Trainer der Module A und B angemessen mit Teilnehmern und ihren Produkten umgehen zu können, werden in Modul C Indikatoren für die Qualität von Radio-, TV- und Online-Produkten entwickelt, deren Anwendung die Teilnehmer im Seminar ausprobieren können, um so praktische Erfahrung in Bezug auf ihre Rolle sammeln zu können. Um die entwickelten Indikatoren angemessen an spätere Teilnehmer vermitteln zu können und die eigene Feedbackkompetenz zu festigen, wird dem Einüben von Feedback und dem Umgang mit Teilnehmern in sensiblen Situationen ein weiterer Schwerpunkt gewidmet. Der Abschluss des Moduls schließlich führt alles Erlernte zusammen in eine Reflexion der angestrebten Trainerrolle und dem persönlichen Feedback durch den jeweiligen Ausbilder / die jeweilige Ausbilderin. Jedem Modul liegt ein ausführlicher Seminarplan mit den zu erwerbenden Lernzielen und den dazugehörigen Methoden zu Grunde. Zentrales Element ist das Face-to-Face-Training mit rund 40 Unterrichtsstunden. Vorausgeschaltet ist ein vorbreitender E-Learning-Kurs, der ebenfalls einen Zeitaufwand von etwa 40 Zeitstunden benötigt. Nach Abschluss eines Moduls haben die Teilnehmer die Aufgabe, die erworbenen Kenntnisse in der praktischen gestalterischen Arbeit in den Bürger- und Ausbildungsmedien bzw. in einer NGO oder Bildungseinrichtung 237

umzusetzen und einen eigenen Beitrag zu erstellen. Die Fortbildung endet mit der Ăœbergabe der Teilnahmebestätigung. Dabei handelt es sich um ein Zertifikat, in dem die erreichten Lernziele transparent dargestellt werden.

238

Modul A: Videojournalismus

A Einführung

240

Videojournalismus - eine Einführung in das Modul Fähigkeiten im Bereich Videobearbeitung sind wichtig für Leute, die im Bereich Bürgermedien und in zivilgesellschaftlichen Organisationen arbeiten. Der erste Schritt unseres Mediatrainer-Kurses bildet dich zu einem WebTV-Reporter aus. Was ist das? Du lernst wie man ein eigenes Storyboard entwickelt, wie man filmt, schneidet und schließlich das fertige Video verbreitet. Das Thema? Alles, was interessant für den Zuschauer und wichtig in deinem direkten Umfeld ist. Das Hauptziel dieses Moduls ist es, Mitarbeitern in Bürgermedieneinrichtungen und anderen NGOs Fähigkeiten im Bereich Videobearbeitung zu vermitteln. Später sollen sie dann diese Kenntnisse nutzen um Videos in ihrem eigenen lokalen Umfeld zu produzieren. Das Modul A besteht aus einer Kombination von drei Elementen: der Vorbereitung durch E-learning, einem praktischen Kurs (Seminar „face-to-face“) und einem Praxisprojekt. Während des E-learnings sollen sich die Teilnehmer mit dem wichtigsten theoretischen Material im Bezug auf Kamerafunktionen, Komposition der Kameraeinstellungen und den Hauptfunktionen von Schnittprogrammen vertraut machen. Jede Lektion wird durch Videomaterial und Animationen unterfüttert, die den Lernprozess unterstützen. Der Teilnehmer des Kurses liest also nicht nur über Bildschärfe, sondern kann sich auch ein Lehrvideo anschauen, dass die Bedeutung und die korrekte Einstellung dieser illustriert. Jede Lektion endet mit einem Test. Die Teilnehmer beantworten Fragen (entweder offene oder multiple-choice-Fragen), die den Zweck haben zu überprüfen, ob die Theorie verstanden wurde. Jeder Teilnehmer soll zudem aktiv an den Diskussionen im Forum des Moduls A teilnehmen. Hier geht es um die Auswahl eines Themas für den Film, der während des praktischen Kurses produziert wird sowie darum, notwendige Informationen für die Videoproduktion zu sammeln. Darüber hinaus sollen die Teilnehmer eine praktische Aufgabe aus dem Bereich Videoschnitt ausführen. Jeder Teilnehmer muss eine Videosequenz herunterladen, schneiden und die editierte Fassung wieder hochladen. Diese wird dann später vom Tutor bewertet. Das Material kann mit Hilfe einer Testversion des Programms (in der Regel 30 Tage) bearbeitet werden, welches jeder Teilnehmer von der Internetseite des Produzenten umsonst herunterladen kann. Das Ziel dieser Übung ist es, den Lernenden zum individuellen Entdecken und Lernen mit dem Videoschnittprogramm zu animieren. Der praktische Kurs umfasst 40 Trainingsstunden und zielt auf maximale Übungseffekte in Kamerabedienung und Videoschnitt ab. Während des Workshops arbeiten die Teilnehmer in Kleingruppen von 3-4 Personen. Das Hauptresultat des Workshops ist ein Kurzfilm, an dem die Teilnehmer grundsätzlich eigenständig,

aber mit Hilfestellung eines Trainers arbeiten. Weitere Ergebnisse des praktischen Kurses sind ein Storyboard und von den Teilnehmern aufgenommene Kurzinterviews. Absolventen des praktischen Kurses müssen dann abschließend ihr Wissen und Können im Bereich Videojournalismus bei der Durchführung eines Praxisprojekts in ihrer eigenen Einrichtung oder ihrem lokalen Fernsehkanal unter Beweis stellen. Den vollständigen Plan des Workshops findest du auf den Seiten 110 - 118.

A Einführung

Was kann man bei einem Kurs in Videojournalismus lernen? 1. Wie man die Kamera benutzt

°° °° °° °° °°

die wichtigsten Funktionen einer Kamera kennenlernen die Funktionen und Merkmale der Kamera und des Mikrophons aufzählen Weißabgleich, Bildschärfe und Kameraverschluss einstellen die Kamera aufstellen und zusammensetzen diese Fähigkeiten durch die Aufnahme eines kurzen Interviews unter Beweis stellen

2. Wie man ein einfaches Interview durchführt

°° °° °° °°

die wichtigsten Elemente eines Interviews darlegen zusammen mit einem Partner zeigen, wie man ein Interview macht ein kurzes Interview aufnehmen, überspielen und schneiden das gefilmte Interview selbst auf gelungene und weniger gelungene Elemente analysieren

3. Wie man eine Story findet

°° °° °° °° °° °° °°

Ideen für Stories mit anderen Teilnehmern in der Gruppe sammeln (schließt aktives Zuhören mit ein) Beispielfilme und ihren Kerninhalt erfassen die eigene Idee vorstellen und Fakten für den Videoreport der Gruppe sammeln das Thema des Videoreports erklären effektiv in der Gruppe zusammenarbeiten den Kerninhalt des Videoreports der Gruppe herausarbeiten die Kerninhalte der Gruppe vorstellen und dafür argumentieren

4. Wie man aus der Story einen Film macht

°° °° °° °° °° °° °°

die Bedeutung von Komposition im Film die Kamera (unter der Leitung eines Trainers) mit ihren grundlegenden Funktionen selbst bedienen eine Liste der nowendigen Ausrüstung zur Videoproduktion zusammenstellen die Elemente eines Drehplans verstehen und ein Beispielplan für einen Drehtag erstellen Rollen innerhalb eines Drehplans verteilen den Drehplan innerhalb einer Gruppe umsetzen (z.B. einen Film aus Rohmaterial machen) die Erfahrungen eines Drehtags gemeinsam mit anderen reflektieren und über die Fortschritte berichten

5. Wie der Film fertig gestellt wird

°° °° °° °°

die Hauptelemente der Schnitttechnik und der Off-Text-Produktion ermitteln seine Fähigkeiten im Bereich Schnitt und Audiomaterial unter Beweis stellen effektiv mit anderen als Teil eines Teams kommunizieren Grafikelemente in ein Video einfließen lassen

6. Wie der Film verbreitet wird

°° °° °° °° °°

die Techniken beim Finalisieren und Verbreiten eines Videos beschreiben diese Techniken beim Finalisieren und der Vorbereitung zur Verbreitung anwenden die eigenen Ideen und angewandten Techniken bei der Finalisierung des Films der Gruppe vorstellen die eigene Arbeit als Teil einer Gruppe bewerten die abgeschlossene Produktion evaluieren

241

A Lektion 1

Lektion 1: Was ist eine Videokamera und wie bedient man sie? 1.1 Einführung Eine Videokamera ist eine fototechnische Apparatur, die bewegte Bilder elektronisch auf ein magnetisches Videoband oder digitales Speichermedium aufzeichnet. Die Videokamera hält in vielen Einzelbildern Ausschnitte aus Bewegungsabläufen fest. Weil das menschliche Auge „träge“ ist, nimmt es Einzelbildfolgen von mindestens 15 Bildern pro Sekunde als zusammenhängenden Bewegungsablauf wahr. Dieser Prozess lässt sich sehr anschaulich mit einem Daumenkino illustrieren. Indem der Betrachter das Daumenkino flitzen lässt, ergeben die Einzelbilder mit den lückenhaften Bewegungsmomenten einen flüssigen Film.

1.2 Film-, Fernseh- und Konsumerkamera Es gibt verschiedene Arten von Kameras. Von der sehr aufwendigen Filmkamera für Kinoproduktionen über die Fernsehkamera bis hin zum Camcorder aus dem Konsumerbereich. Sie unterscheiden sich u.a. durch die Art der Bedienung von einander. Mit der Filmkamera kann das Bild detailliert gestaltet werden. Oft sind mehrere Personen an der Kameraführung beteiligt, um zum Beispiel die Schärfe zu ziehen, die Blende zu regulieren oder die Bildeinstellung zu positionieren. Bei der Berichterstattung des Fernsehens zählt demgegenüber zuverlässige und schnelle Bedienbarkeit. Um dies zu gewährleisten, verfügt die Kamera über leicht handhabbare Schalter, mit denen Funktionen wie Blende oder Entfernung komfortabel eingestellt werden können.. Bei der Konsumerkamera steht die einfache Bedienung im Vordergrund. Der Ottonormalverbraucher hat in der Regel keine technischen Fachkenntnisse und möchte keine langen Handbücher studieren. Wenn er die Kamera einschaltet, soll sie fast von alleine brauchbare Aufnahmen machen. Deshalb arbeiten diese Geräte meistens mit weitgehend automatisierten Funktionen.

1.3 Videokamera und Zubehör Der Video-Camcorder setzt sich aus verschiedenen Bauteilen zusammen:

242

A Lektion 1

Kamerakorpus Der Kamerakorpus ist Hauptbestandteil der Kamera. Hier werden diverse Funktionen wie Stromversorgung oder Aufnahme gesteuert. Objektiv Bei professionellen Kameras ist das Objektiv abnehmbar und wird wie bei einer Spiegelreflex-Fotokamera am KamerakÜrper per Bajonettverschluss angebracht. Wichtige Funktionen der Optik sind Brennweite, Schärfe und Blende.

243

A

Bei Hobby- oder Amateurkameras ist die Optik oft im Kamerakörper integriert und nicht wechselbar. Möglichkeiten, beispielsweise die Blende oder den Focus manuell einzustellen, sind dadurch oft gar nicht oder nur sehr begrenzt vorhanden. Automatiken der Kamera nehmen dem Nutzer solche Aufgaben weitgehend ab, beschneiden dadurch allerdings kreative Spielräume in erheblichem Maße.

Lektion 1 Sucher Der Sucher dient zur Kontrolle des Kamerabildes. Bei neueren Camcordern ist meist zusätzlich ein LCD- bzw. TFT-Bildschirm vorhanden. Für die professionelle Kameraführung ist der Sucher jedoch nach wie vor das wichtigste Kontrollinstrument, da LCD- bzw. TFT-Monitore zu ungenau sind. Vor allem die exakte Einstellung der Schärfe ist durch den Sucher viel besser zu bewerkstelligen. Hochwertige Sucher sind oft schwarz/weiß; sie haben einen stärkeren Kontrast, der eine genauere Schärfenkontrolle gewährleistet. Das Sucherbild bei Konsumerkameras ist in der Regel sehr klein und niedrig aufgelöst. Es eignet sich nicht zur Bildkontrolle und ist nur für den Notfall gedacht, zum Beispiel bei Außenaufnahmen, wenn die Sonne scheint und auf dem LCDBildschirm fast nichts mehr zu erkennen ist.

244

Rekorder Der Rekorder speichert die Kameraaufnahmen auf ein Medium. Über Jahre haben sich verschiedene Videoformate entwickelt. Für die magnetische Videobandaufzeichnung gab es S-VHS, HI 8, DIGI-S, Mini DV, Beta, Beta SP, DV CAM, DVC Pro oder Digi-Beta. Die Zukunft gehört jedoch den digitalen Speichermedien auf XD-, P2- oder SD-Karten und die Videobänder werden über kurz oder lang vom Markt verschwinden.

A Lektion 1

Mikrofon Fast alle Kameras haben ein internes Mikrofon. Im professionellen Bereich ist dieses Mikrofon aber in vielen Situationen nicht ausreichend und wird deshalb nur zur Aufnahme der Raumatmosphäre benutzt. Für spezielle Aufgaben - zum Beispiel Interview in der Reportage oder Dialog in einer Spielszene - gibt es verschiedene externe Mikrofone. Je nach Professionalität der Kamera stehen für den Anschluss externer Mikrophone mehr oder weniger gute Anschlüsse zur Verfügung. Je nach künstlerischen Ansprüchen an die Aufnahmen und Professionalität der Produktion vervollständigt optionales Zubehör die Kameraausrüstung.

245

A Lektion 1 Tonangel Um möglichst nahe an eine Tonquelle bzw. an sprechende Protagonisten heranzukommen, ohne dass ein Mikrophon sichtbar ist, wird häufig eine Tonangel eingesetzt. Hierfür wird ein Tonassistent gebraucht, der die Tonangel mit dem befestigten Mikrofon meist von oben (über dem oberen Bildrand) auf die Tonquelle richtet. Der Kameramann hat somit mehr Bewegungsfreiheit und muss sich zudem nicht mehr um die Tonaufzeichnung kümmern. Akku/Netzteil Akkus sorgen für die Stromversorgung der Kamera vor allem im Außenbereich. Da die Kamera ohne Stromkabel beweglicher bleibt, wird meist auch Innen mit Akkus gearbeitet. Mindestens zwei Akkus gehören zur Standardausrüstung. Das Netzteil dient im Notfall zur Stromversorgung der Kamera, vor allem aber zum Aufladen leerer Akkus.

Stativ Mit Hilfe des Stativs sind wackelfreie und sorgfältig gestaltete Aufnahmen möglich. In der aktuellen Berichterstattung wird häufig auf die Verwendung des Stativs verzichtet, um schneller arbeiten und reagieren zu können.

246

Toplight Ein Toplight dient vor allem in der aktuellen Berichterstattung als Aufhelllicht, wenn nicht genügend Umgebungslicht vorhanden ist und der Einsatz von Scheinwerfern zu aufwendig oder zeitraubend erscheint. Das Toplight wird auf der Kamera befestigt und kann per Akku mit Strom versorgt werden. Toplights, die nicht dimmbar sind, erzeugen unter Umständen hartes Licht; mit Hilfe von speziellen Folien lässt sich dieser Effekt abmildern, so dass zum Beispiel zu starke Kontraste im Gesicht eines Interviewpartners vermieden werden.

A Lektion 1

Kopfhörer Für sorgfältige Tonaufnahmen gehört ein Kopfhörer zur Standardausrüstung. Vor allem Anfänger vernachlässigen bei der Aufnahme gern den Ton und ärgern sich später über die schlechte Tonqualität. Vorschaumonitor Bei wichtigen und künstlerisch hochwertigen Dreharbeiten wird oft ein Vorschauoder Kontrollmonitor an die Kamera angeschlossen. Damit kann die Aufnahme in Bezug auf Helligkeit, Kontrast und Farbe besser kontrolliert werden. In Kameraseminaren empfiehlt sich der Einsatz eines externen Monitors zu Demonstrationszwecken.

1.4 Grundeinstellungen der Kamera Entscheidend für technisch hochwertige Aufnahmen sind grundlegende Kameraeinstellungen, die bei jeder Aufnahme neu justiert werden müssen. Bei vielen einfachen Konsumerkameras funktioniert (leider) fast alles automatisch und es gibt wenige Möglichkeiten, Einstellungen von Hand zu regeln. Ein Großteil der folgenden Funktionsbeschreibungen ist nur mit professionellen und semiprofessionellen Geräten ausführbar.

247

A Lektion 1

Brennweite Die Brennweite lässt sich über die Zoomwippe oder durch Drehen am entsprechenden Objektivring einstellen. Durch die Wahl der Brennweite erscheint das Motiv entweder näher (Telebereich) oder weiter entfernt (Weitwinkelbereich). Zoomfahrten während der Aufnahme können als Gestaltungsmittel eingesetzt werden. Beispielsweise kann durch Heranzoomen an ein Objekt oder eine Person deren besondere Bedeutung für die Handlung hervorgehoben werden. Beliebt ist auch der „Aufzieher“. Hierbei wird von einem Detail in eine totalere Einstellung zurückgezoomt. Zoomen ist ein besonderer Effekt und sollte daher nur bewusst eingesetzt werden. Laienhaft produzierte Filme erkennt man oft an sinnlosem Hin- und Hergezoome. Focus Mit dem Focus wird die richtige Entfernungseinstellung zwischen Objekt und Kamera eingestellt. Falsche Werte führen – in Abhängigkeit von Lichtbedingungen und Brennweite – zu unscharfen Aufnahmen. Zur korrekten Entfernungseinstellung gibt es einen sicheren Weg: Nah an das Hauptmotiv heranzoomen, am Focusring des Objektivs scharf stellen und erst dann den Bildausschnitt festlegen und die Aufnahme starten. Bei Bewegungen der handelnden Personen auf die Kamera zu oder von der Kamera weg ändern sich die Entfernungsverhältnisse, so dass die Schärfe während

LEHRMATERIALIEN Schau dir das Video “How to use the focus” auf www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial an. 248

Focus switch

Zoom button

Zoom ring

A Lektion 1

Focus ring White ballance

Iris

Gain der laufenden Aufnahme nachjustiert werden muss. Das gleiche gilt für entsprechende Kamerabewegungen. Aber hier sind wir schon bei der hohen Kunst der Kameraarbeit angelangt und kommen später noch einmal ausführlicher darauf zurück. Billige Konsumerkameras bieten oft nicht die Möglichkeit, den Focus mit Hilfe des Objektivrings manuell einzustellen. Der Kameramann bzw. die Kamerafrau muss sich hier auf den automatischen Focus verlassen. Um bei schwachen Lichtverhältnissen grobe Unschärfen zu vermeiden, ist es bei billigen Kameras ratsam, möglichst nicht im Telebereich aufzunehmen, weil in diesem Modus die Tiefenschärfe zusätzlich verringert wird. 249

A Lektion 1

Semiprofessionelle und professionelle Kameras arbeiten meist wahlweise mit automatischem oder manuellem Focus. Die Einstellung von Hand ist fast immer vorteilhafter, da der Autofocus beim bewegten Videobild – im Unterschied zum statischen Foto einer Fotokamera – häufig nicht genau genug arbeitet. Laienhafte Aufnahmen weisen oft wechselnde Unschärfen und sichtbares Focussieren der Automatikfunktion auf. Blende Mit der Blendeneinstellung wird festgelegt, wie viel Licht durch das Objektiv in die Kamera fällt. Je heller das Motiv, desto weniger muss die Blende geöffnet werden (kleiner Zahlenwert = große Blendenöffnung, großer Zahlenwert = kleine Blendenöffnung). Konsumerkameras verfügen oft über gar keine oder nur sehr eingeschränkte Möglichkeiten, den Blendenwert manuell zu regeln. Professionelle Kameras haben zur Blendensteuerung einen speziellen Blendenring am Objektiv. In vielen Drehsituationen liefert die Automatikfunktion ganz passable Ergebnisse und wird zumindest zur Ermittlung eines mittleren Blendenwertes herangezogen. Bei Gegenlicht (zum Beispiel Aufnahme gegen ein Fenster) oder umgekehrt sowie bei Lichtschwankungen während einer Einstellung sollte die Blende manuell eingestellt werden.

LEHRMATERIALIEN Schau dir die Videos “Iris” und “Colour temperature” auf www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial an. Farbtemperaturen und Weißabgleich Es gibt drei verschiedene Lichtarten: • Tageslicht • Kunstlicht • Mischlicht Jede dieser Lichtarten hat eine andere Farbtemperatur. Farbtemperaturen werden in der Einheit „Kelvin“ gemessen. Die Farbtemperatur bei reinem Tageslicht liegt bei 5600 Kelvin. Bei reinem Kunstlicht, erzeugt durch Scheinwerfer, liegt die Farbtemperatur bei 3200 Kelvin. Bei Mischlicht, z.B. in Räumen mit künstlichem Licht und Sonnenlichteinfall durch Fenster, kann man die Kelvin-Werte nur per Messung bestimmen. Das menschliche Auge passt sich unterschiedlichen Farbtemperaturen automatisch an. Das bedeutet, die Farbe rot sieht für uns unter Kunstlicht oder Son250

nenlicht mehr oder weniger gleich aus. Bei der Kamera ist die Anpassung an die Farbtemperatur komplizierter und wird über den Weißabgleich geregelt. Bei einem fehlerhaften Weißabgleich wirkt die Farbwiedergabe nicht originalgetreu. Die Aufnahmen weisen zum Beispiel einen Blau- oder Rotstich auf. Bei einem Weißabgleich wird die Kamera an die gegebene Farbtemperatur angepasst. Um die Farbe möglichst originalgetreu darzustellen, benötigt die Kamera eine Referenz, normalerweise ist das die Farbe Weiß. Für den korrekten Weißabgleich wird mit der Kamera bei angemessener Blendeneinstellung eine bildfüllende weiße Fläche anvisiert (z. B. weißes Blatt Papier vor den Kopf eines Protagonisten halten.) Die Kamerafrau bzw. der Kameramann betätigt den Weißabgleichsknopf und hält ihn einen Moment gedrückt. Die Kamera stellt nun alle Farbwerte auf den Referenzwert weiß ein. Im Sucher erscheint eine Meldung, die den erfolgreichen Weißabgleich bestätigt. Solange bei den folgenden Aufnahmen die Lichtverhältnisse gleich bleiben, stellt die Kamera alle Farben korrekt dar. An vielen Kameras gibt es zusätzlich zur manuellen Weißabgleichsfunktion Presets. Dabei handelt es sich um Festwerte für Tages- oder Kunstlicht. Neonlicht hat eine etwas andere Farbtemperatur als der klassische Filmscheinwerfer. Deshalb gibt es hierfür an manchen Kameramodellen zusätzliche Festeinstellungen. Alle Kameras verfügen über einen automatischen Weißabgleich, der unter Umständen ganz brauchbare Ergebnisse liefert, in vielen Situationen jedoch zu ungenau arbeitet und unschöne Farben hervorruft.

A Lektion 1

Gain Mit der Gain-Funktion kann das Bild bei schwachen Lichtverhältnissen elektronisch verstärkt werden. Bei den Konsumerkameras passiert dies oft automatisch. Professionellere Kameras erlauben das Ein- bzw. Abschalten der GainFunktion. Die Gain-Funktion verschlechtert die Bildqualität und wird daher nur im Notfall genutzt.

1.5 Vorsichtsmassnahmen • Um die Kopftrommel im Recorder zu schonen, bitte das Videoband nach Beendigung der Aufnahmen aus dem Recorder nehmen. • Ein Stativ ist speziell am Fluidkopf sehr empfindlich. Nach dem Dreh bitte die Schrauben lösen, damit es beim Transport nicht durch Stöße o.ä. beschädigt werden kann (z.B. Auslaufen des Fluids). Auch bei Gebrauch des Stativs darf der Kopf während eines Schwenks oder einer Neigung nicht festgestellt sein, da er sonst leicht beschädigt werden kann. 251

A Lektion 1

252

• Die Linsen des Objektivs sind ebenfalls empfindlich. Deshalb: Vorsicht, nirgendwo anstoßen! • Das Objektiv bzw. die Vorderlinse mit einem weichen Tuch oder Pinsel reinigen. Schmutz auf der Linse verschlechtert die Aufnahmen. • Nach Beendigung der Dreharbeiten bitte den Objektivdeckel auf das Objektiv stecken, um es gegen Stöße und Verunreinigungen zu schützen. • Akkus von der Kamera abnehmen. Ein Akku sollte erst dann geladen werden, wenn er vollständig leer ist. Angezeigt wird dieses im Sucher der Kamera.

Lektion 2: Grafische Grundlagen Der gestalterische Bereich der Kameraarbeit lässt für Kreativität und spontane künstlerische Ideen viel Freiraum. Trotzdem haben sich im Laufe der Zeit einige Grundregeln zum Bildaufbau etabliert, die den inhaltlichen Gehalt eines Filmbildes stärker akzentuieren können. Dem Zuschauer verdeutlichen sie inhaltliche Aussagen. Folgende Kriterien bieten dem Kameramann bzw. der Kamerafrau eine Orientierung zum grafischen Aufbau eines Filmbildes. Dieses Kapitel ist schon recht anspruchsvoll und richtet sich eigentlich an Absolventen, die bereits Vorerfahrungen mitbringen. Anfänger sollten es überspringen und zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt, z.B. nach der Realisierung der ersten eigenen Filme, nachholen.

A Lektion 2

2.1 Linien / Kontraste Linien und Kontraste sind Elemente, die den Blick des Betrachters beeinflussen. Bei Linien sind es vor allem die Führungs- bzw. Leitlinien, die unseren Blick auf das Zentrum des Bildes lenken. Außerdem haben Linien einen Einfluss auf die Emotionen des Betrachters. Ebenso beeinflussen Hell-Dunkel-Kontraste sowie Licht und Schatten die Blickführung des Betrachters. Der gute und geübte Einsatz von Kontrasten im Bild lenkt besonders effektiv den Blick des Zuschauers. Es gibt unterschiedliche Kontraste, mit denen Filmemacher arbeiten. 253

A Lektion 2

Hell-Dunkel-Kontraste Der wohl bekannteste ist der Hell-Dunkel Kontrast. Legt man einen weißen Kreis in ein schwarzes Quadrat, so wird automatisch der Blick des Zuschauers auf die weiße bzw. helle Fläche gelenkt. Die Aufmerksamkeit des Zuschauers liegt beim Hell-Dunkel-Kontrast immer auf dem hellen Bereich.

254

Farbkontrast Der Farbkontrast wird oft als stilistisches Mittel in Werbefilmen eingesetzt. Hat man zum Beispiel im Bild mehrere Quadrate, die bis auf ein rotes Quadrat alle blau sind, so wird der Blick des Zuschauers auf das rote Quadrat gerichtet.

A Lektion 2

Mengenkontrast When there is just one circle in between squares, the viewer’s attention is directed to the circle. Form- und Flächenkontrast Ist zwischen all den Quadraten nur ein Kreis, so hat man wieder den gleichen Effekt erzielt wie beim Mengen- oder Farbkontrast.

Horizontale, vertikale und diagonale Linien Horizontale Linien Harmonisch, ruhig und statisch wirken.

255

A

Vertikale Linien Eher Eigenschaften wie Dominanz, Macht und Stärke

Lektion 2

Diagonale Linien Erzeugen eher unruhige, disharmonische, dynamische oder spannungsgeladene Eindrücke. Grafische Linien und Virtuelle Linien Es gibt zwei verschiedene Arten von Linien. Grafische Linien entstehen durch die Positionierung von Personen, Objekten oder Raumsituationen. Typische Beispiele sind Straßenfluchten, Horizontale Linien in Landschaften oder die Positionierung von Personen in Räumen. Virtuelle Linien hingegen sind gedachte Linien, die durch Bewegungen im Bild entstehen. Man spricht von sogenannten Bewegungsvektoren. Nicht nur Bewegungen können virtuelle Linien hervorrufen. Auch Blickrichtungen, sogenannte Blickvektoren, und Gesten erzeugen virtuelle Linien im Bild. 256

A Lektion 2

2.2 Bildsymmetrie Dynamik und Spannung wird u.a. durch die Anordnung von Symmetrie bzw. Asymmetrie im Bild hervorgerufen. W채hrend sich in einem symmetrisch aufgebauten Bild die Bildelemente an der Mittelachse spiegeln, sind sie beim asymmetrischen Bildaufbau verschoben. Symmetrie Das symmetrische Bild strahlt, 채hnlich wie horizontale Linien, eher Harmonie aus. Dieser Bildaufbau erzeugt Ruhe, kann aber bei h채ufigem Gebrauch Langeweile hervorrufen. Dies ist der Grund, weshalb viele Bilder aus dramaturgischen Gr체nden asymmetrisch aufgebaut werden.

257

A

Asymmetrie Asymmetrien im Bild wirken dynamischer und spannender, was die Aufmerksamkeit des Zuschauers intensiviert.

2.3 Drittelregelung und Goldenen Schnitts

Lektion 2

Weil asymmetrisch gestaltete Bilder Spannung hervorrufen, arbeiten Kameraleute gern nach der „Drittelregelung“. Sie ist eine Vereinfachung des „Goldenen Schnitts“. Bei der Drittelregelung wird das Bild in neun gleich große imaginäre Rechtecke unterteilt. Die Ecken des genau in der Mitte liegenden Rechtecks sind entscheidend für die Positionierung der Motive im Bild.

258

Beispiel: Eine Blume (bzw. deren Blüte) positioniert man nach der Drittelregelung nicht mittig, sondern legt sie imaginär in die rechte oder linke obere Ecke des mittleren Rechtecks.

2.4 Kadrierung am Beispiel Interview Das Ziel der Kadrierung ist es Objekte oder Personen im Bild wirkungsvoll zu positionieren. Grundlage für die Kadrierung ist wiederum die Drittelregelung. Will man zum Beispiel eine Interviewsituation aufnehmen, so sollte man folgende Dinge beachten. Zunächst wählt man eine passende Einstellungsgröße. Meistens ist das die Nahaufnahme. Sie zeigt die interviewte Person von der Brust aufwärts. Um mehr Raum in der Blickrichtung zu haben, setzt man die Person nach der Drittelregelung entweder mehr nach rechts oder links. Sie sollte ein bisschen seitlich zur Kamera hingewandt sein. Dadurch wird eine Frontalansicht vermieden, die das Gesicht der Person flach aussehen lässt. Außerdem soll über dem Kopf nicht zu viel aber auch nicht zu wenig Platz sein (ausgewogener Kopfraum).

A Lektion 2

259

A Lektion 3

Lektion 3: Bildgestaltung Die Kamerafrau bzw. der Kameramann ist neben technischen Aufgaben auch für die filmkünstlerische Gestaltung der Aufnahmen verantwortlich. Dies zeigt sich in vielen Details. So sollte jede einzelne Filmeinstellung möglichst bewusst geplant sein, denn durch die Art der Gestaltung löst sie auf den Zuschauer eine bestimmte Wirkung aus.

3.1 Einstellungsgrössen Der Umgang mit Einstellungsgrößen gehört zum Basiswissen der Kameraarbeit. Besonders für den Anfänger sind Einstellungsgrößen ein gutes Gestaltungsinstrument, um den filmischen Blick zu schärfen und zu trainieren. Im Laufe der Filmgeschichte haben sich folgende Einstellungsgrößen etabliert. Establisher Der Establisher ist die größte Einstellungsgröße und wird verwendet, um den Ort einzuführen oder die Weite des Schauplatzes zu zeigen. Der Zuschauer bekommt eine Orientierung, wo die Handlung spielt. Beispiel: in einem kleinen Dorf in den Bergen. Totale Die Totale zeigt uns den Ort des Geschehens schon näher als im Establisher. Zum Beispiel: Ein kleines Haus in einem Dorf. Zwei Menschen gehen daran vorbei.

Halbtotale In dieser Einstellung rücken die Protagonisten oder einzelne Protagonisten ins Zentrum und sind von Kopf bis Fuß zu sehen.

260

Beispiel: Die beiden Menschen werden in einer nähreen Einstellung gezeigt.Der Zuschauer kann ihre Gesichter erkennen. Amerikanische Die zunächst im Western verwendete Einstellungsgröße zeigt die Person vom Kopf bis zu den Knien (inklusive Colt). Die Amerikanische verdeutlicht besonders gut die Gestik von Personen, weil die Hände noch im Bild sind.

A Lektion 3

Beispiel: Die beiden Personen bleiben stehen und unterhalten sich. In dieser Einstellung kann der Zuschauer schon Mimik und Gestik erkennen. Halbnahe In dieser Einstellung spielt die Umgebung keine Rolle mehr. Die Person steht im Vordergrund und ist ungefähr vom Bauch bis zum Kopf zu sehen. Beispiel: Die Frau spricht mit der anderen Person und lächelt. Nahaufnahme Diese Aufnahme ist eine gängige Aufnahme im Spielfilmdialog, wird aber auch oft genutzt bei Interviews oder Nachrichtenreportern. Die Person ist von der Brust an zu sehen. Das bedeutet, Mimik und Gefühle sind schon gut erkennbar. Kleidungsstücke wie Hemdkragen, Schmuck, Schlips etc., die möglicherweise Aufschlüsse über die soziale Herkunft des Protagonisten vermitteln, sind ebenfalls mit im Bild. Beispiel: Die Frau unterhält sich mit einer anderen Person. 261

A

Großaufnahme Die Großaufnahme konzentriert sich auf den Gesichtsausdruck. Auch feinste emotionale Regungen sind vom Zuschauer registrierbar.

Lektion 3 Beispiel: Die Frau ist offensichtlich überrascht über den Verlauf der Unterhaltung. Sie versucht ihre Gefühle zu verbergen, aber ohne Erfolg, denn ihr Gesichtsausdruck ist verbissen. Das kann der Zuschauer in der Detailaufnahme sehen. Detailaufnahme Detailaufnahmen rücken Gegenstände, die eine besondere Bedeutung haben, in den Mittelpunkt oder unterstreichen emotionale Regungen von Personen. Beispiel: Der Mann beißt sich auf die Lippe (Detailaufnahme vom Mund). Nächste Einstellung: Der Mann zieht seine Waffe (Detailaufnahme von der Waffe). Informative Einstellungen mit komplexeren Bildinformationen sind oft langsamer geschnitten, so dass der Zuschauer die Handlung bzw. die Informationen gut verarbeiten kann. Um Spannung zu verstärken und den Zuschauer eher emotional anzusprechen, wird oft schnell geschnitten. Die Gestaltung der Einstellungen hat u.a. auch darauf Einfluss, wie der Zuschauer Einstellungsübergänge und Filmschnitte wahrnimmt. Je nach dramaturgischer Absicht können Einstellungsübergänge bzw. Schnitte quasi „unsichtbar“ oder auffällig inszeniert werden.

3.2 Perspektiven Die Kameraperspektive ist ein weiteres filmisches Mittel, mit dem die Wahrnehmung des Zuschauers gesteuert werden kann. Eye Level Eye Level oder Normalsicht ist die neutrale Perspektive bei Aufnahmen von Personen. 262

Die Kamera befindet sich auf Augenhöhe. Sie wird bei Gesprächen, Interviews etc. verwendet und vom Zuschauer als „normal“ empfunden. Untersicht Die Kamera befindet sich unterhalb der Augenhöhe und filmt die Person leicht von unten. Je nach Kontext der Aufnahme kann die Untersicht dem Protagonisten mehr Selbstbewusstsein, aber auch negative Eigenschaften wie Dominanz oder Machtgebaren verleihen. Da sich die Untersicht nur geringfügig vor der Normalsicht unterscheidet, wird sie vom Zuschauer meist nicht bewusst wahrgenommen.

A Lektion 3

Aufsicht Die Aufsicht ist das Pendant zur Untersicht. Die Kamera ist oberhalb der Augenhöhe und filmt leicht von oben auf die Person herunter. In einem entsprechenden szenischen Kontext könnte eine solche Perspektive Eigenschaften der abgebildeten Person wie unterwürfig, niedlich, klein oder schwach unterstreichen. Forsch- und Vogelperspektive Varianten von Unter- und Aufsicht sind die Frosch- bzw. Vogelperspektive. Je extremer die Kamera die Protagonisten von oben oder unten aufnimmt,

desto deutlicher fällt der Kamerastandpunkt dem Zuschauer auf. Die Deutung einer Szene hängt aber von vielen anderen Faktoren ab. Vogelperspektive = Ohnmacht, Froschperspektive = All263

A Lektion 3

macht, solche Faustregeln sind für die Filmgestaltung viel zu oberflächlich und oft nicht zutreffend. Vogel- oder Froschperspektiven werden zum Beispiel auch deshalb eingesetzt, um interessante und experimentierfreudige filmische Umsetzungen zu versuchen..

3.3 Bewegungen im Bild, Kamerabewegungen und Kamerafahrten Wenn man von Bewegungen im Film spricht, unterscheidet man zwei Arten von Bewegungen. Bewegungen 1. Art Diese Bewegungen finden alle vor der Kamera statt. Die Kamera ist dabei in einer festen Einstellung. Beispiel: Eine Person geht auf die Kamera zu oder von der Kamera weg, die Person bewegt sich von links nach rechts oder umgekehrt. Das gleiche gilt auch für bewegte Objekte, z.B. Autos. Bewegungen 2. Art Diese Bewegungen entstehen durch die Arbeit mit der Kamera. Beispiele: Die Kamera bewegt sich auf ein Objekt zu oder von ihm weg. Die Kamera macht eine Neigung von oben nach unten oder umgekehrt. Die Bewegungsarten werden häufig in Kombinationen eingesetzt. Das bedeutet, die Kamera verfolgt eine sich bewegende Person oder ein sich bewegendes Objekt. Genauso gut kann sich die Kamera unabhängig von Personen oder Objekten durch den Raum bewegen.

Formen der Kamerabewegung sind u.a.: Pan Schwenk der Kamera von links nach rechts und umgekehrt. Tilt Neigung der Kamera von oben nach unten und umgekehrt Für Kamerafahrten bzw. -bewegungen stehen in der professionellen Filmproduktion unterschiedliche technische Geräte zur Verfügung, die hier kurz erläutert werden sollen, auch wenn sie in der Bürgermedienarbeit selten genutzt werden können.

264

Dolly Ein Dolly ist ein fahrbarer Untersatz für die Kamera, mit dem ruhige und wackelfreie Kamerafahrten realisiert werden können. Es gibt mehrere Arten einer Dollyfahrt: • Parallelfahrt: Der Dolly bewegt sich parallel zum Motiv im Bild • Vorwärtsfahrt: Der Dolly bewegt sich auf eine Person zu • Rückwärtsfahrt: Der Dolly bewegt sich von einer Person weg

A Lektion 3

Kamerakran Die Bewegung mit einem Kamerakran verstärkt die Dynamik im Bild. Die Kamera kann über etwas hinweg schweben oder fliegen. Oft schwebt ein Kran bei Konzerten oder Shows über die Zuschauermenge. Steadicam Ähnlich wie bei der Handkamera ermöglicht die Steadicam eine schnelle und flexible Kameraarbeit. Der Vorteil gegenüber der Handkamera ist die Bildstabilisation durch die StedicamApparatur. Die Steadicam ist durch die schnellen Abläufe und den schwebenden Effekt ein sehr dynamisches Kamerasystem. Dolly und Steadiacam werden oft bei Plansequenzen eingesetzt. Eine Plansequenz besteht aus einer längeren Handlung ohne Schnitt. Beispiel: Ein Mann geht in ein Gebäude. Er geht durch mehrere Büros und begrüßt seine Kollegen, bis er an seinem Schreibtisch ankommt. Solche Aufnahmen erzeugen größere Raumtiefe und räumliche Orientierung. Eine Plansequenz muss aber vorher gut durchdacht, geplant und choreographiert sein. 265

A Lektion 4

Lektion 4: Lichtgestaltung Während das menschliche Auge eine hervorragende natürliche Anpassungsgabe an vorhandene Lichtsituationen hat, muss man bei der Kamera oft nachhelfen, vor allem bei schwachen Lichtverhältnissen. Kreative Lichtgestaltung bedeutet jedoch noch viel mehr als Aufhellung dunkler Schauplätze. Es geht darum, mit Licht Atmosphäre und Stimmung zu schaffen und besondere Akzente zu setzen. Die ausführliche Behandlung dieses Themas würde an dieser Stelle viel zu weit führen. Deshalb folgen hier nur Ausführungen zu den wichtigsten Grundlagen. Abgesehen von Studioscheinwerfern werden bei Filmproduktionen häufig mobile Scheinwerfer eingesetzt. So gibt es einen klassischen Reportage-Lichtkoffer mit drei Scheinwerfern. Außer den Scheinwerfern gehören zur Ausrüstung spezielle Folien und natürlich Stromkabel.

4.1 Drei-Punkt-Ausleuchtung Im Fernsehbereich hat sich die Drei-Punkt-Ausleuchtung als Standard für Personenaufnahmen etabliert. Sie wird bei Interviews, in Soaps oder beim Spielfilm eingesetzt. Key Light Das erste Licht ist die Führung, auch Key Light genannt. Es ist das stärkste und bestimmt deshalb den Schattenverlauf. Die Führung wird als erstes gesetzt und

Back

Fill

Key Camcorder 266

zwar etwas seitlich neben der Kamera und leicht von oben, damit die Schatten nach unten fallen. Fill Dieses Licht ist die Aufhellung. Sie wird auf der anderen Seite der Kameraachse positioniert und sollte schwächer sein als die Führung. Die Aufhellung mildert den Schattenwurf des Führungslichts. Mit einer Folie bekommt die Aufhellung eine weichere Qualität und wirkt dadurch natürlicher.

A Lektion 4

Back Light Die Spitze ist gegenüber der Führung positioniert. Sie verleiht der Person eine Kontur bzw. Kante und die Person hebt sich dadurch stärker vom Hintergrund ab. Die Aufnahme wirkt dadurch plastischer und bekommt mehr Raumtiefe. Hintergrundlicht Zusätzlich zur Dreipunktausleuchtung kann man noch Hintergrundlicht einsetzen. Ein interessanter Hintergrund kann zum Beispiel durch farbige Folien eine besondere Nuance erhalten. In der freien Umgebung dient die Sonne als Führungslicht. Die Sonne ist eine natürliche Quelle, die der Lichtlogik entspricht. Von Lichtlogik spricht man, wenn die Beleuchtung realistisch und nachvollziehbar erscheint. Wirkt die Lichtgestaltung unrealistisch, spricht man von einer dramatischen Lichtlogik. Hier stehen eher Lichteffekte im Vordergrund.

LEHRMATERIALIEN Schau dir die Videos “Head light”, “Sided light” und “Backlight” auf www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial an.

4.2 Lichtgestaltung durch Lichtrichtung Das Vorderlicht fällt frontal auf die Person. Es wurde in den 40er und 50er Jahren benutzt, zum Beispiel um Filmdiven jünger aussehen zu lassen. Indem das Licht frontal auf die Person fällt, gibt es kaum Schatten, so dass Falten und Hautunreinheiten verschwinden. Allerdings wirkt das Gesicht flacher und dadurch vielleicht etwas kränklich. Streiflicht kommt direkt von der Seite und steht im 90-Grad-Winkel zur Kameraachse. Aufgrund seines starken Schattenwurfs verstärkt es die Dramatik. 267

A Lektion 4

Bei Gegenlicht liegt die Lichtquelle gegenüber der Kamera hinter dem Objekt bzw. hinter der Person. Das Gesicht der Person bleibt im Dunkeln. Gegenlicht sieht man zum Beispiel häufig in Horrorfilmen oder Thrillern.

4.3 Lichtqualität Soll eine Person mit weniger Schattenwurf in Szene gesetzt werden, ist weicheres Licht gefragt. Dies erzielt man durch die Verwendung von so genannten Frostfolien, die an den Flügeln des Scheinwerfers angebracht werden. Den gleichen Effekt kann man mit einer indirekten Lichtführung erzeugen. Man richtet den Strahler auf eine möglichst weiße Fläche oder einen Lichtreflektor (Bouncer). Die reflektierten Lichtstrahlen wirken diffus und glätten die Oberfläche von Objekten. Darüber hinaus haben Filmscheinwerfer meist einen Regler, um das Licht zu streuen und diffuser zu machen. Hartes Licht hingegen ist immer direkt auf das Motiv gerichtet und erzeugt einen harten Schattenwurf. Die Struktur von Oberflächen kommt dadurch gut zur Geltung. videomaker.com

268

Lektion 5: Tongestaltung Jeder Film und jedes Video ist mit Geräuschen, Musik und Sprache unterlegt. Selbst Stummfilme werden meist mit Musik präsentiert. Bei einem Musikvideo ist der Ton ein wesentliches Element. Tongestaltung ist genauso wichtig wie die Bildgestaltung.

5.1 Ton bei der Aufnahme

A Lektion 5

Bei den Dreharbeiten ist es wichtig, den Ton so gut wie möglich aufzuzeichnen. Grobe Fehler sind im Nachhinein meist nicht mehr zu korrigieren. Generell ist zu beachten, dass jedes Mikrofon möglichst nah an der Tonquelle positioniert wird. Je näher das Mikrofon dran ist, desto mehr Direktschall kommt im Mikrofon an. Je weiter die Entfernung des Mikrofons zur Tonquelle ist, desto mehr Diffusschall fängt man mit ein. Diffusschall ist der Schall, der durch Reflektionen an Wänden, Personen oder Gegenständen zusammen mit dem Direktschall am Mikrofon ankommt. Zwar sorgen die Reflektionen für einen Raumeindruck; ist jedoch der Diffusschall zu hoch, kann das Einfluss auf die Verständlichkeit der Aufnahmen haben. Beim Außen-Interview sollte man einen Windschutz für das Mikro benutzen, um störende Windgeräusche zu vermeiden. Der Windschutz besteht aus Schaumstoff und absorbiert Wind und Pop-Geräusche. Für die Tonaufzeichnung gibt es diverse Mikrofonarten, die sich für verschiedene Drehsituationen eignen und durch spezielle Charakteristiken unterscheiden. Kugelmikrofon Ein Mikrofon robuster Bauart. Der Schall wird aus allen Richtungen gleich stark aufgenommen, allerdings mit nur kleiner Reichweite. Es ist geeignet für Interviews in lauter Umgebung. Man muss allerdings direkt hineinsprechen, sonst ist das Tonsignal zu schwach. Kugelmikrofone dienen ansonsten oft als Gesangsmikrofone. Lavalier microphone Es ist eine Sonderform der Kugel und ein kleines Ansteckmikrofon, das kaum zu sehen ist. Lavallier-Mikrofone sind viel empfindlicher als normale Kugelmikrofone und eignen sich für Interview-Aufnahmen in ruhiger Umgebung. 269

A Lektion 5

Richtmikrofon Sie sind besonders für Aufnahmen geeignet, bei denen Nebengeräusche reduziert werden sollen. Durch seine Richtcharakteristik begrenzt, kann die Tonquelle genauer anvisiert und aufgenommen werden. Töne aus anderen Richtungen werden zum Teil weggefiltert. Das Richtmikrofon wird auch bei Aufnahmen eingesetzt, bei denen das Mikrofon nicht sichtbar sein soll und daher weiter weg von der Tonquelle positioniert werden kann.

Es gibt verschiedene Formen von Richtmikrofonen mit unterschiedlicher Richtcharakteristik. Niere: Am stärksten wird Schall aufgenommen, der vor dem Mikrofon auftritt. Zu den Seiten nimmt die Empfindlichkeit je nach Bauart ab. Es kann helfen, Hintergrundgeräusche auszugrenzen und wird gern bei Reportagen-Interviews eingesetzt. Superniere: Sie hat eine stärkere Richtwirkung als die Niere und kann Raumatmosphäre und Hintergrund noch besser aussparen. Keule: ieses Mikrofon hat eine sehr starke Richtwirkung und wird gern zum Tonangeln genutzt. Wenn man genau auf den Mund eines Sprechers zielt, können auch aus größerer Entfernung laute Störgeräusche (Verkehrslärm etc.) zum Teil weggefiltert werden. Häufig wird die Keule auch bei Tierfilmen in freier Natur eingesetzt.

5.2 Off-Ton und On-Ton Der Ton im Film setzt sich aus mehreren Tonquellen zusammen. Man unterscheidet zunächst zwischen On-Ton und Off-Ton. Beim On-Ton ist die Tonquelle im Bild zu sehen, z.B. sprechender Protagonist, ein Musiker oder ein Auto, das durchs Bild fährt. 270

Beim Off-Ton ist die Tonquelle nicht im Bild zu sehen, z.B. Stimme eines Kommentators. Es handelt sich also um Tonquellen, die nicht in der gezeigten Situation ihren Ursprung haben. Typische Off-Töne sind Kommentarsprecher, Effektgeräusche oder Musik. Als Sonderform gibt es noch den szenischen Off-Ton. Hier stammt die Tonquelle zwar von einem Protagonisten der Filmhandlung, dieser ist aber in einer bestimmten Einstellung des Films gerade nicht zu sehen, wohl aber zu hören. Das gleiche gilt natürlich auch für Geräusche oder Musik, deren Ursprung der sichtbaren Filmhandlung zuzuordnen ist.

A Lektion 5

5.3 Musikeinsatz Die emotionale Wirkung von Musik im Film ist ein enorm wichtiges Element. Oft beeinflusst sie die Stimmung des Zuschauers unterschwellig fast noch stärker als das Bild. Musik verstärkt die Atmosphäre oder Dramaturgie einer Filmszene und sorgt für größere Dynamik. Hierbei sollten folgende Aspekte berücksichtigt werden: Tempo Soll eine Szene dynamisch und sehr schwungvoll untermalt werden, eignet sich Musik mit schneller Rhythmik. Typisches Beispiel ist eine Actionszene. Bei besonders sorgfältigen Produktionen wird der Filmschnitt an den Rhythmus der Musik angepasst. Langsame Musik findet man dagegen zum Beispiel in romantischen Szenen. Hier ist die Musik ruhig und entspannend. Auch bei informativen Sequenzen sollte die Musik nur dezent eingesetzt werden, um den Zuschauer nicht abzulenken. Instrumente und Stimmung Jedes Musikinstrument hat einen eigenen Klangcharakter. Zudem werden manche Instrumente mit bestimmten Orten, Situationen, Motiven oder Genres assoziiert. Beispiel: Mundharmonika = Western- oder Cowboystimmung, Dudelsack = Schottland, Rauchig klingendes Saxophon = Bar, Flamenco-Gitarre = Spanien, Akkordeon = Pariser Nachtleben. Ob solche musikalischen Klischees eher informativ, humorvoll, dramatisierend oder ironisch wirken, hängt vom filmischen Kontext ab, in dem sie zum Einsatz kommen.

271

A Lektion 5

Illustrierender Musikeinsatz Es gibt verschiedene Möglichkeiten, eine Bildaussage durch Musik zu unterstreichen: • Bei der Mood-Technik wird die vorhandene Stimmung in einer Szene durch Musik verstärkt. Fröhliche Personen werden mit fröhlicher Musik untermalt oder traurige Personen mit trauriger Musik. • Aus dem Zeichentrickfilm kennen wir Mickeymousing. Dabei werden einzelne Bewegungen im Bild von jeweils einem Ton begleitet. • Chase-Musik ist typisch für Verfolgungsjagden. Chase heißt „Jagd“ und meint hier ein Jazz-Stil, bei dem sich verschiedene Solisten bei ihren Improvisationen periodisch abwechseln und eine Art musikalisches Gefecht liefern – ähnlich wie die streitenden Protagonisten im Film. • Beim pointierenden Musikeinsatz werden - anders als beim Mickemousing - nur dramaturgisch besondere Momente und Bewegungen mit Musik untermalt. Kontrastierender Musikeinsatz Um den Zuschauer zu irritieren, zu provozieren oder seine Wahrnehmung zu schärfen, eignet sich ein kontrastierender Musikeinsatz. Hierbei steht die musikalische Untermalung im krassen Widerspruch zur Bildaussage. Beispiel: Zu einer Kriegsszene ertönt fröhliche Musik. Polarisierender Musikeinsatz Beim polarisierenden Musikeinsatz wird ein neutrales Bild oder eine nicht besonders aufregende Szene durch einen fast übertriebenen Musikeinsatz konterkariert. Dieser Musikeinsatz wirkt je nach filmischen Kontext manipulierend oder ironisch. Beispiel: Ein Politiker kommt ins Bild. Durch den Einsatz von düsterer Musik erscheint der Politiker suspekt oder gar verdächtig.

LEHRMATERIALIEN Schau dir die Videos “Illustrating use of music” und “Contrasting use of music” auf www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial an.

272

Lektion 6: Journalistische Grundlagen Guter Journalismus ist die Basis jedes guten TV-Beitrages. Ohne ihn gibt es kein gutes Fernsehen. Aufgabe des Journalismus ist es, Themen zu finden und diese journalistisch sauber umzusetzen. Dazu gehört neben dem reinen Handwerk vor allem die inhaltliche Verantwortung, gegenüber dem Thema, den beteiligten Menschen / den Betroffenen und dem Zuschauer.

A Lektion 6

6.1 Zum Aufbau von Magazingeschichten Die Magazingeschichte ist ein Sammelbegriff für unterschiedliche Beitragsformate. Der Richtwert für die Länge einer Magazingeschichte beträgt ungefähr 1:30 bis 7 Minuten. Vielleicht etwas stärker als beispielsweise eine Nachrichtensendung soll ein Magazin und damit der einzelne Beitrag den Unterhaltungsbedürfnissen des Zuschauers entgegenkommen. Um den Zuschauer in das Geschehen hinein zu ziehen, beginnt die Magazingeschichte oft nicht mit der Darstellung reiner Fakten, sondern sie erzählt eine „Fallgeschichte“, die häufig am Ende wieder aufgegriffen wird (Klammer) oder sich als roter Faden durch den Beitrag zieht. Nach Bornemann und Gerhold sieht eine standardgemäße Erzählform für Magazingeschichten ungefähr wie folgt aus: Aufbau einer Magazingeschichte Intro:

Bilder und einleitender Off-Text

Info Block 1:

Bilder mit Off-Text u.U. auch unkomentierte Bilder

On-Ton 1:

Interview, z.B. Experte A

Info Block 2:

Off-Text, Bilder oder unkom. Bilder

On-Ton 2:

Interview, z.B. Experte B

...

evt. weitere Infoblöcke und O-Töne

Outro:

Bilder mit zusammenfassenden und oder kommentierenden Off-text

Ob das Intro unbedingt einen, wie es bei Bornemann und Gerhold heißt, „knalligen Text“, eine „bekannte Persönlichkeit“, eine „unglaublichen Begebenheit“ oder andere sensationelle Headlines enthalten muss, ist Geschmackssache. Man muss ja nicht gleich wie die berühmte Zeitung mit den vielen Bildern loslegen und sollte überzogene Versprechungen im Intro meiden. Wenn es allerdings gelingt, den Zuschauer durch Mittel des Geschichtenerzählens anzusprechen, ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass er „dranbleibt“ oft größer, als wenn der Einstieg nur mit Fakten argumentiert. Die nachfolgenden Infoblöcke einer Magazingeschichte erörtern das Für und Wider einer Sache oder beleuchten unterschiedliche Akzente. Die Blöcke bauen aufeinander auf und sind auf den Hauptaussagewunsch gerichtet. Der Redak273

A Lektion 6

274

teur kann in seiner Geschichte nicht die ganze Welt erklären und muss sich auf bestimmte Aspekte konzentrieren. Bei konfliktreichen Themen werden in den Infoblöcken häufig Pro und Kontra dargestellt. Auf einen Infoblock folgt oft ein O-Ton, der den Sachverhalt erklärt, belegt, relativiert oder eine provozierende These dazu aufstellt. Die verwendeten Interviews sind meist kurz (ca. 45 Sekunden pro Interview) und sollen durch das besondere Fachwissen oder die besondere Betroffenheit der Interviewten überzeugen. Anfänger tendieren dazu, zu viel Interview in den Beitrag zu nehmen, weil sie sich nicht zutrauen, die Geschichte selbst und mit eigenen Worten zu erzählen. Das muss ein Redakteur aber unbedingt lernen, denn häufig kann er im Interview erklärte Sachverhalte seiner Gesprächspartner im selbstgeschriebenen Off-Text viel komprimierter und auf den Punkt gebracht erzählen. Im Outro folgt ein Fazit oder ein Ausblick über den weiteren Verlauf der Sache. Dieser Teil darf einen subjektiven Charakter haben und die Meinung des Journalisten zum Ausdruck bringen. Interessante Ideen, genügend Zeit für Themenrecherchen und verantwortungsvolle redaktionelle Arbeit, solche Faktoren sind die Basis für einen guten Video- oder Fernsehbeitrag in der Bürgermedienszene. Ähnlich wie professionelle Journalisten müssen die Bürgermedien-Redakteure Themen finden und diese journalistisch niveauvoll umsetzen. Dazu gehört neben dem reinen Handwerk vor allem die inhaltliche Verantwortung gegenüber dem Thema, den beteiligten Menschen, den Betroffenen und dem Zuschauer. Die Produktion eines Filmberichts ist ein sehr komplexer Prozess, der in verschiedenen Arbeitsschritten abläuft. Die inhaltliche Seite wird meistens einem Redakteur überlassen. Dieser arbeitet eng mit dem Kamerateam zusammen. Die konzeptionelle Vorbereitung des Redakteurs ist mit entscheidend für den Erfolg eines Projekts. Der Redakteur hat u.a. folgende Aufgaben: • Er muss ein passendes Thema für den Filmbeitrag finden. „Passend“ ist hier im Sinne von „Relevanz“ zu verstehen. Dabei geht es zum Beispiel um die Frage, ob die anvisierte Zuschauergruppe für das geplante Thema genügend Interesse mitbringt oder ob das Thema und die geplante Umsetzung neue Anregungen für gesellschaftliche Diskussionen geben kann. • Der Redakteur muss entsprechend recherchieren, um alle für das Thema relevanten Fakten zusammen zu tragen. • Er muss ein Exposé und möglicherweise ein Treatment und ein Storybord entwickeln.

• Er muss interessante Interviews führen - zu Recherchezwecken und vor laufender Kamera. • Er muss die Inhalte auf interessante Art und Weise filmisch darstellen. Hierbei kann er sich an der Tradition der alten Geschichtenerzähler orientieren. Menschen lieben Geschichten und wenn es dem Redakteur gelingt, seinen Stoff dramaturgisch geschickt und spannend zu präsentieren im Sinne einer guten Story, werden die Zuschauer seinen Beitrag gerne ansehen. • Der Redakteur muss den Off-Text schreiben und angemessen und gut verständlich einsprechen.

A Lektion 6

6.2 Themenfindung Ein interessantes Thema zu finden ist der erste Schritt einer Produktion. Im Zusammenhang der Bürgermedienarbeit gibt es durchaus spezifische Inhalte. Dazu gehören Aspekte aus Kultur, Musikszene, Politik, Jugend- und Bürgerbewegungen, Minderheiten, Interkulturelles, Schule, Senioren, Kinder und vieles mehr. Demgegenüber sind die klassischen Themen des Sensations- und Boulevardjournalismus an dieser Stelle nicht relevant. Oberflächliche und voyeuristische Berichte über Kriminalität, Rotlichtmilieu oder Skandalprominenz kann der Redakteur eines Bürgermediums getrost den dafür einschlägig bekannten Medienunternehmen überlassen. Bei der Themenfindung orientiert sich der Redeakteur an den Bedürfnissen der anvisierten Zielgruppe. Fernsehen oder Web-TV ist immer auf einen Zuschauer ausgerichtet und kein Selbstzweck. Das bedeutet, der Redakteur muss ein Thema finden, das zu dem Magazin oder Format passt, in dem es gesendet werden soll. Das Thema sollte neue, interessante, unterhaltsame oder ungewöhnliche Aspekte aufgreifen. Gewünscht vom Zuschauer sind unter Umständen auch Tipps und Ratschläge für die Bewältigung des Alltags. Der Redakteur ist kein Moralapostel. Im Gegenteil: Er deckt seriös auf und überlässt die Meinungsfindung in der Verantwortung des Zuschauers. Ein Moralapostel ist jemand, der über die Welt aus einer bestimmten moralischen Perspektive urteilt - dies ist nicht Job des Redakteurs. Dafür kann er sich Priester vor die Kamera holen. Der Redakteur ist dem Zuschauer verpflichtet, nicht der Moral.

6.3 Recherche Bei einer umfassenden Recherche reflektiert der Redakteur zunächst einmal möglichst alle Facetten seines Themas, um sich dann im weiteren Verlauf für einen Schwerpunkt zu entscheiden. 275

A Lektion 6

Zu den Recherchemedien gehören Internet, Fachliteratur, Zeitungen und natürlich immer noch die persönliche Kommunikation mit Experten und Betroffenen. In den letzten 20 Jahren hat sich das Internet als wichtigste Quelle für die journalistische Recherche etabliert. Das Internet ist allerdings alles andere als zuverlässig, wenn es um die Seriosität von Informationen geht. Oft stößt der Internetsurfer auf unprofessionell zusammengetragene Informationen. Wer ist der Seitenbetreiber und welche Ziele verfolgt er? Woher stammen die Informationen und sind sie richtig? Wie zuverlässig ist die Suchmaschine? Solche Fragen muss sich der Redakteur stellen, wenn er im Internet recherchiert. Um sicher zu gehen, sollte er wichtige Fakten mit Hilfe anderer Recherchequellen oder zumindest alternativer Internetseiten prüfen. Oft ist akribische Recherche notwendig, um an stichhaltige Informationen zu kommen. Es gibt für den Fernseh- oder Videobeitrag nichts Schlimmeres, als mit falschen Statistiken oder verfälschten Fakten zu operieren. Das Gespräch mit Betroffenen und Experten ist eine gute Grundlage für einen persönlichen Blickwinkel. Ein Redakteur ist nicht allwissend und kann nicht von vorneherein jeden Gesichtspunkt kennen. Deshalb muss er sich gründlich umsehen und umhören. Oft hat eine Story mindestens zwei Seiten – vergleichbar einem Theaterstück mit streitenden Protagonisten und Antagonisten. Ein fairer Redakteur lässt normalerweise beide Parteien zu Wort kommen. Der Redakteur sollte stets darum bemüht sein, die Geschichte objektiv und neutral darzulegen.

6.4 Schriftliche Ausarbeitung und Vorbereitung Besonders für Anfänger empfiehlt sich die schriftliche Ausarbeitung eines geplanten Beitrags. Durch die schriftliche Auseinandersetzung zwingt sich der Redakteur dazu, Klarheit zu gewinnen, welche Themenaspekte ihm wichtig sind und mit welchen Mitteln er sie umsetzen kann. Erst wenn der Redakteur in der Lage ist, einem Kollegen o.ä. seine Ideen knapp und verständlich darzulegen, kennt er seinen Stoff wirklich. Die folgenden Stufen der schriftlichen Ausarbeitung sind der Spielfilmproduktion entlehnt. Natürlich muss der Redakteur nicht in jedem Fall nach diesem Muster vorgehen, es dient eher als grober Leitfaden. Wie ausführlich die schriftliche Vorbereitung ausfällt, hängt ab von den Rahmenbedingungen der konkreten Produktion und von der Frage, ob der Beitrag einen eher induktiven oder deduktiven Charakter hat. Bei der deduktiven Methode kennt der Journalist die wichtigsten Aussagen und Thesen seines Films vor Beginn der Dreharbeiten. Er hat ein 276

sehr konkretes Drehbuch und sucht dann bei den Dreharbeiten nach geeignetem Filmmaterial, die seine Thesen bestätigen. Bei der induktiven Methode beschäftigt sich der Redakteur viel stärker mit dem, was er bei den Dreharbeiten vorfindet. Er beobachtet und leitet daraus zentrale Aussagen des Films ab. Wovor an dieser Stelle eindringlich gewarnt werden soll: Fange nicht ohne ein schriftlich formuliertes Konzept an zu drehen! Meist rächen sich schlampige Drehvorbereitungen hinterher, denn das Team ist aufgrund unklarer Vorstellungen dazu gezwungen, viel mehr aufzunehmen, als für den Beitrag eigentlich notwendig wäre. Und ohne Konzept verkompliziert sich meist auch der Schnitt.

A Lektion 6

Exposé Der erste Schritt der Verschriftlichung ist das Exposé. Oft dient es Produzenten oder Redaktionsleitern als Orientierung. Ein Exposé vermittelt kurz und bündig die Grundidee des geplanten Beitrags und enthält folgende Informationen: • Logline – eine Projektbezeichnung mit kurzer Beschreibung der zentralen Idee in möglichst einem Satz • Ort und Zeit der Handlung • Wichtige Personen, die vorkommen und interviewt werden sollen Besondere Themenaspekte • Plot: Wie ist die Geschichte aufgebaut? • Erzähl-Perspektive: Aus welcher Sicht wird der Beitrag erzählt, zum Beispiel aus der Sicht eines Betroffenen, einer gesellschaftlichen Gruppe etc. Treatment Im Treatment wird der Aufbau des Films viel genauer als im Exposé beschrieben. Im Spielfilm enthält das Treatment eine genaue Schilderung der Szenen, wobei in diesem Stadium noch keine Dialoge erwartet werden. Bezogen auf die Produktion eines Magazinbeitrags enthält das Treatment neben der inhaltlichen Beschreibung genauere Anmerkungen zu Kamerastil, Schnittgestaltung sowie Ton und Musik. Storyboard Das Storybord vermittelt einzelne Einstellungen eines Films oder einer Szene. Es visualisiert das Drehbuch und sieht auf den ersten Blick aus wie ein Comic, denn jede Einstellung wird anhand einer Skizze dargestellt. Folgende Aspekte sollen im Storyboard Berücksichtigung finden: While making a storyboard pay attention to: • Skizzen mit Angabe der Einstellungsgrößen 277

A Lektion 6

• Positionen und Bewegungen von Personen oder Objekten in einer Einstellung (die durch die Skizze nicht gezeigt werden kann) • Kameraperspektive • Kamerabewegung • Bildaufbau • Requisite • Andere wichtige Details

6.5 Interview Ein Redakteur muss in der Lage sein, ein Interview zu führen. Durch die Art der Fragestellungen unterstützt er den Interviewgeber, fernsehgerechte Aussagen zu machen. Jeder Interviewpartner ist anders – hierauf stellt sich der Redakteur ein. Während zum Beispiel manche Gesprächspartner kaum Fragen benötigen und von sich aus schon viel reden, sind andere zurückhaltender. Je nach Gesprächstyp muss der Redakteur den Interviewpartner stark führen und seinen Redefluss bremsen oder nachfragen und zum Erzählen motivieren. Offene Fragen können den Redefluss in Gang bringen. Offene Fragen sind so formuliert, dass der Gesprächspartner nicht mit „ja“ oder „nein“ antworten kann.

278

Wichtig für ein gelungenes Interview ist auch die Auswahl geeigneter Gesprächspartner. Oft reicht ein Telefongespräch schon aus um zu beurteilen, wie gut jemand in der Lage ist, flüssig zu erzählen. Im Vorgespräch zum Interview bespricht der Redakteur mit dem Interviewpartner die Themen. Er sollte jedoch vorab keine konkreten Fragen liefern. Vor allem wenig geübte Interviewgeber werden dadurch eher verunsichert und bringen vorformulierte Texte zum Aufnahmetermin mit, wodurch die Antworten abgelesen statt authentisch wirken. Kontroverse Fragen können zu einem spannenden Interview beitragen. Auch persönliche Ansichten sind unter Umständen interessant und dürfen durchaus erfragt werden. Grundlegende Ziele für ein Interview sind das Fachwissen des Gesprächspartners (Experteninterview) oder seine persönliche Betroffenheit, was die Authentizität des Beitrags steigert. Gegenüber Medienprofis wie Politikern ist es durchaus erlaubt, zu unterbrechen, wenn mal wieder fleißig am Thema vorbei geredet wird. Bei Laien sollte der Redakteur behutsamer vorgehen. Grundsätzlich gilt, dass der Journalist dreifach verpflichtet ist, dem Thema, dem Zuschauer und dem Gast. Der Gesprächspartner ist auf den Journalisten angewiesen, da er oft nicht viel oder gar keine Medienerfahrung hat. Er hat also ein Recht darauf angemessen behandelt zu werden. Wie bei der gesamten Beitragsproduktion versucht der Redakteur auch im Interview, die Zuschauerwartungen zu berücksichtigen und entsprechende Fragen zu stellen. Insgesamt sollte nicht zu viel gefragt werden. Für einen klassischen TV-Magazinbeitrag (ca. 2 bis 5 Minuten) wird nicht besonders viel O-Ton benötigt, so dass sich der Redakteur auf wenige Fragen beschränken kann. Von dem Interview werden im Schnitt nur Ausschnitte verwendet, wobei eine Passage meist nicht länger als ca. 40 Sekunden sein soll. Noch längere Interviewpassagen am Stück können dem Zuschauer schnell langweilig erscheinen. Ein großer Teil der Fakten und Informationen lässt sich ohnehin komprimierter im Kommentartext unterbringen.

A Lektion 6

6.6 Storytelling Die meisten Menschen haben eine Schwäche für Geschichten. Insofern tun Redakteure gut daran, ihren Stoff wie eine Geschichte zu präsentieren. Hierzu einige Hinweise: • Die Inhalte eines Beitrags sind das Wichtigste. Sie müssen für den Zuschauer interessant und nachvollziehbar sein und ihn in irgendeiner Weise bewegen. 279

A Lektion 6

• Protagonisten laden zur Identifikation ein und schaffen eine gute Bindung zum Zuschauer. Protagonisten sind hier keine Schauspieler wie im Spielfilm, sondern Personen, an denen sich das Thema oder Aspekte davon plastisch aufzeigen lassen oder die ihre selbst erlebten Geschichten darlegen. • Der Beitrag sollte klar gegliedert und aufgebaut sein. Im Verlauf einer guten Geschichte, bestehend aus Anfang, Mitte und Ende, müssen Veränderungen deutlich werden. Eine Geschichte fesselt die Zuschauer u.a. durch einen starken Anfang, ein starkes Ende und gezielt gesetzte Highlights. • Der Beitrag sollte klar gegliedert und aufgebaut sein. Im Verlauf einer guten Geschichte, bestehend aus Anfang, Mitte und Ende, müssen Veränderungen deutlich werden. Eine Geschichte fesselt die Zuschauer u.a. durch einen starken Anfang, ein starkes Ende und gezielt gesetzte Highlights.

6.7 Voice-Over Den Off-Text, der über einen Beitrag als Zusatzinformation gesprochen wird, nennt man auch Voice Over. Eine gekonnte Voice Over ist klar und verständlich, muss aber auch authentisch wirken und dem Bildinhalt entsprechen. Dabei ist wichtig, dass der OFF-Text inhaltlich das Bild ergänzt und nicht bloß nacherzählt. Die richtige Betonung ist das Grundprinzip für einen guten Voice Over. Monotones Sprechen langweilt den Zuschauer. Grundsätzlich sollte sich der Text nicht abgelesen anhören, sondern so, als ob der Sprecher dem Zuschauer etwas erzählt. Die Idee dahinter: Rede mit dem Zuschauer, aber halte ihm keine Rede. Einige Hinweise zum Sprechen: • Der Sprecher sollte klar und deutlich artikulieren. • Er sollte den Text vorher, sofern er ihn nicht selbst geschrieben hat, mehrmals lesen und gründlich kennen lernen. Er muss von den Inhalten überzeugt sein und selbstbewusst erzählen. • Der Redakteur oder Sprecher sollte nicht zu künstlich oder übertrieben betonen, sondern sich authentisch anhören. • Er sollte nicht zu schnell, aber auch nicht zu langsam sprechen und ein mittleres Tempo finden.

280

Lektion 7: Dramaturgie – Mediales erzählen Jede Geschichte, sei es in ein Roman, ein Hörstück im Radio, ein Kinofilm oder ein Fernsehbeitrag, bedarf einer Dramaturgie. Der Begriff „Dramaturgie“ stammt aus dem Theater und beschreibt den Aufbau und die Gliederung einer Handlung. Das Ziel beim dramaturgischen Erzählen liegt darin, den Zuschauer zu unterhalten. Langweilt sich dieser, hat man das Ziel verfehlt. Es gibt dramaturgische Modelle, die dem Redakteur dabei helfen können, die Aufmerksamkeit des Zuschauers zu halten.

A Lektion 7

7.1 Die Dramaturgie-Pyramide Diese Grafik veranschaulicht den dramatischen Aufbau einer Geschichte. Grundelemente einer solchen Gliederung lassen sich in nahezu allen Arten von Geschichten (fiktional und non- fiktional) wiederfinden. Auf kurze Formen wie ein TV- oder Video-Magazinbeitrag ist ein solch komplexes Modell natürlich nur begrenzt anwendbar. HPP: Handling-Plot-Point Exposition: In der Exposition wird der Zuschauer mit der Ausgangslage bekannt gemacht; er erfährt die wesentlichen Hintergründe: Wer? Wann? Wo? Der sich anbahnende Konflikt ist schon spürbar. Aufbau:

Denouement

Resolution

Falling action

Climax

Rising action

Inciting incident

Exposition

Der Konflikt wird meist durch einen Impuls aufgebaut, zum Beispiel durch ein Ereignis oder ein Gespräch.

281

A

Konflikt: In der Austragung des Konflikts zeichnen sich Möglichkeiten ab, wie die Hauptfigur(en) Gegenspieler und Widerstände überwinden können. Ein Konflikt hat externe Ursprünge (z.B.: Ein Schiff droht unterzugehen) oder interne Gründe wie Selbstzweifel, Angst oder nicht erwiderte Liebe.

Lektion 7 Abbau: Der Konflikt wird gelöst und es entscheidet sich, ob „Der Gute“ gewinnt oder unterliegt. Für den Zuschauer lässt die Spannung nach. Ausklang: Das Ende der Geschichte kann offen oder geschlossen sein. Ein offenes Ende deutet bestenfalls an, welchen Weg die Protagonisten in Zukunft gehen werden. Die HPP’s, die Handling-Plot-Points markieren zentrale Handlungsmomente, in denen sich neue Entwicklungen anbahnen. Sie werden auch Wendepunkte genannt, weil sie die Geschichte in eine neue Richtung treiben. Oft haben HPP einen überraschenden Charakter und sie wirken am stärksten, wenn der Zuschauer sie nicht vorausahnen kann. Die Einleitung und der Ausklang bilden oft eine Klammer. Eine Klammer wird gebildet, indem man den Protagonisten am Anfang und am Ende in vergleichbaren oder ähnlichen Situationen agieren lässt. Beispiel: Am Anfang einer Geschichte lebt der Protagonist P glücklich mit seiner Familie. Im weiteren Verlauf muss er zu einem gefährlichen Militäreinsatz. Am Ende kehrt er, leicht verletzt, wieder in seine Familie zurück.

7.2 Elemente zum Spannungsaufbau Kontraste: Biespiel:. arm und reich, jung und alt, gut und böse Provokation durch Emotionen: Biespiel: Freude, Mitleid, Trauer. Humor: Sofern er zur Geschichte passt, wird vom Zuschauer immer gern gesehen. 282

Retardation: Die Konfliktauflösung oder der Höhepunkt wird hinausgezögert (z.B.: Kurz, bevor der Mann sich von der Brücke stürzen will, klingelt sein Handy, er geht dran und telefoniert, dann springt er.) Suspense:

A Lektion 7

Informations-Vorsprung, der Zuschauer weiß mehr als der Protagonist Überraschung: Der Zuschauer weiß weniger als der Protagonist und wird mit kaum vorhersehbaren Geschehnissen überrascht. Zeitsprünge: Die Geschichte wird nicht chronologisch erzählt, sondern der Ablauf der Szenen ist dramaturgischen Überlegungen unterworfen; typisches Beispiel sind Vor- und Rückblenden.

283

A

Lektion 8: Schnitt In diesem Kapitel werden die Grundlagen des Schnittprogramms Avid Xpress Pro Basics vorgestellt.

8.1 Avid Xpress Pro Basics

Lektion 8 Der Start Es ist wichtig zu Beginn der Arbeit alle benötigten Geräte wie Camcorder, Lautsprecher, Bildschirme, DV-Player einzuschalten, bevor Avid Xpress Pro gestartet wird. Das erste Projekt Nach dem Programmstart wird der User aufgefordert ein Projekt zu öffnen oder zu erstellen. Dieses Projekt kann sich auf dem Computer befinden (Private) oder auf einem externen Gerät (External). Greift der User über ein Netzwerk auf die Projektdaten zu, so wählt er „Shared“. Als neuer User besteht die Möglichkeit ein eigenes Avid-Xpress-Profil zu erstellen. Dabei werden alle Einstellungen, mit denen er in Avid Xpress am liebsten arbeitet, abgespeichert. Die Profile findet man im „Select Project“-Fenster, in dem Pulldown-Menü „User Profile“. Mit „Create User Profile“ wird ein neues Projekt unter einem vom User gewählten Profil-Namen geöffnet, in dem dann die Einstellungen vorgenommen werden können. Die Daten werden automatisch unter dem Usernamen gespeichert und stehen dem User dann bei weiteren Projekten zur Verfügung. Unter „New Project“ kann ein neues Projekt erstellt werden. Wichtig ist dabei ein aussagekräftiger Name, den man sich gut merken kann und die Auswahl von “25p PAL“, im Pulldown-Menü „Format“. Die Oberfläche von Xpress Pro Es stehen 2 Monitore zur Verfügung. Auf dem linken werden im unteren Teil die Bins angezeigt (Bin = Ordner). Sie ermöglichen einen Zugriff auf das Bild- und Tonmaterial. Auf dem rechten Monitor ist das zweigeteilte Composer-Fenster zu sehen. Das linke Fenster verweist auf das Rohmaterial (Sourcemonitor), das rechte Fenster zeigt bereits geschnittene Szenen (Record-Monitor). Die dazugehörigen Clips sind auf der Timeline angeord284

A Lektion 8

net, die sich neben den Bins befindet. Per Drag & Drop zieht der User ausgewählte Bild- und Tonclips auf die Timeline, um sie dort weiter zu bearbeiten.

Um aufgezeichnetes Material von der Kamera in Avid zu importieren, wird das Capture Tool geöffnet (Tools – Capture Tool). Es ist wichtig, die zum Capturen benötigten Geräte vor dem Start von Avid einzuschalten. Ansonsten kann es zu Fehlermeldungen kommen. Der User legt einen Namen für die im Player liegende DV-Kassette fest und klickt auf den roten Record-Button links oben im Capture Tool. 285

A Lektion 8

Nun wird das gesamte Material, das sich auf der DV-Kassette befindet, abgespielt und gleichzeitig auf die Computer-Festplatte, bzw. ins Schnittprogramm importiert. Um die Tonspur zu bearbeiten, gibt es zwei Tools: • Der Audiomixer ermöglicht es, mit Hilfe der Regler die Lautstärke der ausgewählten Tonspur(en) zu verändern. • Mit dem Audiotool kann der User die Audiospur durch Effekte o.ä. bearbeiten. Beide Funktionen sind unter „Tools“ zu finden. Im Projektfenster werden mögliche Einstellungen, Effekte und die Bins angezeigt.

Klickt man einmal auf den Bin-Ordner, öffnet sich das Bin-Fenster mit den Bildund Ton-Clips. Der Schnitt Um einen Ausschnitt aus einem Clip auszuschneiden, wird dort, wo der Ausschnitt beginnen soll, ein „In“ und am Ende ein „Out“ gesetzt. Per Drag & Drop kann die gewünschte Szene in die Timeline plaziert werden. Benutzt man dazu den „roten Pfeil“ (Overwrite), der standardmäßig aktiviert ist, so überschreibt die neue Szene einen Teil der bisherigen Clips in der Timeline.

286

Wird der „gelbe Pfeil“ (Splice-In) benutzt, so werden alle Clips verschoben, so dass Platz für den neuen Ausschnitt geschaffen wird, ohne bereits auf der Timeline vorhandene Clips zu überschreiben.

A Lektion 8

LEHRMATERIALIEN Schau dir das Video “Avid tutorial” auf www.europeanweb.tv/program/tutorial an.

8.2 Eine Video-Datei konvertieren Um dein Video auch im Internet verbreiten zu können musst du die Videodatei konvertieren. Das meistgenutzte Format zur Veröffentlichung von Videos auf Webseiten oder WebTV-Plattformen ist FLV. Die Teilnehmer unserer Trainingskurse nutzen die Plattform Europeanweb.tv, die es ermöglicht Videos online zu streamen und on-demand zur Verfügung zu stellen. Damit dies gelingt, lernen die Teilnehmer wie man mit verschiedenen Programmen Dateien konvertiert. Wir empfehlen euch ein frei verfügbares Programm (SUPER eRight Soft) zu benutzen, das online verfügbar ist. Es ist einfach herunterzuladen und auf dem Computer zu installieren. Nach der erfolgreichen Installation musst du die verschiedenen Parameter für den Video-Output einstellen. Die wichtigsten sind: • Bildformat: 4:3 • Frames pro Sekunde: 25 • Auflösung: 384x288 • Bitrate: 576 kbps oder höher (dies hängt von der Länge des Videos ab) • Audio: 44100 Sampling-Frequenz, 2 Kanäle, Bitrate 128 kbps Wir empfehlen diese Parameter ausdrücklich. Ihr könnt auch ein anderes Bildformat oder eine andere Auflösung ausprobieren, wenn das Video nicht unbedingt auf die Europeanweb.tv-Plattform hochgeladen werden soll.

287

A Lektion 9

Lektion 9: Was ist Web TV? Was ist Internetfernsehen? 9.1 Internetfernsehen Öffentlich-rechtliche und private TV-Sender veröffentlichen Sendungen aus ihren Programmen oder Teile davon zusätzlich im Internet, um es dem Zuschauer zu ermöglichen, Beiträge zeitlich ungebundener und über das Computermedium anzusehen. Als einer der ersten Privatsender in Deutschland zeigte Pro 7 online Ausschnitte aus der Late Night Show „TV Total“, so dass der Zuschauer die lustigsten Szenen noch einmal gucken kann. Die öffentlich-rechtlichen Sender ARD und ZDF sendeten bereits während der EM 2008 und während der Olympischen Spiele zusätzlich übers Internet. Die Aktion war Bestandteil einer neuen Offensive, die das Ziel hatte, jüngere Zuschauergruppen anzusprechen, die wenig Fernsehen und stärker den Computer als Informations- und Unterhaltungsmedium nutzen. Großer und ständig wachsender Popularität erfreuen sich Online-Videoportale wie My Video und YouTube, die zu einer echten Konkurrenz fürs Fernsehen geworden sind. Insofern sind die Bemühungen der Fernsehsender, zusätzlich zum TV-Programm online zu senden, als Reaktion auf den wachsenden Konkurrenzdruck der Videoportale zu verstehen.

9.2 Web TV Das web TV ist ein speziell für das Internet entwickeltes Format. Hier werden Kurzfilme, Beiträge sowie Sendungen nach besonderen Kriterien produziert. Beispiel: „Ehrensenf“ aus Köln stellt seit einigen Jahren diverse Fundstücke aus dem Internet humorvoll und im Stil von Nachrichtensendungen vor. Web TV wendet sich vorwiegend an junge Leute und wirkt dementsprechend inhaltlich und technisch dynamisch. Auch speziell für das Internet hergestellte Werbung wird zunehmend im Netz veröffentlicht. Nachdem das Bürgerfernsehen im Sinne der Offenen Fernsehkanäle in den letzten Jahren eher zurückgefahren worden ist, könnten zukünftig Bürger-Web-TVStationen an deren Stelle treten (www.europeanweb.tv).

9.3 Wieso web TV? Das Internet ist gegenwärtig neben dem Fernsehen und dem Radio eines der wichtigsten Informations- und Unterhaltungsmedien. Die Zugriffszahlen auf einzelne 288

Seiten können sehr hoch sein und innerhalb von ein paar Tagen mehrere Millionen Zuschauer erreichen, wie zum Beispiel bei youTube der Fall. Web TV ist eine ideale Möglichkeit für NGO’s (Nicht-Regierungs-Organisationen) und anderen Institutionen mit geringen Finanzbudgets, sich einen medialen Bereich zu erschließen und größere Zielgruppen zu erreichen. Insofern ist Web TV auch ein sehr gutes Kommunikationsmittel für die internationale Jugendmedienund Bürgerarbeit.

A Lektion 9

9.4 Welche Kriterien sind wichtig für uns? Aufgrund der oft kleinen Auflösung der Videos und der Konvertierung des Videomaterials in verschiedene Formate ist Qualitätsverlust nicht zu vermeiden. Deswegen folgen nun einige Hinweise, die man beachten sollte, um ein inhaltlich und technisch ansprechendes Video zu produzieren. • Bei der Kameraarbeit ein Stativ benutzen, um wackelfreie Aufnahmen zu bekommen. Falls kein Stativ vorhanden ist, die Kamera möglichst ruhig halten, vor allem bei Interviews. • Wegen der geringen Auflösung und kleinen Bildgröße im Internet nicht zu viele totale Einstellungen filmen, sondern lieber Großaufnahmen verwenden. Die Zuschauer können die Bilder so schneller und leichter entschlüsseln und werden nicht vom Inhalt der Beiträge abgelenkt. • Das Motiv muss für die Zuschauer schnell erkennbar sein; daher wichtige Aspekte durch Licht, Perspektive und Einstellungsgröße hervorheben. • Gegenlichtaufnahmen vermeiden, es sei denn, dies hat dramaturgische oder inhaltliche Gründe. • Wie bei normalen Videoprojekten unbedingt mehr Material drehen als benötigt wird, um beim Schnitt Handlungsspielräume zu haben. Eine szenische Einstellung ruhig 3-5 Mal wiederholen, Motive für einen Filmbericht aus mehreren Perspektiven und in unterschiedlichen Einstellungsgrößen aufnehmen. • Jede Einstellung sollte mindestens 10 Sekunden lang sein, denn beim Schnitt braucht man Vorder- und Hinterspeck zum Beschneiden. • Schwenks und vor allem Zooms sparsam einsetzen; sie sollten stets einen ruhigen Anfang und ein ruhiges Ende haben (unbewegte bzw. ungezoomte Aufnahmemomente). • Da beim Konvertieren auch die Qualität des Audiosignals abnimmt, den Ton (vor allem Sprache) sorgfältig aufnehmen. • Für Interviews nur den Interview-Ton benutzen und die Atmo weglassen, um unnötige Nebengeräusche zu vermeiden. 289

A Lektion 9

• Die Musiknachvertonung sollte den Inhalt des Videos unterstützen und Akzente setzen. Daher nur bestimmte Stellen mit Musik unterlegen und nicht den ganzen Beitrag mit Musik zukleistern. • Zu laute Musik wirkt ebenfalls störend. • Die Musik darf an keiner Stelle so laut sein, dass sie die Verständlichkeit der Sprache (Off Text) beeinträchtigt. • Musik, die einen Wiedererkennungswert durch Werbung, Kino, Videoclips, TV-Sendungen oder -Serien hat, nur verwenden, wenn die Wiedererkennung als Gestaltungsmittel dient und beim Zuschauer entsprechende Assoziationen wecken soll. • Auch das Tempo von Musik und die Art der Musik sind durchaus mitentscheidend für die erfolgreiche Rezeption des Videos. Daher sollen bei der Musikauswahl unter Umständen die Hörgewohnheiten der Zielgruppe berücksichtigt werden. • Obwohl man im Internet ein Video mehrmals anklicken kann, guckt der Zuschauer den Beitrag meist nur einmal. Deshalb ist es wie bei jedem normalen Film wichtig, auf Bilder, die keine Aussage haben, zu verzichten. Die Kameramann oder der Redakteur müssen lernen, sich gegebenenfalls auch von ihren „Lieblingsbildern“ zu trennen, sofern sie nicht zum Beitrag passen. • Bei jedem Bildwechsel muss auch wirklich ein neues Bild kommen, das heißt, ein Bild muss sich von dem vorhergehenden deutlich unterscheiden. Man spricht in diesem Zusammenhang von Konturendifferenz. Die Verwendung unterschiedlicher Einstellungsgrößen und Perspektiven trägt dazu bei.

9.5 Europeanweb.tv Europeanweb.tv ist eine Plattform zum Streamen und Anschauen von nichtkommerziellen Videoproduktionen im Internet. Das Motto der Plattform ist „Bürgermedien für Europa“. Dies meint, dass die Plattform ein open webTV-Kanal zur Veröffentlichung von Inhalten produziert von Bürgern oder lokalen Gemeinschaften aus verschiedenen europäischen Ländern ist. Der Kanal dient als WebTV-Plattform für Jugendorganisationen, NGOs und Bürgermedienzentren in ganz Europa. Das Ziel von Europeanweb.tv ist es, für Solidarität, Toleranz und Kooperation zu werben. Es geht außerdem auch darum, europäisches Bürgerbewusstsein zu fördern. Das European webTV-Team initiiert Debatten über Themen von 290

europäischer Bedeutung, stellt verschiedene Standpunkte dar, bietet Lösungen zu gesellschaftlichen Problemen an und präsentiert die unterschiedlichen Meinungen europäischer Bürger. Europeanweb.tv wird zum Großteil von jungen aktiven Leuten aus Polen, Deutschland, der Ukraine, Belarus, Rumänien, Großbritannien und der Türkei gestaltet. Aber es ist offen für jedermann - für lokale Gemeinschaften oder landesweite Bürgermedienstationen gleichermaßen. Interessierte Organisationen können sich auf der Plattform registrieren und ihre Programme veröffentlichen. Jede erhält ihren eigenen webTV-Kanal und kann so die Produktionen online streamen. Multiplikatoren, Medientrainer, NGOs, Bürgermedienzentren und Organisationen der Zivilgesellschaft können sich kostenlos für Europeanweb.tv bewerben. Die einzige Bedingung ist, dass die registrierten Organisationen Inhalte veröffentlichen, die europäische Themen behandeln oder Videos von Bürgern für Bürger zur Verfügung stellen.

A Lektion 9

Ein Video hochladen - Schritt für Schritt Zunächst musst du dich registrieren und dich danach auf der Plattform einloggen. Dann befindest du dich im Dashboard), dem internen Content Management System. 1. Dein Video hochladen Klicke auf “Upload Video” beim VIDEO-Icon. Danach wähle „Select” und suche das entsprechende Video auf deinem Computer. Nur FLV-Dateien bis zu 100 MB können hochgeladen werden. Größere Dateien (mehr als 100 MB) können aufgrund des FTP-Clients nur vom Administrator hochgeladen werden. Nach Auswahl deines Videos drücke den ADD-Button. Der Upload beginnt. Hier ist etwas Geduld nötig. Du wirst automatisch zu der Seite weitergeleitet auf der du 291

A Lektion 9

das Video bearbeiten kannst. Klicke nirgendwo! Warte einfach und du kommst automatisch zur nächsten Seiten (dem Editing Panel). Im Editing Panel kannst du die folgenden Dinge tun: a) den Titel des Videos ändern b) eine kurze Beschreibung des Videos hinzufügen c) Schlagwörter zu deinem Video hinzufügen d) den Slug, der User-Friendly URL ist (z.B. video_report_from_London) e) ein sogenanntes Thumbnail für das Video hinzufügen (in der Thumbnail-Leiste siehst du den Videoplayer. Starte das Video. In der Box “Select frame in player window” kannst du das aktuelle Frame deines Videos sehen. Wähle dieses durch Stoppen des Videos aus und klicke auf “Update thumbnail“ f) das Video online stellen indem du den Status auf “Published” änderst Nicht vergessen: immer „Update status“ klicken! 2. Das Video zu einem bestimmten Programm oder Kanal hinzufügen Unter dem Icon “Programs” findest du “List of programs”. Klicke darauf . Es öffnet sich die “main list”. In den “Operations“ musst du auf das erste Icon klicken. Dies ist die Playliste im Player auf der Startseite. Bitte füge dein Video in der richtigen Reihenfolge hinzu. Das geht schnell, denn du kannst die Drag&DropFunktion nutzen. Ziehe das Video von der linken Liste zur rechten und platziere es im richtigen Ordner. Dann wähle die Funktion „Playliste aktualisieren“. 3. Dein Video ist nun online. Jetzt kannst du es ansehen 4. Dein Video veröffentlichen Du kannst dein Video mithilfe verschiedener sozialer Netzwerke weiterverbreiten. Jedes Video hat seine eigene Seite. Hier kann man es bewerten und kommentieren. Auch der sogenannte “Embedded Code” ist verfügbar, der es erlaubt das Video auf deinem Blog oder deiner Webseite zu posten. Du kannst das Video auch für deine Freunde verfügbar machen, indem du ihnen eine Email schickst oder den Link bei Facebook oder Twitter postest. Kontakt mit Europeanweb.tv Falls deine Einrichtung an einem eigenen WebTV-Kanal oder Kooperation mit uns interessiert ist, kannst du uns jederzeit kontaktieren. Solltest du Fragen oder technische Probleme haben stehen wir unter office@youth4media.eu zu deiner Verfügung.

292

Modul B: Crossmedialer Journalismus

Crossmedialer Journalismus - Einführung in das Modul

B Einführung

294

In den vergangenen 20 Jahren hat sich mit der immer größer werdenden Bedeutung des Internets und seiner zunehmenden Benutzerfreundlichkeit auch die Medienlandschaft nachhaltig verändert. Gab es früher nur bei TV-Serien sogennante “Spin-Offs“, hat sich dasselbe Prinzip auch bei den Medien etabliert. Die Zeitung im Internet zusätzlich zum Printangebot, der Radiobeitrag als Podcast, der TVBeitrag als Vidcast und reichlich Zusatzangebote, die das originäre Medium nicht bieten kann oder will, der verheißungsvolle Gedanke, die eigene Reichweite ins Unendliche zu potenzieren, neue Zielgruppen zu generieren – zumindest theoretisch – all das hat zu einem überbordenden medialen Online-Angebot geführt. Doch der große Erfolg blieb aus. Zunächst einmal funktionierte die Annahme, dass der Print-Leser auch automatisch zum User des Internetangebots wird, nur bedingt. Zum anderen wurde das Angebot der Ursprungsmedien üblicherweise unverändert ins Netz gestellt. Der Vorteil dieser Methode, so dachten die Medienmacher, sei die kostengeringe und einfache Zweitverwertung ihrer journalistischen Arbeit: mit einem Klick im Netz, wenig Mehrarbeit und dafür viel Effekt. Aber auch hier zeigte sich bald; die Zweitverwertung ist gar nicht so unaufwendig und auch nicht so günstig wie gedacht. Um trotzdem dabei zu sein, tummelten sich im Ergebnis auf den Websites Bleiwüsten mit schier endlosen Scrollbalken, Bilder mit langen Ladezeiten und Videos, die nur mit einem speziellen Software-Download überhaupt zu sehen waren. Userfreundlichkeit war ein Begriff, der erst noch kreiert werden musste und sich sowohl in Software als auch Hardware nur langsam niederschlug. Gleiches galt für die inhaltliche Aufbereitung. Auch heute sind nach wie vor Beispiele dieser 1:1-Politik im Netz zu finden. Warum? Weil es einfach ist. Aber einfach ist nicht gleich gut. Teilnehmer des Moduls „Crossmedialer Journalismus“ erwerben grundlegende Fähigkeiten in der Erstellung von Internetinhalten sowie technisches Fachwissen (Erstellen von Blogs, Uploaden von Internetinhalten, Nutzung verschiedener Mediengattungen). Darüber hinaus haben die Teilnehmer die Gelegenheit, ihre Fähigkeiten mit der Kamera und beim Videoschnitt zu verbessern. Das Modul B schließt einen sogenannten Vertiefungsteil mit ein, der darauf abzielt, die wichtigsten Aspekte des Videojournalismus-Moduls aufzufrischen und erworbene Kompetenzen zu erhalten sowie weiterzuentwickeln. Vor dem praktischen Kurs (Seminar „face-to-face“), der eine siebentägige Schulung umfasst, bereiten sich die Teilnehmer in Form von E-learning vor. Das Material, das jeder Teilnehmer studieren soll, führt ihn in die Welt des Onlinejournalismus ein. Die Teilnehmer studieren sowohl Theorie und werden gleichzeitig auch

mit den wichtigsten Begriffen wie Podcast, Vidcast, News, Leitartikel, Glosse, Kommentar, Hypertextprinzip und verschiedenen Schnitttechniken vertraut gemacht. Der wichtigste Aspekt beim E-learning ist die Reflektion über essentielle Definitionen und die Bedeutung von Onlinejournalismus sowie crossmedialen Techniken. Die Teilnehmer des Kurses sollen die Materialien auf der E-learning-Plattform bearbeiten und Webseiten und Internetplattformen nach Infos scannen. Danach werden sie in der Lage sein, selbst die Bedeutung und den Unterschied von geschriebenem Text in der Zeitung und Text im Internet zu reflektieren. Diese Unterscheidung treffen zu können wird später die praktische Arbeit beim Schreiben für das Internet erleichtern. Während des E-learnings soll der Teilnehmer die folgenden Themen reflektieren und sie für den praktischen Kurs vorbereiten: • welche Art von Projekt / Idee / Problem möchte ich durch crossmediale Techniken präsentieren? • Aussehen und Aufbau meines Blogs / meiner Internetseite - welche Informationen möchte ich veröffentlichen? • was für ein Video möchte ich zur Illustration meines Projekts / Idee / Problem drehen? Außerdem haben die Teilnehmer eine Aufgabe zu erledigen. Sie sollen Videomaterial für einen Werbefilm (Ansichten meiner Stadt, meine NGO o.ä) während des E-learnings zusammenstellen. Während des praktischen Seminars bleibt nicht viel Zeit für Vorbereitung und Dreharbeiten. Bei den Workshops „Vertiefungsteil” geht es um verschiedene Schnitttechniken und Sequenzabfolgen sowie darum, einen konkreten Werbefilm zu schneiden. Das praktische Seminar umfasst ungefähr 40 Trainingsstunden während derer die Teilnehmer Multimediagruppen bilden. Sie müssen sich auf ein gemeinsames Thema / Problem / Idee / Projekt einigen, zu dem sie das gesamte crossmediale Material unter Nutzung verschiedener Methoden und Medien vorbereiten. Das Hauptresultat des Moduls ist ein Weblog, das die Message unter Nutzung verschiedener Medienformate wie beispielsweise Öffentlichkeitskampagne oder Werbefilm transportiert.

B Einführung

295

Lektion 1: Was ist Crossmedia also wirklich?

B Lektion 1

Vielleicht lässt sich diese Frage über den Ausschluss am einfachsten beantworten und vermag zudem bereits auf ein Qualitätsverständnis verweisen. Crossmediales Arbeiten bedeutet nicht, dass die Inhalte des Ursprungsmediums, ob Print, Audio oder Film unverändert ins Netz gestellt werden. Crossmedia ist zudem keine Resteverwertung von Artikeln, Bildern, Filmen etc., die im Archiv ein heimliches Dasein fristen und – da der Online-Space ja unbegrenzt scheint – wahllos ins Netz gestellt werden sollten. Crossmediales Arbeiten bedeutet, die ursprüngliche Information, die message, mediums- und zielgruppengerecht in den verschiedenen Medien zu publizieren. De facto bedeutet dies in der aktuellen Medienlandschaft die Nutzung des Internets als Plattform für das Publizieren in einer Vielzahl von medialen Möglichkeiten: Print, Audio, Video, Podcast, Bildergalerien, interaktive Elemente etc. Wer gekonnt crossmedial arbeiten will, muss sich mit verschiedenen Ebenen befassen: 1. Plattform Internet 2. Journalistische Formen 3. Medienvielfalt: Print, Audio & TV 4. Journalist & Redaktion Der crossmediale Journalismus hat sich vor allem durch das Medium Internet entwickelt, da dieses die Plattform für eine multimediale Aufbereitung journalistischer (und anderer) Inhalte bietet. Daher wird im Folgenden zunächst das Medium Internet genauer betrachtet. Anschließend wird der Bogen von der Plattform zu den Inhalten gespannt. Mit Inhalt ist die ursprüngliche Information gemeint, sozusagen der Rohstoff: Dieser Rohstoff kann in verschiedene journalistische Formen gegossen werde, daher werden die grundlegendsten Formen im Folgenden vorgestellt. Schließlich befassen wir uns mit den Machern und Produzenten, den crossmedialen Journalisten, die mit ihren Redaktionen die Schnittstelle zwischen Information und Rezipienten darstellen.

296

Lektion 2: Plattform und Medien Das Internet ist das Medium, das den crossmedialen Journalismus letztlich erst zur Blüte gebracht hat; vorher kam es nur sehr selten dazu, dass ein Journalist gleich mehrere Medien bedienen musste. Die Aufgaben und auch die Ausbildungswege waren klar geregelt, es gab Zeitungsjournalisten, Radiojournalisten und Fernsehjournalisten. Das hat sich geändert und auch die angebotenen Ausbildungen tragen diesem Umstand Rechnung. Denn das Internet vereint alle Medien in sich.

2.1 Das Hypertextprinzip Der wohl größte Vorteil des Internets ist das Hypertext-Prinzip, das dem Leser / Nutzer ein nicht-lineares Konsumieren ermöglicht. Während der Leser in einer Zeitung quasi analog dem Fluss der Information folgen muss, kann er durch die Verlinkungsstruktur eines Online-Artikels die Reihenfolge, in der er die Informationen konsumieren möchte, selbst festlegen. Das bedeutet für den Leser, er kann in seiner Informationsauswahl assoziativ vorgehen und jeweils zu dem Inhalt springen, der ihn am meisten interessiert. Für den Journalisten bedeuten dieser Umgang und diese Erwartungshaltung, dass er neben dem Verfassen und Herstellen der Inhalte sein Augenmerk auch auf eine gekonnte, nah an den Bedürfnissen und Erwartungen der Zielgruppe andockende Verlinkungsstruktur erstellt.

Daten, Zahlen

B Lektion 2

Hintergrund Thema

Bildergalerie zum Thema Download/ Druckangebot/ Podcast/etc.

Link-Index Videosequenz zum Thema Glosse zum Thema

Weitere Meldungen 297

2.2 Erwartungen des Internetnutzers

B Lektion 2

Das Internet hat sich im Zuge seiner rasanten Entwicklung ein Publikum herangezogen, das bestimmte Dinge erwartet. Dazu gehören: • Aktualität des Angebots • Tiefe (hohes Informationsverlangen des Nutzers) durch assoziative Verlinkungen und weitere Inhaltet • Dynamik (Zugriffsmöglichkeiten / Geschwindigkeiten) • Multimedialität (Verwendung verschiedenster Bausteine passend zum Thema), z.B.: °° Texte °° Fotos (Bildergalerien)) °° Grafiken °° Audiosequenzen (Podcast, RSS-Feeds) °° Videosequenzen (Vidcast) °° Animationen °° Downloads • Cross-linkage (Service, additional links, etc.) • Interaktivität °° E-Mail °° Blog °° User-Kommentare etc. Für den Journalisten bringen diese Erwartungshaltungen an die Vielfalt des Internets und die medialen Möglichkeiten die Herausforderung mit, sein Portal / seine Inhalte auch formal logisch zu konzipieren und aus der Menge der möglichen Elemente die für seine Inhalte und seine Zielgruppen logischen Kombinationen auszuwählen. Dabei sollte er auf Folgendes achten: • Orientierung bieten durch • klare Struktur und • logischen Aufbau sowie • kleine Klick-Raten, • eine dem Inhalt angemessene Umsetzung mit • sinnvollen Text-Bild-Ensembles und • einheitlichen, nachvollziehbaren Hyperlinks sowie • kurze Ladezeiten bei Bild- Video- oder Audiodateien. Gerade die scheinbar unbegrenzten Möglichkeiten des Internets und die hohe, ungefilterte Informationsdichte führen bei Usern vielfach zu Frust und Orientierungslosigkeit. Das gezielte Finden von Informationen kann im Internet leicht zu einer zeitraubenden Herausforderung werden. Daher gilt für den Online-Journal-

298

isten auch hier, die Struktur seiner Artikel nicht nur inhaltlich logisch zu konzipieren, sondern auch die gesamte Struktur seines Online-Auftrittes danach auszurichten. So sichert er sich sein Publikum. Der deutsche TV-Sender n-tv ist ein Nachrichten-Sender. Sein Zielpublikum sind Geschäftsleute im oberen bis höchsten Management, Menschen, die sich im Schwerpunkt für Wirtschaft, Börse und Politik interessieren. Entsprechend ist der

B Lektion 2

Internet-Auftritt des Senders www.n-tv.de konzipiert. Er bietet auf der Startseite eine klare, übersichtliche Struktur, die Themen, die seine Zielgruppe erwartet und ein multimediales Angebot, ob Text -Bild-Ensembles, Videos zu den Topthemen oder Podcasts für unterwegs. Der Internetauftritt einer Zeitung, hier der New York Times, legt den optischen und inhaltlichen Schwerpunkt dagegen so:

299

B

Hier wird dem User ein Aufbau geboten, der ihn an das Ursprungsmedium erinnert. Die Informationen werden vor allem durch Text transportiert, Bilder sind sekundär. Die Internet-Startseite des größten deutschen Privatradio-Anbieters zeigt gleichfalls klar, worauf der Schwerpunkt gelegt wird. Bilder und Text sind Nebensache. Was zählt, ist die Marke und eine Navigation, die sich inhaltlich der Radiosprache bedient, z.B. „on air“ oder „off air“.

Lektion 2

Zum Vergleich hier noch der Internetauftritt des größten US-amerikanischen Radiosenders clear channel. Auch hier sind Bilder und Text sekundär, Grafiken und das Hauptmedium stehen im Vordergrund.

300

Beim Vergleich der Websites zeigt sich, dass sie sich meist stark an ihrem Ursprungsmedium orientieren, sowohl optisch als auch in der medialen Gewichtung. Eine TV-Sender-Website setzt stark auf Multimedialit채t, der Ableger einer Tageszeitung auf Inhaltvermittlung via Text, der Internet-Auftritt eines Radiosenders stellt auch online sein Ursprungsmedium in den Mittelpunkt. Was aber uneingeschr채nkt f체r alle gilt, ganz gleich welche Gewichtung vorgenommen wird, ist das Beherrschen der verwendeten journalistischen Formen, sei es im Video, dem Printartikel oder dem Radiobeitrag.

B Lektion 2

301

Lektion 3: Journalistische Formen 3.1 Recherche & Quellen

B Lektion 3

Auf das Thema Recherche ist bereits im ersten Modul eingegangen worden, so dass es hier nur kurz erwähnt wird. Wer ein Thema recherchiert, sollte mindestens drei Quellen haben. Der Journalist informiert professionell. Daher sollten seine Quellen diesem Anspruch gerecht und auch offen gelegt werden, so dass ein Rezipient die Möglichkeit hat, sich selbst eine Meinung über den Anspruch und Gehalt von Quellen zu machen, wenn er das will. Der investigative Journalist zieht sich gern schon einmal darauf zurück, dass er seine Quellen nicht preisgeben darf. Das sollte allerdings nur für Quellen gelten, deren Preisgabe Personen gefährden könnten, was im Alltagsjournalismus so gut wie nie vorkommen dürfte. Ähnlich selten sollten die „die gut unterrichteten Kreise“ zitiert werden, auch sie sind letztlich oft nur ein Synonym für mäßige Recherchearbeit, die sich hinter solchen „Quellen“ versteckt.

3.2 Journalistische Formen Die wichtigsten journalistischen Darstellungsformen sind: • Nachrich • Bericht • Leitartikel • Kommentar • Glosse • Interview • Umfrage Grundsätzlich lassen sich die journalistischen Darstellungsformen in zwei Kategorien unterteilen: die informierenden und die kommentierenden. Ein Journalist muss vor allem diese klare Zweiteilung von informieren und kommentieren beherrschen, es ist die Unterscheidung von Meinungsbildung und Meinungsschaffung. Ein Journalist, der versucht seine eigene Meinung in vermeintlich objektive Formen zu gießen, manipuliert. Zu den informierenden Formen gehören vor allem die Nachricht und der Bericht. Zu den kommentierenden der Leitartikel, der Kommentar und die Glosse. Zur Informationsbeschaffung dienen Formen wie das Interview oder die Umfrage, wobei letztere üblicherweise Meinungen und Stimmungen sammelt und keine Informationen, bzw. ist hier dann die Meinung die Information.

302

Nachricht Eine Nachricht beinhaltet die sachliche Darstellung eines Ereignisses ohne wertende Kommentare und zählt damit zu den informierenden Darstellungsformen. Sie muss aktuell und ihr Inhalt neu, also bis dato unbekannt, sein. Bei der Auswahl von Nachrichtenthemen muss außerdem berücksichtigt werden, dass ihr Inhalt auf ein allgemeines Interesse stößt. Die Nachricht muss zudem leicht verständlich und um Objektivität bemüht sein. Sie ist in aller Regel kurz. Ihr Aufbau orientiert sich an den klassischen W-Fragen: Wer? Was? Wo & Wann? Warum?

Hauptinformation: Wer/Was? Wann/Wo? Wie/Warum? Wozu? Welche Quelle? Zusatzinfo

Abnehmende Wichtigkeit

B Lektion 3

Kürzen von unten

Wozu? Welche Quelle? Und ein W, das nicht Teil der Nachricht, aber entscheidend ist, ist das W in „Für wen?“ Zielgruppenorientierung gilt natürlich auch hier. Die Nachricht ist üblicherweise im Perfekt (Es hat geregnet, als er die Straße entlang ging.), also der unvollendeten Vergangenheit, geschrieben und folgt von Satz zu Satz dem Gesetz der abnehmenden Wichtigkeit der Informationen. Bericht Der Bericht vertieft die Informationen der Nachricht. In ihm findet nicht nur die Neuigkeit ihren Platz, sondern auch die Hintergründe, die Vorgeschichte, verschiedene Aspekte und Zusatzinformationen des Themas. Zitate sind selten, können aber bei entscheidenden Aussagen auch Teil der Berichtsform sein. Der Bericht ist damit auch umfangreicher als die Nachricht und üblicherweise im Präteritum, also der abgeschlossenen Vergangenheit (Es regnete, als er die Straße entlang ging.), verfasst. Auch bei ihm gilt das Prinzip der umgekehrten 303

Pyramide, nur hier nicht in Bezug auf einzelne Sätze, sondern nun auf Absätze. Er bietet stets eine sachliche und chronologische Darstellung der Ereignisse. Leitartikel

B Lektion 3

Der Leitartikel gehört zu den schwierigsten journalistischen Formen, er ist sowohl informierend als auch leicht kommentierend. Er beleuchtet ein aktuelles gesellschaftliches Ereignis detailreich und von verschiedenen Seiten, wobei er dem Rezipienten gleichzeitig mögliche Schlussfolgerungen anbietet. Damit verschmilzt die Grenze zwischen informierend und kommentierend. Der Leitartikel forciert Standpunkte, beleuchtet Pro und Contra und unterstützt den Rezipienten in seiner Meinungsbildung ohne zu manipulieren. Der Leitartikel ist sehr umfangreich und in großen Printpublikationen üblicherweise der Hauptartikel auf der ersten Seite des Mediums. Auch der Leitartikel folgt den Ansprüchen der Aktualität, klarer Struktur und Nachvollziehbarkeit sowie der sauberen Recherche. Kommentar Der Kommentar bezieht Stellung zu einem aktuellen Thema. Dabei wird die vertretene Position deutlich als Meinung und nicht als Fakt kenntlich gemacht. Damit spiegelt der Kommentar immer die persönliche Meinung des Autors wider, ist subjektiv und wertend und zielt deutlich auf die Meinungsbildung des Rezipienten ab. Ein guter Kommentar beinhaltet immer auch eine Begründung der vertretenen Meinung, dies kann argumentierend geschehen, indem der Autor Argumente und Beweise für seine Meinung anführt, oder er stellt verschiedene Standpunkte und ihre jeweiligen Begründungen gegenüber und wägt anschließend ab, welchem Standpunkt der Vorzug zu geben sei. Wer einen Kommentar verfasst, muss sicher sein, dass die Ursprungs-Nachricht dem Rezipienten bekannt ist, der Kommentar verzichtet auf eine erneute Darstellung der Ereignisse. Typische Kommentar-Formate sind daher, sei es in Zeitungen, Radioformaten oder TV-Nachrichten, in der Regel in unmittelbarer Nähe bzw. im Anschluss an das jeweilige Nachrichtenformat platziert. Glosse Formal ist die Glosse nichts anderes als ein Kommentar, sie unterscheidet sich von ihm nicht inhaltlich, sondern sprachlich. Die Glosse ist sozusagen die hohe Kunst des Kommentars. Sie greift sprachlich spielerisch das Thema auf, kommentiert gerne boshaft, ironisiert den Sachverhalt und fordert den Rezipienten auf leichte Art auf, sich eine Meinung zu bilden. Humor und Fachwissen gehören zu einer

304

guten Glosse, sie ist mehr als bloßes Meinungskundtun, sondern kommentiert auf eine sprachlich und höchst professionelle Weise. Grundsätzlich eignen sich alle Themen für eine Glosse. Interview Das Interview ist die gängigste journalistische Form und kann verschiedenen Zwecken dienen. Hier werden die beiden Hauptformen vorgestellt, die für alle Medien gleichermaßen gelten: • das themenzentrierte Interview, auch Expertengespräch genannt. Bei dieser Form ist die Funktion des Interviewpartners klar definiert: Er kommt als Experte für ein bestimmtes Thema zu Wort. Möchte der Journalist beispielsweise etwas über Bau und Sicherheit eines bestimmten Staudammes wissen, wird er sich wahrscheinlich um den zuständigen Ingenieur als Gesprächspartner bemühen. Dieser kann in seiner Eigenschaft und Funktion am ehesten etwas zu diesem Thema sagen. Gänzlich uninteressant ist dabei, wie der Ingenieur zu diesem Beruf und speziell zu diesem Job gekommen ist. • Das wäre dagegen in der zweiten Interviewform interessant: dem personenzentrierten Gespräch. Hier steht der Gast mit seinem Leben, seinen Erfahrungen, seinem individuellen Können, Wissen, Talent etc. im Vordergrund. Im Falle des Ingenieurs wäre dies zum Beispiel der Fall in einem Interview mit dem Thema „Mein Traumjob“. Der Rezipient würde hier erfahren, warum der Beruf des Ingenieurs gerade für diesen einen Menschen etwas Besonderes ist. Würde das Gespräch mit einem Berufsberater geführt, wäre es wieder ein themenzentriertes Interview. Unter die Form des personenzentrierten Interviews fällt auch der so genannte Promi-Talk. Wenn der Journalist wissen will, ob sich der Hollywood-Star nun von seiner Frau getrennt hat oder nicht, steht ganz klar das Leben des Gesprächspartners im Vordergrund. Das gilt auch für die kleinen Stars vor der Haustür. Ein Promi-Talk kann genauso gut mit Alltagshelden geführt werden, z.B. mit der alten Dame, die jeden Herbst junge Igel aufpäppelt und über den Winter bringt, oder mit der Mutter, die eine Kindergarten-Initiative gründet. Promis gibt es überall. Beide Interviewformen können sich auch mischen bzw. ineinander übergehen. Wichtig ist, als fragender Journalist die Stoßrichtung des Gespräches festzulegen und sich möglichst auch daran zu halten, da sonst Planlosigkeit droht, die sich in der Regel in Orientierungslosigkeit beim Rezipienten niederschlägt. Egal, welche Form gewählt wird, das Interview ist die unmittelbarste journalistische Form, da sie die Aussagen der Gesprächspartner unverändert und authen-

B Lektion 3

305

B Lektion 3

tisch wiedergibt. Das gilt insbesondere bei Radio- und TV-Interviews, in denen die Zuhörer und Zuschauer sich selbst ein Bild über jemanden machen können, ohne bzw. nur mit einer indirekten Vermittlung durch den fragenden Journalisten. Daher sollte der Journalist immer beachten, dass es beim Interview niemals um ihn selbst geht, sondern um den Gast. Das gelungene Interview steht und fällt mit der Auswahl des richtigen Gastes. Das bedeutet zum einen in der Recherche den richtigen Ansprechpartner zu ermitteln und im zweiten Schritt zu überprüfen, ob der Gast in spe auch medientauglich ist. Während dies bei Print-Medien egal ist, ist es bei Radio oder TV von entscheidender Wichtigkeit für die Qualität des Interviews. Die Auswahl des Interviewgastes sollte daher auch immer dessen mediale Kompetenz berücksichtigen. So sollte beispielsweise jemand mit einem starkem Akzent oder Sprachfehler für ein Radiointerview nicht unbedingt ausgewählt werden. Wenn also ein möglicher Gast für einen Radio- oder TV-Beitrag recherchiert wird, muss mit diesem ein Vorgespräch geführt werden. Das Vorgespräch Das Vorgespräch beinhaltet die Klärung folgender Fragen: 1. Ist der ausgewählte Experte der richtige? Kann er wirklich etwas zum Thema sagen, kennt er sich aus? Ist er der logische Ansprechpartner in seiner Funktion oder gibt es noch andere? 2. Passt der Gast auch zur Zielgruppe? In einem Format für junge Menschen, sollte ein Experte zum Beispiel auch von dieser Zielgruppe möglichst akzeptiert werden. 3. Ist der Gast medientauglich? Ist er fähig einigermaßen in ganzen Sätzen zu sprechen, auf den Punkt zu antworten, sich verständlich für die Zuschauer oder Zuhörer auszudrücken? 4. „Kann“ der Moderator mit dem Gast? Auch das ist wichtig für ein gelungenes Gespräch. Stellt der Moderator schon im Vorgespräch fest, dass der Gast ihm zutiefst unsympathisch ist, sollte er lieber noch weitersuchen. Ein gutes Interview hängt maßgeblich von der Gesprächsatmosphäre ab. 5. Das Vorgespräch beginnt nie mit den Worten „Hallo, ich bin X vom Sender Y und hätte Sie gern für ein Interview zum Thema Z.“ Warum nicht? Wer so beginnt, hat keine Chance mehr, die Interviewzusage auf höfliche Art zurückzunehmen, wenn sich im anschließenden Gespräch herausstellt, dass der anvisierte Gast entweder nicht kompetent ist oder möglicherweise medial nicht geeignet. Wer sein Gespräch wie in diesem Beispiel beginnt, hat jemandem ein Interview angeboten, von dem er noch nichts weiß. Das

306

kann leicht schief gehen. Besser so: „Hallo, ich bin X vom Sender Y, wir recherchieren für eine Sendung zum Thema Z (und Sie sind mir als Experte empfohlen worden). Können Sie mir erklären, wie …“ Wenn der Moderator dann im Verlauf des Gesprächs merkt, dass der Experte sich sehr gut eignet und er mit ihm klarkommt, kann er die Einladung zum Interview entspannt aussprechen: „ Das haben Sie so gut erklärt, möchten Sie nicht Gast in meiner Sendung zu diesem Thema sein?“ oder ähnlich. 6. Im Vorgespräch werden nie Fragen im Detail abgesprochen. Auch wenn es das ist, was jeder Gast will. Wer Fragen vorher genau abspricht, raubt dem Gespräch jede Spontaneität, denn nicht selten bereiten sich die Interviewgäste so exakt auf die erwarteten Fragen vor – im schlimmsten Fall kommen sie mit auswendig gelernten Antworten, die sie vielleicht sogar noch auf Zetteln dabei haben –, dass sie im Gespräch hochgradig irritiert sind, wenn der Moderator von diesen Fragen abweicht. Klassische Reaktionen sind dann Kommentare wie: „Das haben Sie vorher nicht gesagt, dass Sie das fragen.“ oder „Diese Frage war aber nicht abgesprochen.“ Beides ist in einer Aufzeichnung oder sogar einem Live-Interview extrem ärgerlich und demaskiert die Situation für den Zuschauer oder Zuhörer als einstudiertes Gespräch, als Theater statt echtem Journalismus. Davon abgesehen sitzt der Moderator dann einem Gast gegenüber, der nun auf der Hut sein wird, weil er einem Moderator, der sich nicht an die abgesprochenen Regeln hält, nicht mehr traut. Besser ist es daher, das Themenspektrum im Vorgespräch einzuschränken. Wenn das Vorgespräch wie unter Punkt 5 beschrieben geführt wird, ist es ein Leichtes am Ende zu sagen „Und genauso, wie wir uns gerade unterhalten haben, wird auch das Interview sein.“ Dann weiß der Gast genau, worum es geht und ist entspannt, weil es das Vorgespräch auch war, ohne dass die Fragen konkret notiert worden sind. 7. Der Moderator sollte im Vorgespräch genau darauf achten, wie sich sein Wunschkandidat verhält und wie er mit ihm spricht. Fällt er ins Wort? Ist er schnell emotional? Hat er eine nervige Angewohnheit? Was auch immer es ist, es wird auch im Interview da sein. Daher sollte im Zweifelsfall noch weitergesucht werden nach einem Kandidaten, der sich vielleicht besser eignet.

B Lektion 3

Aufbau eines Interviews Jedes Gespräch sollte für eine definierte und dem Moderator präsente Zielgruppe spannend und interessant sein. Das bedeutet, dass der Moderator einige Dinge beherzigen sollte: Der Gast sollte immer mit vollständigem Namen und seiner Funk307

B Lektion 3

tion vorgestellt werden, damit der Zuhörer oder Zuschauer sofort weiß, mit wem er es zu tun hat. Für den Aufbau gilt, sich nicht an das Thema heranzupirschen, sondern direkt einzusteigen und möglichst jede Chronologie zu meiden. Zwei Einstiegsformen haben sich bewährt, entweder vom Allgemeinen zum Besonderen zu kommen oder genau andersherum vom Besonderen zum Allgemeinen. Hier ein Beispiel für den Weg vom Allgemeinen zu Besonderen: „Das Thema Gesundheit und Gesundheitsvorsorge ist in Zeiten steigender Krankenkassenbeiträge in aller Munde. Jetzt soll es auch den Rauchern stärker an den Kragen gehen. Gestern ist gegen einen Raucher von seiner 16jährigen Tochter, die an Lungenkrebs erkrankt ist, Klage auf Schadenersatz eingereicht worden. Über diesen Fall reden wir heute. Bei mir ist Herr XY, er ist Fachanwalt für Schadenersatzklagen. Herr XY, was ist an diesem Fall dran? …“ So kann ein Moderator von einem allgemeinen Thema auf den konkreten und aktuellen Anlass überleiten und seinen Gast gegenüber dem Publikum einführen. Letzteres passiert im Übrigen immer in der dritten Person, da er ja dem Publikum vorgestellt wird. Es ist schlechtes Moderatorentum dem Gast zu sagen, wer oder was er ist: „Bei mir ist Herr XY, Sie sind …“ Der Gast weiß, was er ist, daher sollte die Vorstellung an die Zielgruppe / das Publikum adressiert sein: „Bei mir ist Herr XY, er ist …“. Der Moderator ist das Bindeglied zu seinem Publikum und sollte dieses auch entsprechend in die Gesprächssituation mit einbeziehen. Die zweite Variante geht den umgekehrten Weg vom Besonderen zum Allgemeinen. Zum Beispiel wäre dann die Klage gegen den Raucher der Aufhänger für ein Gespräch über das Nichtraucherschutzgesetz in Europa. Frageformen Da ein Interview im Schwerpunkt ein Frage-Antwort-Spiel ist, sollte ein Moderator die gängigsten Frageformen beherrschen und wissen, wann sie einzusetzen sind. Dazu gehören:

308

• die offene Frage • die geschlossene Frage • die Alternativfrage • die Suggestivfrage Die offene Frage ermöglicht nur ausführliche Antworten. „Warum haben Sie sich für diesen Weg entschieden?“ „Was genau haben Sie dann getan?“ Der Befragte muss aufgrund der Fragestellung möglichst in ganzen Sätzen antworten. Diese Frageform eignet sich besonders, um den Gast in das Gespräch einzuladen, etwas Inhaltliches zu erfahren. Es animiert den Gast zu reden. Dagegen ermöglicht die geschlossene Frage nur Antworten auf Ja oder Nein:

B Lektion 3

„Sind Sie für die Todesstrafe?“ „Waren Sie bei der Demonstration dabei?“ Diese Frageform wird genutzt, um eine Haltung oder eine Information auf den Punkt zu bringen. Diese Frageform eignet sich auch gut, um „Vielredner“ einzudämmen, indem man ihnen auf elegante Art den Wortumfang beschneidet. Die Alternativfrage gibt möglichen Antworten vor: „Möchten Sie Wein oder Wasser?“, „Wählen Sie die Demokraten oder die Republikaner?“. Diese Frageform eignet sich, ähnlich wie die geschlossene Frage, für kurze Statements, die aber nicht Ja oder Nein umfassen. Die Suggestivfrage legt in ihrer Fragestellung eine mögliche Antwort bereits nahe „Warum sind Sie lieber in Deutschland als in der Schweiz?“, „Sind Sie denn nicht auch gegen die Todesstrafe?“. Suggestivfragen zielen auf eine Manipulation des Befragten ab. Dem Gesprächspartner wird die gewünschte Antwort bereits nahegelegt. Wer so fragt, muss sich darüber im Klaren sein, dass Gesprächspartner sehr wohl oft merken, ob sie manipuliert werden und dann oft das Gespräch verweigern. Mit der inneren Haltung eines offenen und fairen Moderators / Journalisten lassen sich Suggestivfragen selten vereinbaren. 309

Weitere Frageformen sind zum Beispiel die rhetorische Frage, die nicht auf eine Antwort zielt, oder die ironische Frage, die in Kontroversen eher ihren Platz findet und den Gesprächspartner durch die Umkehr in den Gegensatz herausfordern soll. Beide Frageformen kommen aber üblicherweise in Interviews nur sehr selten vor.

B Lektion 3

Grundsätzliches Der Moderator muss das Gespräch in der Hand behalten, aber er darf nicht sklavisch an seinen Fragen hängen. Das bedeutet, er muss aktiv zuhören und den Aspekt herausfiltern, der für sein Publikum spannend und interessant ist. Das funktioniert nur, wenn der Moderator bereit ist, sich auf das Gespräch, den Gast und das Thema voll einzulassen. Zu vermeiden ist daher: • die Fragenliste abzuarbeiten (besser einen flexiblen Fragenkatalog erstellen) • dem Gast zu sagen, wer oder was er ist • das eigene Expertentum auszuleben • dem Gast nicht zuzuhören Somit sind dies die goldenen Regeln für gelungene Interviews: • Sei gut vorbereitet und habe sauber recherchiert! • Finde einen für dein Publikum spannenden Einstieg zum Thema! • Ein Fragenkatalog ist besser als eine Fragenliste! • Sorge als Moderator dafür, den richtigen Gast zu haben! • Sorge dafür, dass der Gesprächspartner sich wohl fühlt! Denn nur ein solcher Gast wird entspannt sein und gut reden, was vor allem bei Radio- und TV-Interviews wichtig ist. • Kläre die eigene Position. Für wen fragt der Moderator, d.h. für welche Rezipienten-Zielgruppe sind Thema und Gast interessant. Der Moderator sollte darauf achten für eine definierte Zielgruppe zu fragen und sich nicht am Eigeninteresse zu orientieren. • Sage nie etwas, was der Gast besser sagen könnte. Dafür ist er nämlich da! • Habe ein vorher definiertes Ziel, das schützt vor planlosem Geschwätz! Umfrage Die Umfrage ist ein klassisches journalistisches Werkzeug, um Stimmungen und Meinungen in größerer Zahl zu generieren, zum Beispiel um zu einem Thema möglichst viele verschiedene Meinungen einzuholen. Damit ist die Umfrage auch

310

üblicherweise eingebettet in andere Formate und wird, außer etwa bei ComedyUmfragen ohne weiteren Tiefsinn selten als eigenständiges Element eingesetzt. Während sie inhaltlich oft benutzt wird, um ein Stimmungsbild zu erhalten, ist sie methodisch gut geeignet, um verschiedene Radio- und TV-Formate aufzulockern oder um bestimmte Thesen zu illustrieren und einen lockeren Einstieg in ein Thema zu ermöglichen. Inhaltlich sind der Umfrage keine Grenzen gesetzt, ob zu politischen Themen „Wie finden Sie die Bundeskanzlerin?“, zu Themen vor der eigenen Haustür „Was wünschen Sie sich noch für diesen Stadtteil?“ oder um die Allgemeinbildung zu testen „Wie heißt der längste Fluss Europas?“ Grundsätzlich gilt, dass Themen für Umfragen aktuell oder kontrovers, hintergründig oder amüsant sein sollten. Eine Umfrage sollte nicht eingesetzt werden, wenn der Rezipient sich die Antworten sowieso schon denken kann. Wichtig ist, dass bei einer Umfrage jedem Befragten exakt die selbe Frage gestellt wird, ohne Umschreibungen oder Überformulierungen, denn jede Varianz der Fragestellung verfälscht das Ergebnis. Zudem ist es bei Radio- oder TVUmfragen im anschließenden Schnitt unmöglich, die Antworten sinnvoll aneinanderzuschneiden, wenn sie auf unterschiedliche Fragen gegeben worden sind. Als Frageform sollte möglichst immer die Frage gewählt werden, und es sollten unterschiedliche Zielgruppen befragt werden, um so heterogene Antworten zu bekommen. Wird also eine Umfrage zum Beispiel zum Umbau eines Hauptbahnhofes geführt, sollten nicht nur Zugreisende, sondern auch das Bahnhofspersonal, die Kaufleute vor Ort, die Security und auch die üblichen Heimatlosen in Bahnhöfen dazu gefragt werden, um ein umfassendes und multiperspektivisches Bild zum Thema zu erhalten. Oft ergeben sich aus solchen Umfragen spannende Ansätze für den anschließenden Beitrag, der das Thema weiter bearbeitet. Es gibt noch eine Vielzahl weiterer journalistischer Formen, die in unterschiedlicher Gewichtung in den Medien eingesetzt werden. So ist zum Beispiel die LiveReportage im Radio eine beliebte Form bei Sportereignissen, die von der lebendigen Perspektive des Reporters lebt, oder die gebaute Reportage als ein Format, das gern für Infotainment-Sendungen – ob in Radio oder TV –, wie etwa populärwissenschaftliche Dokumentationen, eingesetzt wird. Eine weitere Form ist das Radio-Feature, das Elemente aus Hörspielen und Dokumentationen gekonnt verbindet, vor allem auch durch den Einsatz von Musik und Geräuschen. Da diese Formen komplexer und kunstvoller sind, ist es ratsam zunächst die Grundlagen sowohl der journalistischen als auch der medialen Formen zu beherrschen.

B Lektion 3

311

Lektion 4: Medienvielfalt: Print, Radio & TV

B Lektion 4

312

Die moderne Medienvielfalt birgt neben vielen Chancen, wie einer größeren Reichweite auch Risiken, nämlich das Risiko, jedes Medium nur noch „irgendwie“ zu bedienen und keines mehr richtig. Jedes Medium folgt seinen eigenen Gesetzen, die hier näher vorgestellt werden. Da das Medium Fernsehen mit seinen spezifischen Anforderungen bereits Schwerpunkt in Modul A war, konzentriert sich Modul B neben dem Plattform-Medium Internet auf Print und Radio.

4.1 Texten fürs Lesen: Print & Online Das Texten für Print- als auch für Online-Medien ist hier bewusst zusammengefasst. Während in den vergangenen Jahren diese beiden Bereiche noch strikt getrennt wurden, da die Internet-Forschung davon ausging, dass der Online-Journalismus eine eigenständige Gattung sei, hat sich inzwischen gezeigt, dass gutes Schreiben und Beherrschen der journalistischen Formen unabhängig von der veröffentlichenden Plattform ein Muss ist. Die Besonderheiten des Hypertext-Prinzips und der journalistischen Formen sind bereits erklärt worden, so dass hier nun vor allem das Schreiben an sich betrachtet wird. Wer für einen Leser textet, ob ein Zeitungsleser oder ein Internetuser, ist zweierlei verpflichtet. Zum einen der journalistischen Form, die er wählt, als auch dem Leser und seiner Erwartungshaltung. Grundsätzlich muss er verständlich texten und sich in Komplexität und Anspruch an seiner Zielgruppe orientieren. Die Zielgruppe der BILD-Zeitung unterscheidet sich beispielsweise von der Zielgruppe der Financial Times. Beide Print-Medien informieren ihre Leser aber über dieselben Ereignisse, allerdings in unterschiedlicher Tiefe und Komplexität, die sich sowohl in der Länge von Artikeln, der Wortwahl, dem Satzbau und der journalistischen Haltung niederschlagen. Das Prinzip der Präzision und Klarheit sollte bei beiden berücksichtig werden, denn alle Artikel sollten beim ersten Lesen verstanden werden können. Wer also zu komplex, umständlich oder verschachtelt schreibt, verliert Leser. Das Argument, der Leser könne ja noch einmal nachlesen, wenn er etwas nicht versteht, hat sich als Rechtfertigung als nutzlos erwiesen. Leseranalysen haben längst bewiesen, dass der Leser genau das nicht tut. Wenn er etwas nicht versteht, liest er nicht noch einmal nach, er bricht ab. Als Journalist bedeutet das, der Regel zu folgen: „Keep it simple short“. Und es bedeutet auch konsequent Inhalte zu hierarchisieren. Bei Online-Texten sollte das Wichtigste zuerst angeführt werden. Der Onlinetexter genießt die Freiheit dem Rezipienten durch die Tiefenstruktur des Internets und die Möglichkeit der Verlinkung ein nonlineares Lesen zu ermöglichen. Das ändert aber nichts an dem Qualitätsanspruch an die Inhalte.

Beispiel: Schriftsprache “Mit dem gotischen Bau des Kölner Doms wurde 1248 nach dem Plan des ersten Kölner Dombaumeisters Gerhard von Rile, der entweder französischer oder deutscher Herkunft war und 1260, bereits zwölf Jahre nach Baubeginn der Kathedrale, verstarb, begonnen.”

Beispiel: Online-Text “Mit dem gotischen Bau des Kölner Doms wurde 1248 nach dem Plan des ersten Kölner Dombaumeisters Gerhard von Rile begonnen. Von Rile war entweder französischer oder deutscher Herkunft, er verstarb bereits zwölf Jahre nach Baubeginn der Kathedrale.”

B Lektion 4

In der leicht vereinfachten Online-Variante sind entweder direkt im Text Verlinkungen zu den Hauptinformationen gesetzt, oder sie sind im unmittelbaren Umfeld des Textes angesiedelt, zum Beispiel eine Bildergalerie des Kölner Doms in seinen verschiedenen Bauphasen und ein Artikel über Gerhard van Rile, sein Leben und Wirken.

4.2 Radio und Schreiben fürs Sprechen Eines der drei Hauptmedien im crossmedialen Journalismus ist neben TV und Print das Radio oder hier weiter gefasst der Audio-File, der als Podcast auf einer Internet-Plattform hinterlegt werden kann. Der große Unterschied zum Radio besteht hier in der on-demand-Funktion, ein Podcast kann vom Hörer konsumiert werden, wann immer er will, und wenn er ihn via RSS-Feed abonniert, wird dieser ihm automatisch in festen Abständen auf seinen PC geladen. Diese neuen Möglichkeiten im Konsum ändern jedoch nichts am Radio-Handwerk an sich, das auch ein crossmedialer Journalist beherrschen muss. Der große Unterschied zu den anderen Medien liegt beim Radio in der Aufbereitung der Inhalte für das Hören. Das umfasst neben dem Beherrschen der journalistischen Formen die gekonnte Umsetzung in das gesprochene Wort. Dazu gehört als Kernvoraussetzung das Schreiben fürs Sprechen, das saubere Sprechen und die technisch einwandfreie Aufbereitung. 313

B Lektion 4

Das Schreiben fürs Sprechen zeichnet sich vor allem dadurch aus, dass es auf jeglichen komplizierten Satzbau verzichtet. Es ahmt die gesprochene Sprache nach, dabei wird noch unterschieden, ob für eine freie, also moderative Rede geschrieben wird oder für einen zu verlesenden Text wie etwa eine Nachricht. Grundsätzlich jedoch gilt:: • Ein Satz – eine Botschaft • Verb nach vorne • Keine Schachtelsätze • Wenig bis gar keine Fremdwörter • Keine Synonyme (Synonyme verwirren, Wiederholungen schaffen Verständnis) Der Hörer muss in der Lage sein, den Sinn sofort zu verstehen, er kann in der Regel weder anhalten noch zurückspulen, dem muss ein gesprochener Text Rechnung tragen. Beispiel: Schriftsprache “Mit dem gotischen Bau des Kölner Doms wurde 1248 nach dem Plan des ersten Kölner Dombaumeisters Gerhard von Rile, der entweder französischer oder deutscher Herkunft war und 1260, bereits zwölf Jahre nach Baubeginn der Kathedrale, verstarb, begonnen.”

Beispiel: Hörsprache “Der Bau des Kölner Doms begann 1248. Der erste Kölner Dombaumeister war Gerhard von Rile. Es ist ungeklärt, ob von Rile deutscher oder französischer Herkunft war. Er starb 1260, zwölf Jahre nach Baubeginn des Kölner Doms.” Jeder Satz enthält eine Botschaft. Die Botschaften bauen möglichst ohne Verschachtelungen und Synonyme aufeinander auf. Beispiel: Audio-Nachricht (Quelle WDR 5) “In Birma wollen UNO-Experten heute im Katastrophengebiet den Beginn der internationalen Hilfe vorbereiten. Die Militärregierung des südostasiatischen Staates hat den Helfern Bewegungsfreiheit zugesichert. 314

Das Ausmaß der Naturkatastrophe ist noch nicht zu übersehen. Chinesische Medien sprechen inzwischen von mindestens 15.000 Toten. China ist der engste Verbündete Birmas. Am Samstag hatte eine mehrere Meter hohe Flutwelle als Folge des Zyklons „Nargis“ die Küste des Landes überschwemmt. Hunderttausende Menschen wurden obdachlos. Im Süden von Birma ist die Strom- und Wasserversorgung zusammengebrochen. Inzwischen gibt es Kritik am Krisenmanagement. Die Bevölkerung soll unzureichend vor dem Wirbelsturm gewarnt worden sein.” Auch hier ist zu erkennen, dass jeder Information aufeinander aufbaut. Die Nachricht als klassisches journalistisches Format beginnt mit dem aktuellen Anlass und verweist erst im späteren Teil der Nachricht auf die Hintergründe. In diesem Beispiel ist das Neue, dass die internationale Hilfe vorbereitet wird. Es folgt die genauere Erläuterung, wie das von statten gehen soll und welche Probleme sich ergeben. Im Anschluss wird das auslösende Ereignis (Wirbelsturm), das bereits einige Tage zurückliegt und damit nicht mehr neu ist, aufgegriffen, um den Bezug zur aktuellen Nachricht herzustellen. Schreiben fürs Sprechen gelingt am besten, wenn jeder geschriebene Text vor dem tatsächlichen Aufnehmen laut gesprochen und auf die Regeln hin überprüft wird. Oft werden erst durch das Hören Mängel in Formulierung und Satzbau erkennbar.

B Lektion 4

Beispiel: Audio-Nachricht (Quelle WDR 5) “Der frühere Postchef Zumwinkel hat in seinem Steuerverfahren ein Geständnis abgelegt. Vor dem Bochumer Landgericht räumte er ein, Teile seines Vermögens in einer Liechtensteiner Stiftung hinterlegt zu haben. Dadurch habe er 970.000 Euro Steuern hinterzogen. Zumwinkel sprach vom größten Fehler seines Lebens, für den er die Folgen tragen werde. Der frühere Postchef sagte, wegen der spektakulären Durchsuchung seines Hauses in Köln vor einem Jahr hätte seine Familie und er bitter gebüßt. Die Staatsanwaltschaft wird vermutlich eine Bewährungsstrafe beantragen. Prozessbeobachter erwarten, dass Zumwinkel eine Gefängnisstrafe erspart bleibt.” In diesem Beispiel ist der jeweilige Neuheitswert des Satzes unterstrichen. Auch hier bauen die Informationen aufeinander auf, indem zu der Hauptinformation im Folgesatz jeweils die Spezifizierung geliefert wird. 315

4.3 Betonungsregeln

B Lektion 4

316

Die Erkenntnis, was in einem Text wichtig ist, ist die Basis der sinnvollen Betonung. Nur wenn der Sprecher genau versteht, was er spricht, kann er die Inhalte adäquat betonen. Das ist deshalb wichtig, weil der Sprecher durch seine Betonung dem Hörer Orientierung bietet und ihn durch den Inhalt führt. Betont er gegen den Sinn der Nachricht, schafft er Verwirrung beim Hörer. Leiert er einen Text einfach nur herunter, schafft er Langeweile beim Hörer. Wichtig ist daher, den Text sowohl passend zum Inhalt als auch passend zur Zielgruppe zu interpretieren. Die Textsorte bestimmt die Haltung des Sprechers und die Form der Interpretation. Nachrichten werden sachlich und klar vorgelesen / vorgetragen, ohne Wertung. Kommentare werden durch Betonung von Wertungen deutlich kenntlich gemacht. Moderation ist die persönliche Ansprache eines Hörers und meint die freie Rede und nicht „eine Rede zu halten“ Lyrik: Der Inhalt bestimmt die Betonung, nicht der Reim. Zeilenumbrüche, Reimschemata sind für das Vortragen keine Orientierungshilfe, nur der Inhalt zählt. Erzählungen werden erzählt, nicht vorgelesen. Hier ist die Haltung des Sprechers entscheidend, sei es die Märchentante, der Erzähler eines Krimis etc. Figurenrede ist Schauspielerei. Wer einen Text mit verschiedenen Rollen spricht, muss jeder Rolle eine Stimme zuordnen und diese konsequent durchhalten. Zur Annäherung an den Inhalt eines Textes sind diese Fragen hilfreich: • Wer spricht mit wem? • Wie wird mit wem gesprochen? • Was ist die Kernbotschaft? Daraus folgt für die sinnvolle Betonung eines Textes die Berücksichtigung dieser Kriterien. Betont werden: • Betont werden: °° das Neue °° das Weiterführende °° Gegenteile (z.B. Arbeitnehmer und Arbeitgeber) °° Substantive oder Verben, die die Handlung voranbringen °° Dinge, die zusammengehören • Nicht betont werden dagegen: °° Dinge, die bereits genannt worden sind °° Adjektive ohne relevanten Bezug Folgende Mittel lassen sich neben der reinen Wort-Betonung einsetzen. • Sprechgeschwindigkeit (Tempo), z.B. bei Einschüben oder um Dynamik zu erzeugen

• Variieren der Tonhöhe • Zäsuren (z.B. zur Hervorhebung; Betonung von etwas Wichtigem; Mittel der Ironie) • Stimmung / Emotion • Melodie / Rhythmus • Lautstärke Satzzeichen sind für Schriftsprache. Ohne spricht es sich oft besser. Das gilt vor allem für Kommas! Betont werden Sinnzusammenhänge. Beispiel: Betonungs “Der Bau des Kölner Doms begann 1248. Der erste Kölner Dombaumeister war Gerhard von Rile. Es ist ungeklärt, ob von Rile deutscher oder französischer Herkunft war. Er starb 1260, zwölf Jahre nach Baubeginn des Kölner Doms.”

B Lektion 4

Unterstrichen ist, hier, was betont wird. Der erste Satz kann „auf Punkt“ gelesen werden und markiert damit einen Sinnabschnitt. Zwischen dem zweiten und dem dritten Satz dagegen wird die Stimme nicht abgesenkt, da der bezugnehmende Sinn weitergeht. Denn beide Sätze beziehen sich auf dasselbe Substantiv, hier Gerhard von Rile. Der letzte Satz wird wieder auf Punkt gelesen, das heißt, die Stimme abgesenkt, da hier der Gesamtsinn- und Text zu Ende ist.

4.4 Qualitätskriterien Audio – die Checkliste Auch bei Audioproduktionen gilt es bestimmte Standards einzuhalten, die eine hohe Qualität gewährleisten. Drei Bereiche sind dabei entscheidend: die inhaltliche Qualität, die technische Qualität und die kommunikative Qualität. Eine Gewährleistung dieser Qualitäten führt am besten über das Beantworten der folgenden Checkliste: Inhaltliche Qualität • • • • • • •

Was ist die Hauptaussage? Erfährt der Hörer etwas Neues? Wird er unterhalten? Sind die Informationen ungewöhnlich, einzigartig oder überraschend? Hat der Beitrag einen roten Faden? Hat der Beitrag ein definiertes Ziel? Ist der Beitrag logisch aufgebaut? 317

Kommunikative Qualität

B Lektion 4

• • • • • •

Für wen ist dieser Audio-Beitrag interessant / wer ist die Zielgruppe? Warum ist der Beitrag für diese Zielgruppe interessant? Wo ist der Bezug zur Zielgruppe? Wie vermittelt der Beitrag die Inhalte? Ist die Beitragsform angemessen gewählt für die Inhalte? Ist die Haltung des Beitrags / des Moderators / Sprechers dem Thema und der Zielgruppe angemessen?

Technische Qualität • Aufnahmen ohne störende Nebengeräusche • Eine konstante Lautstärke innerhalb der Aufnahme • Saubere Schnitte und Übergänge • Saubere Blenden, z.B. zwischen einem Jingle und dem O-Ton. • Keine Übersteuerungen • Verständlichkeit in Sprache & Sprechen Diese Checkliste ist nicht nur für Audio-Beiträge hilfreich, sondern nützt grundsätzlich bei der Annäherung an ein Thema, um seine Umsetzung und das Ziel nicht aus den Augen zu verlieren. Ziel eines Journalisten ist immer, seine Zielgruppe adäquat zu informieren oder zu unterhalten und dabei sicherzustellen, dass das gewählte Thema auch tatsächlich für die Rezipienten interessant ist und dieses nicht bloß angenommen, sondern auch kritisch hinterfragt wird.

4.5 Audiotechnik: Audacity Wer crossmedial arbeitet und beispielsweise für einen Beitrag mit der Kamera loszieht, kann gleichzeitig aus dem aufgezeichneten Material eine Bilderstrecke für die Website generieren sowie aus dem aufgezeichneten Ton einen Podcast mit den Kernaussagen erstellen. Unabhängig von der TV-Technik und dem Filmschnitt, ist es daher sinnvoll zumindest ein reines Audioschnittprogramm zu beherrschen, z.B. für den Reinschnitt von Aufnahmen oder für das Bearbeiten von Aufnahmen, die rein über Mikrophon und z.B. Reportageeinheit entstanden sind. Es gibt eine

318

Vielzahl guter Audioschnittprogramme wie z.B. „cool edit“ oder „samplitude“. Diese Programme sind sehr gut geeignet, wenn komplexere Audiobearbeitungen, z.B. mit Effekten und vielen Spuren vorgenommen werden sollen, etwa bei der Erstellung eines Features oder Jingles. Für den einfachen Schnitt vollkommen ausreichend wird hier audacity vorgestellt, ein Freeware-Schnittprogramm. Hier erfolgt nur eine kurze Einführung in das Programm, Übungen zu audacity finden sich im E-Learning-Bereich, dort ist auch die Verlinkung zu finden. Der direkte Weg geht über den Download unter www.audacity.de. Da Programm ist multilingual, nach dem Download kann der Nutzer bei der Installation aus 27 Sprachen wählen. Audacity ist ein relativ minimalistisches, vor allem aber übersichtliches Audioschnittprogramm. Die Startseite zeigt nur die das klassische Menü sowie die Aufnahmefunktionen. Es reicht ein Klick auf den roten Record-Button und sofort startet die Aufnahme, sofern die richtige Audioquelle eingestellt ist. Diese findet der User im Menü unter Bearbeiten / Einstellungen (engl. edit / preferences).

B Lektion 4

Anschließend kann die Aufnahme durch den Rec-Button gestartet werden. Die Tonspur wird während der Aufnahme bereits generiert und bietet so sofortige Kontrolle.

319

Audiotakes, ob im MP3- oder Wave-Format, können leicht importiert werden. Auch MIDI-Spuren für Musikbearbeitungen sind importfähig. Dazu wird unter dem Menü die Rubrik „Projekt“ ausgewählt und „Audio importieren“.

B Lektion 4 Sobald eine Tonspur importiert ist, kann sie abgespielt und bearbeitet werden. Um die Tonspur zu bearbeiten, zum Beispiel um zu schneiden, reicht es aus mit dem Cursor in den Track zu klicken und dort den Bereich ziehend zu markieren. Der markierte Bereich lässt sich über die Delete-Taste entfernen. Audacity arbeitet non destruktiv, das bedeutet der jeweilige Arbeitsgang kann auch wieder rückgängig gemacht werden. Die bearbeitete Tonspur kann sowohl als Projekt gespeichert werden, zum Beispiel wenn die Bearbeitung noch nicht abgeschlossen ist, oder als Audiodatei exportiert werden, sei es als MP3- oder als Wave-Datei und dann an einen beliebigen Ort gespeichert werden. Auf der Hilfe-Website http://manual.audacityteam.org, die allerdings nur auf Englisch zur Verfügung steht, finden sich ausführliche Hilfestellungen zu allen Fragen als auch ausführliche Programmerklärungen.

4.6 Podcast & RSS Feed Das Ziel des Erstellens von eigenständigen Audiodateien ist, sie als Podcast auf der Internet-Plattform zur Verfügung zu stellen und auch damit dem crossmedialen Ansatz zu entsprechen. Podcasting (abgeleitet von der Verbindung aus iPod und Broadcasting) meint genau das, das Erstellen und Anbieten von Mediendateien über das Internet. Dabei ist noch zu unterscheiden, ob ein Internetuser sich die Datei selbst herunterlädt oder ob er sie abonniert, zum Beispiel bei einer Rubrik, die sich regelmäßig aktualisiert wie etwa Nachrichten, und sie ihm dann automatisch auf den Server 320

geladen werden, in letzterem Fall wird der Podcast als RSS-Feed bezeichnet. Um abonnierte Podcasts lesen zu können, bedarf es eines Feedreaders, der sich automatisch bei Anklicken eines RSS-Feeds aktiviert. Die eingefügte Grafik veranschaulicht den Weg der Nachricht vom Macher, dem Podcaster, zum Abonnenten, dem User. Es gibt neben audacity als generelles Audioschnittprogramm eine Vielzahl von meist kostenpflichtigen Podcasting-Programmen, zum Beispiel podhost oder podmaker. Das Programm podproducer (www.podproducer.net) dagegen ist ein Freeware-Programm. Es reicht in der Regel vollkommen aus, sich mit einem Schnittprogramm vertraut zu machen. Der anschließende technische Teil, also das Konvertieren der AudioDateien passend zu Plattform und Feedern sowie Upload und Platzierung auf der jeweiligen Plattform fallen dann in der Regel tatsächlich unter den Aufgabenbereich des Online-Redakteurs. Selbiges gilt natürlich auch für das Hochladen und ggf. Konvertieren von TVBeiträgen für Vidcasts.

B Lektion 4

321

Lektion 5: Journalist & Redaktion

B Lektion 5

Wer crossmedial arbeitet, steht vor der Herausforderung einen Inhalt so aufzubereiten, dass er dem Medium, in dem er publiziert werden soll, entspricht, und genauso der Zielgruppe, die dieses Medium und dieser Inhalt ansprechen sollen. Dabei ist zu beachten, dass das Wissensmonopol der Journalisten längst hinfällig geworden ist. In der westlichen Welt kann durchaus von einer Wissenswelt gesprochen werden, Wissen stellt kein Exklusivgut mehr dar, das Internet ist zur Weltbibliothek avanciert. Das bedeutet für den Journalisten, er muss die Inhalte so aufbereiten, dass seine Publikation am ehesten den Geschmack seiner Zielgruppe trifft, denn die Konkurrenz ist nur einen Klick entfernt. Hatte der Konsument früher nur vergleichsweise wenig Auswahl in seiner Wissens- und Informationsbeschaffung, hat sich dies heutzutage vollständig verändert und muss von den Medienmachern berücksichtigt werden. In den Anfängen des crossmedialen Arbeitens führte der Wunsch nach unbedingter Präsenz in allen Medien dazu, dass ausgebildete Journalisten plötzlich zu Allestätern mutierten, Alleskönner waren sie deshalb aber nicht. Und doch sollte der Print-Journalist mal eben schnell noch die Nachricht für den Podcast aufsprechen (wohl eher vorlesen), Bilder recherchieren für die zusätzliche Bildergalerie im Netz und das alles auch noch online layouten und publizieren. Vorbei die Zeiten, als Journalisten noch Spezialisten waren und wirklich recherchieren und schreiben durften. Der Fast-Food-Journalismus mit Allestätern zog in die Redaktionen ein und ist bis heute auch noch anzutreffen. Mit seriösem Journalismus hat das freilich wenig zu tun. Hinzu kommt, dass der moderne Journalismus als Dialog mit seinen Rezipienten gesehen werden muss und längst nicht mehr ein einseitiger Monolog ist, Foren und Kommentar-Funktionen auf Nachrichten-Websites zeugen von diesem Austausch genauso wie auch neuere Plattformen wie z.B. Twitter oder Facebook, die von den Medien genauso genutzt werden wie von ihren Rezipienten. Was bedeutet das für die Praxis? Es bedeutet, dass der moderne Journalist nach wie vor sein Handwerk beherrschen muss. Bei einem Vergleich z.B. mit einem Maler, könnte es so beschrieben werden: Die Mindestvoraussetzung für diesen Job ist die Fähigkeit zu einem geraden Pinselstrich, Deckenmalerei ist was für Spezialisten. Für Redaktionen bedeutet dies, entweder einen Pool von Spezialisten zu beschäftigen, die die jeweiligen Medien gekonnt bedienen können, oder ihre Journalisten von vorne herein crossmedial auszubilden und sich dabei auf ein Mindestniveau zu verständigen und verbindliche Qualitätskriterien zu entwickeln,

322

die sowohl dem Inhalt als auch der medialen Ausformung als Orientierung und Richtwerte dienen. Das gilt für Profi-Journalisten genauso wie bürgerschaftliches mediales Engagement. Jeder, der öffentlich journalistisch tätig ist und publiziert, trägt zu Meinungsbildung und Meinungsschaffung bei. Darüber muss er sich immer im Klaren sein, gleich auf welchem Niveau er das tut. Damit einher gehen eine Verantwortung für das eigene Tun, eine Reflexion der eigenen Motive und ein angemessener Umgang mit Informationen.

5.1 Qualitätsverständnis

B Lektion 5

Jeder, der sich in journalistischer Form öffentlich äußert oder durch sein Schaffen an öffentlicher Meinungsbildung und Meinungsschaffung beteiligt ist, sollte ein grundsätzliches Qualitätsverständnis für seine Arbeit mitbringen. Dazu gehört vor allem das sorgfältige Arbeiten, sei es in der Recherche, dem Umgang mit Gästen, dem Verwenden von journalistischen Formen. Beispiel: Wer einen Kommentar in Form einer Nachricht vorträgt, täuscht sein Publikum und macht aus einer Tatsachendarstellung einen Tatsachenbehauptung, deren Wahrheitsgehalt nicht bewiesen ist. Beispiel: Wer in einem Gespräch auf der Jagd nach guten O-Tönen das Mikrophon „heimlich“ anlässt, verletzt die Vertraulichkeit des Wortes und macht sich – zumindest in Deutschland – strafbar. Bei kontroversen Themen für eine ausgewogene Berichterstattung zu sorgen, den Rezipienten sich selbst eine Meinung bilden zu lassen, indem der Journalist informiert und nicht manipuliert, ist ebenfalls Folge eines reflektierten Verständnisses für das eigene öffentliche handeln. Gute Qualität definiert sich somit über mehrere Rubriken. Zum einen der inhaltlichen, die die Themenauswahl und Themenaufbereitung je nach Medium betrifft. Hilfreiche Fragen hierfür sind: • Welche Themen finden statt und warum? • Sind sie aktuell? • Bieten sie spannende Aspekte? • Sind sie für die meisten Zuschauer, Zuhörer oder Leser interessant? • Ist das Thema sauber recherchiert? Stimmt alles, was vermittelt wird? 323

B Lektion 5

324

Die zweite Rubrik ist die des Rezipienten: • Für welche Zielgruppe wird dieses Thema überhaupt aufbereitet? • Und was braucht diese Zielgruppe, um die Inhalte optimal aufnehmen zu können? Ein Fernseh-Beitrag für Kinder ist zum Beispiel anders konzipiert als ein Beitrag für Erwachsene. Je nach Bildungsniveau des Publikums unterscheidet sich auch die Ansprache erheblich, sei es in Komplexität, Wortwahl, Facettenreichtum usw. Die dritte Rubrik bezieht sich auf die technische Qualität: Dazu zählen Faktoren wie einwandfreie O-Töne fürs Radio, dramaturgisch gut gebaute Beiträge, für den Webauftritt zum Beispiel ein gelungenes Design / Layout, kurze Ladezeiten bei hinterlegten Videos, Podcasts, Bildern etc., für die Fernsehmacher eine saubere Kameraführung, eine klar verständliche Sprache des Moderators oder Off-Sprechers – kurzum diese Rubrik befasst sich mit dem gesamten rossmedialen Handwerkszeug des Journalisten. Und die vierte Rubrik bezieht sich auf das Miteinander in der Arbeit. Guter Journalismus ist Teamarbeit in einer Redaktion, ist die stete Begegnung mit fremden Menschen, sei es in der Recherche, im Interview, bei der Umfrage oder O-Ton-Jagd. Auch hier sollte ein Qualitätsverständnis dem Umgang miteinander zugrunde liegen. Dazu zählt zum Beispiel der pflegliche Umgang mit der gemeinsamen Ressourcen (ob Kamera, PC oder Mirkophon etc.) genauso wie innerhalb eines Redaktionsteams das zuverlässige Einhalten von Absprachen oder im Umgang mit potentiellen Gästen diesen ehrlich, fair und respektvoll zu begegnen. Die hier benannten Kriterien zu den einzelnen Rubriken sind nur einige wenige, die als Anregung zur Reflexion über die eigene (angestrebte) Rolle als Journalist und das eigene Handeln als solcher dienen sollen.

Lektion 6: Sequenzen 6.1 Montagen, Einstellungen und Sequenzen Eine Einstellung ist das kleinste Element beim Filmemachen. Es ist ein kontinuierlich augenommenes Stück Film das von einem Schnitt begrenzt ist. Eine Sequenz beinhaltet mehrere Einstellungen. Diese Einstellungen müssen innerhalb einer Sequenz optisch und inhaltlich zusammenpassen, sodass der Zuschauer diese als zusammengehörige Sequenz wahrnimmt. Einstellungen werden nach Zugehörigkeit kombiniert, meist sind Zeit und Ort sowie Gestaltung und Handlung übereinstimmend. Auf diese Weise werden verschiedene Einstellungen zu einer Einheit (Sequenz). Das übliche Schema, Einstellungen zu kombinieren: Das Bildmaterial soll im Schnitt möglichst logisch und folgerichtig geordnet werden. The common way to combine shots: In the editing the shooted material should be arranged logically and consistently: 1. Eine Totale etabliert die Situation 2. Eine Haltotale oder Halbnahe führt zu der Person/Objekt des Interesses. 3. Naheinstellung konzentriert sich auf die Person/Objekt Die Regel: Vom Allgemeinen zum Besonderen. Diese Strucktur funktioniert auch andersherum. Wenn man zu Beginn eine Nahaufnahme anstelle einer Totalen zeigt, kann das die Neugierde des Zuschauers verstärken, wie in folgendem Beispiel.

B Lektion 6

Beispiel: In der Kunstausstellung 1. Eine Nahaufnahme eines Portraits (starkes Einstiegsbild) 2. Eine Halbnahe eines Besuchers, das Portrait betrachtend 3. Eine Totale, die den Besucher im ganzen Raum zeigt “Prinzip der allmählichen Verdichtung oder Öffnung” Die Art und Weise, wie man eine Sequenz realisiert sollte immer zum Inhalt (Bild und Handlung) passen. Im kino und im Fernsehen kann man die verschiedensten Arten von Sequenzen finden. Wenn man einige Einstellungen hat und sie mit einem Schnittprogramm kombiniert, möchte man, dass sie ein bestimmten Eindruck bei dem Zuschauer hinterlassen. Um diesen Eindruck zu erreichen, kann man verschiedene Montagetechniken verwenden, die ein Grundwissen über Montagen vorraussetzen. 325

6.2 Zusammenfassende Montage Eine Zusammenfassende Montage rafft die erzählten Vorgänge, indem sie für die Handlung unötige Informationen weglässt. Das wir auch “elliptisches Erzählen” genannt. Beispiel:

B Lektion 6

1. Totale. Eine Strasse in einer Gossstadt wird gezeigt 2. Halbtotale. Ein Auto hält vor einem Bürogebäude. Der Fahrer steigt aus und geht in Richtung Eingang. 3. Halbtotale innen. Der Mann geht zum Aufzug und drückt einen Knopf. 4. Halbnah. Die Tür geht auf, er betritt den Aufzug 5. Halbtotale. Die Tür öffnet sich im 15. Stock, der Mann verlässt den Aufzug und betritt ein Grossraumbüro Im Film beansprucht diese Sequenz ca. 15 Sekunden währen sie in der Realität mehrere Minuten dauern würde. Deshalb wird es “Zusammenfassende Montage” genannt. Gestaltungsmuster einer Zusammenfassenden Montage • Oft gezeigte Bilder: typisch: Kalender/ Uhren als Indikator für vergehende Zeit • Blenden: als Zeichen für vergehende Zeit • Prinzip des Typischen und Eindeutigen: klare Bildinhalte, einfache Symbolik • Wiederholung und Variation einzelner Einstellungen: Trainierender jeden Morgen beim Wecker klingeln, anfangs ist er müde gequält, zum Ende hin schnell und motiviert. Diese Einstellungen können zum Ende hin auch verknappt werden um langweilige Wiederholungen zu vermeiden. • Pars Pro Toto: ein Teil (bildliches Detail) steht für ein Grosses Ganzes (Füsse des Trainierenden in Trainingsschuhe zeigen den Verlauf eines ganzes Jahres,(die Schuhe sind erst neu und weiß, dann schmutzig dann voll Schnee,Laub, Regen oder Staub) Auf diese Weise wird nur anhand der Schuhe gezeigt, dass der Protagonist ein Jahr lang trainiert hat. • Akustische Klammer: durchlaufende Musik oder kommentierender Off- Erzähler

6.3 Beschreibende Montage Eine Beschreibende Montage (auch bekannt als “Impressionen”) stellt eine allgemeine Stimmung oder Situation dar, keine konkrete Handlung. Zeit und Kontiuität spielen meistens keine Rolle. Die Bilder der Sequenz werden nach Thema oder Mo326

tiv zusammengestellt. Bevor der Cutter anfängt zu schneiden muss er wissen was er beschreiben will. Time and continuity usually doesn’t play a big part. The pictures of the sequence are arranged according to theme or motive. The editor neesd to be sure about what he wants to describe before he edits. Beispiel: Der Cutter will einen normalen Tag am Strand beschreiben, er kombiniert also Bilder von Sand, Kindern, Schwimmenden Menschen, einem Eisstand, Rettungsschwimmern, Surfern u.s.w.) Gestaltungsmuster einer Beschreibenden Montage: • • • •

Die Einstellungen sind durch eine musikalische Klammer verbunden Blenden sybolisieren Idylle und Ruhe (je nach Inhalt) Aussagekräftige Bilder und Symbole Es muss ein Ordnungsprinzip deutlich werden, nach dem die Einstellungen zusammengestellt sind.

B Lektion 6

Beispiel: Die Einstellungen sind chronologisch geordnet. 1. Sonnenaufgang am Strand 2. Menschen breiten ihre Handtücher aus 3. Surfer laufen ins Wasser 4. u.s.w. Bis zum Sonnenuntergang Die Einstellungen sind nach Thema geordnet. 1. Essende Menschen, Die Eisbude, Cocktails 2. Kinder die eine Sandburg bauen, weinende Kinder, spielende Kinder 3. Wind- und Kitesurfer, Menschen die Drachen steigen lassen

6.4 Parallelmontage Parallel Montage wird auch “Simultanmontage” genannt. Es werden zwei oder mehrere gleichzeitig ablaufende Handlungsstränge durch “Cross Cutting” miteinander verbunden. “Cross Cutting” ist der technische Begriff für abwechselnd in den Film geschnitten Handlungsstränge. Sie eignet sich gut zum Spannungsaufbau. Die Handlungen laufen am Ende meist zusammen. Beispiel: 1. Totale: Zug fährt langsam in den Bahnhof ein. 2. Amerikanisch: X läuft gehetzt durch den Bahnhof 327

3. 4. 5. 6.

Halbtotale: Zug kommt langsam zum stehen Vogelperspektive: X hastet die Treppe hoch Haltotale: Leute steigen aus, Zugtüren schliessen sich, der Zug fährt ab Nah: X ärgert sich, weil er den Zug verpasst hat

Gestaltungsmuster einer Paralellmontage

B Lektion 6

• • • • •

Schnittfrequenz steigert sich im Laufe der Handlung Einstellungen stehen am Anfang länger, werden kürzer zum Ende hin Verengung der Einstellungsgrössen (erst Totalen, dann Naheinstellungen) Match Cuts Unterschiedliche Rhytmen als Stil, (langsameinfahrender Zug/ zur Bahn hetzender Mann) • Akustische Klammer • Oder jeder Handlungsstrang hat ein eigenes Musikmotiv

6.5 Clipmontage Bei der Clipmontage steht die Schaffung eines Images, Looks oder einer Stimmung im Vordergrund. Um dieses zu erreichen besteht sie aus vielen Reizen und Bildern. Diese Art von Montage ist sehr typisch für Musikvideos. Beispiel: Eine Reise von New York nach London wird in 5 Sekunden erzählt mit Signalbildern und Effektgeräuschen. 1. Nah: Taxitür geht zu 2. Totale: Flugzeug hebt ab 3. Detail: Pass wird gestempelt 4. Detail: Londoner Taxizeichen Generell lässt sich sagen, dass bei einer Clipmontage alles erlaubt ist, sofern es die gewünschte Aussage unterstützt. Das einzige Ziel der Clipmontage ist es, etwas zu provozieren und zu unterhalten. Dennoch gibt es einige typische gestaltungsmuster, die oft verwendet werden. Gestaltungsmuster einer Clipmontage • • • • • 328

Schnittfrequenz steigert sich im Laufe der Handlung Einstellungen stehen am Anfang länger, werden kürzer zum Ende hin Verengung der Einstellungsgrössen (erst Totalen, dann Naheinstellungen) Match Cuts Unterschiedliche Rhytmen als Stil, (langsameinfahrender Zug/ zur Bahn hetzender Mann)

• Akustische Klammer • Oder jeder Handlungsstrang hat ein eigenes Musikmotiv

B Lektion 6

329

Lesson 7: Aspekte der Montage / Schnitttechniken 7.1 Ransprung / Cut In

B

Wie Dir von Modul A bekannt ist, beginnt eine Szene oder ein Bericht meistens mit einem “Establisher”, der eine Situation oder einen Ort einleitet. Der Ransprung ist eine Annäherung daran (Ort oder Situation). Es zeigt das Objekt oder die Person in einer näheren Einstellung. Um den Ransprung zu reaisieren sollte man die Position der Kamera nicht verändern. Man muss nur ranzoomen und den richtigen Bildausschnitt wählen. Beispiel: Ransprung

Lektion 7

7.2 Cut Back Das Gegenteil vom Ransprung ist der Cut Back. Beide Schnitte leiten in oder aus einer Situation, einem Ort oder einer Emotion. Sei vorsichtig mit ihrem Gebrauch in Szenischen Sequenzen. Sie haben in bestimmten Situationen eine starke Aussage. Wenn man sie falsch einsetzt kannst du beim Zuschauer etwas ganz anderes bewirken, als du bebsichtigt hattest. Beispiel: Cut Back

7.3 Motivierter Schnitt Wenn man von einem zum anderen Bild schneidet, sollte man immer einen Grund haben. Dies könnte ein Ton- oder Bildimpuls sein. Oder aber ein emotionaler Gr330

und um eine emotionale Reaktion des Zuschaeuers hervorzurufen.Ein Beispiel für einen Impuls aus der näheren Umgebung, könnte ein Schnitt auf ein Klingelndes Telefon sein. Das wäre ein Tonimpuls. Ein anders Beispiel wäre, ein Schnitt auf eine Person die gerade in einer Szene im Hintergrund den Raum betreten hat. Das wäre ein Bildimpuls. Diese Regelungen sin flexibel und können je nach Ausdrucksweise oder Thema angepasst werden. Bedenke, dies ist eine Erzählweise, die deine Film unterstützt – benutze die Technik um deiner Aussage ausdruck zu verleihen. Jeder Schnitt sollte einen Grund haben. Ein Schnitt kann entweder von einem Ton- oder Bildimpuls hervorgerufen werden. Jedesmal, wenn sich etwas im Bild auf etwas ausserhalb des Bildes bezieht, ist das die Motivation, das Bild zu zeigen, das die Antwort darauf gibt.

B Lektion 7

Beispiel: Bildimpuls

Example: X schaut etwas an, das sich ausserhalb des Bildes befindet. X`s Gesichtsausdruck verrät Angst oder Neugier. Hierbei muss immer eine Antwort folgen. In einzelnen Fällen wird die Antwort nicht gegeben. Dies kann die Spannung steigern. Zum Beispiel würde man in Horror Filmen das Monster nicht sofort sehen. Ein Tonimpuls kann nahezu jedes Geräusch sein. Die häufigsten Tonimpulse sind Türklingel, Telefon, eine Stimme, eine Explosion, ein Schuss usw. Das Bild auf das man schneidet, zeigt die Tonquelle. Beispiel: Tonimpuls 331

Das Geräusch des fallenden Glases, ist der Zeitpunkt, an dem der Zuschauer das Glas zu sehen bekommt.

B Lektion 7

7.4 Schnitt in der Bewegung Der beste Weg von einer Einstellung zur nächsten zu schneiden ist in einer Bewegung. Dieser Schnitt ist für den Zuschauer unsichtbar, er wird den Schnitt nicht bemerken. Dies garantiert eine flüssige Sequenz. Der zuschauer kann sich auf das Geschehen konzentrieren. So gehts: Du musst eine Szene aus zwei Perspektiven drehen. Dafür brauchst du zwei Kameras, oder du drehst jede Einstellung mindestens zweimal aus den verschiedenen Perspektiven. Dabei musst du sehr präzise sein und der/die Schauspieler/in muss sich bei jedem Take gleich bewegen. It is the most common way of cutting in scenes of movies, or TV Series. Beispiel: Schnitt in der Bewegung

7.5 Zwischenschnitt Eine Einstellung mit kleinerem Bildausschnitt ist zwischen Einstellungen mit grösserem Bildausschnitt geschnitten. Dieser Schnitt wird auch Insertschnitt genannt. Inserts sind eine übliche schnitttechnik für Interviews oder Szenen. In Interviews wird er benutzt um einen Schnitt zu verdecken, der sonst Irritierend 332

wäre (siehe auch: Irritierender Schnitt). Oder um eine spezielle Gestik der Hände oder Füsse zu zeigen. Häufig wird er benutzt um Nervositat oder eine Gefühlsregung des Interviewpartners zu zeigen (z.B. zitternde Hände). In Szenen zeigt der Zwischenschnitt dem Zuschauer einen näheren Blick auf etwas. Beispiel: In einem Krimi: Der Zuschauer sieht eine Szene in einer Küche, dann sieht man eine Nahaufname eines Messers auf dem Tisch. Auf diese Weise wird dem Zuschauer signalisiert, dass diesem Messer eine besondere Bedeutung zukommt. Der Zwischenschnitt muss nicht immer einen bestimmten Grund haben, er macht ein Szene auch dynamischer. Beispiel: In einem Interview

B Lektion 7

Beispiel: In einer Szene

333

B Lektion 7

7.6 Irritierender Schnitt Der Irritierende Schnitt ähnelt dem Jump Cut, aber sollte vermieden werden. Er ist ein Fehler. Wenn sich zwei aufeinanderfolgende Einstellungen zu sehr ähneln, wird der Zuschauer irritiert. Irritierende Schnitte passieren zum Beispiel, wenn man ein Wort oder einen Satz aus einem Interview schneidet. Die gefilmte Person wird sich im Bild nur minmal bewegen. Dieser Vorgang dauert zwar nur 1/25 Sekunde, ist aber dennoch sichtbar und irritierend für den Zuschauer. Beispiel: Das ist ein Konturensprung

Wenn du ein Interview kürzen willst, kannst du entweder ein Zwischenbild einfügen, einen Weissblitz benutzen (oft in den Nachrichten zu sehen), oder du kannst das Interview mit 2 Kameras aus verschiedenen Perspektiven aufzeichen, damit du im Schnitt von einer Perspektive auf die Andere schneiden kannst. Die Person scheint trotzdem flüssig zu reden.

7.7 Zentrierter Schnitt In Modul A hast du gelernt, wie man das Blickzentrum des Zuschauers lenken kann. Das Blickzentrum ist ein wichtiger Bestandteil des Schnitts. Wenn man auf das Blickzentrum schneidet, ist die Sequenz flüssiger und angenehmer anzuschauen. So gehts: Die erste Einstellung endet mit dem Blikzentrum (eine Person oder ein Objekt) im linken Teil des Bildes. 334

Die zweite Einstellung beginnt mit dem Blickzentrum an der gleichen Stelle im Teil des Bildes. Beispiel: zentrierter Schnitt Wenn man auf das gleich Objekt schneidet musst du eine andere einstellungsgrösse wählen, oder die Kameraperspektive verändern. Andernfalls ntsteht ein irritierender Schnitt.

7.8 Lineare Einstellungsverknüpfung Ein anderer Weg um harte Schnitte zu vermeiden ist dominante Linien aufeinander abzustimmen. Eine starke grafische linie in der ersten Einstellung, erscheint auch in der zweiten Einstellung.

B Lektion 7

Beispiel: lineare Einstellungsverknüpfung

7.9 Jump Cut Jump cuts werden oft in Filmen oder Kurzfilmen genutzt, um Zeit während einer Aktion zu verkürzen, die in der Realität zu lange andauern würde. Darüberhinaus steigern sie die Dynamik eines Videos, besonders wenn es sich um ein Musikvideo handelt und auf den Beat geschnitten ist. Wenn du bei einer längeren Einstellung ein paar Frames aus der Mitte schneidest, sodass die Person (das sich bewegende Objekt) in dem Bild umherspringt. Du kannst den Jump cut verwenden um zeit zu überbrücken, aber du musst beachten, dass die Kamera exakt die gleiche Position hat und dass der Bildauschnitt sich nicht verändert. Dafür solltest du die Kamera auf deinem stativ feststellen. Ausserdem solltest du auch darauf achten, dass sich nicht noch andere Dinge bewegen. Wenn man zum Beispiel einer lebendige Strasse im Hintergrund hat, springen auch andere Menschen und Autos im Bild herum und lenken von dem Eigentlichen (Person oder Objekt) ab. 335

Du kannst das verhindern, indem du einen Drehort aussuchst der nicht zu sehr belebt ist.

Beispiel: Jump Cut. Der Bildauschnitt bleibt exakt der gleiche. Nur die Person springt.

B Lektion 7

7.10 Match Cut Die gleiche Einstellungsgrösse und ein sehr ähnlicher Bildinhalt werden kombiniert. Der Match Cut (“match” engl für zusammenpassen) ist eine schöne Art von einer Szene zur Anderen zu schneiden. Beispiel: In der ersten Szene geht es um ein Mädchen. Um auf ein anderes Mädchen überzuleiten, wird die erste Einstellung des zweiten Mädchens exakt genauso aussehen wie die letzte Einstellung des ersten Mädchens.

336

Es gibt zwei verschiedene Arten von Match Cuts. Dieser ist ein motivischer Match Cut. Das heisst, das die Motive der beiden Einstellungen zusammenpassen. Der andere Match Cut ist der technische Match Cut. Das bedeutet, das die technische Umsetzung 端bereinstimmt. Zum Beispiel wenn die erste Einstellung ein Zoom auf ein Objekt ist, und die darauf folgende Einstellung ebenfalls ein Zoom auf ein Objekt ist, aber auf ein anderes Objekt.

B Lektion 7

337

Modul C: Trainerkompetenzen

Einführung in das Modul

C Einführung

340

Die Fortbildung MedienTrainer soll Menschen dazu befähigen, adäquat an öffentlicher Kommunikation teilzunehmen und sie aktiv mit zu gestalten. Adäquat meint dabei zum einen, dass sie sich der Medien in einer ihnen angemessenen Weise bedienen können. Das bedeutet, dass sie mit den journalistischen und medientypischen Anforderungen vertraut sind und sicher damit umgehen können. Drei Bereiche müssen sicher beherrscht werden, um eine gelungene mediale Kommunikation zu gewährleisten. 1. Die erste Ebene bezieht sich auf die Inhalte und ihre Zielgruppen: Welche Themen will ich medial aufbereiten? Wer an öffentlicher Kommunikation teilnimmt, sollte etwas zu sagen haben – und zwar etwas, das auch für andere Menschen wichtig, interessant, informativ oder unterhaltsam sein kann. Hier kommt die Auseinandersetzung mit der Zielgruppe ins Spiel. Denn vor der Überlegung, wie ein Thema umgesetzt werden kann, muss die Überlegung stehen, für wen dieses Thema interessant sein könnte und wie der gewünschte Rezipientenkreis medial erreicht werden kann. Hilfreiche Fragen können sein: Welches Ziel soll mit dem Beitrag – ob im Radio, Fernsehen oder auf der Internetplattform – erreicht werden? Was soll die Zielgruppe erfahren, was soll sie fühlen oder denken? Wozu soll sie veranlasst werden? Warum ist dieses Thema auch für andere als den „Macher“ wichtig? 2. Die zweite Ebene umfasst die inhaltliche Umsetzung eines Themas. Welche Facette des gewählten Themas soll beleuchtet werden? Welche Dramaturgie braucht der Beitrag? Welche Fragen müssen gestellt und beantwortet werden? Welche Anmutung soll der Beitrag haben (zum Beispiel eher ernst, unterhaltsam oder dokumentativ)? Wie baue ich einen Beitrag auf? Welche Darstellungsform passt am besten zu meinem Thema? Ist ein Interview ideal oder ein Magazinbeitrag? Welche Stimmen brauche ich? Experten, Betroffene, Beobachter? Was soll der rote Faden des Beitrags sein? 3. Wenn diese Fragen sicher beantwortet sind, folgt die dritte Ebene: Die des Handwerks, die konkrete Umsetzung. Dazu zählt beispielsweise die Fähigkeit, eine Radio- oder Fernsehaufnahme zu erstellen, die den Qualitätsansprüchen des jeweiligen Mediums standhält, z.B. dass das Bild scharf ist und der Ausschnitt gut gewählt, der Ton verständlich und ohne störende Nebengeräusche aufgezeichnet, der Schnitt sauber und die Ladezeiten auf einer Internetplattform von möglichst kurzer Dauer sind. All diese Fähigkeiten müssen Medienschaffende beherrschen, darin unterscheiden sich Profijournalisten nicht von Bürgern, die an öffentlicher Kommunika-

tion teilnehmen wollen. Für beide gelten dieselben Qualitätsansätze, lediglich die Komplexität der Medienprodukte gestaltet sich in der Regel unterschiedlich. Wer Bürger befähigen will, gelungen an öffentlicher Kommunikation mitzuwirken, muss diese daher in allen drei Bereichen schulen und unterstützen. Die Module A und B bilden dabei die Grundlage dieses Ziels. Modul A vermittelt die journalistischen Grundlagen sowie Kompetenzen im Bereich Fernsehjournalismus, Modul B vertieft beide Ebenen und ergänzt sie um crossmediale Aspekte im Bereich Onlinejournalismus. Modul C beinhaltet schließlich das Handwerkszeug des Trainers, welches vermittelt, wie Menschen in ihrem Lernen unterstützt und gefördert werden können, so dass diese am Ende öffentliche Kommunikation über die Medien aktiv mit gestalten können.

Inhalte Modul A Das erste Modul bildet die Teilnehmer im Schwerpunkt „Videojournalismus“ aus. Die Herangehensweise ist praktisch ausgelegt. Der praktische und sichere Umgang mit der Kamera, Mikrophon und Ton sollen anhand kleinerer Aufgaben erprobt werden. Dabei werden die Teilnehmenden mit der Entwicklung von Ideen und Storys vertraut gemacht. Exposeentwicklung und Storyboard, die richtige Recherche, die dramaturgische Umsetzung eines kurzen Beitrags, die Aufnahme, Auswahl von Bildausschnitt und Anschlüssen etc. stehen dabei ganz praktisch im Vordergrund. Die Teilnehmenden sollen sich selbst in der praktischen Medienarbeit anhand der Produktion eines kurzen Videobeitrages erproben. Auf der theoretischen Ebene erlernen sie dabei die Grundlagen des journalistischen Arbeitens, wozu Fragetechniken und das Schreiben von Moderationen, der Umgang mit Gästen und das Kennenlernen von rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen öffentlicher Kommunikation gehören. Ziel von Modul A: Kennenlernen und Erproben des Videojournalismus. Persönliche Fertigkeiten und Kompetenzen erwerben, um an öffentlicher medialer Kommunikation aktiv gestaltend teilnehmen zu können.

C Einführung

Inhalte Modul B Im zweiten Modul werden die Inhalte des ersten Moduls vertieft und ergänzt. Das bedeutet, dass sowohl die praktischen als auch die theoretischen journalistischen Grundkenntnisse vertieft werden. Dazu zählen auf der praktischen Ebene das Produzieren eines weiteren Beitrages, aber auch die Weiterverwertung der erarbeiteten Informationen. Damit ist hier der crossmediale Ansatz gemeint: journalistisches Arbeiten auf mehreren Ebenen, dem Fernsehen einerseits, aber auch die Verbreitungskanäle Audio und Internet rücken in den Mittelpunkt. Wie muss eine 341

C Einführung

342

Story für eine Internetplattform aufbereitet werden? Was bedeutet Publizieren im Internet überhaupt? Wie muss dem Hypertextprinzip und den Erwartungen der User entsprochen werden, um eine möglichst hohe Resonanz zu erzielen? Welcher Texte bedarf es, welcher Fotostrecken oder weiterführenden Verlinkungen? Das Modul B verfolgt das Ziel, die Teilnehmenden mit der crossmedialen Arbeitsweise vertraut zu machen. Journalistische Kenntnisse aus Modul A werden vertieft, dazu gehören das Anwenden verschiedener Interviewformen, das Schreiben fürs Sprechen, die zielgruppengerechte Moderation, das Beherrschen der unterschiedlichen journalistischen Formen, ob Nachricht, Beitrag, Reportage oder andere. Ziel von Modul B: Vertiefen und Sicherung der persönlichen journalistischen Fähigkeiten und Kompetenzen der Teilnehmenden im Bereich Videojournalismus. Kennen- und anwenden lernen von Crossmedia-Elementen für eine internetbasierte öffentliche Kommunikation.

Voraussetzungen Modul C: Train the Trainer Dieses Modul richtet sich an Menschen, die zum einen über die inhaltlichen medialen Fähigkeiten und Kompetenzen verfügen, die in den Modulen A und B vermittelt worden sind. Darüber hinaus erfüllen sie aber auch noch andere Voraussetzungen, dazu gehören im Einzelnen: 1. Der Interessent muss nachweisen: °° dass er über Praxis im Bereich Medien/TV verfügt, sei es durch die erfolgreiche (!) Teilnahme an den Modulen A und B oder auf andere Art, z.B. schriftlicher Nachweis von einschlägigen Fortbildungen. °° dass er möglichst bereits erste Erfahrungen im Bereich Seminarleitung / Seminarplanung gesammelt hat. 2. Der Interessent muss über folgende Kompetenzen verfügen: °° Offenheit und Neugier °° Spaß an der Arbeit mit Menschen °° Kommunikative Kompetenz °° Respektvoller und wertschätzender Umgang mit anderen °° Bereitschaft sich selbst zu reflektieren °° Standing haben für die Rolle als Multiplikator (persönliche Kompetenz) °° Prozesskompetenz (planvolles und strukturiertes Arbeiten) 3. Der Interessent muss seine Motivation schriftlich darlegen und begründen. 4. Der Interessent sollte volljährig sein. Wer als Trainer anderen Menschen Wissen vermitteln möchte, muss neben diesen Kompetenzen auch über das richtige Handwerkszeug verfügen, dazu gehören das Wissen über Lernziele, Methoden, gruppendynamische Prozesse, Seminar-

planung und Seminarorganisation. Vermittlung dieses Wissens ist Inhalt von Modul C.

Modul C – Inhalte im Überblick 1. Der Wechsel vom Macher zum Multiplikator – Rollenverständnis entwickeln 2. Aufgabe und Verantwortung als Medientrainer reflektieren, Annäherung an die zukünftige Rolle 3. Theoretische Grundlagen des Gesamtkonzeptes MediaTrainer 4. Einbindung und Position als Medientrainer innerhalb des Projektes 5. Genaue Kenntnis der Module A und B und des damit verbundenen Anspruchs an den Medientrainer 6. Seminarplanung und Seminardesign 7. Didaktik: Kognitive, affektive und psychomotorische Lernziele 8. Methodik: Auswahl von Methoden (angemessen für Lernziele, Teilnehmer & Trainer) 9. Qualitätsverständnis im Umgang mit Teilnehmende und Produkten Modul C – Multiplikatoren-Ausbildung 1.

Rollenwechsel, Aufgabe und Haltung

Lernziele

• • • • Inhalte

• • • • • •

C Einführung

Rolle des Medientrainers verstehen und Bewusstsein schaffen für die Anforderungen an diese Rolle: vom Macher zum Multiplikator Reflektion der eigenen Haltung zur neuen Rolle Aufarbeiten der eigenen Haltung zum Thema Lernen Bewusstsein schaffen für die unterschiedlichen Anforderungen an den Medientrainer seitens des Projektes Aufgabe des Medientrainers im Rahmen des Projektes in allen Facetten verstehen und annehmen Der Medientrainer als Trainer, Coach, Lehrer, Lernpartner und Autorität: Rolle und Verhalten Reflektion der eigenen Lernbiografie Wertesysteme und Menschenbilder als Grundlage für den Umgang mit Teilnehmern Inhaltliche Anforderungen an den Medientrainer durch das Projekt Reflektion über ein zugrunde liegendes Qualitätsverständnis auf Produkt- und Teilnehmerebene Genaue Kenntnis der Module A und B auf Trainerebene / Theoretische Grundlagen des Gesamtkonzeptes MediaTrainer

343

1.

Jeweils zu den affektiven, kognitiven und psychomotorischen Lernzielen passend, Bsp.: Theorie-Input, Kleingruppenarbeit, Plenum, Präsentation, Reflektion

Lernzielkontrolle

Präsentation, Ergebnispräsentation, Rollenspiel etc.

Umfang

2 Tage

Ressourcen

Moderationstechnik (Metaplanwand, Flipchart, Moderationskarten, Stifte, Zeichenstifte etc.)

Lehrmaterialien

Curriculum / Projektbeschreibung MediaTrainer, Handout zu Menschenbildern …

2.

C

Rollenwechsel, Aufgabe und Haltung

Methoden

Trainer-Tools: Didaktik & Methodik

Lernziele

• • • • • •

Einführung

• • Inhalte

• •

• • • •

344

Unterschiedliche Lernziele (kognitiv, affektiv, psychomotorisch) kennenlernen Methoden kennenlernen, die zu den einzelnen Lernzielen passen Methoden kennenlernen, die zu den Teilnehmern und dem Trainer passen Teilnehmerbedürfnisse erkennen und berücksichtigen lernen Bewusstsein schaffen für heterogene Teilnehmergruppen Umgang mit möglichen Diskrepanzen von Teilnehmerbedürfnissen und vorgegebenen Lernzielen in den Modulen A und B Vertiefen der Kenntnisse über die crossmedialen Besonderheiten Feedbackmethoden für Media-Produkte kennenlernen Lernziel-Definitionen, Zuordnung von bisher selbst erlebten Methoden zu den Lernzielen Methodische Umsetzung der Module A und B unter Berücksichtung der eigenen Trainerpersönlichkeit und unterschiedlichen Teilnehmergruppen Teilnehmeranalysen (Kinder, Migranten, Senioren etc.) Qualitätskriterien für TV- / Audio- / Print-Produkte Reflektion über die Verantwortung bei der bürgerschaftlichen Teilhabe an medialer öffentlicher Kommunikation Kriteriengestütztes Feedback von Produkten der Module A und B als Trainer

Methoden

Jeweils zu den affektiven, kognitiven und psychomotorischen Lernzielen passend, Bsp.: Theorie-Input, Kleingruppenarbeit, Plenum, Präsentation, Reflektion

Lernzielkontrolle

Präsentation, Ergebnispräsentation, Rollenspiel etc.

Umfang

2 Tage

2.

Trainer-Tools: Didaktik & Methodik

Ressourcen

Moderationstechnik (Metaplanwand, Flipchart, Moderationskarten, Stifte, Zeichenstifte etc.), CD-Player, TV

Lehrmaterialien

Handout Lernziele, Handout Methoden, Handout Seminardesign, Handout Qualitätskriterien, Handout Feedbackregeln …

3.

Seminarrealität: Der Trainer und seine Teilnehmer

Lernziele

• • • • •

Festigung der neuen Rolle als Multiplikator Verantwortung in der Rolle anerkennen Feedbackmethoden für den Umgang mit Teilnehmern kennenlernen Resonanzgestütztes Feedback der Teilnehmer kennenlernen Klärung letzter Fragen

Inhalte

• • • • •

Feedback-Rollenspiel Eigene kurze Seminarsequenzen geben Feedback durch Teilnehmer Resonanz durch den Ausbilder Open Space für Teilnehmer-Themen

Methoden

Jeweils zu den affektiven, kognitiven und psychomotorischen Lernzielen passend, Bsp.: Theorie-Input, Kleingruppenarbeit, Plenum, Präsentation, Reflexion

C Einführung

Lernzielkontrolle Präsentation, Ergebnispräsentation, Rollenspiel etc. Umfang

1 Tag

Ressourcen

Moderationstechnik (Metaplanwand, Flipchart, Moderationskarten, Stifte, Zeichenstifte etc.)

Lehrmaterialien

Online- & Hörbeispiele sowie TV-Beispiele aus den Modulen A und B, Plattform www.europeanweb.tv, Johari-Fenster, Handout SelbstFremdwahrnehmung

Modul C – Aufbau und Struktur Das Modul C führt die Teilnehmenden in fünf Tagen durch einen Rollenwandel vom Seminarteilnehmer zum Seminarleiter / Trainer, es schließen sich drei vertiefende praktische Tage an. Das Modul ist so aufgebaut, dass es die Teilnehmenden ausgehend von ihren Erfahrungen als Medienproduzent hinführt zur neuen Rolle der Trainertätigkeit. Dies geschieht durch einen angeleiteten Prozess der Reflexion und der Erkenntnis, was es bedeutet Trainer zu sein, welche Fähigkeiten und Kompetenzen auf personaler Ebene dafür notwendig sind. In den ersten beiden Tagen liegt daher der Schwerpunkt zum einem auf der Wissensvermittlung des Projekthintergrundes und zum anderen auf dem Heranführen an die neue Rolle. Dies geschieht durch die persönliche Reflexion der eigenen Lernbiografie. Aus dieser wird der Anspruch an einen kompetenten Trainer abgeleitet. Dem eigenen 345

C Einführung

346

Handeln zugrundeliegende Werte werden ebenso im Modul thematisiert und fließen in das Grundverständnis ein, wie die Teilnehmenden als Trainer im Rahmen des Projektes später agieren wollen. Das Thema „Qualität im Handeln“ steht dabei im Vordergrund. Da jeder gute Trainer über eine große Methodenvielfalt verfügen muss, die es ihm jederzeit erlaubt, in seinem Tun adäquat auf Situationen und Menschen im Seminarkontext zu reagieren, ist der zweite Schwerpunkt des Moduls auf das Kennenlernen und Erproben von Methoden gelegt. Neben dem Handwerkszeug des crossmedialen TV-Journalisten, welches die Teilnehmenden in den Modulen A und B erlernen, geht es hier nun um Methoden zur Wissens- und Kompetenzvermittlung. Damit einher geht auch die theoretische Unterweisung in den Bereich der kognitiven, affektiven und psychomotorischen Lernziele und den Lernzielen adäquaten Einsatz von Methoden. Auch hier ist wieder die persönliche Reflexion über die eigenen Vorlieben und Fähigkeiten Teil des Seminars, um die eigene Trainerrolle weiter zu festigen. Neben der Methodenvielfalt braucht ein Trainer Tools zur optimalen Vorbereitung auf seine Seminare. Die Teilnehmeranalyse und das sinnvolle Verwerten der Ergebnisse soll dabei den künftigen Trainern Sicherheit für ihre eigene Seminarvorbereitung vermitteln. Um später in den Modulen A und B angemessen mit Teilnehmern und ihren Produkten umgehen zu können, werden in Modul C Indikatoren für die Qualität von Radio-, TV- und Online-Produkte entwickelt, deren Anwendung die Teilnehmer im Seminar ausprobieren können, um so praktische Erfahrung in Bezug auf ihre Rolle sammeln zu können. Um die entwickelten Indikatoren angemessen an spätere Teilnehmer vermitteln zu können und die eigene Feedbackkompetenz zu festigen, wird dem Einüben von Feedback und dem Umgang mit Teilnehmern in sensiblen Situationen ein weiterer Schwerpunkt gewidmet. Der Abschluss des Moduls schließlich führt alles Erlernte zusammen in eine Reflexion der angestrebten Trainerrolle und dem persönlichen Feedback durch den jeweiligen Ausbilder / die jeweilige Ausbilderin.

Lektion 1: Rollenwechsel: Aufgabe & Haltung 1.1 Kompetenzen Wer als Trainer arbeitet, sollte über verschiedene Fähigkeiten und Fertigkeiten und eine reflektierte Haltung zu seiner Aufgabe und Rolle verfügen. Vier Kernkompetenzen stehen dabei im Vordergrund: • Personale Kompetenz • Soziale Kompetenz • Methodische Kompetenz • Fachliche Kompetenz Personale Kompetenz Die personale Kompetenz stellt die Person in den Mittelpunkt, sein Selbstverständnis, seine Fähigkeit sich zu reflektieren in Bezug auf seine Kompetenzen und seine Rolle. Wer über personale Kompetenz verfügt, reflektiert sein Handeln, seine Position und seine persönliche Einstellung in und zu unterschiedlichen Kontexten. Als Trainer bedeutet dies u. a. der Rolle eines Trainers gerecht zu werden, sich darüber Gedanken gemacht zu haben, welche Erfordernisse die Rolle eines Trainers mit sich bringt, ob und wie diese Rolle souverän ausgefüllt werden kann, und welche Fähig- und Fertigkeiten möglicherweise noch fehlen, um daraus gegebenenfalls die entsprechenden Handlungen abzuleiten. Modern hat sich der Begriff des „Standing“ entwickelt, der all dies zusammenfasst. Ein Trainer, der über Standing verfügt, hat diese Rolle angenommen und füllt sie souverän sowohl fachlich als auch in der praktischen Arbeit mit Menschen aus. Dazu gehört auch die Verinnerlichung der anderen drei Kompetenzen.

C Lektion 1

Soziale Kompetenz Die soziale Kompetenz verlagert den Schwerpunkt vom Individuum auf die Gruppe. Allgemein formuliert meint die soziale Kompetenz die Summe an persönlichen Einstellungen, Fähig- und Fertigkeiten, die für eine gelungene soziale Interaktion zwischen dem Individuum und einer Gruppe notwendig sind. Da ein Trainer in Lehr-Lern-Kontexten meistens mit Gruppen arbeitet, ist diese Kompetenz von großer Wichtigkeit, da sie die Atmosphäre in diesem Kontext maßgeblich beeinflusst. Wer erinnert sich nicht an einen Lehrer in seiner Kindheit, der nicht über diese Kompetenz verfügte und es schaffte eine ganze Klasse gegen sich aufzubringen? Gelungenes Lernen war in diesen Situationen kaum mehr möglich. In der Wirtschaft wird für soziale Kompetenz gern der Begriff der soft skills genutzt, dieser greift allerdings in dem hier gemeinten Sinne zu kurz. 347

Fachliche Kompetenz Die fachliche Kompetenz umfasst zum einen das notwendige Fachwissen, das der Trainer vermitteln soll, sie geht aber darüber auch noch hinaus, indem sie neben dem Wissen und Beherrschen der Lehrinhalte diese auch in größere Zusammenhänge einordnet. Ein Trainer sollte neben der Fachkompetenz im engeren Sinne somit auch, immer in Kontexten denken können, also zu einem Transfer der Fachkenntnisse in andere Kontexte fähig sein. Salopp formuliert sollte er „über den Tellerrand hinausschauen“ können und erkennen, wo und wie seine Fachkenntnisse und Fertigkeiten von Nutzen sein könnten. Methodische Kompetenz

C Lektion 1

Wer als Trainer arbeitet muss über ein Repertoire an Methoden verfügen, die es ihm erlauben Lerninhalte angemessen zu vermitteln. Das bedeutet, dass er neben der reinen Kenntnis von Methoden auch wissen muss, wann welche Methode in welchem Kontext sinnvoll und zielführend ist. Nicht jede Methode passt zu jedem Thema, Kontext oder Lernenden. Kompetenz meint daher sowohl die Kenntnis als auch den souveränen und angemessenen Umgang und Einsatz von Methoden. Die Methodenkompetenz eines Trainers kommt bereits im Vorfeld einer Lehr-LernSituation zum Tragen, wenn es gilt, Seminar- oder Workshopeinheiten zu planen und dabei die Methoden bereits festzulegen, durch die optimales Lernen möglich gemacht wird. Der Trainer muss also bereits im Vorfeld ein Lernziel definiert haben, den Lernprozess der Lernenden berücksichtigen sowie die Rahmensituation des Lehr-Lern-Kontextes (große Gruppe, kleine Gruppe, Homo- oder Heterogenität der Gruppe, viel Platz, wenig Platz, welches Material steht zur Verfügung, was muss noch besorgt werden etc.) in seine Planung mit einbeziehen, um dann die passende Methode auszuwählen. Ist all dies gegeben, verfügt der Trainer über Methodenkompetenz. Feedback-Kompetenz Diese Kompetenz umfasst die Fähigkeit des Trainers dem Lernenden angemessen Rückmeldung über seinen Lernprozess oder sein Lernergebnis geben zu können. Ein Beispiel: Ein Teilnehmender hat eine Moderation geschrieben und aufgenommen. Er möchte wissen, ob diese so in Ordnung ist. Der Trainer greift bei der Bewertung der Moderation auf die eigene Fachkompetenz zurück und kann inhaltlich die Frage beantworten. Die Feedbackkompetenz meint aber das WIE der Rückmeldung. Wie der Trainer dem Lernenden erklärt, was schon gut ist und was noch verbessert werden kann. Der eigenen Feedbackkompetenz liegt immer eine Haltung

348

gegenüber sich selbst und anderen zugrunde. Bin ich konstruktiv und wertschätzend in meiner Rückmeldung, oder eher belehrend und dünkelhaft?

1.2 Anspruch & Haltung des Trainers Aus diesen vier bzw. fünf Kernkompetenzen lässt sich der Anspruch an den Trainer ableiten, sich selbst immer wieder in seiner Rolle und seinen Kompetenzen zu reflektieren, seine Fähig- und Fertigkeiten auszubauen, weltoffen und fortbildungswillig zu sein und als Lehrender immer wieder auch zum Lernenden zu werden. In der persönlichen Reflexion ist die Auseinandersetzung mit dem eigenen Handeln zugrunde liegenden Menschenbild unumgänglich. Menschenbilder “Welches Bild sich jemand von sich und anderen Menschen macht, hängt von seinem (und der anderen) Platz in der Gesellschaft ab und wirkt auf die Abgebildeten zurück.”1 Jeder Mensch – und damit auch jeder Trainer! – trägt ein bestimmtes Bild von der Welt und den Menschen in sich. Dieses Bild wird u.a. bestimmt von folgenden Fragen: Was ist der Mensch? Welche Werte hat er? Woran glaubt er? Dieses Bild und die daraus resultierende Haltung, die innere Einstellung, bestimmen die Sicht des einzelnen (Menschen) und sein Handeln. Für den Trainer bedeutet dies, dass auch die Wahl seiner Methoden und sein Umgang mit Lernenden vorgeprägt sind. Das dem eigenen Denken und Handeln zugrundeliegende Menschenbild ist nicht immer bewusst gewählt. Es kommt kann aber zum Beispiel bei der Bewertung bestimmter Sachverhalte zum Vorschein. Wenn Menschen in den Kategorien stark/schwach beurteilt werden, spricht das für ein eher biologistisches Menschenbild. Noch heute wird in vielen Kontexten, gerade in der westlichen Welt, der Wert eines Menschen mit seiner Leistung verknüpft. Das führt zum Beispiel dazu, dass Menschen, die nichts leisten (können), sich oft minderwertig fühlen. Ein Phänomen, das häufig bei arbeitslosen Menschen vorkommt. Auch in Lernkontexten gibt es diese Verknüpfung. Diese kann dazu führen kann, dass z.B. Kinder, die schlechter in der Schule sind, weniger Selbstbewusstsein entwickeln als gute Schüler. Wer als Trainer arbeitet, sollte sich daher genau darüber im Klaren sein, welches Menschenbild er in sich trägt und mit in seinen Unterricht nimmt. Zudem wie die-

C Lektion 1

1

(cf. Förster, Wolfgang: Humanismus. In: Hans J. Sandkühler u.a. (Ed.): Europäische Enzyklopädie zu Philosophie und Wissenschaften, Band 3, p. 358 f.)

349

ses Bild sein Lehren und die Lernenden beeinflussen kann. Daher soll an dieser Stelle ein kurzer Exkurs über die gängigsten Menschenbilder erfolgen: Humanistisches Welt- und Menschenbild

C Lektion 1

Humanismus bezeichnet die Gesamtheit der Ideen von „Menschlichkeit“ und des Strebens danach, das menschliche Dasein zu verbessern. Daraus leiten sich folgende Grundüberzeugungen ab: • Die Würde des Menschen, seine Persönlichkeit und sein Leben müssen respektiert werden. Das meint zum einen Respekt vor der „Andersheit des Anderen“ (E. Levinas) zu haben und bezieht sich zum anderen auf das Konzept der „persönlichen Souveränität“ (vgl. Hilarion Petzold). • Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit sich zu bilden und weiter zu entwickeln. • Die schöpferischen Kräfte des Menschen sollen sich entfalten können. • Die menschliche Gesellschaft soll in einer fortschreitenden Höherentwicklung die Würde und Freiheit des einzelnen Menschen gewährleisten. Biologistisches Menschenbild Die folgenden Klassifizierungen bilden oft die Grundlage rassistischer Überzeugungen: • Herrenrasse (nach Kriterien) • Prinzip der Stärke (Der Stärkere überlebt) • psychische „Störungen“ (Abweichungen vorher definierter Normen) werden als biochemische Probleme aufgefasst und so behandelt (Elektroschock oder Medikamente statt Psychotherapie oder Akzeptanz; z.B.: Homosexualität als Krankheit definieren und behandeln) Mechanistisches Welt- & Menschenbild • Der Mensch als Maschine (mit Störfaktoren) • Der Mensch muss „funktionieren“; er geht „kaputt“, er hat eine „Störung“ • Der Mensch ist determiniert & vorhersagbar in seiner Aufgabe & Funktion • Zielt auf eine technische Beherrschung der Natur Die Darstellung von der Welt- und Menschenbildern ist an dieser Stelle eng gefasst und wenig differenziert betrachtet. Die Teilnehmenden sollen Bezug zu diesen Wertvorstellungen nehmen. Die eigene Sicht verdeutlichen und diskutieren.

1.3 Wer bin ich als Trainer? Wie führt ein Trainer seine Gruppe? Wie tritt er auf? Wie möchte er wahrgenommen werden? Wo positioniert er sich selbst innerhalb des gruppendynamischen 350

Geflechts? Wer als Trainer arbeitet, hat eine bestimmte Vorstellung von sich selbst, seinem Handeln und Wirken, ein so genanntes “Selbstbild“. Die Teilnehmenden machen sich wiederum auch ein Bild vom Trainer, das so genannte “Fremdbild“. Oft sind Selbstbild und Fremdbild nicht deckungsgleich, das heißt ein Mensch empfindet seine Wirkung auf andere anders als diese es tun. Das einfachste Beispiel ist ein schüchterner Mensch, der aber von anderen als arrogant wahrgenommen wird. Je stimmiger Selbst- und Fremdbild sind, umso höher ist die persönliche Sicherheit, der Trainer „weiß“, wie er wahrgenommen wird und kann darauf vertrauen. Genauso hat auch jeder Teilnehmer ein Bild von sich, das durchaus auch mit einer Fremdwahrnehmung kollidieren kann. Beispiel: Der Teilnehmer (ein angehender Moderator) empfindet seine Außenwirkung schon als sehr souverän und fit und will unbedingt vor die Kamera. Der Trainer dagegen ist der Meinung, dass der Moderator in spe noch mindestens fünf Übungsmoderationen braucht, bevor er souverän genug vor einer Kamera auftreten kann. Die Sozialpsychologen Joseph Luft und Harry Ingram haben das Phänomen Selbst- und Fremdwahrnehmung griffig in ein Schaubild gefasst: Mir bekannt

Mir unbekannt

Anderen bekannt

Öffentliche Person A

Blinder Fleck B

Anderen unbekannt

Mein Geheimnis Private Person (was ich vor anderen verberge) C

Das unbewusste Wissen (Talente, Fähigkeiten, Begabungen…) D

C Lektion 1

Selbst- und Fremdwahrnehmung: A: Öffentliche Person: zeigt ein Verhalten, das einer Person selbst und anderen auch bekannt ist. Hier fühlen wir uns sicher, es gibt keine Diskrepanz zwischen der Selbst- und der Fremdwahrnehmung. B: Der Blinde Fleck der Selbstwahrnehmung zeigt Verhaltensweisen, Gewohnheiten, Vorurteile, Zu- oder Abneigungen, die der Person selbst nicht bekannt sind, von anderen aber wahrgenommen werden. Hier finden sich oft auch bestimmte Schrullen oder Eigenheiten, z.B. dass jemand immer mit seinem Bein wippt, aber das selbst gar nicht merkt. 351

C Lektion 1

352

C: Private Person, auch Das Geheimnis oder der Bereich des Verbergens genannt, beinhaltet Dinge, die eine Person bewusst vor anderen verbirgt (heimliche Wünsche, Ansichten und Meinungen etc.). Die private Person gewährt nur ausgewählten Menschen Einblick, z.B. dem Partner/der Partnerin, engen Freunden etc. Selbst hier gibt es allerdings eine Grenze, hinter die niemand darf. Dort verbergen sich oft Ängste, Scham oder Schuld, Wünsche oder Leidenschaften, die die Person für sich behält. D: Das Unbewusste: Dieser Bereich ist weder der Person noch anderen bekannt. Mit Hilfe der Tiefenpsychologie kann man diesen Bereich erschließen. Für den Trainer kann es hilfreich sein, Selbst- und Fremdwahrnehmung regelmäßig auf Stimmigkeit oder Diskrepanz zu überprüfen. Als geeignetes und praxiserprobtes Werkzeug dienen z.B. Feedback-Bögen, die nach einem Workshop oder Seminar an die Teilnehmenden verteilt werden. Wird auf diesem Bogen explizit danach gefragt, wie der Trainer in seiner Rolle und seinen Kompetenzen (Fach-, Sozial-, Feedback-, Personal- und Methodenkompetenz) wahrgenommen wurde, erhält der Trainer wertvolles Material für seine eigene Reflexion. Sollte ein Trainer zum Beispiel ein Seminar als sehr stimmig und gelungen empfinden, in den Feedbackbögen aber das Gegenteil lesen, gibt ihm das konkrete Hinweise auf seine blinden Flecken und Einschätzungen. Aber es gilt auch: Es gibt keine absolute Wahrheit. Rückmeldungen sollten also immer als das gesehen werden, was sie sind: persönliche, individuelle Momentaufnahmen und Einschätzungen, keine Wahrheiten oder Fakten. Nicht nur für den Trainer sind Rückmeldungen hilfreich, auch Lernende brauchen sie, damit sie ihr eigenes Lernen und ihre Fortschritte einschätzen können. Das geschieht in einem Workshop in der Regel permanent durch Hilfestellung oder Lob, Anweisung oder Tadel. Manchmal kann es aber auch hilfreich sein, Teilnehmende in die Selbstreflexion einzuladen, zum Beispiel mithilfe folgender Tabelle. Wichtig dabei ist, dass diese Tabelle ausschließlich für den Lernenden ist und ihm als Hilfe dienen kann, wenn er möchte. Reflexion ist eine persönliche und freiwillige Handlung, sie kann weder verordnet noch erzwungen werden. Der Trainer kann allenfalls in die Reflexion einladen.

Sichernde Einschät-

Entwicklungsein-

zung (was kann ich schon)

schätzung (Was muss ich noch lernen)

Fachkompetenzen (zum Beispiel: • Experimentierfreudigkeit • Beschreiben können • Umgang mit Technik • Unterschiedliche Darstellungsformen kennen und anwenden können) Soziale Kompetenzen (zum Beispiel: • Aufmerksam sein (mit offenen Augen durch die Welt gehen) • Mitteilungswille / Radio ist Kommunikation • Interesse an anderen Menschen haben • Respekt vor der Andersheit des Anderen • Sich einlassen können • Mit anderen zusammenarbeiten und Spaß daran haben • Vertrauen in das Team haben)

C Lektion 1

Personale Kompetenzen (zum Beispiel: • Neugierde • Lust aufs Geschichten erzählen haben / Worte finden • Experimentierfreude • Kreativität zulassen • Sich seiner eigenen Rolle bewusst sein • Warum mache ich Medienarbeit? • Bereitschaft zu lernen und Neues kennen zu lernen • Andere berühren können, Stimmung transportieren)

Auch ein Trainer sollte genaue Vorstellungen von seinen Kompetenzen und eventuellen Lücken haben, und das möglichst bevor er einen Workshop gibt oder ein Seminar hält. 353

1.4 Trainertypen Wer bin ich, wenn ich unterrichte? Das Ziel ist klar: Inhalte sollen vermittelt werden, Teilnehmende sollen lernen. Aber wie will ich wahrgenommen werden? In der Wirtschaft werden auf Basis der Erkenntnisse des Sozialpsychologen Kurt Lewin vor allem drei Führungsstile unterschieden, die hier kurz vorgestellt werden, da sie sich in Teilen auch auf die Rolle des Trainers übertragen lassen. Der autoritäre oder hierarchische Führungsstil

C Lektion 1

Hier gibt es eine klare Top-Down-Struktur: der Chef, Vorgesetzte oder Trainer gibt Anweisungen, verteilt Aufgaben, ohne die Befehlsempfänger (ob Angestellter der Schüler) um ihre Meinung zu fragen. Die Hierarchie ist geklärt, der Untergebene hat zu gehorchen. Werden Fehler gemacht, wird eher bestraft als geholfen. Eine Fehlerfreundlichkeit ist nicht vorhanden. Dieser Führungsstil ist auch als Lehrstil an Schulen bis weit ins 20. Jahrhundert hinein üblich gewesen. Absoluter Gehorsam und Respekt durch Schüler wurde verlangt, Prügelstrafe, Nachsitzen, die Arbeit mit Versagensängsten waren Methoden, um Gehorsam und Fleiß seitens der Schüler zu gewährleisten. Der demokratische oder kooperative Führungsstil Wer so führt, bezieht Untergebene und Weisungsempfänger in die Arbeit mit ein. Er sucht den Austausch, wünscht sich ein sachliches Einbringen der Mitarbeiter in Form von konstruktiven Vorschlägen, Ideen etc. Durch das Einbeziehen der Mitarbeiter steigen oftmals sowohl ihre Motivation als auch ihre Leistungsbereitschaft, die selbstwirksam in die Arbeit eingebunden werden. Eine höhere Identifikation mit der Arbeit / dem Unternehmen kann die Folge sein. Dennoch bleiben auch bei diesem Stil die Kompetenzen klar geregelt, das bedeutet letztendlich ist auch dieser Führungsstil hierarchisch angelegt. Für einen Trainer kann dies bedeuten, die Lernenden in ihrem Prozess zu begleiten und sich darauf einzulassen, dass sie das Tempo mitbestimmen und einen Anspruch darauf haben in ihrem Lernen methodisch optimal unterstützt zu werden. Gleichzeitig bleibt der Trainer aber auch dem Rahmen (gesetzt durch den Auftraggeber) und den vereinbarten Zielen (Was muss bis wann vermittelt worden sein?) verpflichtet und muss diesen unterschiedlichen Ansprüchen gerecht werden. Der Laissez-faire-Führungsstil Er ist das Gegenteil des autoritären Stils, denn er gewährt den Mitarbeitern größtmögliche Freiheiten, lässt sie sowohl ihre Arbeit als auch Organisation bestim-

354

men, es gibt wenig geregelte Abläufe, alles passiert irgendwie, der Chef lehnt seine Rolle ab und übernimmt keine Verantwortung. Auch dieser Führungsstil hat sich im vergangenen Jahrhundert in Bildungs- und Erziehungssystemen wieder gefunden: die antiautoritäre Erziehung, Schulformen ohne Lehrer als Autoritätspersonen, die Abkehr vom Leistungsprinzip waren eine Antwort auf den autoritären Stil. Es gibt weitere Führungsstile, die mehr oder minder Mischformen dieser drei darstellen. Ein Stil jedoch hat sich dabei vor allem auf der Trainerebene herauskristallisiert, nämlich Der fördernde Stil Bei ihm steht das Wirken des Trainers im Mittelpunkt, der seinerseits die Lernenden klar fokussiert. Das führt zu einer Trainerpersönlichkeit, die ausgewogen führt, fördert und fordert und weiß, wann was notwendig ist, die Freude an der Arbeit mit Menschen hat und sowohl prozess- als auch ergebnisorientiert arbeitet. Dieser Trainer nimmt die Bedürfnisse seiner Teilnehmenden ernst, verfügt über ein hohes Methodenrepertoire sowie hohe persönliche Souveränität und Standing in seiner Rolle, da sonst ein Abrutschen in den Laissez-faire-Führungsstil drohen kann. Er sieht sich selbst in der Verantwortung ein Umfeld und eine Atmosphäre zu schaffen, in der Lehren und Lernen möglich ist, ohne dabei seine Aufgaben und Ziele aus dem Blick zu verlieren.

C Lektion 1

355

Lektion 2: Trainer-Tools: Didaktik & Methodik 2.1 Was bedeutet gelungenes Lehren und Lernen?

C Lektion 2

Trainer und Teilnehmende begegnen sich in Lehr-Lern-Kontexten, an die verschiedene Qualitätsansprüche gestellt werden können. • Wie definiert sich gelungenes Lehren und Lernen? • Wie misst der Trainer den Erfolg seiner Arbeit? Traditionell, und so kennen wir es auch aus der Schule, werden Lehr-/Lernziele entwickelt und vorgegeben. Das Erreichen dieser Ziele wird mit Lernstandskontrollen überprüft, z.B. Klausuren, Prüfungen usw. Diese Art der Wissensvermittlung setzt beim Trainer und seinen Zielen an. Er definiert, was ein Teilnehmer können muss und fragt dieses Wissen oder die zu erlernende Fähigkeit zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt ab. Diese Art des Lehr-Lernens sagt allerdings nichts über die Qualität des Lernprozesses beim einzelnen Teilnehmer aus. Um diese fassbar zu machen, sind bestimmte Fragestellungen hilfreich. Beispiel: Hat der Teilnehmer Spaß gehabt? War er motiviert? Konnte er gut folgen? Ist der Lehrende auf die individuellen Bedürfnisse der Lernenden eingegangen? Weitere Indikatoren für gelungenes Lernen können sein, ob es eine hohe oder niedrige Abbrecherquote im Kurs gab, ob Teilnehmende danach – wie in diesem Fall – in dem medialen Bereich aktiv geworden sind, ob sie als Multiplikatoren fungiert haben, haben sie anderen davon erzählt, wie toll der Kurs / die Erfahrung etc. war. Diese Sichtweise unterscheidet sich gravierend von klassischen Lehr-Modellen, denn sie fokussiert den Lernprozess des Einzelnen und gesteht ihm sein Recht auf gelungenes Lernen zu. Damit verabschiedet sie sich von der überkommenen Vorstellung, dass eine Lehrmethode für alle Lernenden passt, dass der Lehrende sich auf die reine Vermittlung von Inhalten beziehen kann, ohne die Bedürfnisse von Lernenden zu berücksichtigen. Für den Trainer bedeutet dies im Umkehrschluss, er muss neben seinen definierten Lernzielen methodische und didaktische Kompetenzen und Kenntnisse haben, um eine theoretisch fundierte und in der Praxis wirksame Gestaltung und Unterstützung von Lern- und Lehrprozessen gewährleisten zu können. Um eine Vermittlung solcher Kenntnisse geht es neben der Vertiefung der fachlichen medialen Inhalte in Modul C.

356

2.2 Lernziele Die Lernpsychologie oder auch die pädagogische Psychologie befassen sich seit längerem mit den unterschiedlichen Ebenen des Lernens, eine ausführliche Thematisierung würde hier zu weit führen. Den Lernenden in seinem individuellen Prozess zu unterstützen, ihn selbst lernen zu lassen anstatt ihn einfach zu belehren, das ist ein Anspruch, der an moderne Wissensvermittlung gestellt werden darf. Dieser Anspruch an das Lehren lässt sich zum Beispiel auf den Ebenen der Methodenvielfalt, der Planung und Struktur von Seminaren und Workshops, der präzisen Definition von Lernzielen und dem Einsetzen der jeweils passenden Methoden umsetzen. Die Definition von Lernzielen meint das, was gelernt werden soll, und zwar das tatsächlich formulierte Ziel auf Ebene des Lernenden. Dabei sollten die Lernziele immer in Abgleich gebracht werden mit den Lernbedürfnissen der Teilnehmenden. Lernziele, die die vorhandenen Fähigkeiten und Kompetenzen von Lernenden nicht berücksichtigen, laufen Gefahr nicht realisiert werden zu können, sondern im Gegenteil bei den Lernenden auf Ablehnung zu stoßen. Die definierten Lernziele müssen beide Ebenen berücksichtigen, zum einen die der zu vermittelnden Inhalte und zum anderen die der Lernenden, hier konkret das Vermitteln von Kompetenzen im Bereich Videojournalismus (Modul A) und Crossmediajournalismus (Modul B). Lernziele können in drei Kategorien eingeteilt werden: • kognitive • affektive • psychomotorische Für den Lehrenden ist es wichtig zu wissen, in welcher Kategorie sein Lernziel angesiedelt ist, da jede Kategorie andere Methoden zur Vermittlung der Inhalte verlangt.

C Lektion 2

Kognitive Lernziele Die kognitiven Lernziele siedeln auf der Ebene des reinen Wissens und der intellektuellen Fähigkeiten (kognitiv aus dem Lateinischen von cognoscere: „erkennen, erfahren, kennenlernen“), d.h. sie werden über den Verstand erschlossen. Der Lernende kann Wissen abrufen und auch anwenden. Beispiel: Die Teilnehmenden der Module A und B lernen Videojournalismus. Dazu gehört, dass sie auch Qualitätskriterien kennen lernen, anhand derer sie beurteilen können, ob ein Film gut gemacht ist oder nicht (Bildausschnitt, Dramaturgie, Ton, Bildqualität etc.). Das heißt, sie haben sich ein Wissen angeeignet, das sie befähigt, eine fachliche Einschätzung vor357

zunehmen und sich gleichzeitig an diesem fachlichen Wissen in ihrer Arbeit selbst zu orientieren. Affektive Lernziele

C Lektion 2

358

Die affektiven Lernziele beziehen sich auf innere Werte, Einstellungen, Interessen und Haltungen des Lernenden. Diese sollen reflektiert und/oder verändert werden. Werte sollen hinterfragt und variiert oder gefestigt werden. Daraus kann ein verändertes Verhalten erfolgen. Ein gutes gesellschaftliches Beispiel ist die moderne Einstellung zum Thema Lernen: gab es vor fünfzig Jahren noch die weit verbreitete Methode des Lernens mithilfe des Rohrstocks, weiß man heute, dass gutes und nachhaltiges Lernen nicht durch Angst vor Strafe begünstigt wird, sondern dass eine bedrohungsfreie Atmosphäre notwenig ist, um gelungenes Lernen zu ermöglichen. Aus dieser Erkenntnis heraus hat sich ein Wertewandel vollzogen, eine neue Be-Wertung; nicht nur das Ergebnis zählt, sondern auch der persönliche Prozess. Ein Abschaffen der Prügelstrafe an Schulen war eine Folge der gesellschaftlichen Neubewertung vom Umgang mit Kindern (auch in LehrLernkontexten). Wenn ein Mensch sich vor Spinnen fürchtet und diese tötet, gibt es dafür auf der kognitiven Ebene keinen Grund. Die Tiere sind weder gefährlich noch bedrohen sie den Menschen. Auf der affektiven Ebene aber wird eine Bewertung der Spinne vorgenommen: eklig, gruselig, gefährlich, bedrohlich usw. Daraus folgen verschiedene Verhaltensweisen, entweder die Vermeidungsstrategie – das Zimmer wird verlassen, bis die Spinne entfernt worden ist – oder die aktive Variante – die Spinne wird getötet. Beide Varianten sind der reinen Sachlage nicht angemessen. Ein Lernziel kann hier sein, die Angst vor Spinnen zu überwinden, d.h. die eigene Einstellung zu diesen Tieren und die Bewertung einer entsprechenden Situation zu verändern, so dass der Mensch keine Angst mehr hat und das Tier überlebt. In den Modulen A und B geht es auch darum, die Teilnehmenden in die Reflexion über ihr mediales Wirken einzuladen. Ein Lernziel ist, dass die Teilnehmenden sich mit der Verantwortung, die öffentliches Kommunizieren bedeutet, auseinanderzusetzen und eine eigene Haltung zu eigenen journalistischen Arbeiten zu entwickeln. Themen diese Lernziele sind zum Beispiel die Auseinandersetzung mit dem Spannungsfeld von Meinungsbildung und Meinungsschaffung, der Umgang mit der Möglichkeit von Meinungsmanipulation in den Medien, z.B. allein dadurch welche Fakten in einem Beitrag zu einem Thema genannt und welche dagegen weggelassen werden. Ein weiteres affektives Lernziel ist die eigene Reflexion über und Verpflichtung zu journalistischer Qualität. Wenn die Teilnehmenden aus den Modulen A und

B Qualitätskriterien für ihre journalistische Arbeit kennen lernen (ein kognitives Lernziel), sollen sie sich auf der affektiven Ebene damit auseinandersetzen, ob und wie ein aus diesen Kriterien resultierender Qualitätsanspruch in ihr eigenes journalistisches Handeln einfließt. Psychomotorische Lernziele Die dritte Kategorie, die psychomotorischen Lernziele, verknüpfen intellektuelle Kompetenzen mit körperlichen Fähigkeiten. Einfachstes Beispiel: schreiben können. Schreiben ist die Verknüpfung von dem Wissen um schriftliche Buchstaben und der tatsächlichen Fähigkeit diese mit der Hand schreiben zu können. In den Modulen A und B findet sich auch eine Vielzahl von psychomotorischen Lernzielen, zum Beispiel eine Kamera richtig bedienen zu können, ein Mikrophon korrekt zu halten, ein Cutter-Programm anwenden zu können. Methoden Die Kenntnis der unterschiedlichen Lernziele ist deshalb wichtig, weil es unterschiedlicher Methoden bedarf, um diese zu vermitteln, da der Einsatz von Methoden sich nach dem gewünschten Lernziel richtet (kognitiv, affektiv oder psychomotorisch), aber auch dem Trainer und der Zielgruppe, sprich den Teilnehmenden.

C Lektion 2

Beispiel: nicht theoretisch lehren, ohne Fahrübung und Praxis wird ein Fahrschüler nicht Autofahren lernen können (ein typisches psychomotorisches Lernziel), die Kenntnis der Straßenverkehrsordnung aber lässt sich sehr wohl ohne Praxis vermitteln, da ihre Kenntnis ein typisch kognitives Lernziel ist. Wie ich mich letztlich auf der Straße als Autofahrer verhalte, ob ich eher defensiv oder aggressiv fahre, eher zum Risiko als zur Vorsicht neige, hängt mit meiner Einstellung und Haltung zusammen, hier bewegt sich ein mögliches Lernziel auf der affektiven Ebene. Jedes Lernziel braucht seine ihm angemessene Methode. Daher ist es wichtig als Trainer jederzeit zu wissen, auf welcher Ebene das angestrebte Lernziel angesiedelt ist, denn daraus resultiert die Methode der Vermittlung, die Lehr-Methode.

359

2.3 Kleine Methodensammlung Es ist sinnvoll, diese Sammlung mit selbst erlebten und gelernten Methoden zu ergänzen, um bei Seminarplanungen einen Pool von Methoden zur Hand zu haben. Vorstellungsrunde (mit individueller Vorbereitung) Der Trainer nennt den Teilnehmenden drei oder vier Fragen, die jeder für sich in einer vorgegebenen Zeitspanne beantworten soll. Anschließend wird die Beantwortung reihum im Plenum präsentiert. Typische Fragen sind solche nach den Wünschen, Erwartungen oder Befürchtungen der Teilnehmenden. Zudem fordert der Trainer die Teilnehmenden auf sich kurz vorzustellen. Ziel: Positionierung, Selbstdarstellung, Kennenlernen, Gruppenkonstituierung.

C Lektion 2

Vortrag Theoretischer Input, geeignet für kognitive Lernziele, typische Medien sind Flipchart, Beamer, OHP Handouts. Vorträge sollten möglichst nicht nach der Mittagspause eingesetzt werden. Ziel: Alle Teilnehmer zügig auf den gleichen Kenntnisstand zu bringen, üblicherweise schließen sich Rückfragen im Plenum an. Ergebnis-Präsentation Erarbeitete (Zwischen-)Ergebnisse werden dargestellt und im Plenum oder Kleingruppe präsentiert. Dem voran geht in der Regel die Gruppenarbeit. Gruppenarbeit Ist ein hilfreiches Instrument, um verschiedene Themen und Ideen zu erarbeiten. Dabei profitiert die Kleingruppe von den verschiedenen Sichtweisen, die die Teilnehmenden einbringen. Typische Medien sind Karteikarten, Folien, Metaplanwand für die anschließende Präsentation. Kleingruppenarbeit braucht klare Themen- und Zeitvorgaben. Sie eignet sich sehr gut für affektive Lernziele. Gruppenarbeit mit Perspektivwechsel Hierbei wird der erste Teil einer Aufgabe auf zwei Gruppen verteilt, der zweite Teil der Aufgabe dann umgekehrt in den Gruppen bearbeitet. Der Perspektivwechsel führt zum einen zu neuem Interesse (da die Aufgabe neu ist) und rundet zum anderen das Gesamtergebnis ab, da sich auf diese Art alle Teilnehmer mit allen Themen befassen müssen. Zudem stärkt er das Teamgefühl und die Haltung „alle für alle“.

360

Dyade (Partnerarbeit) Diese Methode bietet sich an, um eine intimere und intensivere Arbeitsatmosphäre zu schaffen und fördert den Austausch zwischen Teilnehmern. Sie lässt sich zum Beispiel gut im Anschluss an die Aktive Imagination verwenden. Einzelarbeit Bei der Einzelarbeit werden Thema und Aufgabe vom Trainer genau vorgegeben. Der Teilnehmer muss ungestört arbeiten können. Ziel ist eine Konzentration auf sich selbst oder auf Erlebtes, Reflexion eigenen Verhaltens. Peripatetisches Wandeln Je zwei Teilnehmer gehen in einer vom Trainer festgelegten Zeitspanne miteinander spazieren und tauschen sich über ein vorgegebenes Thema aus. Typische Themen sind der Austausch über Prozess- und Ergebniszufriedenheit. Ziel ist u. a. Reflexion, Abgleich und Austausch. Pausen Sie bieten neben dem notwendigen die Gelegenheit zum informellen Austausch, ebenso wie zur informellen Gruppenbildung. Pausen können als Intervention eingesetzt werden, um z.B. ein Thema abzuschließen und mit Wiederbetreten des Raumes ein neues zu beginnen. Gerade bei erhitzten Situationen kann dies sinnvoll sein. Dann sollte die Pause allerdings mit dem Arbeitsauftrag versehen werden, den „Rest noch draußen zu klären“, damit es dann weitergehen kann.

C Lektion 2

Blitzlicht Jeder Teilnehmer erhält die Gelegenheit in einem Wort oder einem Satz etwas darüber zu sagen, wie es ihm in Bezug auf ein Thema, eine Situation gerade geht. Die Äußerungen werden vom Plenum nicht kommentiert, vom Trainer in der Regel auch nicht. Der Trainer leitet die Methode durch Vorgabe des Themas und der Spielregeln an. Ziel ist es, augenblickliche Stimmungen & Zustände der Gruppe (Frust, Fröhlichkeit, Müdigkeit etc.) als Momentaufnahme zu fixieren, um so ggf. Störungen wie Müdigkeit oder Überforderung transparent zu machen. Stimmungsbarometer / Prozessbarometer Ebenso wie das Blitzlicht wird das Stimmungsbarometer nach einer abgeschlossenen Einheit / Übung angewendet, um Stimmungen transparent und sichtbar zu machen und ggf. seitens des Trainers auf Störungen reagieren zu können. Mit Klebepunkten können die Teilnehmer auf einer vorbereiteten Skala ihre Stimmung 361

oder bei dem Prozessbaromter ihre Zufriedenheit mit dem Prozess visualisieren. Die Teilnehmer werden gebeten alle gemeinsam ihre Punkte zu kleben, um so die Anonymität des Einzelnen zu sichern. Anschließend wird das Stimmungsbild kurz besprochen. Perspektivwechsel

C Lektion 2

Ein Perspektivwechsel (z.B. auf die Meta-Ebene) kann durch den Trainer erfolgen. Sinnvoll ist diese Methode, um gerade Gelerntes auf der Metaebene zu verdeutlichen. Ziel ist es die Methodenkompetenz der Teilnehmer zu erweitern und neue Sichtweisen auf sich selbst und die Gruppe zu ermöglichen. Der Wechsel muss angekündigt werden, sei es verbal „Ich wechsele jetzt auf die Metaebene…“ oder durch eine Handlung, z.B. sich hinter seinen Stuhl stellen, einen Hut aufsetzen etc. Rollenspiel Im Rollenspiel werden reale Situationen simuliert und können so in einem sicheren Rahmen erprobt werden. Das Rollenspiel braucht immer eine klare Aufgabenstellung und Rollenverteilung sowie einen Spielleiter, der auf die Einhaltung der Vorgaben achtet und allen Mitspielern bekannte Regeln. Ziel eines Rollenspiels ist es, dass die Spielenden sich ausprobieren können und ihr Handlungsrepertoire und ihre Kompetenzen erweitern lernen. Klassische Rollenspiele finden sich zum Beispiel in der Prävention von Konfliktsituationen. Gruppenaufteilung Gruppen können auf verschiedenste Art aufgeteilt werden. Die Aufteilung richtet sich nach dem gewünschten Ziel, z.B. Teilnehmer immer wieder neu zu mixen, um ein Gruppengefühl zu unterstützen, oder um bestimmte Teilnehmer zu separieren, um dadurch bestimmte Konstellationen aufzubrechen etc. Eigenverantwortliche Gruppenaufteilung erfordert von den Teilnehmern ein hohes Maß an sozialer Kompetenz und sollte nur dann erfolgen, wenn der Medientrainer sicher ist, dass das Ergebnis der Aufteilung sich nicht kontra produktiv auf die folgende Aufgabe auswirken kann. • Methode 1: Durchzählen 1,2,1,2,1, …. Oder 1,2,3,1,2,3,1,2,3 etc. • Methode 2: Auslosen von Teilnehmern °° Variante: Auslosen durch „Rittersport“ (farbige Schokolade, Teilnehmer nach ihrer Schokoladen-Auswahl zusammenstellen: fröhlich, nett, gut geeignet nach dem Mittagsessen, wenn der Süß-Jieper einsetzt)

362

°° Variante: Hör-Memory: Behälter (Filmdosen) werden mit unterschiedlichen Dinge gefüllt, je zwei (oder drei etc.) mit derselben Substanz. Jeder Teilnehmer bekommt eine Dose und muss seine anderen Kleingruppenmitglieder „erhören“. • Methode 3: Teamaufteilung durch „Anführer“. Diese Methode sollte nur in einer Gruppe angewendet werden, die in sich sozial gut aufgestellt ist, sonst kann es zu Ausgrenzungs-Effekten kommen (wenn bestimmte Teilnehmer als letztes gewählt werden….)

C Lektion 2

363

Lektion 3: Seminarrealität: Der Trainer, seine Teilnehmer, die Ziele In Seminarkontexten begegnen sich Menschen, die in einem festgelegten Zeitraum ein vorher definiertes Ziel erreichen wollen. Beim MediaTrainer sollen Menschen in kurzer Zeit lernen, sich medial ausdrücken zu können, Medienprodukte zu erstellen und über diese an öffentlicher Kommunikation teilnehmen zu können. Damit dies gelingt braucht es einen verantwortungsvollen Umgang mit den Teilnehmenden (Feedback), eine definierte Qualität der Ziele (Qualitätsmanagement) und einen Plan, der all dies berücksichtigt (Seminardesign).

3.1 Das Feedback

C Lektion 3

Das Feedback, die Rückmeldung an den Lernenden, ist die wohl wichtigste Methode in Lehr-Lern-Kontexten, da sie persönlich und individuell dem Lernenden eine Einschätzung seines Wissens- oder Fähigkeitsstandes durch den Trainer bietet. Der Rückmeldung durch den Trainer wird von dem Lernenden dabei oft eine hohe Wichtigkeit beigemessen, da er als der Experte angesehen wird und damit fundiert den Lernprozess bewerten können sollte. Ein Feedback kann sowohl helfen als auch schaden, wenn es zum Beispiel verletzend ist, das Selbstbild des Lernenden erschüttert und in großer Diskrepanz zu dessen Selbstwahrnehmung steht. Deshalb gilt es bestimmte Regeln des Feedbacks zu beachten. Es sollte: • in Ich-Botschaften formuliert sein, • wohl dosiert sein, • erwünscht sein, • unmittelbar, d.h. zeitnah und nicht aus der Erinnerung formuliert werden, • konkret und präzise sein, • Wahrnehmungen (Ich nehme dich wahr als …), keine Zuschreibungen (Du bist …) ausdrücken, • Feedback ist nur eine Wahrnehmung, sie sagt nichts über die Wirklichkeit aus! • beschreibend sein, nie wertend, • wertschätzend und einfühlsam geäußert werden.

3.2 Das kriteriengestützte Qualitätsmanagement Wenn es darum geht Produkte zu bewerten, braucht es klar definierte und bekannte Kriterien, anhand derer das Produkt bewertet wird. Wenn zum Beispiel ein Videotrailer zur Disposition steht, muss es Kriterien geben, anhand derer sich 364

ein guter Trailer von einem schlechten unterscheiden lässt. Sinnvoll ist eine Unterteilung in mehrere Kategorien. Beispiel: 1. Kategorie: Technik Wie ist der Trailer technisch gemacht? Wie sind die Aufnahmen, der Schnitt, der Ton, die Bildhelligkeit, die Farbe, die Kontraste etc. In dieser Kategorie geht es um das reine Handwerk, sonst nichts. 2. Kategorie: Inhalt Worum geht es in dem Trailer? Wie wird der Inhalt vermittelt? Gibt es einen roten Faden? Ist die Umsetzung des Themas gelungen? Wie stellt sich die Dramaturgie des Trailers dar? Stimmig und rund? 3. Kategorie: Kommunikation Wem will der Trailer was sagen? Welche Zielgruppe soll angesprochen werden? Und wird sie das mit diesem Trailer auch? Soll er mehr unterhalten oder informieren? Was soll er beim Rezipienten auslösen? Die drei Kategorien Technik, Inhalt und Kommunikation bieten die Grundlage zur Bewertung eines medialen Produktes, ob Videotrailer, Film, Radio-Podcast oder Internetartikel. Bei jedem Produkt muss es klar definierte Kriterien geben, über die die Qualität des Beitrags ermittelt werden kann. Ohne solche Kriterien verkommt jede Rückmeldung des Trainers zu seinem persönlichen Ausdruck von Geschmack. Und das kann zur Unsicherheit beim Lernenden führen. Die Kriterien sollten immer losgelöst vom persönlichen Geschmack sein, nur so lässt sich eine Vergleichbarkeit und Verlässlichkeit in der Produktqualität erreichen. Folglich geht es auch nicht darum, ob einem Trainer das Produkt eines Teilnehmenden gefällt oder nicht, es geht darum, ob dieses Produkt den qualitativen Ansprüchen seiner Gattung gerecht wird. In einem Workshop ist es immer sinnvoll, gemeinsam mit den Teilnehmenden die Kriterien für einen guten Videobeitrag oder andere mediale Produkte zu erarbeiten. Das schafft Verbindlichkeit und Klarheit und dient sehr gut zur Orientierung in der Produktion.

C Lektion 3

3.3 Seminardesign Ein Seminar wird durch verschiedene Faktoren bestimmt: durch das Thema, die Anzahl und Homo- oder Heterogenität der Teilnehmenden, die Rahmenbedingungen / die Infrastruktur, den Trainer und seine Vorlieben, das benötigte Equipment. Vieles davon kann der Trainer zum Beispiel durch eine Teilnehmer-Analyse im Vorfeld klären, diese kann sinnvoll sein, um sich auf mögliche Erwartungen, 365

Probleme oder Herausforderungen im Vorfeld eines Seminars einstellen zu können. Das bedeutet, dass zum Beispiel über einen kurzen Fragebogen bei der Anmeldung hilfreiche Informationen von den Interessenten erfragt werden können. Zur konkreten Planung von Workshops und Seminaren sind folgende Rubriken hilfreich:

C Lektion 3

366

Zeit

Thema

Ziel

Methode

Medium

Von wann bis wann dauert diese Einheit?

Was genau ist mein Thema, worum geht’s?

Was will ich bei den Teilnehmern erreichen? Was soll gelernt /getan werden?

Wie mache ich das? Welche Methoden kommen warum zu Einsatz?

Was brauche ich dafür? Welches Equipment muss vorhanden sein?

Die Module A und B des MediaTrainer sind in ihren Inhalten und Zielen bereits festgelegt. Jedoch hat jeder Trainer methodische Vorlieben, mag die eine Vorgehensweise lieber als die andere. Auch Teilnehmende können sowohl sehr homoals auch sehr heterogen sein, so dass Flexibilität seitens des Trainers nötig ist, um jederzeit angemessen reagieren zu können. Ein gelungenes Seminar zeichnet sich durch Methodenvielfalt, Abwechslung, gesicherte Lernerfolge, Stringenz und Klarheit aus. Für ungeübte Trainer ist eine detaillierte Seminarplanung daher sehr hilfreich, eigene blinde Flecken und mögliche Schwierigkeiten bereits im Vorfeld in der Planungsphase erkennen und beheben zu können, als diese ins Seminar zu tragen und dort ad hoc reagieren zu müssen. Teilnehmende haben üblicherweise auch Wünsche und Bedürfnisse, die über die reinen Inhalte hinausgehen, dazu zählen zum Beispiel der Wunsch andere Menschen kennen zu lernen, Spaß haben zu wollen, sich selbst vorstellen zu können, Interessen auszutauschen etc. Diesen Bedürfnissen wird ein guter Trainer gerecht, indem er in dem Aufbau seines Seminars und der Wahl der Methoden auch immer darauf achtet, dass neben den Lerninhalten auch andere Bedürfnisse mit bearbeitet werden. Zum Vergleich: Wer kennt das nicht: Ein ewig langer, nicht enden wollender Vortrag mit einer Powerpoint-Präsentation, die zudem vom Trainer vorgelesen wird. Am besten noch nach der Mittagspause, wenn der Wunsch nach einem Nickerchen sowieso schon recht groß ist… Das ist keine gelungene Struktur. Auch in der schulischen Ausbildung weiß man inzwischen, dass lange Lehrervorträge keineswegs das Lernziel sichern, sondern meistens eher dazu führen, dass Schüler abschalten. In der Lernpsychologie wird daher auch von dem Ziel der Gedächtnishaftung gesprochen. Ziele, Methoden-

vielfalt, Planung und ein guter Blick für die Bedürfnisse von Lernenden sind das Rüstzeug eines guten Trainers. Oder, um es mit den Worten Konfuzius’ zu sagen: “Sage es mir – Ich werde es vergessen! Erkläre es mir – Ich werde mich erinnern! Lass es mich selbst tun – Ich werde verstehen!“

C Lektion 3

367

Projektbeschreibung Digitale Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien prägen alle Lebensbereiche, sowohl im Beruf als auch in der Freizeit. Im Unterschied zu den traditionellen Massenmedien, die als Einwegkommunikation angelegt sind, besteht die Welt des Internets aus Teilnehmern, die sowohl Sender als auch Empfänger sind. Nutzer der neuen Medien sind sogenannte „Produser“, eine begriffliche wie inhaltliche Synthese aus „Produzenten“ und „user“. Die neuen digitalen Produktionsmittel sind für die Bürger verfügbar und ermöglichen ihnen, Beiträge zu schreiben, Klänge und Bilder zu produzieren und diese im Internet weltweit zu publizieren. Fähigkeiten im Umgang mit Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien sind in der modernen Berufswelt unverzichtbar. Menschen, die in diesem Bereich nur über geringe Kenntnisse verfügen, müssen auf dem Arbeitsmarkt große Nachteile hinnehmen. Daher ist Medienbildung die Schlüsselqualifikation von Gegenwart und Zukunft. Medienkompetenzen beschränken sich nicht allein auf die Befähigung von Menschen, sich in einer mehr und mehr von Medien durchdrungenen Welt kompetent orientieren zu können, sondern auch darauf, die Fähigkeit zu besitzen, mit Medien aktiv kommunizieren zu können, mit individueller Kreativität Medien zu gestalten und mediale Informationen kritisch zu analysieren. Für die Vermittlung dieser Kompetenzen besteht europaweit ein dringender Bedarf an Fachkräften. Bisher fehlte in diesem Bereich ein europäisches Fortbildungskonzept mit offen zugänglichen Lehr- und Lernmaterialien. Mit dem MediaTrainer ist ein neues Konzept geschaffen worden, das in der Berufsbildungspraxis von Beschäftigten in Einrichtungen der Bürger- und Ausbildungsmedien sowie in Offenen Kanälen im Fernsehen und Radio Anwendung findet. Diese nichtkommerziellen Medieneinrichtungen (Community Media) erfüllen eine wichtige gesellschaftliche Funktion. Sie ermöglichen Bürgerinnen und Bürgern Partizipation und Kommunikation im Bereich politischer und soziokultureller Bildung. Sie bieten die Möglichkeit, für ihre Meinungen Öffentlichkeit herzustellen und ein eigenes Programm zu gestalten. Sie sind zugangsoffen für alle Bürgerinnen und Bürger, für ihre Ideen und Ansichten.

Hintergrund, Bedarf, Ziele Mit Web 2.0 und „Social Media“ haben die Bürgermedien neue Kommunikationsformen aufgegriffen und neue Verbreitungswege im Internet eröffnet. Möglich wurde dieses durch die ständige Innovation im Bereich digitaler Technologie. Die Digitalisierung hat dazu beigetragen, dass sich die Arbeitsabläufe im Journalis369

mus in den letzten Jahren stark gewandelt haben. Der Journalist heute benötigt Kenntnisse im medialen Erzählen und Schreiben für die verschiedenen medialen Plattformen Radio, Video, Zeitung und Internet. Er muss die Grundlagen der crossmedialen Produktion beherrschen. Dieser neue Bedarf erfordert entsprechende Konzepte in der Aus- und Weiterbildung. Die Kompetenzen, die durch die crossmediale Produktion in den Bürgerund Ausbildungsmedien gefragt sind, gehören zum integralen Bestandteil des Fortbildungskonzeptes MediaTrainer. Die Konzeption des MediaTrainer ist von neun Partnereinrichtungen aus Deutschland, England, Finnland, Polen, Rumänien, Zypern und der Türkei entwickelt und ausgearbeitet worden. Die methodischen und didaktischen Elemente wurden im europäischen Diskurs zusammengestellt. Bei der Konzeptentwicklung war es von Vorteil, dass die Partner unterschiedliche Ansätze und Schwerpunkte der Medienarbeit in die Gestaltung eingebracht haben. Sie waren jeweils geprägt von den Leitlinien und Zielen der Partnereinrichtungen, den persönlichen Erfahrungen der verantwortlichen Aktiven und dem jeweiligen Kontext der nationalen Medien- und Bildungssysteme. Die gemeinsame Abstimmung und Darstellung der Inhalte des Fortbildungskonzeptes hat sich über einen Zeitraum von knapp einem Jahr erstreckt. Es basiert auf den Erfahrungen bewährter Praktiken, die zu Beginn des Projekts systematisch zusammengestellt wurden. Im Sinne einer neuen Lehr- und Lernkultur haben vielfältige Aspekte dabei Berücksichtigung gefunden. So ist es durch den modularen Aufbau möglich, gegebenenfalls nur Teilbereiche der Fortbildung durchzuführen und flexible Zeitmuster, je nach den individuellen Möglichkeiten des Anbieters und der jeweiligen Zielgruppe, zu bilden. Das Online-Lernen verkürzt die Präsenzphasen der Fortbildung und ermöglicht zudem Interessenten aus aller Welt, Zugang zu den Lernmaterialien und Trainingskursen zu erhalten. Im Herbst 2010 ist das zweijährige Innovationstransferprojekt der beruflichen Bildung mit der Herausgabe dieses Handbuches beendet worden. Es wurde mit finanziellen Mitteln des EU-Programms „Leonardo da Vinci“ gefördert. Ansprechpartner und Kontaktstelle für die Förderung war die Nationale Agentur Bildung des Bundesinstituts für Berufsbildung in Bonn. Mittlerweile sind die drei Trainingsbausteine der Fortbildung in allen Partnerländern mehrfach auf lokaler und internationaler Ebene getestet und durchgeführt worden. Der MediaTrainer wird jetzt kontinuierlich mit vielen neuen Partnereinrichtungen in weiteren EU-Ländern angeboten und ist in der beruflichen Fortbildung auf europäischer Ebene nachhaltig verankert. Davon profitieren 370

die Beschäftigten in den Ausbildungs- und Bürgermedien, in Einrichtungen der Weiterbildung, Betrieben für Mediengestaltung sowie in kleinen zivilgesellschaftlichen Organisationen (NGO´s), für die bisher nur wenige Aus- und Fortbildungsgänge bestanden haben. Mit dem MediaTrainer ist eine europaweit nutzbare modulare Fortbildung mit Anerkennungskonzept geschaffen worden, die im Ausland erworbene Qualifizierungselemente (Module) anerkennt, nutzt und die erworbenen Kompetenzen transparent macht. Sie werden befähigt, Grundkompetenzen in der kreativen Nutzung und Gestaltung digitaler audiovisueller Medien und des Internets an ihre Zielgruppen zu vermitteln.

MediaTrainer für Europa Der Projektpartner European Youth4media Network veranstaltet regelmäßig Trainingskurse auf europäischer Ebene und kooperiert dabei mit seinen 36 Mitgliedsorganisationen in 24 europäischen Ländern. Das Netzwerk fördert die Partizipation, Kommunikation und die Medienkompetenz von jungen Menschen. Schwerpunkte der europäischen Zusammenarbeit sind die Ausbildung von Medientrainerinnen und Medientrainern, der Austausch von Fachkräften der Jugendmedienarbeit, politische und interkulturelle Jugendbildung sowie die Umsetzung innovativer, medienpädagogischer Konzepte. Das Netzwerk hat es sich zur Aufgabe gemacht, Bürgerinnen und Bürger für die aktive Medienarbeit zu gewinnen, sie zu motivieren und anzuleiten. Sie lernen, sich medial auszudrücken und medienkritisch zu analysieren, um sich an der öffentlichen Meinungsbildung mit eigenen Beiträgen zu beteiligen. Für die erfolgreiche Kommunikation spielt die Qualität der medialen Botschaft eine tragende Rolle. Gestalterische und kommunikative Elemente müssen in einer Weise zusammengebracht werden, die der Rezipient gut aufnehmen und verstehen kann. Damit die mediale Kommunikation der Bürger gelingen kann, werden qualifizierte Fachkräfte, die Medientrainer, benötigt. Sie vermitteln die erforderliche Medienkompetenz, die zur Produktion eigener medialer Beiträge benötigt wird. Im Rahmen der Fortbildung erstellen die Teilnehmenden mediale Beiträge zu interkulturellen, politischen oder unterhaltenden Themen, die sie auf den Internet-Plattformen des Netzwerkes (www.europeanweb.tv) und in Offenen TV-Kanälen veröffentlichen. Auf den internationalen Trainingskursen werden neben medialen Kenntnissen vor allem auch interkulturelle und soziale Kompetenzen erworben. Teilnehmende aus unterschiedlichen Ländern arbeiten in den Lerngruppen zusammen. Nationale Grenzen spielen keine Rolle mehr und interkulturelle Verständigung findet wie selbstverständlich statt. Durch die Auseinandersetzung mit der politischen Realität in anderen Teilen Europas werden national geprägte Denkstruk371

turen überwunden. Auf diesem Wege entwickeln junge Menschen Ansätze einer gemeinsamen europäischen Identität. Sie erlangen vielfältiges informelles Wissen im Bereich der interkulturellen und politischen Bildung. Diese Lerninhalte werden nicht gelehrt, sondern handlungsorientiert erschlossen.

Transparenz und Anerkennung Teilnehmende der Fortbildung MediaTrainer erhalten einen Kompetenznachweis, der nicht nur die Teilnahme und den Zeitumfang bescheinigt, sondern auch benennt, welche Lerninhalte erfolgreich bearbeitet worden sind und welche Kompetenzen die Teilnehmenden erworben haben. Es beschreibt das Fachwissen, die Fertigkeiten und die sozialen Kompetenzen, die in der Fortbildung erworben worden sind. Den Absolventen wird es damit leichter gemacht, die erlernten Fertigkeiten gewinnbringend für die weitere Planung und Gestaltung ihrer beruflichen Laufbahn zu nutzen. Als Formatvorlage für den Kompetenznachweis wird gegenwärtig der Europass beziehungsweise der Youthpass genutzt. Diese Angebote der Europäischen Kommission helfen, Fähigkeiten, Kompetenzen und Qualifikationen in klar verständlicher und allgemein nachvollziehbarer Form auszuweisen und europaweit zu präsentieren. Ein Anerkennungsverfahren hinsichtlich des Europäischen Qualifikationsrahmen (EQR), beziehungsweise des Europäischen Leistungspunktesystems (ECVET) wird gegenwärtig weiterentwickelt. Die Lernergebnisse der Teilnehmenden dokumentieren sich im individuellen Wissensbestand (Bildung), in individuellen Fertigkeiten (praktische Mediengestaltung) und Kompetenzen (soziale Interaktion, Arbeitserfahrung). So entsteht für jeden Teilnehmenden ein Portfolio seiner Lernergebnisse, es ist nachprüfbar und transparent. Zukünftig wird ein europäischer Referenzrahmen für Kompetenzen im Bereich des crossmedialen Journalismus und eine valide Bewertung der Fortbildung MediaTrainer in Form von ‚Credit points’ umgesetzt. Eine Bewertung der Fortbildung kann nur in Orientierung und in Relativität zu vergleichbaren ECVET – Modellen umgesetzt werden. Diese werden gegenwärtig als Leistungspunktesysteme in der universitären und in der beruflichen Medien(aus)bildung noch entwickelt und liegen noch nicht vor. Die Qualifikationen der Teilnehmenden der Fortbildung „MediaTrainer“ sowie ihre gestalterische Produktivität in der Anwendungspraxis im Bereich der Ausbildungs- und Bürgermedien wird dann auf einer standardisierten Grundlage transparent gemacht werden können.

372

Project Partners

373

Project partners Bürgerhaus Bennohaus – civil centre, Arbeitskreis ostviertel e.V. The civil media centre Bennohaus is a socio-cultural and media-pedagogical facility which is open for all citizens - especially for children, youngsters and seniors. Cultural meeting point, art gallery, educational institution and a media competence centre – the Bennohaus has a broad sphere, in the local district as well as in an European framework. The educational institution is an accredited advanced training institution. Interested citizens, participants of occupational media qualifications as well as teachers and media pedagogues educate themselves occupationally through seminars or in the frame of qualification kits. Versatile interdisciplinary and generation spanning projects offer possibilities of self-activity. The Bennohaus organizes and boosts cultural and media pedagogical workshops with children, youngsters, seniors and „multipliers“ which are aligned on a city, national and international level. In the Bennohaus a LLL further education facility and a community media station (TV, Radio) is situated. In regular training seminars, innovative and media-pedagogical concepts for the promotion of political education are put into practice. These seminars offer new professional and mediation competences to workers and volunteers for their work especially with pupils schools and migrant organizations. The participants learn how to work out and how to present political and intercultural themes together with youngsters. Bennohaus is an Eurodesk service point. It offers all important information concerning the program “Youth in Action” and other promotion programs. Internet and television, which is very popular for youngsters, are used intensively and therefore reach this age group directly. The Bennohaus is the office and has the leading membership of the association European Youth4media Network. The network boosts participation, communication, media competence of youths on a local level as well as in the European interconnection. The civil media center Bennohaus possesses longtime experiences in European project work considering the field of ICT- and Media-Competence intercession. Right now it is educating 6 audio-visual media designers. Within the project the Bennohaus realized the project management, the project coordination, the controlling and the quality control. Bürgerhaus Bennohaus, Arbeitskreis Ostviertel e.V. Dr. Joachim Musholt Bennostr.5 48155 Münster 374

0049 (0) 251 – 609673 www.bennohaus.info E-mail: geschaeftsfuehrung2@bennohaus.info

University of Cyprus – Department of Computer Science The University of Cyprus was established in 1989. It consists of six faculties. The university offers 29 undergraduate programmes where 4104 students attend. There are also 1219 students attending a variety of postgraduate programmes. The university employees 443 academic staff and 286 administrative staff (all figures are for the year 2008). The Department of Computer Science belongs to the Pure and Applied Sciences faculty. It offers a Bachelor degree in Computer Science, as well as four Master degrees and a Ph.D. degree in Computer Science. It has strong research programs in computer networks, architecture, algorithms, databases, data mining, distributed processing, artificial intelligence, software engineering, and graphics areas. The manager and personnel of the lab, have extensive experience in the area of e-learning, having participated already in numerous projects and other research activities in this field.The University of Cyprus has played the role of the e-learning consultant within this project. The purpose of this role was to provide ideas and solutions on e-learning for the training courses. Department of Computer Science, University of Cyprus, Prof. George A Papadopoulos 75 Kallipoleos Street, P.O. Box 20537, CY-1678, Nicosia, Tel: 00357-22-892693 E-mail: george@cs.ucy.ac.cy

Bundesverband Bürger- und Ausbildungsmedien The BVBAM was founded on the 2nd of November 2007 to procure political importance to the public and educational media on German federal and European level. The BVBAM is a common governing body which unites the „open TV channels“, non-commercial local radios, free radios, university radios, radios for educational training, TV channels for apprenticeships / advanced training / trailing, open channels on local radio, to give them political importance and to secure their future and enhancement. Through exchange, cross linking, information giving and cooperation among each other, for example considering topics like digitalisation, intercession of me375

dia competence, European projects, the „public media members“ can foster each and commonly enhance each other through the BVBAM. It strengthens the positions of the public and educational media and offers them service and support. Through the bvbam right now there are 30 licenced broadcasting stations as well as some National Associations of Public Media represented. The Federal Association BVBAM assures the valorisation of the product outcomes and especially the integration of the advanced training into the occupational education and advanced training in Germany. bvbam bundesverband bĂźrger- und ausbildungsmedien e.V. Georg May (President) Poststr. 12 D-31275 Lehrte Germany Tel: + 49 (0) 170 / 2922502 georgmay@bvbam.de www.bvbam.de

European Youth4media Network e.V. European Youth4Media Network e.V. is giving young people a voice through digital media. It is a European association of 36 organisations from 24 countries working in the field of community media and civil society. The member organizations form the active European network of communities, youth institutions as well as culture- and media- centers, being places for communication and civic engagement. Together, the youngsters of the European partner institutions organize cross-border networks of youth media work. They promote political and intercultural dialogue by means of audiovisual media. Youth4Media has a wide range of activities on local as well as on the European level. The main spheres of activities include: Political and media education - the new informational technologies offer attractive means of communication which are effectively used in the process of intercultural learning and political education. Young people investigate political, cultural, social issues in public debates with politicians and experts. These debates are disseminated live via internet on www.owtv.de and europeanweb.tv. Extensive usage of modern dissemination tools allow to reach a wide public in Europe. A variety of themes are discussed and presented in films from the differ376

ent national point of views thus promoting intercultural dialogue and exchange of opinions among young people. Media training courses - innovative media- pedagogical concepts of education and qualification in the field of ICT and new media. Everyone can become a ‘produser’ (a term synthesising producers and users). Our training courses across Europe help young people to develop skills in effective use of ICT and new media. All training courses are supported by the e-learning. Participants can become web-TV reporters, new media journalist or even a trainer. In the module ‘train the trainers’ they can acquire knowledge about methodologies for teaching media skills to children, young people, social workers, community media workers, NGO leaders, migrants and senior citizens. Intercultural dialogue projects - local and European events are broadcasted by our European team of youth web-TV reporters from all over Europe. Programs available at web-TV promote democratic values, intercultural understanding, raise awareness among the EU citizens, and especially young people of the importance of intercultural dialogue in their daily life. Training and exchange of experts of the youth media work - media-pedagogical concepts connecting new media and political education are put into practice during regular trainings and seminars. These seminars offer new professional and mediation competences to multipliers and volunteers for their daily work with special emphasis on work with unprivileged youngsters. The participants learn how to develop and present political and intercultural themes to young people in their communities. European awareness; advocacy for community media development in Europe - members of the network are Eurodesk and Europe Direct service points. They offer all important information concerning the Youth in Action Programme and other European programmes. Network members strongly advocate for the creation and development of community media in Europe by initiating European conferences, direct efforts in local communities and establishing networks of media multipliers and youth TV reporters on the European level. International youth cooperation - the network supports mobility of young people by organizing international youth media camps. Guided by trained multipliers, youngsters learn how to produce TV-reports, create short films, compose music, and run live TV broadcasts. Hands-on media work is a possibility for young people to express themselves in a creative way, to present their own world, to reflect the reality and to articulate their own interests. The products are disseminated widely via internet (www.europeanweb.tv and www.owtv.de) and via Open TV Channels in Europe (about 15 million people). 377

European Youth4media Network e.V. Benedikt Althoff, Michał Wójcik Bennostr.5 48155 Münster 0049 (0) 251 – 609673 www.youth4media.eu, www.europeanweb.tv E-Mail: office@youth4media.eu

European Meeting Centre –Nowy Staw Foundation European Meeting Centre - Nowy Staw Foundation was established in 1993. The Foundation supports all social initiatives that aim at building civil societies, cooperation and solidarity between nations. It seconds the processes of democratic change in Belarus and Ukraine and Poland’s integration with the European Union. It promotes Lublin and Lublin Voivodeship as the meeting place of different cultures and nations. The Foundation bases its actions on Christian principles. Through education of all generations it enforces the ideas of democracy, self-governance, social market economy, solidarity between nations and cultural understanding beyond all borders. Foundation bases its activities on the following programme sections: Academy “Złota 9” (political and civic education), European youth cooperation, European information, Labour Market Institute, Community Media Centre, Economic Forum of Young Leaders, Christian Social Week. For 7 years already our Foundation promotes the idea of community media in Poland. It is such an initiative that serves the development of the civil society and inspires the citizens to create a dialogue and to express their own ideas and thoughts. During 2003-2005 the Foundation has created the program of the community media centre. Since 2003 our Foundation organizes journalistic training courses and media workshops for youth workers and young people. Moreover, we realize long –term projects which aim at the development of the vocational training in the sphere of ICT and media as well as projects the main aim of which is to create web TV. In 2006 we began to work on the creation of the web TV channel for the NGOs www.ngotv.eu. We have also created an international web-TV team which is trained to work and cover the events of the conferences, seminars or videoconferences. During the international trainings which Foundation realizes together with our partners in different cities of Europe (Lublin, Lviv, Münster, Orleans, Rishon Le 378

Zion, Istambul, Tbilisi) the youth itself makes reports about culture, community, history, religion and political issues. The majority of these productions you can watch in the internet (www.europeanweb.tv) or at the public shows of these films. We use community media in the political education. We organize seminars which aim at initiating public debates on different topics that are of interest to the citizens of European Union. Moreover we have realized videoconferences with the citizens of partner cities of Lublin, which are Lutsk and Münster. European Meeting Centre –Nowy Staw Foundation Tomasz Różniak 3 Skłodowskiej-Curie Street 20-029 Lublin Poland www.eds-fundacja.pl E-mail: eds@eds-fundacja.pl

Romanian-German Foundation Timisoara Fundatia Romano-Germana (Rumänisch-Deutsche foundation for apprenticeships and advanced training) was founded on the 20. April 1992 FRG-CPPP is a private, non-profit educational facility and has experienced and internationally qualified personnel as well as accoutrements that fit EU standards. During the by now 15 years of work in training and adult education as well as in the frame of 31 international projects, 14400 participants were educated in 952 measures. Of 4297 unemployed participants 90% could be imparted into a steady job after their course. The FRG-CPPPC Timisoara is a member of the EVBB (Europäischer Verein Beruflicher Bildungsträger), EBSA (European Building and Services Association) and is working together with over 100 enterprises and institutions in Romania as well as together with 19 well-known West European enterprises. FRG is a big training facility in Romania and has long-term European project experience. For the accomplishment of the training on an European level the organisation supplies the areal infrastructure. FRO assures the transfer and the accomplishment of the advanced training in different educational sectors in Romania. Romanian-German Foundation Timisoara Nicolae Cernei Calea Aradului 56 300291 Timisoara Romania 379

00 40/ 256 426 780 www.frgtim.ro E-Mail: ncernei@frgtim.ro

ARI Movement Social Participation and Development Association ARI is a network of NGOs with the Head Office in Istanbul. Focal point is the social, media and political educational work with different target groups in order to boost the civil society and civil engagement in Turkey. The ARI Movement promotes civil society participation through the creation and dissemination of information, and also promotes, at the national and local levels, the formation of institutes as vehicles for participation in the democratic process. The organization strives to encourage Turkish youths to implement the values of participatory democracy into their everyday lives. The main expertise areas are Youth, Women Studies, International Relations and Community-Politics. The ARI Movement’s aim is to promote participatory democracy, as well as nurture new social leaders in Turkey. For this reason, it is extremely important to target young people in the age bracket of 15-25. This age group also happens to make up 50 percent of society. In the project ARI assured the transfer and accomplishment of the advanced training as well as the putting together of a circle of participants of employees of NGOs and advanced training facilities in Turkey. ARI took over the spreading and valorisation of the product results for the target sectors in Turkey. ARI 34396 Istanbul Didem Dilda Atalay Defne Kadioglou 90 212 211 90 71 E-Mail: defnekadioglu@gmail.com,

Community Media Association The CMA is the governing body of Community-TV, Campus-radio, educational and student radios, Training-, Advanced Training- and Trial-channels as well as civil broadcasting in great Britain. The Community Media Association has been supporting the community media sector in the UK and across Europe since 1983. It works with its 600+ membership to promote participatory media projects to give marginalised communities a voice and to increase community and civic participation. The CMA has many years’ 380

experience in running national and transnational projects to raise the profile of community media across Europe and to encourage Europe-wide cooperation and peer to peer learning and training environments to benefit entrants to the community media sector. It has significant expertise in the delivery of training on broadcasting (radio and television), internet radio and television, podcasting, mobile blogging, media literacy and using media as a tool to make ICT accessible. Community Media Association Jaqui Devereux Paternoster Row 15 UK S1 2BX Sheffield 0114 279 5219 www.commedia.org.uk E-mail: jaqui.devereux@commedia.org.uk

Noema-CMI Noema is consultancy company with specialities in the areas of enterprise development, telematics, on-line learning, flexible working, virtual organisation and community building as well as development of collaborative initiatives for telematic centres focusing on collaborative work and learning for remote areas. Our speciality is in effective grassroot / regional and practical development and implementation of vocational training, enterprise development, on-line learning, flexible working, and virtual organisation/network building. We are involved in a range of Finnish and Scandinavian educational networks that will among other provide a valuable base for analysis, testing, and comparative studies as well as for dissemination and valorisation purposes. We are also specialised in development and implementation tailor made training programmes for SMEs, project managers in the areas of management, enterprise development, application of new technology, virtual communities and portals. Noema-CMI Anna-Kaarina Mรถrsky-Lindquist Tuohisaarentie 716 FI - 582 28 Lohilahti 00358/15-674472 Email: Anna-Kaarina.Morsky@noema.fi

381

Expert and consultant, Casy Dinsing Mrs. Dinsing substantially supported the development of the moduiles and the learning materials. As a qualified communication coach and trainer for media trainers, Casy M. Dinsing provides corporate coaching for the optimization of authentic and customized external corporate communications, and in close cooperation with the relevant company, she develops crisis communication strategies. She also teaches disseminators in the field of journalism on behalf of State Media Authorities and international projects. Lecturing at universities, she shares her expert knowledge to students of the Communication and Media Studies and of Journalism, and her seminars and workshops make them understand the niceties of effective multimedia communication. Die Dozentin Casy Dinsing Aerbecker Str.8 D-47669 Wachtendonk www.diedozentin.de E-Mail: dinsing@diedozentin.de

Links www.youth4media.eu On-going training courses, seminars and conferences across Europe www.europeanweb.tv Web TV platform, streming online, video on-demand, European content www.owtv.de Open web TV channel for M端nster and Germany, web TV magazines trainer.europeanweb.tv E-learning platform

382

Bibliography 1. Pädagogische Psychologie: Erfolgreiches Lehren und Lernen, Marcus Hasselhorn und Andreas Gold, 2009 2. Psychologie des Lernens: Eine Einführung, Rosemarie Mielke 2001 3. Psychologie des Lernens (Springer-Lehrbuch), Guy R. Lefrancois und Silke Lissek 2006 4. Lehren und Lernen: Einführung in die Instruktionspsychologie, Karl Josef Klauer und Detlev Leutner, 2007 5. Methodensammlung für Trainerinnen und Trainer, Peter Dürrschmidt, Joachim Koblitz, Marco Mencke, und Andrea Rolofs, 2009 6. Handbuch Active Training: Die besten Methoden für lebendige Seminare, Bernd Weidenmann, 2008 7. 100 Tipps & Tricks für Pinnwand und Flipchart, Bernd Weidenmann, 2008 8. Taxonomie von Lernzielen im kognitiven Bereich, Max D. Engelhart, Edward J. Furst, Walker H. Hill, und Benjamin S. Bloom, 2001 9. Wörterbuch Psychologie und Seelsorge, Michael Dieterich und Jörg Dieterich, 2006 10. Die psychologische Situation bei Lohn und Strafe, Kurt Lewin, 1964 11. Europäische Enzyklopädie zu Philosophie und Wissenschaften, Hans J. Sandkühler u. a. (Hrsg.), 1990 12. Developmental sequences in small groups Psychological Bulletin, 63, 348399, B.W. Tuckman, 1965 13. The Johari Window, a graphic model for interpersonal relations. Western Training Laboratory in Group Development, Luft, Johann & Harry Ingham, 1955 14. Das Methoden-Set, Reinhold Rabenstein, Rene Reichel, und Michael Thanhoffer, 2004 15. Stefan Bornemann und Lars Gerhold: TV-Produktion in Schule und Hochschule. München 2004 16. Internet-Journalismus, Klaus Meier (Hg.), 2002 17. Texten fürs Web, Stefan Heijnk, 2002 18. Journalistisches Texten, Jürg Häusermann, 2005 19. Crossmedia, Christian Jakubetz, 2008 20. Qualität im Journalismus, Hans-Jürgen Bucher & Klaus-Dieter Altmeppen (Hg.), 2003 21. Radio-Journalismus, Walter von La Roche & Axel Buchholz (Hg.), 2004 22. Einführung in den praktischen Journalismus, Walter von La Roche, 2006 383

Answers Test A1 1. c 2. a 3. b 4. c 5. b 6. c 7. b 8. c 9. c

Test A2 1. c 2. d 3. a 4. b 5. b 6. c 7. d 8. b 9. d

Test A3 1. d 2. d 3. b 4. b 5. a 6. c 7. b 8. b 9. b

Test A4 1. c 2. a 3. a 4. b 5. b 6. c 7. d 8. b 9. c

Test A5 1. d 2. c 3. a 4. c 5. b 6. c 7. d 8. b 9. c

Test A6 1. d 2. b 3. a 4. c 5. b 6. c 7. d 8. b 9. d

Test A7 1. d 2. c 3. a 4. c 5. a 6. c 7. d 8. d 9. b

Test A8 1. d 2. a 3. a 4. b 5. b 6. b 7. d 8. a 9. d

384


MediaTrainer handbook