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SCP-eZINE quarterly

p h o t o g r a p h y


A r t w o r k : G a b i C o s t e a

C o v e r P h o t o : M i c h a i

l


Curated photographs selected from the SCP Group by Michail Moscholios This is the 2nd quarterly eZine of the Street Core Photography Group. You can find all of them on, and download them for free, from: http://issuu.com/michailfotografia Street Core Photography website: http://www.streetcorephotography.com Facebook address: The STREET CORE PHOTOGRAPHY group https://www.facebook.com/groups/496641317130357 July 2017

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A n d r e a B o c c o n e

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A n t o n i

o O j e d a

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D a v i

d M a r Q u i n t o

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F e r m í

n G u z m á n

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W

hy stop in this picture? Precarious geometry!

Blur it, convert it in B&W, turn it upside down, it will not lose its compositional value. Broken, scarified shapes. Why stay in this picture? Contradictions! Mute dialogues between surrendered humans and their shattered dreams. Cracked, disillusioned reality. Eternal symbols igniting extinguished ardors over and over again.

Why Dzintra took this picture? Because the image was there all the time but nobody else had the courage to acknowledge it. Because most of us know that each framing takes away irreversibly a piece of us, because we become more vulnerable with each shutter release and because only her triggered the devastating game of redescovering oneself through the fragmented commemoration of the past.

From the Featured Series

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D z i n t r a Z v a g i n a

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"S

uddenly the world was flooded with photographs that resembled the image of a

badly adjusted television screen‌a picture's first impact was more important than its staying power." A so precise analysis of what is happening nowadays in photography, one would say. Believe it or not, these lines by John Szarkowski refer to the 1950's state of photography. Fortunately, since then we have learned to accept and to understand the descriptive power of the photographer. We have transcribed with agility the surrealist negations: "Ceci n'est pas un arbre, une fillette, un mur ‌". We have accepted with brio that The Treachery of Images is not a vice, but a virtue to which capitulate and live with. From the Featured Series

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N i k o s P r i p o r a s

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M

aybe I failed to mention: before becoming a good photographer, get yourself a

good editor, or become one! A good editor will tell you that you should not limit your choice in freezing a scene where a kid is throwing a ball, even if the ball is looking like a globe (Alex Webb, Tehuantepec, Mexico). A good editor in you, will tell you not to limit yourself to a passing shadow in the foreground when there are whole worlds to discover in the background (Economopoulos, Cuba). And if you start refusing taking pictures of reflections on bus and train windows; if you put your camera down in front of misery and suffering (the engines of western society); if you realise that fails are nothing more than sparklers; if you admit that all the above are transient, illusory and ephemeral bubbles, then you will probably envy and echo Spiros' work! Spiros is a great editor and he knows how to joggle with both a fugitive moment and a perpetual geometry. From the Featured Series

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S p i r o s S o u e r e f

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From the "Get out" movie 2017: Chris is a photographer. Jim Hudson is a blind art dealer, curator and critic. ____________ JIM: - I am an admirer of your work. You have a great eye. You've got something. The images you capture. So brutal, so melancholic. It's powerful stuff, I think. Believe me, the irony of being a blind art dealer isn't lost on me. CHRIS: - How'd you do it? JIM: - My assistant describes the work to me in great detail. _____________ Of course the allusion was that critics are little, if not at all, related to visual faculties. Having said that, and even if it may seem a dull exercise, let's start describing Andreas' picture, There is this arm and hand with open fingers behind transparent curtains. The light is frontal and the high contrast isolates the arm from the rest of the scene. We then realise that it belongs to a little girl with her profile emerging only as a silhouette. The scene is set in a house interior with the left side (curtains in contre-jour) replicating in the background using the pattern as connecting thread. The image is colour but the approach is black and white with only the arm's skin rendered in bright colours and some blue hues here and there ‌

Description is the first and essential step to arrive at a meaningful judgment. It is the moment when we collect data or facts. We answer the what, the where ... we acknowledge the content and the form. Decoding pictures is a step further: answering not the What, Who, When and Where but the Why (to be continued) ‌ M i c h a i

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A n d r e a s K a t s a k o s

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N

othing new under the sun.

All has been seen and said under the sun, that's why there was (and still is) a huge trend (Meyerowitz, Leiter, Webb, Manos ... ) in contemporary street photography to harden the shadows, implode the blacks, blow the highlights. Looks like sometimes it is amusing, or even seemingly original, to dissimulate flaws and underline beauties (or vice-versa). But then what a fragmented representation of our "dear" subjects this is. Life under strong and permanent sunlight, hard shadows, profound blacks and bright faces, is not ourselves. The persons represented this way are not the ones as we know them or as we meet them fleetingly. The human eye when scanning a scene instantly adapts to the quantity of light around the points of our interest. There is no way to see such clotted blacks or such blown whites with our bare eye (maybe only after getting in and out of a dark room under a summer sun). There is no doubt that the uncanny effect is welcome but how many extremely high contrasted photographs have survived in time (considering that Man Ray's works were photograms and not photographs). These maneristic pictures may look impressive but at the same time this very feature makes them ephemeral. They will perish easily into oblivion. As with all the rest, experiment but don't imitate it for life nor make it a life achievement!

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‌ In photography subjects and objects are most honestly represented under a diffuse light. Photographs found in museums are mainly of a delicate and natural palette of shades and contrasts. That is why you (we) should shoot with care! Use smoothly the contrast cursor (respectively don't over-push your film rolls) and try to include as many details as possible in this precious tiny frame called a photograph. This last bit may be in contradiction with previous ideas (shared also by the undersigned) of using abstraction by reduction and subtraction, of composing by elimination and not by inclusion. But who told you that photography is not anymore a young child full of enthusiasm for experimentation and contradictions. It still is, for our good luck and awe ... ________ Antonio who is working obsessively with shadows, geometry and hard light does his outmost to strike the right balance for all the above. The present picture is one more proof of the photographer's struggle to fiddle with Koudelka's dogs, Webb's gorgeous lights, the own fears and the public's ‌ acceptance!

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A n t o n i

o O j e d a

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F l o r

i n a L u p u t

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G e o r g e S i r s i

r i

s

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G u y L e G u i

f

f

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S

omeone was saying that there is just a tiny probability a teenager Lartigue and a

senior Atget to have known and seen each other shooting at the Bois de Boulogne. It would have been no way to miss each other today with the infinite availability of everybody's work through modern communication tools. And still, my ignorance on so many talented photographers has not been getting any better albeit all the accessibility and ease of information. I am hence not to be forgiven when I prefer to present a picture over so many others apparently better. Curating is as much a private moment (or even more) as photographing. And I may be alone in describing and decoding Henri-Pierre's image, but I cannot stay indifferent in front of a theatrical scene spontaneously created by life, nevertheless, only acknowledged and captured by the author's keen eye. Admire the bent legs and pipes, and the lifeless subjects with the strange glances as opposed to the almost alive doll and the perpetual movement of the drawings on the wall.

Even the gestures and the expressions are so forced that we may easily consider that we all are crash-test dummies in an urban test tunnel. LIfe in a lab-tube, in-vitro!

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H e n r

i

- P i e r r e C h a v a z

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The contact sheet of a contact sheet

Robert Frank's "Trolley, New Orleans 1955" was indeed like a contact sheet … a notion that in the digital era has only an archival and historical use (if any). Frank's image was presenting many different frames, stories, emotions put together in a single shot. A political essay and statement on the American society of segregation. Koushik's picture is the most successful among any conscious or subconscious replications of Frank's iconic picture I have ever seen … In addition, it is more honest, no declarations, no opinions or judgments … (just observing without judging, dear to a particular eastern philosophy)! Only one more thing I have to add … Robert Frank's picture was a single shot! Check out the 81 contact sheets from "The Americans": a single shot, exposure 16, of an ISO125 KODAK PLUS-X film! And that shot was/is the favourite of hundreds of photographers, it made the cover of the book, it made Kerouacq write about it … And my haunting question is: Why on earth we cannot do such pictures anymore? Is it because triggering the shutter means nothing in terms of cost and it won't consume another exposure of the once precious film roll? Is it because no one waits anymore for the meaningful moment to shoot?

Whatever the reason, I think it is time to have every picture accompanied by its subsequent and preceding shots. I need to see what was there before and after. I need a contact sheet. And I need to see why, with all this unbelievable digital gear, we are unable to make a difference, an icon, a meaningful image … I am taking also the liberty to declare us victims of a technology that has taken over our visual sensibility and it just records randomly and accidentally. M i c h a i

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K o u s h i

k S i n h a R o y

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I

t is the end of world as we know it ... and it was so for some years now but no one

seems to care! Do something different than Google's 9-eye monster recording everything on every street! Street View is not at all a child's play. All, and I mean all, street photography at eye level has been done by that gigaphotographer. Why you people are still shooting without bending your knees, without putting the camera somewhere, anywhere, except against your wonderful front scull of divine homo erectus that you are. Why some are still disturbed by a tilted horizon? How an Italian urban facade under a warm hue of summer light is anymore something worth recording? Grow, get connected, use all the gadgets you carry in your pockets and on your tablets and laptops. Use the power of the limitless digital space, use your neurones for editing and selecting quickly and on the money, sort the meaningful bits out of petabytes of raw pixels. Stop composing! Start curating! Throw your ego away and punish your own creations by banning them for a long time. Expropriate yourself from them, then appropriate them again. The more the alienation the better the selection. In any possible way, we posses so little of the materiality of a photograph, the latter being mostly created by ingenious mechanics and electronics. Don't be fooled by the "creative" touch of the photographer-artist and his ruling over automation. That "touch" is nothing more than touching the shutter button! And maybe re-"touching" a universe that never existed and never belonged initially to the author (this is the undersigned's clumsy definition of post-processing).

Thank you Niki for the reminder! M i c h a i

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N i k i G l e o u d i

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I

am surprised how many people (even in SCP) like a silhouette in front of an exotic

beach under a special light (usually a sunset). But why our aesthetics, our perception of beauty only surfaces in situations we do not feel concerned with? Why our liking goes only to "illusional windows" that we may hang in our living room but not hide under our bed for private reading? (mind you, this is not a puritan discourse) The beautiful and the ugly, the important and the trivial can have equal artistic value. Moreover, if there is something left to discover (blame the Greeks and their classic aesthetics for this), it may be found only in the dusty roads, the ravaged buildings and the turfed concrete. We should shift away from the aesthetic rightness and go into the truth of disorder, embrace the revealing and the compelling rather than the contemplative and the placid. Elena uses the buildings shadow to create a zagged crack, a fractured habitat, where the openings are not doors or windows. They are not even post-war remains. Originally "apocalyptic" means revealing, and this picture is inviting us to scratch one by one the layers on the wall and make appear all the devotion to build, all the violence to destroy, all the humiliation to conceal. The passer-by was probably a testimony of all this, and passing by in a hurry is his only hope to be able to forgive.

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E l e n a R a c e a l

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T

he absolute mystery, the "secret of a secret" applied with virtuosity.

The more I approach to see the details the less I learn about the picture. No When, no What, no Where is revealed or guessed. Not to mention the Why, the reason behind the capturing of this particular time and space slice. I can decode some parts but some others remain at the sphere of a nightmarish abstraction. The geometry has a haunting rhythm as does the ghostly figure below, transparent, fused within the texture, already a shadow itself and still capable to be reflected on the wall. The light is in pieces. Broken, bounced, weakened for a moment and then strong again. The greys are escaping any formal balance and the shapes are denying to stay regular. The right half of the precious frame is so empty and so full at the same time, and the only refuge for this extreme visual uneasiness. All and all I am spending a long time in front of Rafael's picture and that's the first sign of a successful image. The second sign is that, as I leave the picture behind me, I become aware that the picture won't leave me for a long time.

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R a f a e l I a n o s

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Aesthetics and anaesthetics Why two pictures? One is not enough to stand alone? Mind you, this is not a diptych, these 2 pictures are not here to provide support one to another. They're two, simply because I want to double your pleasure and attention for this photographic expression residing at the very profound of Stela Patrulescu. Why do I get so absolute and intimate (some would think) about this? Because otherwise I cannot explain the continuous, almost nightmarish, envy I feel in front of the clear and direct photographic compositions (or decompositions) of Stela's reality ‌ which is also ours, mine, but I am too blind to see. And if I wanted to turn around the issue back to my overfed ego, I would have asked: why am I so blind? But, for just this time, I will stop talking about me, and return to Stela's work. If narration is one of the important ingredients of meaningful photography, then the short stories created instantly by Stela are photography's response to the neorealist cinema of nowadays, as well as to the socialist realism of the seventies, which both needed very long scenes to convey a message of doubtful impact. Aesthetic overdose leading to anaesthesia. Two or even three hours of mute film rolling to arrive from the gun to the rose, from the subhuman chaos to the ruler's order. Movie directors are very close to dictating (reading on our behalf) after all. Just switch on the antonyms, the opposite notions, of the above and you will have the honest, unforced and poetic revelation of the eternal moments created by Stela. Her version of a surrounding world which evolves too fast to be understood and to create empathy. Her still images do exactly that: they dilate time for us to be able to overcome our handicap of visual anaesthesia (even blindness in my case) and to empathise with an action depleted, a low-adrenaline universe which will not make it to the news but it will make your days. M i c h a i

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S t e l

a P a t r u l e s c u

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S t e l

a P a t r u l e s c u

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I r i

s T u s a

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L u c a P a s q u a l

i n i 36


M a g d a l e n a R o e s e l e r

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T

he The theater, the plot and the kit

Almost a 100 years of street photography since KertÊsz. The photographic stills of the so called living theater changed a lot in all those years. Greys became colours, the plot became experimental, arbitrary, without a start and an end, unlike the compositional gems of HCB. The odd, the peculiar, the anecdotic became the standard. As if the less we understood, the greater the artistic breakthrough of the photographer. Freaks and monsters (sensu largo, including half bodies entering and leaving the frame, juxtaposed in Siamese twins postures) became and stayed a dear subject for the street photographers because of their clear and immediate impact on people's delightful suburban lives. Presently, the once most fearful situation when assembling a scene (seeing fragments not fitting the kit) is almost what makes nowadays a street photograph stand out in the "experts" eyes ‌

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‌ Unfortunately, the people who tell you that, the curators who convince you to be as odd as possible ‌ well they spend their lives indoors in verbose symposia, colloquia and round tables. What a waste ... (of time mostly). If we look closely at the work of the Masters we will see that they all had only a few "good" years. As someone said, don't remember his name (wink): "to be a good photographer is not an eternal achievement but just a clandestine touch of genius!" Steven is out there at dawn, at night, by any weather, under any light, mostly alone, and he is shooting like there is no tomorrow. And he's right! There isn't! Go out and shoot, because life is a beach and then you dye ... or paint (yours truly talking in front of the mirror). ______________ PS: Whoever in front of Steven's picture didn't feel on their skin the chill of the night, whoever didn't admire the meticulous construction of the scene piece by piece, whoever wasn't moved by the muted dialogues of the buyer/seller and of the primary colours, is invited to come forward and throw me the first stone.

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S t e v e n J e n s e n

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M a k i

s M a k r

i

s

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M a n o l

i

s N e g r

i

s

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M a r i

a R i c o s s a

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F l o r

i n a L u p u t

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M a r t

i

n UW a l

t z

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M i h a i C i a m a

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P a n f

i

l P i r v u l e s c u

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The frame The wise advise in art schools (whether it is painting, drawing or photography) "use the whole frame/canvas" does not mean only to fill the rectangle with objects, subjects, shapes, colours, shades ‌ Populating every angle does not necessarily mean that the frame is used meaningfully. Because, oddly some might say, the most important part are the limits, the edges of the frame against which the contents are measured. A shape, any shape, looks totally different depending on its distance from the outer limits, and consequently any cropping becomes an act of creation. Unfortunately, not in this art, not in photography. We are lucky enough (unlike cinematography) to have a rectangular "dictator" trapping not only our vision but also our subjects. The impossibility of escaping is for once welcome.

In fact, the whole artistic eneavor in photography is the choice of what stays in. Widely known stuff you would say, but allow me this reminder: Cropping is denying your art previously made through the viewfinder when triggering the shutter. Obsessively changing the limits of your pictures is entering another world, sometimes a world of pain (for the viewers). Tasos is, honestly and intuitively, allowing his picture to live and grow in the original form it has been conceived. But he is also proving to us all something else equally important: the viewers are able to recognise a meaningful interpretation of reality albeit any "aesthetic" or "technical" barriers. And thus the respect becomes reciprocal. The only way to live a photographic life, a photographer's life.

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T a s o s B i r i

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Witnessing everything around us and having an audience of millions can be the end of creativity or just another beginning. Under the condition to still be able to see under the "tear gas" attack and survive the visual Armageddon. Yuji is one of the survivors. He also features one of the few signatures I am able to recognize "blindly". I recognize his surroundings, his quality of light, his lens, his eye-level framing. But beyond lens, light, POV, processing, what else is a personal and recognizable style? It is not the extreme experimentation, historical/documentary value).

the

grotesque

(these

only

have

a

It is the plan, the ideas, your state of mind, your suffering, your quest of truth, your need of equilibrium. During these moments you have to be highly concentrated in what you feel and think. It is a highly mental exercise and as such you should be away from "noises" and the collective approach. I chose this picture to demonstrate that there are no predefined recipes in doing something in an original way. The scene is not original (there are no original scenes, there are original points of view). However the personal choice of the author to include certain elements, to freeze certain gestures, to interpret an ordinary moment through his unique inner algorithm, well all these are truly original. I am quoting here what I've said in the past about him and the same words pop up over and over again: "Yuji's subjects and street scenes are delivered to us from an eye-level vantage point, with a normal focal and under a typical light. But then, how these pictures are becoming so uncanny? I have no idea of how street life is in Japan but I dare to prefer this hyperreal obsessive look, over Moriyama's (and many others') manneristic ... accidents" M i c h a i

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Y u j

i I s h i z a k i

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P a u l R a y m o n d P a u l

e

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R a d u M i h a i I a n i

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R i

t e s h G h o s h

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S o r a n a B o r d a s

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S p i r o s S o u e r e f

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S t e l

a P a t r u l e s c u

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S v i

l e n N a c h e v

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T a s o s B i r i

s

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T z e n X i n g

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X i m e n a E c h a g u e

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D r a g o s - R a d u D u m i

t r e s c u

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G u y L e G u i

f

f

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C r i s t

i n a B u g a r i

u

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T z e n X i n g

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R i

t e s h G h o s h

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M i h a i

l C i a m a

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A n d r e a R a t t o

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F e r m í

n G u z m á n

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T z e n X i n g

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E l

i s a T o m a s e l

l

i

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D a n a C o r i n a P o p e s c u

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E m i

l

i a n A v r ă m e s c u

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I r i

s T u s a

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B a c k c o v e r : M i c h a i

l


Find us on www.streetcorephotography.com

SCP eZINE - 2nd issue - July 2017  

"The Street Core Photography (SCP) Magazine", is a quarterly eZine with the best pictures of SCP together with critiques on selected images...

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