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RAY

FASHION & BE AU T Y

E XC E L L E N C E O F L I F E

Tammy-Anne

Fortuin

& The Fabulous Homebrew Crew travel to:

Ro bb e n I s l a n d • S o we t o • Fr a n s c h h o e k

Issue 3 / 2009

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FASH ION & BEAU T Y

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se ction T I T L E

Issue 3 / 2009

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Issue 3 / 2009

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CONTENTS

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lifestyle, arts & culture: 76 80 82 86 90

travel:

The South African Lipizzaners Breed

12 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 32 36 40 48

Soweto Gospel Choir Tammy-Anne Fortuin Fernanda de Lange Dylan Lewis

sports: 158

The Real Heroes

motoring: 178

Franschhoek Motor Museum

Robben Island Bali Kani – Maldives Phuket Cervinia Tignes Val Claret Wengen Palace Positano Castello di Monte Soweto A Huguenot Story Viva la France

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health: 96 98 102 104

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God’s Pharmacy Breast Cancer – The Good News Part 2 Prostate Health Disease Prevention

inspirational: 107 108 110 114 116 118

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Win the Race

Shield the Steel The Divine Law of Life Faith Recession Prosperity Discipleship


R AY MAGA Z I N E

culinary delights 62 64 70

La Colombe Fairview Reuben’s

gardening 54 56 58

Urban Garden Design Contemporary Garden Design Namaqualand

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fashion & beauty: 120 124 126 132 136 140 142

David Tlale JJ Schoeman Lunar Simon Rademan

photography 149 156

Koos van der Lende Evolve from Film to Digital

Pour Homme Angel Lifestyle

décor: 166 171 173

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Abigail Keats

One&Only Ode to French Elegance Carné Interior Design

regulars: 6 182 183 184

Editor’s Letter Subscriptions Stockists Listing Short Story – Cheetah Chase Issue 3 / 2009

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editor’s Can you feel it? Spring is in the air at last. Days are getting warmer and soon those winter woollies can be packed away for another 6 months. I think we sometimes take for granted the excellent weather we enjoy in South Africa. It is amazing what the word ‘spring’ means to people. It holds such hope for everyone during the cold winter months, of a season ahead waiting to burst open with warm air and fragrant blooms. The mere mention of the word is enough to conjure up images of fun and happy times, like lunches in the green outdoors, or family picnics and late sunsets, and the throwing open of veranda doors to let the fresh air stream in and getting into the garden to get your hands into the soil. It is the season when

Image above: Koos van der Lende

LETTER

enjoy. Since the arrival of the French Huguenots way back in 1688, our history has been enriched by a subtle French flavour. The French art of living and respect for handed-down tradition come together when a household brings out its perfectly starched and ironed table-napkins and sparkling crystal glassware... The French are also famous for their divine cuisine and we have a fair selection of French-inspired cuisine on offer. Their gardens are permeated by the perfume of heavenly blooms, the bedrooms ready to welcome their guests, the dining-room tables immaculately laid with the finest porcelain and silver, and the kitchens showing all the signs of delicious gourmet meals in preparation. All these are part of their rich heritage. I hope you will enjoy the articles in this edition of Ray. It is filled with all the promises of a great spring, ranging from fashion

“It is filled with all the promises of a great spring; ranging from fashion and beauty trends to latest designer looks; to fresh decor ideas and stunning destinations.” willow trees suddenly burst into bright green buds, when pink and white fluffy blossoms of peach and apricot trees bloom, a delicate dance of petals stretching across the orchards. It is such an emotive word; it instantly conjures up feelings of hope and renewal and images of all things fresh and clean. History has a way of influencing who we are and what we

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and beauty trends, to the latest designer looks, as well as fresh decor ideas and stunning destinations. They’re all aimed at giving you, our loyal readers, a visual feast of wonderful ideas and a fun read. Here’s to a blissfully happy spring.

Rina


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TR AV E L

Image: Koos van der Lende

discover YOUR WORLD

Doesn’t matter what journeys we take, where we travel in one or another way it will leave unforgettable memories. South Africa and the continent of Africa is undoubtedly one of the world’s best classrooms. It’s exciting, enthralling and full of educational potential, with both cultures and natural environment at the fore. Learn that the biggest thrills and life lessons come from observing your surroundings. Follow in the footsteps of the great explorers, and travel!

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ROBBEN

Island

“Someone has written about two prisoners looking out of their cell window: one saw iron bars while the other saw stars.” Ahmed Kathrada, 1993 Text: Adéle Minnaar Images: Michael Maherry

Who can be unmoved on first hearing of its

inhabitants – the Lawbreakers, the Lunatics and the Lepers! Few places so small and insignificant looking can boast of having played so important a part in the history of a vast multitude of people. Few places in the world symbolise the struggle for freedom against oppression of basic human rights, as Robben Island does. Many of the leading members of South African political parties and business sector were incarcerated there from 1964 to 1991, including Mr Nelson Mandela. Many African chiefs and political leaders who were brave enough to stand against this oppression, found themselves spending time within the confines of Robben Island. As one could imagine, tales of heroism and strength of will, became a great source of knowledge and inspiration to generations that fought for peace. Indeed a place where great men met. From the 17th to the 20th centuries, Robben Island served as a place of banishment, isolation and imprisonment. Today it

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is a World Heritage Site and museum, a poignant reminder to the newly democratic South Africa of the price paid for freedom. People lived on Robben Island many thousands of years ago, when the sea channel between the Island and the Cape mainland was not covered with water. Since the Dutch settled at the Cape in the mid-1600s, Robben Island has been used primarily as a prison. To go to this Island is still an experience of immense power. It is a cold, damp and lonely island. No source of fresh water and barely any trees or plants. Very little communication could be achieved between the outside world and the inhabitants of Robben Island. The waters surrounding were famous for its stormy and icy conditions where many Great White sharks swam. The stormy weather conditions characteristic to the southern tip of Africa became known as the Cape Of Storms. Robben Island has not only been used as a prison. It was a training and defence station in World War II (1939-1945), and a


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hospital for people with leprosy and the mentally and chronically ill (1846-1931). In the 1840s, Robben Island was chosen for a hospital because it was regarded as both secure (isolating dangerous cases) and healthy (providing a good environment for cure). During this time, political and common-law prisoners were still kept on the island. As there was no cure and little effective treatment available for leprosy, mental illness and other chronic illnesses in the 1800s, Robben Island was a kind of prison for the hospital patients too. Chronology Pre 1498: Precolonial Unknown • Archaeological research being conducted. 1498-1652: European ships passing the Island via the Cape to the East. Prison, refuge, pantry and post office • 1498: First recorded landing on RI by Vasco da Gama’s fleet. • c.1525: Portuguese convicts • 1615: English convicts • 1632-40: Autshumato living on RI 1652-1795: Dutch East India Company period Prison, Pantry & Quarantine station • c.1658- 1795: Criminal and political prisoners • 1682 - 1795: East Asian exiles • 1771-1790: Quarantine station 1795-1802: First British occupation Prison • Military & criminal prisoners 1803-1806: Batavian period Prison 1806-1910: British colonial period Prison & Hospital

• 1808-1846: Military, criminal and political prisoners • 1846-1931: Hospital for lepers (until 1931), lunatics (until 1921) and chronic sick (until 1891). • 1855-1869: Xhosa political prisoners • 1874-1890: Prisoners from present-day Kwazulu Natal and Northern Cape regions. • 1866-1921: Convict station 1910-1961: Union of South Africa Convict station, Hospital & Coastal Defence and Training Station • 1866-1921: Convict station • 1846-1931: Hospital for lepers (until 1931), and lunatics (until 1921). • 1939-1959: Occupied by the Army and Navy for training and coastal defence. 1961-1994: Apartheid Republic of South Africa Prison • 1961-1991: Maximum security prison for political prisoners • 1961-1996: Medium security prison for criminal prisoners 1994: Democratic South Africa Museum & Heritage Site • 1997: Museum, National Monument • 1999: World Heritage Site Conservation Bird life Robben Island – the Dutch name, meaning ‘seal island’ – by the time of discovery, harboured thousands of seals, penguins, tortoises, birds and sea mammals. It was generally a safe breeding ground. Whales enjoy the location in early spring, while lobsters and shell fish are found all along the shoreline. Hundreds of years ago, whales swam around the waters of the Island in great masses. Jan van Riebeeck wrote in 1652: “We/I noticed many whales in the bay, and especially this month Issue 3 / 2009

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they were so near the ship that one could easily jump onto them from the yacht”. Robben Island hosts about 132 bird species. These include seabirds, waterbirds and terrestrial birds. A few, such as the Chukar Partridge and the Guinea Fowl, have been introduced to the island by humans. The African Penguin (formerly known as the Jackass Penguin) is a species that was abundant in the 17th century, but was brought to the brink of extinction in the 1800s by human activities. By 1983 the penguins were re-introduced and have since established a breeding population. They are a favourite attraction of visitors to the island. Natural vegetation The types of flora and fauna on Robben Island however has been affected by humans through farming practices and by the introduction of extensive plantations of shrubs and exotic trees. Some of these were planted to provide shade for patients during the period in which the Island functioned as a leper colony. The spectacular veld flowers typical of the West Coast, also display their beauty on the Island during spring. Marine and wildlife The boat trip between Cape Town and Robben Island provides an opportunity to see a wide spectrum of seabirds and marine mammals including Cape Fur seals, Southern Right whales and Dusky and Heaviside Dolphins.

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Once on the Island, you will be able to see some of the 23 species of mammals which have been recorded, including small herds of bontebok, springbok, steenbok, fallow deer and eland. An increasing number of ostriches, lizards, geckos, snakes and three species of tortoise can also be found. Geology The Island is actually the summit of an ancient, now submerged mountain, linked by an undersea saddle to the Blouberg. Its lower strata consists of Malmesbury shale forming a rocky and somewhat inhospitable coastline. Above this lies a thick limestone and calcrete deposit covered by windblown sands and shell fragments. The Island is low-lying with the highest point being 24 metres, also known as Minto’s Hill, (named after a nineteenth-century Surgeon-Superintendent of the General Infirmary) above sealevel. The climate is Mediterranean, as in nearby Cape Town, but the Island experiences stronger winds and comparative extremes in temperature. Since 1997 it has been a museum and a heritage site. The museum is a dynamic institution, which acts as a focal point of South African heritage. It runs educational programmes for schools, youths and adults, facilitates tourism development, conducts ongoing research related to the Island and fulfils an archiving function. • Source: http://www.freedom.co.za/www.robben-island.org.za/


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Bali

CLUB MED

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TR AV E L • • • •

Situated in the south of the island of Bali. Airport: Denpasar Transfer: 30 minutes. Village welcomes children of any age, children’s club facilities provided from 2 years upwards. ACCOMMODATION • 398 rooms. Shower room/WC, air conditioning, hairdryer, mini-bar*, telephone, television, personal safes. BARS AND RESTAURANTS 4 restaurants: offering various buffet options each with its own unique decoration. Specialty Restaurant with outside deck, ideal for small group dinners. Snack bar (afternoon and evening), afternoon tea. 1 bar. NEW TOTAL ALL-INCLUSIVE PACKAGE At most Villages this season you will find the new Total Allinclusive formula where any extra drinks and snacks outside of meal times are included in your package price. This package offers you a pre-paid open-bar, day and night, so you don’t have to worry about the bill at the end of your stay! LEISURE ACTIVITIES Swimming pool and separate children’s pool, Club Med Spa*, Turkish bath*, Jacuzzi*, sauna*, badminton, pool tables*, giant chessboard, pétanque, table tennis, midnight bar, taped classical music, live band, Club Med evening entertainment. CLUB MED SPA* Enjoy precious moments of wellbeing at the Club Med Spa. Turkish bath*, Jacuzzi*, sauna*. CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS • BABIES NEW: Club Med Baby Welcome (up to 2 years) included in the price. Everything for the comfort and wellbeing of the very young and their parents. Enrol at time of booking only; subject to availability (spaces are limited). • CHILDREN Petit Club Med* (2 to 3 years). Petit Club Med swimming pool and playground. Enrol at time of booking only; subject to availability (spaces are limited). Mini Club Med (4 to 10 years) included in the price. A Mini Club Med swimming pool. • TEENAGERS Juniors’ Club Med (11 to 17 years, throughout the season) included in the price. SPORTS • GOLF 6-hole pitch and putt course within the Village, practice net,

putting green, practice bunker. Lessons for all levels. Three 18hole courses* outside the Village, one a 15-minute walk away. Green fees* payable on arrival. Other sports also available on site… • Lessons for all levels Circus school for children, flying trapeze, bungee trampoline. Beginners Windsurfing, snorkelling (only with boat trips), water aerobics, Club Med fitness, archery, yoga. • Sports available with no tuition Kayaking, water polo, beach volleyball, football, weighttraining room, sports hall (basketball, handball and volleyball), squash, tennis (6 hard courts). DISCOVERY* • A selection of our excursions* • Bali paddy-fields by bicycle or on foot (1/2 day) • Rafting on the Ayung (1/2 day) • Monkey forest and sacred temples (1/2 day) • Discover the hinterland by 4x4 (1 day) • Boat trip to island of Lembogan (1 day) • Kintamani (1 day) • Visit to temples of Mengwi and Tanah Lot. À la carte: Jogjakarta and Borobudur** by plane and bus (1 day), the cultural capital and sacred temples • Chauffeured car hire with guide. Further information is available from the Excursions office at the Village. **Classified as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Other facilities Club Med boutique*, local and Asian crafts (furniture and interior decoration)*, Balinese handicrafts covered market*, beach towels, washing machine*, tumble-dryer*, laundry service*, dry-cleaning*, hairdressing salon*, photographer*, Internet access*, conference rooms*. Credit cards accepted in the Village: (for settlement of accounts only) Visa, MasterCard, American Express. *Extra cost. THOSE INFORMATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

For a quotation and more information please contact : Exotic Vacations: Tel: 012 369 6130 E-mail: esmep@exoticvacations.co.za Website: www.exoticvacations.co.za

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Like a mirage, this garden-island rises out of the Lapis-Lazuli blue of the lagoon. A paradise for those who love diving, and for those who are simply in love.

Kani

CLUB MED

Set in the archipelago of the Maldives (Indian Ocean),

south-west of Sri Lanka on the island of Kanifinholu, 20 km from the capital of Male’. Time seems to stand still between sky and sea. You’ll live on the water, watching the ever-changing colours of the lagoon, from turquoise blue to greenest jade. Village welcomes children of any age but no children’s club facilities provided. Accommodation Recently renovated and redecorated, Kani offers you Suites* on Stilts and Deluxe Rooms on the beach* featuring all the personal service attention you could wish for. 232 rooms

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with balcony or terrace. Shower room/WC, air-conditioning, fan, hairdryer, mini bar*, telephone, television, personal safes. Deluxe Bungalow Sea View Deluxe Room Beach: spacious rooms with four-poster bed, interior/exterior bathroom, terrace garden and private beach. Lagoon Suite (On Stilts). Suite on Stilts: 70m new bungalows built out over the water with four-poster bed, living room, bathroom with sea view, private terrace with direct access to the lagoon. Room service* for breakfast and brunch. Bars and Restaurants Village has been awarded ‘Table coup de cour’ status for its


TR AV E L cuisine and culinary activities. • Le Velhi, restaurant offering various buffet options. • Kandu, speciality a la Carte restaurant. • Gourmet dinner*: with international menu (evenings require reservations). • Snack bar (afternoon and evening), afternoon tea (at the beach bar). • 2 bars. New Total All-Inclusive Package At most villages this season you will find the new Total AllInclusive formula where any extra drinks and snacks outside of meal times are included in your package price. This package offers you a pre-paid open-bar, day and night, so you don’t have to worry about the bill at the end of your stay! (Excluding Premium brands) SPORTS • Scuba diving* Great diversity of corals, Napoleon fish, turtles, stingrays and mantas, silvertip sharks, lionfish, sea slugs… 8000 species of fish have been recorded here. Dives right along the coral reefs (thilas) or through passes. • Special courses* Beginners and advanced diving packages are available at extra cost. Progress towards PADI certification*. NITROX diving and certification*. Hire* wet suits and diving computers, underwater cameras, photos/video footage. SNORKELLING Sites along edges of reefs, rich in fauna and flora (lifejacket compulsory). Lessons for all levels only with boat trips. OTHER SPORTS ALSO AVAILABLE ON SITE… • Beginners Sailing (catamaran), windsurfing, water aerobics, Club Med fitness. Sports available with no tuition Kayaking, water polo, beach volleyball, and football. Sports outside of the Club Med Village.* Deep-sea fishing. LEISURE ACTIVITIES Swimming pool, Club Med Spa*, creative workshop*, badminton, petanque, table tennis, midnight bar, live band, Club Med evening entertainment. DISCOVERY* • A selection of our excursions* • The village of Hura and Thulhaagiri Island by speedboat (1/2 day) • Vashugiri and Etheremarivaru islands by seaplane (1 day) • Rihiveli by sea plane (1 day) • Discover Male’ (1/2 day) CLUB MED SPA* Enjoy precious moments of well being at The Club Med Spa. Travel Information Flights to Male’ Transfer: 35 mins by boat Other facilities Club Med boutique*, beach towels, washing machine*, tumble dryer*, Internet access*.

For a quotation and more information please contact : Exotic Vacations: Tel: 012 369 6130 E-mail: esmep@exoticvacations.co.za Website: www.exoticvacations.co.za

Credit cards accepted in the Village: (For settlement of accounts only) Visa, Mastercard, American Express. It is advisable to take US Dollars. *Extra cost.

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Phuket

CLUB MED

Situated on Phuket Island, in the Bay of Kata, 890 km south of Bangkok. Transfer time is only one hour. The Village welcomes children of any age, children’s club facilities provided from 2 years upwards. ACCOMMODATION • 299 rooms. • Shower room/WC, air-conditioning, hairdryer, minibar*, telephone, television, personal safes. BARS AND RESTAURANTS • Village has been awarded “Table coup de cour” status for its cuisine and culinary activities. • Le Mamuang: restaurant offering various buffet options. • Gourmet dinner*: with international menu (evenings, reservations required). 20

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• Snack bar (afternoon and evening), afternoon tea. • 2 bars. NEW TOTAL ALL-INCLUSIVE PACKAGE At most Villages this season you will find the new Total Allinclusive formula where any extra drinks and snacks outside of meal times are included in your package price. This package offers you a pre-paid open-bar, day and night, so you don’t have to worry about the bill at the end of your stay! LEISURE ACTIVITIES Swimming pool with separate children’s pool, Club Med Spa*, pétanque, table tennis, midnight bar, taped classical music, live band, Club Med evening entertainment. CLUB MED SPA* Enjoy precious moments of total wellbeing at the Club Med Spa.


TR AV E L CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS BABIES NEW: Club Med Baby Welcome, (up to 2 years) included in the price. Everything for the comfort and wellbeing of the very young and their parents. Enrol at time of booking only; subject to availability (spaces are limited). CHILDREN NEW Petit Club Med* (2 to 3 years) Petit Club Med swimming pool and playground. Enrol at time of booking only; subject to availability (spaces are limited). Mini Club Med: (4 to 10 years) included in the price. Mini Club Med swimming pool and playground. TEENAGERS Juniors’ Club Med (11 to 17 years, throughout the season) included in the price. SPORTS • Golf 9-hole pitch-and-putt course, practice net, putting green,

practice bunker in the Village. Lessons for all levels. Five 18-hole courses* outside the Village, only a 35-minute walk away. Green fees* payable on arrival. • Scuba diving* (outside of club med) Beginners and advanced diving packages are available at extra cost. Please enquire for more details. OTHER SPORTS ALSO AVAILABLE ON SITE... • Lessons for all levels Club Med fitness, circus school for children, flying trapeze, and bungee trampoline. • Beginners Snorkelling (only with boat trips and short bus ride), water aerobics, tennis (6 hard courts), archery, yoga.

• Sports available with no tuition Water polo, basketball, beach volleyball, weight-training room, squash, volleyball. DISCOVERY* • A selection of our excursions* NEW: Kao Sok, nature safari (1 day), Phang Nga** bay by junk and canoe (1 day), Phang Nga** bay by speedboat (1 day), The Phi-Phi islands by speedboat (1 day), Bangkok, the incredible capital of the Kingdom of Siam (1 day or 2 days). Further information is available from the Excursions office at the Village. **Classified as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Other facilities Club Med boutique*, local and Asian crafts (furniture and interior decoration)*, tailor-made clothing*, beach towels, laundry service*, cleaning*, hairdressing salon*, photographer*, Internet access*, conference rooms*. Credit cards accepted in the Village (for settlement of accounts only): Visa, MasterCard, American Express.

Health Village recommended for people with reduced mobility in wheelchairs (but access to speciality restaurant and beach is difficult). For a quotation and more information please contact : Exotic Vacations: Tel: 012 369 6130 E-mail: esmep@exoticvacations.co.za Website: www.exoticvacations.co.za Issue 3 / 2009

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CLUB MED

Cervinia

Try out the delights of winter sports as a family Italian-

style in the . This recently renovated Club Med Village is even more welcoming than before. Location • Situated in the Aoste Valley, 100 km from Turin. • Altitude: 2 050 m in the centre of the resort. • Ski domain of Cervinia Zermatt Valtournenche. • Altitudes of between 3900 m & 1524 m. Village welcomes children from 2 years; children’s club facilities provided from 4 years. In accordance with Italian law, all the communal parts of this Village, especially bars and restaurants, are classed as nonsmoking areas. Accommodation The Village consists of two hotels: the main hotel, the Cristallo, with four levels, and the Cristallino, with three levels. The hotels are 50 yards apart and are linked by an indoor walkway. The village consists of 207 redecorated rooms, which are divided between the Cristallo and the Cristallino. Each room has a hairdryer, telephone, television and personal safe. Cristallo Suite Suites measuring 40m2, located on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th floors of the Cristallo hotel with stunning views of Mont Cervin. Elegantly decorated, warm lounge area, 2 flat-screen televisions, mini-fridge, room service and dry-cleaning service (at extra

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cost). Bathroom. Cristallino Club Room A beautifully decorated room measuring 20m2, with all the facilities and services you need to enjoy your stay. Shower room. Bars and Restaurants Every palate is catered for by our bars and restaurants, which serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. Bar drinks and snacks: This package offers you a pre-paid open-bar, during the day and the evening, where you can enjoy a complete range of popular branded drinks and sweet- and savoury snacks. Drinks are also available during meal times, so you don’t have to worry about the bill at the end of your stay! This Village has been awarded ‘Table coup de coer’ status for its cuisine and culinary activities. • Our restaurants: • The Cristallo restaurant offers various buffet options. • NEW: The ‘Plan Maison’, a mountain restaurant with a sun terrace on the pistes. • 1 bar. Snow sports Ski pass valid from Monday to Saturday morning for the Cervinia Zermatt Valtournenche ski domain. • Altitudes of between 3900m & 1524m • 360 km of downhill pistes


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• 27 black • 30 red • 73 blue. • 104 snow cannons. • 80 ski lifts. Snowpark. Information and enrolment on arrival only and subject to availability and weather conditions. These activities are only available to guests staying a minimum of 7 days. Ski lessons (from 4 years) or snow boarding lessons (from 8 years) valid from Monday to Friday. These lessons are for all levels and given in small groups (maximum of 12 people). Also available on site… NEW: 3 activities to try out and discover new ways of having fun in the snow: • Snow scooters • Ice-skating • Bowling Leisure Activities Indoor swimming pool (towels against deposit), Turkish bath, saunas, weight-training room, table tennis, terrace, night bar, Club Med evening entertainment. Children and Teenagers Facilities for children aged 4 years and up: • Mini Club Med (4 to 10 years). • Juniors’ Club Med (11 to 17 years, during European school holidays). A dedicated, specially trained team of G.Os looks after children. • For Mini Club Med, activities are organised from 8h30 am to 17h00 and from 18h30 to 21h00 6 days a week. • Snow gardens from 4 years. Optional Extras… (Not included in the Club Med package price). Snow sports (1) Option of hiring your ski or snowboard equipment.

Club Med Spa (1) Wide selection of packages lasting from 1 to 6 days. Serenity and Delights (4 days) Zénitude (3 or 6 days). Men’s Care Kit (3 days). First Snowfall short breaks Be the first to enjoy the early snowfall for a short duration at Cervinia, from 4 December to 23 December. Ski passes and ski/snow boarding lessons are included throughout the day on these specific dates from the day after you have arrive. Please enquire for more information and prices. Parking (1) Covered parking in the Village (limited spaces): please reserve your parking space when you book. Services Boutique Club Med, photographer, lave-linge, sèche-linge. (1) For the Club Med Spa packages, Club Med Ski Service and car park, enrol at time of booking or on arrival, subject to availability and the conditions of sale and prices charged at the Village. Please enquire for all prices. Transport • Flights to Turin. • Closest Airport: Turin. • Transfer: 1 hr 30 mins. • Trains and self-drive option: please enquire for more information. Credit Cards accepted by the Village: Visa, Mastercard, American Express, Maestro, Diners.

For a quotation and more information please contact : Exotic Vacations: Tel: 012 369 6130 E-mail: esmep@exoticvacations.co.za Website: www.exoticvacations.co.za Issue 3 / 2009

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CLUB MED

Tignes Val

Claret At an altitude of over 2,000m, in one of the most

beautiful ski domains in the world, this Club Med Village offers something for everyone. Location • Situated in the Savoie region, 27km from Bourg-SaintMaurice. • Altitude: 2,100m, in the centre of the resort, at the foot of La Grande Motte. • Ski in the Espace Killy ski domain, at altitudes of between 3,450m and 1,550m. • Village welcomes children from 2 years, children’s club facilities provided from 4 years. • All indoor areas in this Village are non-smoking, with the exception of one lounge and the nightclub. Accommodation : The village consists of two hotels, with a total of 239 rooms. Le Val Claret – the main hotel, and Le Petit Claret – linked to the main hotel by an indoor corridor. Each room has a hairdryer, telephone, television and personal safes. Club Room Comfortable room measuring 30m2, with all the facilities

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and services you need to enjoy your stay. Bath or shower room. Separate toilets. Some Club rooms are interconnecting or specially designed for a family holiday. Single occupancy is also available at an extra cost. All the rooms are subject to availability. Supplements will apply for all other room categories, if you have not chosen a standard Club Room. Please enquire for supplement prices and more details. Bars and Restaurants Every palate is catered for by our bars and restaurants, which serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. Bar drinks and snacks: This package offers you a pre-paid open-bar, during the day and the evening, where you can enjoy a complete range of popular branded drinks and sweet and savoury snacks. Drinks are also available during meal times, so you don’t have to worry about the bill at the end of your stay! • Our restaurant: • The Grand Motte restaurant offers various buffet options. NEW: You can also enjoy lunch at the other village in this ski domain. Discover Val d’Isere. • 2 bars.


TR AV E L Snow sports espace killy Ski pass valid from Monday to Saturday for the Espace Killy ski domains : Tignes and Val d’Isere, at altitudes of between 3450m and 1550m (subject to agreements between resorts). At the start and/or end of a season, access to Val d’Isere will depend on snow conditions. The Tignes Val Claret resort is equipped with a ‘hands free’ lift-pass system intended to reduce ski lift queues. A refundable deposit may be applied in the Village to ensure that you remember to return it at the end of your stay. • 300 km of downhill pistes • 14 black • 36 red • 59 blue • 20 green. • 202 snow cannons. • 98 ski lifts. Snowparks. • Heated lockers for skis and boots. Ski lessons (from 4 years) or snow boarding lessons (from 8 years), valid from Monday to Saturday morning. These lessons are for all levels and given in small groups (maximum of 12 people) NEW: Henri Autier course, for beginners to experts (from 12 years) Ski directly from the Club Med Village. Leisure activities Heated indoor swimming pool, (8m x 5m), Turkish bath, sauna, (towels against deposit), weight-training room, stretching, terrace, nightclub, Club Med evening entertainment. Children

Club Med Ski Service (1), option of hiring your ski or snowboard equipment. Club Med Spa (1) Wide selection of packages lasting from 1 to 6 days. Serenity and Delights (4days). Zenitude (3 or 6 days). Pamper Package for Him (3 days). (1) For the Club Med Ski Service and Club Med Spa, enrol at time of booking or on arrival, subject to availability and the conditions of sale and prices charged at the Village. Please

Facilities for children aged 4 years and older. • Mini Club Med (4 to 10 years). A dedicated team of G.O.s looks after children. Activities are organised from 8:30 am to 5 pm and from 6.30pm to 9 pm, 6 days a week. NEW: Club Med Champions Academy, for children between 8 and 12 years: 5 day skiing courses in the snow park. 24 December 2006 – 07 January 2007, 11 – 25 February 2007, 01 – 29 April 2007. Bookable on site only. Teenagers • Juniors’ Club Med (11 – 17 years, during European School Holidays). Optional Extras... (not included in the Club Med package price) Snowsports

enquire for all prices. Transport • Flights to Geneva. (If you have chosen the Club Med package). • Closest Airport: Geneva. • Transfer: 3 hrs 15 mins. • Trains and self-drive option: please enquire for more details. Credit Cards accepted at the Village: Visa, MasterCard, American Express.

For a quotation and more information please contact : Exotic Vacations: Tel: 012 369 6130 E-mail: esmep@exoticvacations.co.za Website: www.exoticvacations.co.za

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CLUB MED

Wengen PALACE “I’ve rediscovered the mountains and they’re just how I always dreamed they would be. An unspoilt, natural beauty. There are no cars here, just pure mountain air!” Situated in the Bernese Oberland, 25km from Interlaken. • Altitude: 1,400m, in the centre of the resort. • At the foot of Eiger, domains of Kleine Scheidegg and Mannlichen. Altitudes of between 2,200m and 1,330m. • Village welcomes children from 4 months, children’s facilities provided from 4 years. • All indoor areas in the Village are non-smoking, with the exception of one lounge and the nightclub. Accommodation The hotel, with its 207 rooms, consists of two interconnected buildings. The middle part was formerly a luxury hotel dating from the 1930s to which a new wing, the Edelweiss, was added in the 1970s, designed in a modern architectural style. Each room has a hairdryer, telephone, television and personal safes. Luxury Room Valley View Attractively decorated room with breathtaking views across the valley. Rooms measure 13 to 38m2 depending on the number of guests and are located in the main hotel. Shower room. 26

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Club Room Edelweiss Comfortable room measuring 14m2, with all the facilities and services you need to enjoy your stay. Shower room. Single occupancy is also available in each of the categories at an extra cost. Bars and Restaurants Every palate is catered for by our bars and restaurants, which serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. Bar Drinks and snacks This package offers you a pre-paid open-bar, during the day and the evening, where you can enjoy a complete range of popular branded drinks and sweet and savoury snacks. Drinks are also available during meal times, so you don’t have to worry about the bill at the end of your stay! (Excluding premium brands) • Our restaurants • Restaurant offering various buffet options. • The Refuge, a speciality restaurant • 1 bar.


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Snowsports Ski pass valid from Sunday to Friday for the ski domains of Kleine Scheidegg and Mannlichen, at the foot of the Eiger, at altitudes of between 2,200m and 1,330m. • 110km of downhill pistes. • 6 black • 18 red • 8 blue. • 20 snow cannons. • 19 ski lifts. Snowpark. The Wengen resort is equipped with a ‘hands free’ lift pass system intended to reduce ski lift queues. A refundable deposit may be applied in the Club Med Village to ensure that you remember to return it at the end of your stay. Ski lessons (from 4 years) or snowboarding lessons (from 8 years), valid from Sunday to Friday morning. These lessons are for all levels and given in small groups (maximum of 12 people). Also available on site… Stretching, guided walks and snow-shoe walks (from 12 years). Leisure Activities Terrace, piano bar, nightclub, Club Med evening entertainment. Children and Teenagers • Babies • NEW: Club Med Baby Welcome: for the under 2’s • All you need for your baby available in the room and at the restaurant. • Please note there is no supervised childcare for the under 4 years. • We recommend that you consult your doctor to find out if it is suitable for your child to travel to a high altitude destination. • Children Facilities for children aged 4 years and older: • Mini Club Med (4 to 10 years). • Juniors’ Club Med (11 to 17 years, during European school holidays). • A dedicated, specially trained team of G.O’s looks after children. • Activities are organised from 8:30am to 5pm and from 6:30pm to 9pm, 6 days a week. Optional Extras…. (Not included in the Club Med package price) • Snowsports (2) Club Med Ski Service, option of hiring your ski or snowboard equipment. • Discovery (2) NEW: Trip to the summit of the Jungfrau and lunch at the summit, from 4 years. Transport • Closest Airport: Zurich. • Transfer: 2 hrs 30 mins Credit cards accepted in the Village (Only for settlement of bills): Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Diners. Information is subject to change without prior notice

For a quotation and more information please contact : Exotic Vacations: Tel: 012 369 6130 E-mail: esmep@exoticvacations.co.za Website: www.exoticvacations.co.za Issue 3 / 2009

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Positano The emerald of the Italian Amalfi coast.

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“It is a dream place that isn’t quite real when you are there and becomes beckoningly real after you have gone”. John Steinbeck Text & Images: Oltremare.

The Amalfi Coast, or Costiera Amalfitana in Italian,

is a stretch of coastline on the southern side of the Sorrento Peninsula of Italy, extending from Positano in the west to Vietri sul Mare in the east. Renowned for its rugged terrain, scenic beauty, picturesque towns and diversity, the Amalfi Coast is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site and the entire coastline is scattered with one romantic, quaint town after another – each with its own local history and features. Positano in particular captured our imagination because of its unique setting – beautiful buildings which seem to almost cling to the cliffside; the local cuisine; its reputation as host to a number of local Italian fashion labels and so much more. Only 90 minutes from Naples, Positano is on the doorstep of Capri and a short drive away from numerous towns along the Amalfi coast, such as Ravello, which offers a host of summer musical and entertainment events. And here’s a chance for Ray magazine readers to experience one of the gems of the Amalfi coast of Italy for seven nights and return with their creative and adventurous spirits satisfied. Indulge in painting and cooking lessons or diving and hiking excursions, the unique experience of a classical music evening, and two private coastal cruises. And, of course, we will build in some free time for you to be able to tour the boutiques that showcase Positano fashion. Protected from the northern winds by the Lattari mountains, Positano has a mild and dry climate. The structure of the town is very original: its buildings cling in tiers to the rock face and the small houses form the subject of endless photos and paintings. We have chosen Hotel Villa Franca, a charming four-star in

mod-cons to welcome you to the lap of Italian luxury and style. The bar, terrace and lounge look out over the old village and the coastline. The swimming pool is placed at the top of the hotel, the best position in town, and the only one with a full panoramic view of Positano and the Gulf. The wellness centre offers treatments and massages, a sun bed, a Turkish bath and a cardio-fitness gym. This is what your Positano experience will include: Sail away Your package includes two private cruises provided by Cassiopea-Positano. Capri day trip Your Capri day trip starts at around 9:30am from the Positano jetty. Rather than joining the masses on a ferry to Capri, you will be enjoying a leisurely private tour of the numerous grottos and sights around the island. Should you decide to take a dip in the crystalline waters along the way or in Grotta Verde (Green Grotto), towels are provided. You will have most of the day free to see the sights of Capri and do as you wish. You can camp out in La Piazzetta and watch the rich and famous passing through, take in the historical and geographic sites in an open-air taxi, or visit the numerous famous-name boutiques that will transport you to Rodeo Drive or the Champs-Élysées. You will start your return trip to Positano at around 4pm, viewing the amazing sights along the way one last time. Sunset cruise Enjoy a glass of prosecco (Italian champagne) while we take you on a romantic sunset cruise along the beautiful Sorrento coast. You will take in amazing sights such as the Li Galli islands and then head on to the small fishing village of Nerano. This is

“Positano in particular has caught our imagination because of its unique setting of beautiful buildings which seem to almost cling to the cliff side, framed by a burst of flowers, the local cuisine, its reputation as host to a number of local Italian fashion labels and just so much more.” the heart of Positano. Originally an old seigniorial villa, the Hotel Villa Franca was redesigned to include tiled floors, stone from Vesuvius and lacquered terracotta vases, which all typify the surroundings and blend into the original architecture. The romantically decorated rooms are equipped with all the

where we will make our stop for dinner and savour the delights of the local cuisine at a typical local restaurant overlooking the sea. Visit www.cassiopea-positano.com for more information. A classic memory Another gem of the Amalfi coast is Ravello, a town founded in

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T R AV E L both beginners as well as more experienced artists and will be hosting an afternoon session either on the beach front, where he usually paints, or in a more secluded area of the town. All materials are supplied along with some of the local vino to get the creative juices flowing. If you would like to see some of his works and find out more about where he has exhibited, visit www.positanoart.com and click on any of the paintings with the prefix VOL. Explore the big blue You will be able to choose from six dives all located in what is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful marine reserves in the world, Area Marina Protetta di Punta Campanella, extending from Punta del Germano to Massa Lubrense. Your local dive guides are all highly qualified and licensed to enter the marine reserve area. Discover heaven The Amalfi coast and, in particular, the area above Positano, offer some of the most breathtaking views from the mountains lording over this region. It is no wonder that one of the most popular walks has been named ‘Walk of the gods’. Depending on your preference and fitness level we can offer you walks of between two and six hours.

the fourth century AD and about an hour’s drive from Positano. Every summer the town is host to the Ravello Festival, celebrating its artistic connections. It is the oldest of the Italian arts festivals

“Indulge in painting and cooking lessons or diving and hiking excursions, the unique experience of a classical music evening, and two private coastal cruises.” after the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, and is particularly famous for open-air concerts in the Villa Rufolo. You will depart in the late afternoon – the scenic drive is an experience in itself – and then you’ll be treated to a superb dinner in one of the local restaurants and an evening of classical music under the Italian stars. Unique experiences: You can choose any two of the following four hand-picked packages: Cook up a storm Feel like picking up a few delicious Italian recipes from one of Positano’s finest restaurateurs? We have negotiated a special cooking lesson at Lo Guarracino, listed in several guides as one of the most sought-after and highly recommended restaurants, with the founder and chef, Renata. You will be treated to a late afternoon three-course cooking lesson and then get to enjoy your meal. The lesson starts at around 4pm; lasts for about twoand-a-half hours and then you sit down and enjoy your meal with some delicious local wine. Visit www.loguarracino.net. Capture the beauty of Positano with brush and canvas Renowned watercolourist, Pasquale Volpe, is a native of Positano who has exhibited his watercolours around the world, from London to Hong Kong. Pasquale has offered us the opportunity of a painting session to capture the beauty of the area. He has superb patience and is able to accommodate

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The cost: Prices start from €1,995 pp sharing and includes; seven nights’ accommodation in a superior room, transfers from Naples return, Capri day excursion, sunset cruise plus dinner, return transfer to Ravello inc ticket and dinner, plus a choice of two of the four special experiences. The cost of flights is excluded but we are able to assist you in securing flights should you require. Standard terms and conditions apply. Visit www.oltremare.co.uk for details.

Contact us If you are interested in taking up this reader offer, please send an email with ‘Positano with Ray Magazine’ in the subject line to wishes@oltremare.co.uk or telephone Dawn on 011 802 4502 during office hours. Please supply us with the following information: • Name and surname • How many people? • Preferred dates • Experience preferences (choose 2 per person): • Cooking lesson • Painting session • Hiking session • Diving session


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CASTELLO

di Monte

Discover untold luxury & timeless romance, where special memories are made‌ Text: Castello di Monte Images: Michael Maherry

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The perfect balance of luxury, privacy and Location - Castello Di Monte will magically transport you to another era, when life was lived with effortless grace. Situated on the hillside, its tall walls and massive rustic copper gates open to allow you to step into a taste of Tuscany, reminiscent of an old 16th century Italian farmers Villa. Shrouded by a beautiful garden with lavender bushes and olive trees in the front and lemon trees with a trellised garden at the back, the stucco plaster Villa transports one to another place in time. If you linger on the terrace, the sweeping views of Pretoria will snatch your breath away. At Castello, you are our welcomed, honoured guest. FACILITIES at THE HOTEL: Enjoy elegance, tranquillity and grace – if luxury is in the detail, Castello Di Monte flies on the wings of excellence. Your special function at Castello Di Monte, whether you are attending; a business meeting, conference or a small intimate wedding (exclusive use of villa compulsory with only 20 guests maximum), it will be a truly unforgettable experience. The landscaped garden with terraces and running water troughs lends itself to a visual feast – the perfect backdrop for a perfect occasion. Some Other Features: central music system, sauna and steam shower. Jacuzzi in Honeymoon Suite and fire places in

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Bar Lounge & Formal Lounge. Roman outdoor swimming pool, Outdoor chess set & Wine cellar ACCOMMODATION: Bygone grace and modern convenience are seamless companions. For bedtime comfort you are spoilt for choice. Which of the nine luxuriously appointed and individually decorated rooms will you choose from? Will it be the presidential suite, complete with fireplace and four-poster: or the honeymoon suite with handpainted murals: or a freshly made-up classic bedroom some with private balcony’s, fit for royalty? Sixteenth century splendour is enhanced by every modern amenity. Castello Di Monte boasts Jacuzzi and jet showers and well-proportioned ensuites. Your comfort is enhanced with DSTV / Cable, minibar, under floor heating, air-conditioning and of course, morning tea or coffee. • Contact: 402 Aries Street, Waterkloof Ridge, Pretoria, 0181, South Africa P. O. Box 25096, Monument Park, 0105, South Africa Reservations: +27 12 3466 984 Fax: +27 12 4606 739 Email: info@castello.co.za Visit: www.castello.co.za

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Soweto “Feel the Rhythm”

Origins of its Name Soweto obtained its name from the first two letters of “South Western Township” which was the original description of the area. “Soweto is a symbol of the New South Africa, caught between old squatter misery and new prosperity, squalor and an upbeat lifestyle. It’s a vibrant city which still openly bears the scars of the Apartheid past and yet shows what’s possible in the New South Africa” Early development The establishment of Soweto is, like Johannesburg, linked directly to the discovery of Gold in 1885. Thousands of people from around the world and South Africa, flocked to the new town to seek their fortunes or to offer their labor. Within 4 years Johannesburg was the second largest city. More than half the population was black, most living in multiracial shanty towns near the gold mines in the centre of the town. As the gold mining industry developed, so did the need for labor increase. Migrant labor was started and most of these workers lived in mine compounds. However, other workers had to find their own accommodation, often in appalling conditions. Current Status of Soweto. Soweto falls within the municipality of the Johannesburg Metro Council in the province of Gauteng, which appropriately

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Text & Images: KDR Travel & Tours

means place of Gold. The original rental houses have now been sold to the tenants who received a subsidy from the government to cover the cost of the houses. Private sector housing was developed from the 1980’s funded by the various banks. Freehold title is available for the properties. Services are provided by the Johannesburg Metro council and electricity by Eskom. Soweto.co.za Soweto.co.za is part of the KDR Sports and Adventure Travel Pty Ltd group. The web site was started after we noticed that there weren’t any tour companies offering a “complete” tour of Soweto. Many would offer a tour with a “View” of the area through a bus window, but none allowed you to experience it, hear the stories, eat the food, drink the beer and enjoy the vibe of this area. Denis (one of the KDR Sports and Adventure partners) had been involved with housing and “upliftment” projects in Soweto for many years. We started gathering a few role players and information about the area. For a while Denis acted as the KDR Tour Guide helping to train new guides and perfect the tour experience. He now manages the KDR projects in Soweto bringing together businesses, those


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able to help and those most needing the help. Denis is one of the most respected fund raisers and project managers working in Soweto and coined the phrase “Experiential Tourism”. The tours focused on getting people out of the vehicles and into the markets, the hostels, the squatter camps and into some real shebeen’s (local bars). We were showing clients around squatter camp areas like Mshengeuville in Mofolo, but we realized the best way for tourists to learn about the area was from the people who lived there. The local residents were helping us with our tours, showing clients into their houses and explaining their way of life. Some of the residents started earning a small salary from us. Partnering with some of our clients, we found ways of helping the community by helping to start and run crèches, food programs and educational programs. KDR Travel & Tours Development Initiatives in Soweto KDR Travel & Tours Philosophy on Development KDR Travel & Tours as a responsible tour company is committed to investing in development projects in its area of operation. A particular focus is on Soweto where KDR Travel & Tours’ focused business – www.soweto.co.za – is a leading tour company in the area focusing on both local and international tourists as well as South African companies wishing to expose their staff to the dynamics, history and culture of Soweto and its people.

Arising from the exposure we have to the dynamics of Soweto and a desire to put something back into the community within which we operate on a commercial basis, the company has decided to develop a community development programme or Corporate Social Investment philosophy, but with a difference. KDR Travel & Tours has developed the philosophy of “Development Tourism” where by it exposes tourists to the cultural and developmental aspects of the area, whilst at the same time contributing directly and indirectly to the upliftment of people in need. As part of the process, tourists, local and international, as well as private and corporate, are given the opportunity to participate and contribute financially, in kind and in time to the various projects. A portion of company profits (including a direct percentage of tour profits) is invested directly by the company in the projects. Other donors are encouraged to contribute where they have an interest. In this regards a new special section 21 not-for-profit company has been formed. Focused Development: The following areas of development are concentrated on: • Early childhood development, • Youth leadership. • Sports, • Arts and Culture. • Environmental issues. Early Childhood Care Program: KDR Travel & Tours and the Bridge School initiated the establishment of crèches in informal settlements in 2004 in

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T R AV E L Soweto. Subsequently with support from Nick and Lynne Hudson and RMB, a section 21 not-for-profit company was established in 2007 to formalize the management of financial support from donors – Soweto Youth and Development Projects (SYDP). One of the prime foci of SYDP is providing preschool care and school preparation for children of poor families who normally could not afford to send their children to one of the many private crèche facilities run on a commercial basis. (The fees (normally from R180pm) at these schools are not affordable on a child care allowance of R200.) Most of the parents of children attending our schools are unemployed. The teachers are being empowered to take ownership of the management aspects but with support through SYDP. Two crèches are currently being supported: Siyakhuliswa Educare and Preschool. (Meaning: “we are getting a hand up”) Located in Lehae. This facility was initially established in the Mshenguville squatter camp in Soweto and was relocated to Lehae, to the south of Soweto near Lenasia, in the beginning of 2007 as the residents of Mshenguville were being relocated to the new “RDP” development in terms of the governments housing initiative to do away with informal housing. The crèche is presently located on the housing site of the manager/teacher Ms. Lilian Nxumalo. Application has been made to the council for the lease of a permanent crèche site Erf 799 Lehae, which is well located in the area.

developed so as to increase enrollment numbers. Substantial funding will be required for the new developments in due course. Siyakhuliswa Kids: Ekukhanyeni Crèche (meaning “the bright”): Located in the Diepkloof Hostel complex Soweto. The crèche started in the beginning of 2006 in one of the old single quarter rooms in the old migrant worker hostel, a notorious legacy of Apartheid. The conditions are very poor in the hostel complex which is no longer run as a hostel (which is presently a squat), but the council has started on an upgrade programme for the entire complex, and new houses for families and singles are currently being built. Application has been made to the council to allocate a permanent site in the redeveloped area. The teachers here are Sylvia Mafa who also underwent the level one Asha training, Elina Mazibuko and Queeneth Majola together with a cleaning and cooking assistant. Currently there are 66 children enrolled, all coming from the hostel, and the fees are kept very low, R30pm, because of the poverty prevalent in the hostel. We are working hard to ensure that the crèche complies with municipal requirements and it is registered with the department of health. An “edutainer” (a converted shipping container 2.2X12m) and two wooden “wendy” houses (3x5 and 3x6) provide the classroom facilities. Three prefab buildings have been installed to provide facilities for a kitchen and two toilet blocks.

It is understood that the site has been allocated but the legal formalities are still under negotiation with the Johannesburg Property Company. It is hoped that the crèche can relocate to the official site during 2009. Lilian has been trained by Asha at level one and she is assisted by an assistant teacher as well as a cook/cleaner. Additional training is planned for 2009 as soon as a suitable course is scheduled by Asha or another training institution. Some 37 children aged from 2 to 6 attend the school. The crèche is located in an “Edutainer,” a converted shipping container. The facility is well appointed but cramped. Flush toilets, an office/sickroom and storeroom have recently been added. As soon as the crèche site has been formally allocated, the new facilities will have to be planned and developed in terms of council requirements. It is hoped that the increased space available will enable expanded and permanent facilities to be

Playground equipment is provided. There is limited playing space in the fenced off grounds, and rubber matting covers the playing area making for a clean environment. Ekukhanyeni crèche: There is ongoing need for funding of the two crèches. There is presently a critical need for financial support to continue to meet the monthly needs of the two crèches to the extent of approximately R10.000 pm. Parent fees are insufficient to cover the food and other running expenses (including the stipends for the 7 staff employed at the two crèches) and the funding of the shortfall comes from donations. Other Projects: Other initiatives supported include youth and educational programmes in Kliptown and Lehae. In particular the Kliptown Youth Program is supported in a number of ways.

“As soon as the crèche site has been formally allocated, the new facilities will have to be planned and developed in terms of council requirements.”

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TR AV E L A group of dynamic young people from this extremely disadvantaged area are engaged in developing the youth of the area in the fields of Arts and Culture, Sports, Literacy and school enhancement, tertiary support and bursaries and a feeding program. Some 350 young people of the area are actively involved in the programs. Sport sponsorship is an important area of development especially soccer and netball. Clubs are supported in Kliptown and Lehae. In partnership with Altus sports, an exciting initiative has been introduced in Kliptown, Lehae and Diepkloof called “Life’s a Ball”. This is a morality and character building program using sport. Some 25 young people have been trained in leadership and various sporting codes including soccer, netball, cricket, volleyball and athletics. These “sports officers” are then deployed in schools and community centers working with young people, mainly school children doing coaching and development. Wild life and environmental projects in partnership with the Jane Goodall Institute South Africa: In this initiative food gardens have been established in Kliptown and Lehae, tree planting and greening initiatives are underway in the above areas and Diepkloof and animal

awareness and environmental programs are ongoing involving mammal courses and excursions to the Zoo and game reserves like Suikerbosrand and Pilanesberg. Musically talented youth are also supported and a band called ‘Duduzile and the Young talent’ is being supported. Funding: A portion of tour fees goes into development projects but clients and others are encouraged to support these worthwhile initiatives on a once off or on going basis. To this end a dedicated banking account handles all donations through the Section 21 Company: Soweto Youth and Development Projects, Bankers: FNB, 4 Merchant Place Code 200607 A/C No. 62156534200. This company has a representative board (29% of directors are black) and as all financial and other support is targeted at disadvantaged communities in and around Soweto, BEE broad based criteria are met, thus enabling companies supporting the company projects to apply for rating. For more information please contact us on: Web: www.soweto.co.za Email: tours@soweto.co.za Telephone: 011 315 1534

Soweto and Johannesburg Tours: Soweto Half-Day Tour Soweto Half Day tour, Johannesburg with hotel transfers ideal for corporate cultural teambuilding and airport stop over’s. Visit the Hector Pieterson Memorial, Vilakhazi Street, Diepkloof, and Baragwanath Taxi Rank, Kliptown Squatter Camp with airport and hotel pick-ups and transfers From: R 418.00 per person Aprox Time: 09h00 - 12h30

Johannesburg and Soweto Tour From Colonialism through Apartheid to Democracy Johannesburg and Soweto tour. Take your Soweto tour a step further - why not spend part of the day seeing Johannesburg and how its growth and history are directly linked with that of Soweto’s. This is an essential trip for anyone interested in the Miracle of Transformation that is South Africa. From: R 700.00 per person Aprox Time: 7/8 hours

Soweto Full Day Tour The tour is a very “experiential” tour. We take our guests out the vehicles, into the homes and workplaces of Sowetans. From visiting hostels and squatter camps to having drinks in a real shebeen, our clients get more than just a bus trip with commentary through this world famous city. From: R 660.00 per person Aprox Time: 6/7 hours Full Day Tour and Power Swing Enjoy a full day Soweto tour visiting Ekukhanyeni crèche, Bara market, Rotsos Shebeen, Twin towers Power Swing, hector Peterson Museum, Vilakazi Street, Regina Mundi, Kliptown Squatter camps, and enjoy a delicious lunch at one of the top restaurants. From: R 1 100.00 per person Aprox Time: 6/7 hours Johannesburg City Tour Visit Liliesleaf, the Constitutional Court in Hilbrow and view Johannesburg from the ‘Top of Africa’ on the top floor of the Carlton Centre. The tour takes a trip to the Apartheid Museum and New Town for an interactive shopping spree at a Flea Market. Lunch is included From: R 750.00 per person Aprox Time: 7 hours

Evening Shebeen Tours Are you tired of the usual boring function restaurants inundated with the irritating Fun Police???? Then try something a little more adventurous for office party and sample some true African Hospitality. To truly experience Soweto, its people and its vibrant atmosphere, you have to visit this amazing place by night... Ask us for the best available price Aprox Time: 7/8 hours An Amazing Race Our newest and most popular event picks you and your colleagues up from the office. In Soweto, you will compete in team-building exercises whilst experiencing the vibe of Soweto. Liliesleaf Farm Liliesleaf aims to bring the events that took place in Rivonia 45 years ago into South Africa’s current socio-political context by allowing the original infrastructures to recreate the living and working environment at the time of the raid. The restoration process was a collaborative effort between archaeological findings, oral recollections and archival and historical research to document the history of the liberation struggle for current and future generations. Issue 3 / 2009

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True Huguenot Story A beautiful story of hope and faith is the one of Guillaume Chenu, who was not yet fourteen years of age when his family arranged for him to embark on an English vessel in order to prevent his forceful conversion to the Roman Catholic Church. Text: Vigne, Randolph Images: Michael Maherry

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Bound for Madeira, the St Joseph left Bordeaux

on 22 March 1686, with Guillaume Chenu on board. His family arranged with the captain of the ship to send the youngster to Holland at the first opportunity after arriving at Madeira. From there it would have been relatively easy to reach one of his eldest brothers, Jacques, who held an important position in Germany at the court of Margrave John George II of AnhaltDessau. As was expected, the St Joseph was searched for Huguenot fugitives by the French authorities just before it set sail from Bordeaux. The captain declared that Guillaume was an apprentice send to Madeira to learn the confectioner’s art and he managed to slip through the net. This was quite a credible alibi, since at that time the manufacturing of sweetmeats from sugar produced on Madeira and the Canary Islands formed an important part of Madeira’s economy. But the danger of being discovered was not past yet. They had hardly left the anchorage at Bordeaux when they were joined by a convoy of French ships bound for Cadiz under the command of a Monsieur de Villette. After three days they were at last separated from the French convoy by a violent storm in which the St Joseph lost its main mast. After hours of anxiety the ship was eventually saved through the unfaltering diligence of the crew. On the morning of April 5, the Island of Porto Santo was sighted at last. This Island with its golden beaches and fish-rich streams must have been a welcome sight to the crew and passengers. Here they remained all day to refresh themselves. In the distance, to the south, they could see the dark cliffs of the island of Madeira. The following day the 6th, they continued their voyage. Passing Ponta de São Lourenço, with its intermingling of shades of blacks, browns and reds on cliff, soil and rock, they at last dropped anchor at the roadstead of Santa Cruz on the southeast coast of Madeira.

education. As young as he, was Guillaume stood his ground. Having had an aversion for the Jesuits and their methods of indoctrination, he thanked the commanding officer for his concern but stated firmly that he was sufficiently instructed in matters of religion and certainly had no need for instruction by any Jesuit priest. Furthermore he wished to have nothing to do with them, and that it would be of no use putting him under their care for he would not respond to their instructions or answer any of their questions. The commanding officer was furious. He told Guillaume that he was damned and instructed him to leave on a barque for France within two days. If he was found on the island after that time he would be thrown into prison where he would remain for much longer than he might have anticipated. Guillaume was troubled. He felt dejected and was quite fearful of the commander’s threats. Walking past Igreja Matriz de Santa Cruz, he even felt menaced and oppressed in his spirit. However, he immediately took a firm resolve rather to suffer than to deny his faith. Guillaume prayed and again a door was opened from above through which he could escape. As he walked along, deep in thought, he found himself at the harbour and caught sight of a ship preparing to set sail. His curiosity arisen, Guillaume inquired after the name of the ship’s captain and her destination. He was informed that she was leaving for the East Indies under the command of an Englishman, Captain John Cribb. It suddenly came to him that this must be his means of escape sent to him by God. Without even considering the alternatives, a journey to France or to the East Indies, he immediately called on Captain John Cribb who was still ashore. Explaining his predicament Guillaume implored the captain to let him accompany him, in whatever employment he wished. Captain Cribb was so moved by the young lad’s plight that he

At Santa Cruz Guillaume was placed in the care of two French Protestant merchants, the brothers Jean and Benjamin Phillipe, who owned one of the biggest business and trading firms on the island. To find a ship sailing for the Netherlands proved more difficult than expected. Guillaume had to stay on Madeira for a period of six months before he could leave, but then not to the intended destination. This subtropical paradise had a lot to offer the eyes and the soul of any visitor – the waves lapping beaches of black pebble or the murmur of levadas bringing water from the northwest. All these things conspired together to sooth the youngster’s restless mind, and had circumstances been different, they might have succeeded. There were only two or three weeks left before Guillaume would have been able to board a ship bound for Amsterdam when things took a turn for the worst. A small barque arrived from Lisbon with instructions from the French ambassador to Guillaume’s host. The order was sent to the commanding officer of the island who summoned the Phillipe brothers. They were to convert to Catholicism immediately or leave the island within eight days. The following day Guillaume was summoned to the commanding officer himself and various questions regarding his religion was put to him, which Guillaume answered as best as he could. His interrogator was not satisfied, alleging that Guillaume was still too young to know what was best for him. He indicated that he intended putting Guillaume in the care of two Jesuit priests, thereby ensuring that the young man receive a decent

granted him enough time to fetch his few belongings from his hosts, who lived not far away, and to whom he bade a brief and sad farewell. So it was on that very same day, 4 October 1686, that Guillaume went on board the frigate HMS Bauden as the personal servant of the captain. The Bauden set sail immediately. For a second time he succeeded in eluding the Roman Catholic persecutor. But he would be sailing in a southerly direction away from the Netherlands and Germany, from his family and friends. If he could have only known what was lying ahead...But even then he would not have been troubled since Guillaume Chenu de Chalezac was under the protection of the God of the Huguenots, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. From Madeira the Bauden sailed to the island of Maio in the Cape Verde Archipelago. The splendour of turquoise seas and white beaches on the western coast of this rather flat island were offset by a near bareness of hardy thorn trees and salt flats. Here they took in some salt and bought a number of cattle from the local inhabitants. They were told that the island was recently raided by the crew of a pirate ship in which some cattle were lost. Due to torn rigging needing repairs the Bauden had to drop anchor in the harbour of the nearby island of São Tiago. They had just entered port when another ship, flying no flag, tried to follow. However, the wind started blowing right off shore, so that she could not enter and had to bear away and drop anchor on the other side of the island. Two or three days

This was quite a credible alibi, since at that time the manufacturing of sweetmeats from sugar produced on Madeira and the Canary Islands formed an important part of Madeira’s economy.

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later the unknown ship tried to reach them again. But again the ship did not succeed in entering the harbour and had to bear away one more time. In the meantime two of the ship’s soldiers who went ashore did not return. The captain suspected that they were either killed or deserted the ship, but decided to stay for a few more days in case they show up. The next Sunday two men dressed like priests came aboard the Bauden under the pretext of collecting alms and were welcomed by Captain Cribb. They asked to be shown around the ship which the captain instructed

windward side of the HMS Bauden. Being of Dutch design the crew of the Bauden were under the wrong impression initially that she was an Indiaman bound their way in great need of water and other provisions, since she has been unsuccessful in entering the harbour at São Tiago. Soon the wind died down. However, the still unknown ship succeeded in closing the distance between the two ships and a boat manned by six men was lowered which approached the Bauden. The rowers lay upon their oars just outside musket shot and hailed the frigate. Information about the two ships was exchanged. Viewing the Bauden for some time in silence they bade them a pleasant voyage and returned to their ship. In the meantime the Bauden’s ‘prospective glass’ had been put to use to obtain a better view of the unknown ship. With a shock they suddenly noticed that the ship itself was actually being rowed towards them by twelve oars on a side. Her real intentions were now quite clear – she was a Roque of the seas intended on capturing the Bauden. Captain Cribb had the alarm bell rung to summon the crew unto deck. The ship’s chaplain said a prayer and in the words of Guillaume Chenu urged them ‘more with a bellicose than a scholarly eloquence’ to defend themselves to the last man. Thereafter preparations to ready the frigate for battle started in all earnest. The ship’s guns were double loaded with double and round shot, two of the biggest sails were taken in, the yards and spars were fastened and the deck was cleared. As a nasty surprise to any pirate boarding the ship from the rear or the front, the powder coffers were fetched, two to the poop and two to the forecastle. To ensure an even warmer welcome, melted butter were poured and peas strewn on both the poop and forecastle decks to make it slippery, while two boards struck full of ‘ten penny nails’, were placed in position with the nails facing upwards. In the meantime the captain had assigned the crewmembers to their posts. Guillaume was placed at the door of the magazine with the task of handing out ammunition to the crew. The commander spoke some words of encouragement and everyone went to his station as ready as could be. At about noon the pirate ship, flying French colours, came within shouting distance of the Bauden. Captain Cribb was instructed to lower the frigate’s boat and come aboard the French ship. His answer was that if they had any honest intentions they should rather send somebody aboard the Bauden. In broken English one of their crewmembers then indicated that boarding the frigate was exactly what they intended doing, where upon Captain Cribb answered: ‘You are welcome. If you can win her,

They started off at about eight o’clock in the morning. It took them until four in the afternoon before they were close enough to attempt a landing, but due to rocky shores and rough seas they could not. the gunner to do. But something about the priests behaviour made him very uneasy, and why would clergymen be asking so many questions about the crew and armament of the Bauden? So he ordered the ship’s boat tobe manned and the priests to be put ashore. The next day the unknown ship tried to enter port again, but again the wind was not in their favour. They hailed the Bauden, but their words could not be picked up by the crew. They seem quite desperate to make contact with the Bauden. In the end they had to leave. Captain Cribb waited a few more days for the missing soldiers, but without any success. On 8 November he at last gave orders to leave the safety of São Tiago harbour. Early one morning, a week or so later, the same Dutchbuilt ship, which tried to enter the harbour, was spotted on the

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you can have her.’ No sooner had these words been spoken when roques from the French ship fired a volley of small shot into the frigate’s crew. Everybody took cover. The Bauden returned the enemy’s fire and the battle had started in all earnest. Twice the pirates succeeded in boarding Captain Cribb’s ship, once at the bow and once at the stern, throwing fifty to sixty men into the attack, but in both cases they were driven off the ship, the powder boxes being especially effective. During the fight the captain went from bow to stern, encouraging soldiers and sailors to stand fast and keep on fighting. He was wounded twice, once in the thigh and once in the stomach, but he kept on giving orders and encouraging his crew. Once when he passed Guillaume at the door of the magazine, where he was loading the crew’s


TR AV E L muskets, he told the young lad, who must have been scared almost out of his wits at that time: ‘Take courage Frenchman and drink a little brandy to strengthen yourself’. For the third time this brave commander was wounded, receiving two musket shots in the chest. This time it was fatal and he died close to where Guillaume was stationed. He had given his life to save his ship and his crew. Yet once more the enemy tried to get foothold on the Bauden, but for the third time they were driven back. The enemy’s gunwale was by now beaten in, having received many a cannon shot between ‘wind and water’. All of a sudden the pirates’ courage left them like the wind dying down on a sailing ship. They called off the attack altogether and limped off in need of finding a suitable place for careening their ship. Fallen pirates were everywhere – on the poop, the forecastle and on the main deck. One of them, a walking arsenal, was found dead on the poop together with a cutlass, a poleaxe, a musket, a stinkpot,

none of the helmsmen knew this particular part of the coast. At this stage Richard Salwey made a fatal decision by putting a boat ashore to acquire more reliable information about their position and to obtain fresh provisions in case they were still some distance from the Cape of Good Hope. Having long since passed the Fairest Cape, they were actually along the Wild Coast, close to what was known as the River São Christovão on most of the maritime maps of that time. This was a very dangerous and inhospitable part of the coast which do not normally react very friendly to boats being put ashore. After having taken the Bauden as close as possible to the coast, the ship’s boat was launched with a party of eight, including Guillaume Chenu. They started off at about eight o’clock in the morning. It took them until four in the afternoon before they were close enough to attempt a landing, but due to rocky shores and rough seas they could not. One of their parties jumped into the water and

Being of Dutch design the crew of the Bauden were under the wrong impression initially that she was an Indiaman bound their way in great need of water and other provisions, since she has been unsuccessful in entering the harbour at São Tiago. two pistols, powder charges and bullets and a length of rope to tie down anyone taken prisoner. The bodies of the enemy were cleared from the deck and thrown into the sea. Useful items were removed to keep as booty. As his part of the booty Guillaume received a new pair of breeches, a seven-foot gun and a brace of pistols. According to the young Huguenot’s estimates about 150 of the 300-strong pirate crew were killed, while the Bauden’s losses were only eleven. These were Captain Cribb, the first pilot and nine seamen or soldiers. The wounded counted 24, one of them being the merchant Richard Salwey. The battle was won and the pirates had left. Apart from having lost their leaders, the casualties on the British ship were of a negligible nature. Once again the God of the Huguenots had protected Guillaume Chenu in a mighty way. Things could have been different. Had the pirate ship succeeded at entering the harbour back at São Tiago when the foremast of the Bauden’s rigging had been down for repairs, they would have been an easy prey for these rogues. Or had the Bauden’s crew not succeeded in repelling the pirate attack at sea on three critical occasions, Guillaume might have ended back in France. Or if it had not been for Captain Cribb’s bravery, the lives of a captured frigate crew might even have ended in execution. So with God’s grace Guillaume Chenu de Chalezac continued his journey aboard the HMS Bauden, bound for India, after they have spent the night after the attack to repair the ship’s rigging. With the merchant Richard Salwey, now performing duty as master of the ship, they headed southwards towards the Cape of Good Hope. The British frigate circumvented the southernmost point of Africa without mentioning it in any of the records at our disposal. Neither did they make use of the anchorage in Table Bay or the hospitality provided by the VOC refreshment station at the foot of Table Mountain. Whether this was on purpose or through poor navigation and adverse weather conditions we can only speculate. The first we hear about the HMS Bauden and its crew again is their sighting of land at four o’clock on 8 February 1687, three months after doing battle with the pirate ship. At this time they were in dire need of fresh water and other provisions. They had little salt left and worms had contaminated their beef supply. Most of the men were weak from scurvy and the wounds received during the battle with the pirates did not heal properly. They found themselves in a bit of confusion since

swam ashore, but hardly had he set foot ashore when three tribesmen approached him. He felt threatened, jumped back into the sea and returned to the boat. For three more days they searched for a suitable place to land, but without any success – since ages past this wildest of coasts had been striving hard to keep all intruders out, absorbing waves and breaking ships and boats. Their provisions were running low and in the end they had no choice but to return to the ship, but they could find no ship. There was nothing, only emptiness! The ocean greeted them with silence that was overwhelming and threatening. A heavy wind had sprung up and they could not brave the open sea in their small boat to try and find their ship. They had to return closer inshore where they were surrendered to whims of a merciless coast. The following night a thunderstorm broke loose with a fury that was more than intense. It seemed as if all the elements were conspiring together to bring about the destruction of eight men and a boat. Lightning and wind prevented them from hoisting the sails and the huge swell soon began to fill the boat. They had only caps and hats at their disposal to bail out water in order to keep afloat. Peals of thunder kept on ringing in their ears. The constant roar of monstrous waves smashing themselves to smithereens in their relentless onslaught upon an unyielding rock barrier almost drove them out of their minds. They could hardly hear one another and were unable to follow the orders of the crewmember who navigated their boat. The thick blackness of night hung like a blanket upon them. They became fearful and miserable. They did not fare much better the next day. The onslaught the previous night was replaced by hunger and thirst. For five more days they remained in this wretched state without food and water. On the sixth day they found themselves close to a huge rock protruding from the sea about three km from the mainland. Here they landed their boat with great difficulty in the hope of finding at least some fresh water, but to no avail. This rock was totally barren, the only life being strange flightless birds that were unfamiliar to them. They killed some of these birds, but due to lack of firewood and any means to light a fire they had to eat them raw. They also drank their blood which quenched their immense thirst somewhat. By now they were totally exhausted from a lack of sleep and constant toil and they could no longer stand the wretchedness of the situation. The crew of the boat had two options: They could use the little strength they Issue 3 / 2009

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T R AV E L still had to reach the mainland and face the possibility of a quick death by drowning or being killed by tribesmen, or they could keep on looking for the Bauden facing a lingering death in their open boat. They chose the first. They gave up all hope of finding the ship from which they had departed and headed for shore. Ten days after leaving the Bauden, during which they had gone through indescribable travails, they landed their boat on a sandy beach and stepped onto Southern African soil, many a league from civilisation and the settlement at the Cape of Good Hope, which they had bypassed. Guillaume and his crew members had become castaways somewhere along the south eastern coast of Southern Africa. They were safe for the time being. The same God who had once calmed a storm on the Sea of Galilee had saved one more band of men from yet another angry sea. Immediately after landing, Guillaume, the helmsman and two other crew members set off to look for water which was their greatest need at that moment. They had not gone far when they saw six natives with a herd of cattle, who upon seeing the white men immediately took off, leaving their cattle behind. Guillaume and his shipmates tried to call them back, but without any success. One of them must have had previous contact with a ship plying the sea route to India, or some information about these pale foreigners and their trading goods must have reached his ears. He hesitated for a moment and the white men redoubled their efforts to convince him of their friendly intentions. His curiosity got the better of him and setting aside his fear and mistrust, he approached them with outstretched hand, palm turned upwards. Much impressed with the good manners of this noble son of Africa they almost trampled each other in an effort to shake hands with him. His was not overly impressed. Succeeding in disentangling his hand from that of the last one of these overeager white men with their strange ways at last, he stretched out his hand again, palm still turned upwards. Suddenly it dawned upon them that he wanted something to be placed in his hand other than their own hands. So they warmed his palm with a small piece of copper. With a broad smile he set off after his fellow cattle-herders with an even greater speed they did. He soon returned with a large leather bag filled with curdled milk. The four seamen returned to their comrades on the beach to share what had been bestowed upon them. The curdled milk quenched their thirst and filled their empty stomachs. What a feast it was. Food for connoisseurs. Much better than their last meal of raw penguin meat which had still had left a somewhat fishy taste in the mouth. Using drift wood from the beach and dry branches from the coastal bush, they lit a huge fire with the onset of darkness in order to keep away wild animals and other intruders. Being freed from the confined space of their small boat they were able to enjoy a good night’s rest and the night passed without

their safety, the little band of castaways brought their weapons into plain sight. Not to defend themselves. That they could not do for their powder had become damp during the night. It was meant to be an act of vigilance, nothing more, but as soon as the crowd of onlookers noticed the muskets, they fled – every last one of them. It now became as clear as daylight that these people definitely had previous contact with the white man and his weapons, which might not always have been to their advantage. Not wanting to scare away their only source of food and prospect of survival, the castaways put away their muskets where it could not be seen. Reassured of the white men’s good intentions, the local inhabitants soon returned in numbers, bringing with them chickens, sheep and cattle in order to trade with these strange foreigners from the sea. Guillaume and his shipmates traded a whole ox for a piece of copper as long as a man’s finger. A few glass beads of various colours would also earn the owner a large quantity of whatever meat he preferred. They were impressed. It seemed that from now on they would have no shortage of food. There would be no need to resort to eating raw penguin meat again. After having cut up the ox, they placed the meat in their boat. They were now waiting for the incoming tide to float their boat off again. An old woman approached them with a clay pot for cooking some of their meat. Having done that they passed the pot around and every crew member helped him to the dish. They put the empty pot aside and were ready to enjoy an early lunch. When was the last time they had been blessed with fresh, well-cooked meat? Then something very unfortunate happened, something which is liable to happen, when two unfamiliar cultures meet and not sufficient cool headedness and foresight is applied. Seeing that the food had been served, the old woman ran up to them all of a sudden, wanting to retrieve her empty pot. Caught off balance by the abruptness of her act, the helmsman, realising that they actually still needed this pot for preparing future meals, lurched forward to try and stop her from doing so. The old woman got frightened; wild-eyed she grabbed the pot and started running away. Not wanting to lose such a valuable item, the helmsman rushed after her trying to stop her from disappearing into the crowd. He shouted at her, indicating that he wanted to pay for the pot. The crowd of onlookers totally misinterpreting his actions, thinking that he wanted to do her harm, rushed at the small band of castaways and attacked them with stones, spears and knobkieries and whatever they had at their disposal. Due to the suddenness and fury of the attack, the crew did not have time to retrieve their muskets. They could only run into the surf trying to escape the violent onslaught. As Guillaume was retreating with his comrades, he received a heavy blow against the skull. He was felled like a log, but immediately jumped up again, desperately trying to follow the

any incident. Or so it seemed. Word had quickly spread about the arrival of the strangers and their copper. The next morning when the very first light of the new day enable the human eye to discern familiar things like rock and beach and bush, they were quite surprised, if not horrified, to be welcomed not only by previously imagined objects of nature, but by what looked like each and every inhabitant of the local area. It seemed as if hundreds or even thousands of them had arrived silently under the cover of darkness. They filled the whole beach. Feeling totally overwhelmed by this mass of humanity and fearing for

rest of the party into the surf. He did not get much further when, upon receiving a flurry of blows, he was felled again. Guillaume was so close to the surf, but this time he was not able to get up again. The last thing he could remember before losing consciousness was the distant roar of the sea and the salty smell of wet sand. When Guillaume came to he was alone. The only sound was that of the sea and a seagull crying overhead. Nothing more! Sitting up painfully he tried to remember what had happened. He had three painful gashes on his head, his feet and hands were badly swollen and his body was black and blue

Not wanting to lose such a valuable item, the helmsman rushed after her trying to stop her from disappearing into the crowd.

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TR AV E L all over. It took some time before he could recollect his senses. Then everything rushed back – the smell of cocked meat with his mouth watering, the old lady and the pot, the unexpectedness and fury of the attack and their mad dash for the safety of the surf. Guilluame was still trying to stand up straight on wobbly legs, wondering what had happened to his comrades, when he was approached by two black men. They took him by the hand and led him to a river close by. Here they washed his bloody

did not really made any impression on his battered mind. Not at this stage. He was alive, but he was only a boy of fourteen and he was alone, and now this loneliness was threatening to overwhelm and crush him. His head and his body were still hurting. He felt lost. Lost in a country most people haven’t even heard about. He could not even speak the language and where would he now find anything to trade for food. Not even the sound of surf on sand could sooth his troubled mind. For a

head and then took him to where they lived. They put some food before him, but Guillaume had lost his appetite and was not able to make use of their hospitality. He had to know what happened to his comrades. With great difficulty he succeeded in escaping from the watchful eyes of his benefactors. Reaching the beach it wasn’t long before he started discovering the bodies of his comrades, one after the other. None of them had made it to safety. They were killed, all of them to the last man! These were his friends whom he had come to know so well over the last ten days in the confined space of their boat. For one fleeting moment he almost considered taking his own life. But looking at the mutilated bodies of his friends and with tears rising in his eyes, it all of a sudden came to this young fugitive from France that it was a wonder indeed that he was still alive. The God of the Huguenots, a God of miracles, had protected Guillaume Chenu d Chalezac once more again. The fact that he had been struck down first had saved him from certain death. Their attackers had pursued his fleeing shipmates with a single-minded determination to spend all their fury on those still fleeing from them. So intended were they on their gruesome task that they had actually forgotten about the fallen boy and did not return immediately to finish him off. Only after they had succeeded in spending their pent-up fury did they return to strip him of all his clothes. He also realised that had he been felled after reaching the surf he would have surely drowned in his unconscious state. But all these things and the boundlessness of God’s mercy

moment he almost succeeded in overcoming this feeling of total despondency, but then he lost it all. He took off like a madman running to nowhere, trying to destroy himself. When he reached a river he did not stop and although he could not swim and did not know how deep the stream was, he threw himself into the water, not caring anymore about life or death. On reaching the middle of the stream the current took hold of him and he started drifting toward the sea. But by some sort of a miracle he did not drown as was his intention, but was actually deposited onto a sandbank in the middle of the river. From here he could easily make his way to the riverbank. Guillaume’s troubles were not over yet. He was soon to be afflicted once more, like gold is being finally purified from the last bit of dross that in total obstinacy did not want to be separated from which should be unsullied. After he got out of the river he just kept on stumbling ahead. Where he was going he did not know and he did not care. Turning around he saw two blacks running towards him at full speed. They soon overtook him and tried to force him to turn around. It seemed as if they wanted him to accompany them. Guillaume could not understand what was being said. So he just kept on, trying his best to ignore them. This angered the two men to such an extent that they started beating him severely. Now Guillaume could really not care what was happening to him. He was in such a bad shape physically and psychologically that he could not resist his assailants in any manner. So he just lies down and let

Guillaume and his crew members had become castaways somewhere along the south eastern coast of Southern Africa.

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Image: Koos van der Lende

the blows rain down upon him. They were welcome to hit him as long as they wanted to. It was as if his assailants had become possessed by demons. They just kept on hitting and hitting until in the end they could go on no more. Then they simply walked away leaving the young boy behind, more dead than alive. Two full-grown men had assaulted a mere boy, fourteen years of age, throwing everything into the attack until they could keep it up no longer. But the blows of their knobkieries merely bounced off his body without any of his bones being broken or his skull being cracked. This was another divine miracle in the life of Guillaume Chenu de Chalezac, if not the greatest miracle of them all. But the young man was not quite ready yet to accept the truth of it all. Soon afterwards he was approached by another two blacks. Expecting to be assaulted once more, he just kept on lying in the same position. But these two were true Samaritans. Instead of hitting him, they picked him up and dragged him towards their hut. Here they lit a fire to warm him, applied cow dung to his

insight was confirmed beyond any doubt. At the end of the day, as he was driving the cattle back to the owners’ kraal, he saw a man coming toward him. Although he was wearing the traditional garb of animal skins, there was something different about him. He had an enormous beard with a shock of unruly white hair. The man stood still, looking intensely at him who could not believe his eyes. He was actually looking at another white man, albeit a bit more suntanned than the normal specimen from Europe. The man started addressing him in English, but neither being fluent in this language they had to resort to Portuguese in the end, the only language they were both comfortable with. Guillaume learned that the stranger standing before him was of the Dutch survivors from the Stavenisse who had left Terra da Natal more than a year ago and had arrived in the area of the local chief a few months earlier. He indicated that a group of them were determined to reach the Cape of Good Hope by foot. They intended leaving on 20 March and if Guillaume was

In the meantime, in order to keep body and soul together, he entered the service of the VOC as a seaman and did that for a while. head wounds and provided him with something to eat. He was not allowed to lie idle for too long. It soon became quite obvious though, these two had an ulterior motive in saving his life. The very next day he was sent to look after their cattle. Watching the Samaritans’ cattle gave him enough time to reflect upon his situation. With a wry smile he realised that by now he should actually be becoming used to loneliness and separation. Not long ago he had to leave everything that was close to him – his family and his country – in order to escape the oppressor from Rome. And then he had lost a protector and friend during a pirate attack. Twice now he had been attacked violently. In both cases his assailants had only one objective – to kill him! But twice they had been unsuccessful. The last pair had come at him tooth and nail, throwing everything into the attack, but in the end they had to give up, too exhausted to go on. If such an assault could not kill him...? To think about it, he had not even been able to execute his own destruction, however hard he tried in utter madness. If this is the case, it might just be that God was taking care of him after all. And all of a sudden he knew for certain that his God and his Saviour, who were also his Companion, and who had protected him in the past, would also look after him in the future. It was on the fourth day of cattle herding that this divine

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interested he could join them. The young man accepted his offer with joy. Leaving the cattle behind Guillaume accompanied his newly founded friend to the kraal of the chief where the Dutchman and his comrades were lodging. He was received with kindness and sympathy. Having already mastered the local language to some extent, the Dutchman was able to interpret. The chief was really concerned about Guillaume’s misfortunes. It was definitely not on his instructions that Guillaume’s comrades were killed and that he was treated in this way. As the departure date of their journey to the Cape of Good Hope was fast approaching, each member of the party kept himself busy collecting provisions for twenty four days, in spite of being advised by their benefactors not to undertake such a foolhardy journey. On the appointed date they left with great expectations which soon turned into total disillusionment. On their journey they faced lots of different obstacles and a few died in the process. At the end they had to turn around and go back to their Xhosa hosts who received them with open arms. The group were now living in utter disillusionment where everything had been consumed by darkness and depression. There was no thankfulness left for hospitality received from the Xhosa, for safety, enough to eat and the beauty of nature. Guillaume could not stand the negative attitude of his fellow ‘Christians’


TR AV E L any longer, so he turned to the heathen. He found lodging with Sotope, a cousin of the chief, who showered tenderness onto this fair-skinned young man – tenderness ‘that was not that of a barbarian’. He would soon become a permanent member of Sotope’s family. He had given up a self-centred existence and God’s plans could now freely flow through him. Soon after moving in with the new family, he became seriously ill with dysentery. Although he had been delivered from selfcentredness he had not been delivered from the consequences of such a life. That he still had to face. His condition became worse. For three whole months he had to suffer in agony without the aid of any medicine, his only aid being what strength was still left in his body. The members of his adopted family could not stand his suffering at all. He often heard them saying that they

soon produce the reigning king of England, William III. How awesome can things be if they are left in the hands of God. After his interview with Commander van der Stel, Guillaume was showered with kindness. He was promised to leave for Holland at the first available opportunity, and in the meantime he would be treated as one of the van der Stel household. He ate at the commander’s table and slept in the same room as his children of which the youngest two, Hendrik and Cornelis, were about the same age as Guillaume. Soon afterwards a fleet arrived from the East, which left the Cape of Good Hope on 30 June, 1689 with Guillaume Chenu aboard the Spierdijk. They had an uneventful voyage, probably the most joyous one in Guillaume’s life. Near the end of their journey they even encountered two English ships at the

Expecting to be assaulted once more, he just kept on lying in the same position. But these two were true Samaritans. Instead of hitting him, they picked him up and dragged him towards their hut. should rather kill him off instead of letting him suffer any longer. Others wanted to abandon him in a nearby forest so that he could be devoured by wild beasts, but Sotope, whom by now had come to love this young man as a son of his own, forbade anybody to even speak in that manner. In the end Guillaume pulled through and each day he and his foster-father grew closer to each other. Soon after Guillaume’s recovery he was walking along the beach when he came upon a piece of copper the size of a man’s fist which he presented to Sotope as a gift. The natives of that part of the country attached greater importance to copper that any other metal and his foster-father could not stop embracing him. But it was not the material value of the gift by which Sotope was almost overcome, rather the symbolic worth of this act of benevolence which he treasured above all. Guilluame was becoming like one of the family. He took part in the games of the other youngsters of his age. He became carefree again, like a normal child, forgetting about the ordeals he had undergone since he had left Bordeaux more than a year ago. To shorten a very long story, he was rescued by a boat on its way to the Cape of Good Hope and the young French Huguenot had been restored to the fellowship and protection of a spiritual family of Protestant believers. He wrote a letter to be sent off to find out if his family was still alive and what happened to them. In the meantime, in order to keep body and soul together, he entered the service of the VOC as a seaman and did that for a while. Guillaume was summoned by Commander van der Stel who wanted to know if he was the Frenchman who had returned from among the Xhosa. The Commander questioned him about his family in order to verify his identity, where-after he was shown two letters and asked if he recognised the handwriting. Guillaume was staring at the handwriting of his mother and brother. He was overcome with emotion and could not speak. The young French boy, who had become a man, now learned what had happened after he had written to his family. His letter had actually reached Princess Albertine Agnes of OrangeNassau, who was the widow of the stadtholder of Friesland, and had also close links with the Dutch East India Company. This royal lady had written to the Amsterdam Chamber of the East India Company and the wheels were set in motion to bring Guillaume back to Holland from where he could be re-united with his family in the princely state of Anhalt-Dessau. Guillaume had contacts in the House of Orange which he knew nothing about – the very same royal house which would

entrance of the Channel who informed them that the Prince of Orange had been crowned King of England. This news was received with much jubilation. They toasted the health of the king which was followed by a salute from the whole fleet to which the English ships responded. On 24 October 1689, the Dutch fleet reached its destination – the coast of Zeeland. The captain of the Spierdijk took Guillaume with him to his home in Middelburg. After enjoying the hospitality of the captain’s household for several days, they travelled to Amsterdam where he was presented to officials of the Dutch East India Company. It was here that Guilluame learned that his mother and most of his family were now residing with his brother Jacques in Dessau. It was also in Amsterdam that Guilluame sought out a merchant by the name of Jacobus Lakeman to whom his mother had referred him in her letter. He was received in the friendliest way and Jacobus Lakeman also advanced some money to him to enable him to travel to Dessau, where with God’s help he arrived at the end of October. Great was the joy when the ‘lost son’ was welcomed back by the Chenu family. The young man, who had left his footprints among the AmaXhosa in an unknown land far to the South, had returned home at last. The God of the Huguenots had watched over him for four years and would continue to do so for the rest of his life. However, the joy of his return was short-lived, for on the same day Guillaume arrived back, his mother had a stroke. She passed away seven days later, but her greatest wish to see her youngest son, for whom she had prayed constantly, once more, was fulfilled. But what is even more amazing is to see the hand of God in the ordeals of Guillaume Chenu, protecting this young lad, physically and spiritually, later to rejoin his family after spending four years in the unknown. Let us also think for a moment about the anxiety of a mother, having to be separated from their thirteen year old boy, not arriving at his intended destination and not hearing from him during all this time, but still trusting in God’s providence and protection, believing against all odds that she will see her son once again. • Vigne, Randolph (editor): Guillaume Chenu de Chalezac, ‘The French Boy’. The narrative of his experiences as a Huguenot refugee, as a castaway among the Xhosa, his rescue with the Stavenisse survivors by the Centaurus, his service at the Cape and return to Europe, 1686-9. Second Series No 22, Van Riebeeck Society, Cape Town, 1993 for 1991.

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Vive la

FRANCE

France is a patchwork of very distinct regions, and its capital is one of the world’s most celebrated cities of culture. To understand France today, you need to know something of its past.

Text: Nicola Williams; Oliver Berry; Miles Roddis Image: Adele Minnaar; Hannes de Bruyn

France has existed in its present form since the

15th century. The nation’s boundaries are largely natural ones, with the English Channel to the North, the Atlantic to the West, the Pyrenees and the Mediterranean to the South, and the Alps, the Jura Mountains and the Rhine to the east. It is Western Europe’s largest nation and the world’s 47th largest country. Its population of just over 60 million is unevenly distributed between sparsely populated rural regions and large urban, industrialised areas such as Paris and Lyon. Three quarters of French people live in towns and cities. France’s average population density of 109 people per sq km is low in comparison with the rest of Western Europe. The country is divided into 22 regions, including Corsica, which in turn are split into 96 administrative districts (including two Corsican ones), known as départments. The largest region, Ile de France, incorporates Paris, the capital,

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located at a natural basin formed by meandering River Seine, and home to approximately 12 million people. Paris is the energy centre of the country. Highways, railways and airways radiate from there and the city is the political, economic, cultural and tourist hub of France. France receives around 77 million visitors a year, making it the world’s most popular tourist destination. Visitors come for the historic cities, superb landscapes and unsurpassable food and wines. On top of these, the country offers a pleasant climate, glorious beaches, and first-rate winter sport facilities, most notably in the Alps and the Pyrenees, and a rich culture tradition. Paris, its beautiful and cosmopolitan capital city, has always attracted artists, writers, philosophers and composers. It has been called everything from a whore by Henry Miller to ‘one of the most noble ornaments of the world’ by Montaigne. It is certainly the centre of everything French and the nexus of French transport (all distances are measured


TR AV E L from the square in front of Notre-Dame Cathedral). Paris is the world’s fashion capital; it is revolutionary in its grand arts and architectural projects, but it also has one of the best-preserved city centres in Europe. It has a distinctive population, stylish, intellectual and reputedly strong minded, and different from the rural France. The South of the country though, has also played a major role in art and literature. France is the only nation located in both Northern and Southern Europe and this is reflected in the extraordinary variety that is to be found within its borders. After the great glaciers receded from Europe, circa 450BC, France was populated from the East by a large influx of Celtic peoples. These were the legendary Gauls, or Galli, reputedly a strong and independent people, who left an indelible stamp on the French character and celebrated since in every French language classroom from Paris to Martinique as ‘nos ancêtres les Gaulois’ (our ancestors the Gauls). As fossil finds and cave paintings attest, France has been inhabited for millennia. The Gauls settled it, the Romans usurped it and the French made it a nation. France prides itself on capturing the cultural high ground, whether upholding intellectual standards or making a simple salad dressing comme il faut. Yet France today is slightly unsure of its identity. The French contribution to South Africa The Huguenots were French Protestants who were members of the reformed Church which was established in 1550 by John Calvin. They were influenced by the reformation caused by people like Maarten Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, John Wycliff, Johannes Huss, Marsilio Ficino, Pico della Mirandola, Giannozzo Manetti and others who called for a return to a Biblical mindset. They started to read the Bible themselves instead of listening to it being read to them in Latin. They could not find the pope in the Bible, but realise that it is all about Christ. The Roman Catholic Church proceeded to eliminate the Protestants. They had a choice to live, but only if they would deny their believe and convert to the Roman Catholic Church. Some of them decided to flee from France, and they went to different places like Canada, America, Netherland, Germany, Switzerland and South Africa. Although most of the French Huguenots came to South Africa during the year 1688, this country’s Huguenot roots can actually be traced back to the establishment of the very first European settlement at the Cape of Good Hope. Maria de la Quellerie, wife of VOC Commander Jan van Riebeeck who arrived in Table Bay on 6 April 1652 to establish a refreshment station on the sea route to the East, was of Huguenot decent. Maria’s grandfather, a French nobleman by the name of Chretien de la Quellerie, became a Huguenot minister in 1572 and had to flee from France during that very same year after the St Bartholomew massacre. Apart from Maria van Riebeeck, various other Huguenots also settled at the Cape of Good Hope before the exodus of 1688. When, in 1660, the persecution in France became more intense, the number of Huguenots fleeing to the Netherlands increased. Dominique de Chavonnes, an officer of the garrison at the Cape was such a fugitive. We also know that Francois Villion settled at the Cape as early as 1671, as well as the brothers Francois and Guillaume du Toit in 1686. The Huguenots, who arrived at the Cape of Good Hope at the end of the 17th century, consisted of only a fraction of the largescale Protestant flight from France. This happened after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. Nevertheless, their numbers were large enough to have a considerable influence and to leave a lasting impression on the young settlement at the Cape. After the main stream of Huguenots arrived during

1688-1689, they comprised approximately one sixth of the free burgher population. Many of the Huguenots emigrants were highly trained craftsman or experienced farmers and made an important contribution to prosperity in the Cape. They were particular individuals who were well versed in viticulture and oenology (the growing of grapes and making wine, brandy and vinegar). They, as well as their descendants, proved that they were hard-working people and their efforts led to an immense increase in the improvement of quality Cape wines. A number of wine estates have French names to this day, as a reminder of their important contribution to this industry in the Western Cape. The number of vine plants increased from 100 in 1655 (three years after the arrival of Jan van Riebeeck at the Cape) to 1,5 million in 1700. The legacy of the Huguenots was far reaching in South Africa. Today thousands of their proud descendants carry with dignity the surname of which the spelling is unchanged from the original, such as De Villiers, Malan, Du Toit, Du Plessis, Du Preez and Malherbe. The spelling of many was localized, such

as Viljoen, Cronje, Pienaar, Retief, Minnaar and Senekal. The Huguenots are characterized by their intrinsic pride, diligence, integrity and honesty. Although they strove to maintain their own identity at first, they soon intermarried with the other colonists to fully become South Africans. Within two generations even their home language, French, largely disappeared. What remains of lasting value is the proud heritage of men, women and children who suffered for a cause and followed the road of exile to return to their spiritual integrity. This was certainly true of most of the refugees, and the longing which they must have felt for the country which they had left for ever, is reflected in the names which were chosen for their farms which they laid out along the hills of the Western Cape: Languedoc and Provence, La Brie, Calais and Cabrieres; and many others which recalled memories of images from their childhood and the roots from which they sprang. The Huguenots also placed a great importance on the Word of God and the Bible played a central role in their family lives. Bible reading was a daily occurrence and the family and children learned to read by using the Bible. Much of the respect and regard that the Afrikaner has for God today can be traced back to the ethos of the Huguenots. Flowing from their persevering faith, the Huguenots were willing to stand up for the truth and defend it even if it meant they had to risk their very lives. • Information taken from: ‘Die Hugenote en hul erfenis’ by Lynne Bryer & Francois Theron and ‘The French Refugees at the Cape’ by C Graham Botha and ‘Huguenots who came to the Cape’ by the Huguenots Memorial Museum, Franschhoek Issue 3 / 2009

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Issue 3 / 2009

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http://vontyras.jimdo.com or contact Corinna 078 801 9698


GARDE N I NG

Image: Rina Smit

blossoms

AND BLOOMS September is the time to plant summer-flowering bulbs such as candelabra flower (Brunsvigia radulosa), crinums, pineapple flower (Eucomis spp.), blue squill (Scilla natalensis), nerine and watsonia. If there is sufficient space, include clumps of agapanthus, kniphofia, Bulbine frutescens, Diascia integerrima, diorama, Sutera grandiflora and the indigenous foxglove (Ceratotheca triloba). Experiment and see which flowers are best suited for your garden. Seed companies have made it easy for the gardener by developing designer seed mixes to suit a particular situation or season. Some contain a mixture of grasses. Ornamental grasses are part of a natural meadow, adding softness and movement.

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There are a whole range of urban garden types. When buying in urban areas it is not unusual to have a roof garden, courtyard garden, flower garden, vegetable garden, front and back garden in suburban style, a sloping garden a large or small garden.

Urban Garden

Design

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GARDE N I NG Common Traits If urban gardens come in different shapes and sizes, then what are their common traits? Urban gardens are strongly affected by the buildings around them. The surrounding construction affects access to sunlight and can block out light and heat or create areas where there is an excess of heat. If the closest buildings have been built more recently, the debris from these may have affected the soil making it difficult for plants

“However it is possible to grow edible gardens for the purposes of self-reliance, personal gourmet and sustainability� to root. Design and interest in gardens have recently increased dramatically, ensuring that there are many ways to combat the problems of an urban garden and creating gorgeous urban gardens of varying types. Urban Escapism The design of the urban garden is important because in built up area it is often the only space users might claim as one of tranquillity or as a haven from the city. It is a place where there is the control and the will to manipulate it into becoming quite different to its surroundings. A lot of imagination can

go into a garden and the rise of urban escapism has been inevitable. Drawing inspiration from all over the world many urban gardens have themes such as a jungle theme. These themes are usually implemented by professional designers who create gardens using hard landscaping, artistry and plants suited to the available soil and sunlight. These gardens can be built in the heart of urban areas and can be designed to be low maintenance. Gardens that are suited to very little planting, such as courtyard gardens, can also be inspired by other parts of the world. A European theme such as a Greek or Roman style garden can bring a sense of order and quiet to a garden in contrast to a noisy city. Even roof gardens can easily be designed to be a place of relaxation, although they are usually an extension or another room to the house. Water features, container plantations and colour via soft furnishings and lighting and so on can now be relatively easily lifted and situated on a roof. For almost wherever a person would like to go, even fairyland, designers can bring the ultimate escape fantasy to an urban garden.

Edible Gardens It may seem that an urban garden may not be able to have as many functions as a country garden, particularly as they are generally smaller and do not have access to the natural garden soil and wildlife. However, it is possible to grow edible gardens for the purposes of self-reliance, personal gourmet and sustainability. It is possible to grow cherry blossom and citrus fruits with the aid of artificial lighting and heating. Herbs and other more unusual personal gourmet food might also be grown in urban areas, often with the use of containers. Container gardens are easy to establish and the mobility of this type of garden means plants can be moved around gardens, particularly useful in courtyard or roof gardens, to get the best sunlight or to minimise frost damage. Edible gardens are increasing in popularity and can be enjoyed as much in urban or country areas with the use of modern technologies and clever designs of experts who ensure that edible gardens also have appealing scents and visuals. Concealing Technologies Gardens are now often ideally perceived as versatile multitarget spaces. The former division of gardens into different corners or segments has lost its appeal and concealing

technologies are replacing this tradition. This is where the same space is used differently at different times. For example, a child’s play area during the day might be used as a space for entertaining at night and a family dining area on weekends. This type of multi-usable space is usually created through the use of hard landscaping and contemporary design. For example, a roof garden might use large tiles which are suitable flooring for a child to play on and for entertaining. Soft (removable) furnishings and outdoors furniture also enable the same space to be used differently. Other space can be utilised in a small back garden, for example, as a work place during the day and an entertainment room in evenings. This is achieved with the use of outdoor lighting, appropriate colour scheme and seating. It is quite possible to fit a variety of uses into the same space.

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contemporary

GARDEN

DESIGN Contemporary garden design is concerned with current lifestyle trends, popular culture and modern art, innovation and originality in gardens, today.

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GARDE N I NG

Traditionally gardens have either been functional

and used to grow herbs, vegetables and fruit to eat and owners have partially, at least, lived off their land, or used as a point of display, often in the form of flower gardens. Gradually the uses for gardens have increased over the years from growing various plants to keeping pets, parking a car, a play area for children and a shed or workshop. Formerly gardens were most used in the summer for the occasional barbeque and informal outdoor game. More recently people have begun to increasingly use

These features fit well with popular designs, such as a minimalist design or current trends in colour schemes, and add to the overall attraction of the garden. Some are also functional in enabling the garden to become a place to entertain. Modern designs also utilise space as effectively as most people desire their garden to be uncluttered yet inviting, rather than bare. The walls can be seen as a canvas or backdrop to the garden and complement the overall look in the garden. Wall dĂŠcor is increasingly popular as the garden, as a place for entertainment, might be seen as an extension of or another

“The use of steel, chrome, marble and black granite is becoming increasingly popular in contemporary gardens creating visual interest, even unique sites of interest in gardens.� gardens for entertaining and dining, night and day, in addition to some of the more traditional uses. Contemporary gardens are frequently designed for new uses in conjunction with some more traditional uses, for a more demanding consumer with a more discerning eye. Roof and courtyard gardens, small and sloped gardens, gardens with little access to light or poor soil, for example, can be utilised far more effectively with the use of hard landscaping. It is more difficult to grow plants in these types of garden,

room to the house. It follows that in a roof garden, for example, wall mountings such as a relief screen reflecting modern art might feature. Containers for plants are suited to this type of garden and these might also be a modernised feature with the use of galvanised metal containers. In other small gardens the wall space might be used for hanging containers for plants or other attractions. Steel wire gabions which contain unusual choices of sculpture are an example of how the wall might be utilised for contemporary design.

make them look attractive or make them multi-functional, yet hard landscaping and the use of other contemporary materials enables such gardens to be functional and attractive. Shape and Style Other modern features in contemporary design include the use of shape and style. Concentric, circular and square shapes are used more; a circular lawn is more unusual and eye catching. There is also greater choice in flooring from paving, slate, shingle, brick and gravel which builds and varies texture and adds colour. Paving with metal or glass flecks can also reflect light. Levels can be changed dramatically in the garden; a platform garden can be created from raised decking, for example. Contemporary Elements Contemporary style is most clearly inscribed in garden features. The use of metal and metallic colours is increasingly popular in modern design. The use of steel, chrome, marble and black granite is becoming increasingly popular in contemporary gardens creating visual interest, even unique sites of interest in gardens.

Lifestyle Matching The advantage of contemporary design is that busy lifestyles can be taken into consideration in the garden design. Hard landscaping, metal features and sculptures do not need as much attention as traditional gardens and modern gardens can easily be designed with little in the way of maintenance. However, the use of the garden itself can be increased. Lighting for evening use, even outside heating, can be incorporated into the design so that the garden might be used all year round, night and day. For more information, contact: Jamie Ferreira Managing Director Landscape In The Service Of Art Cell: 074 102 2271 Fax: 086 662 2271 jamie@blueraincreations.co.za www.blueraincreations.co.za

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Namaqualand West Coast Wonderland

Images: Michael Maherry

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GARDE N I NG

Namaqualand is a semi-desert environment; however in the spring (July to September) depending on the rains, a miracle occurs. As the rains soak into the thirsty earth, millions upon millions of flowers emerge in a phenomenal explosion of colour which transforms the landscape into a wonderland of beauty. A spring flower tour of the well known Namaqualand flowers is most spectacular in the winter rainfall area on the western, arid side of South Africa. The natural Cape flower phenomenon of the Namaqualand area (kontrei) is regarded as a natural wonder. The flowers on these Namaqualand tours are brightly coloured, sweet scented and massive in numbers to maximise their attraction to pollinators such as wasps, bees and birds by day and moths by night. Namaqualand stretches from the small town of Garies in the south to the Orange River to the north. Its western border is the

wild Atlantic coast, and the remote town of Pofadder marks the eastern border. The Namaqualand spring flowers are justifiably world famous. In a good year this botanical masterpiece puts on a show that is unrivaled anywhere on Earth. If you experience this natural wonder you will remember it for the rest of your life. The region boasts numerous rock art and archaeological finds, dating back several hundreds, possibly thousands, of years. The region is also famous for Rooibos tea – the Western Cape is the only place in the world where it is grown and cultivated. The Namaqua National Park has been established to protect this unique phenomenon. There is no official accommodation in the park; however there are many hotels, guest houses, B&Bs and camping sites available in and around the small towns that dot the vast landscape. •

For more information please visit Garies Garies is one of the most popular tourism centers in the spring flower region. Garies Tourist Information phone number: +27 27 652 1014 Kamieskroon Kamieskroon is another popular flower town. The Skilpad Wild Flower Reserve is located nearby and is definitely worth a visit in the season. Kamieskroon Tourist Information Phone number: +27 27 672 1627 Springbok Springbok is the capital of the Namakwa region and is centrally

located to give you good access to the area. Springbok Tourist Information Phone number: +27 27 712 2011 Port Nolloth Port Nolloth is a small harbour town on the Atlantic coast. Port Nolloth Tourist Information Phone number: +27 27 851 8229 Pofadder Pofadder is a small remote town that was first established as a mission station in 1875. Pofadder Tourist Information Phone number: + 27 54 933 0063

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F O OD

Image: Rina Smit

delights

CULINARY Food is time travel. Flavours, tastes, smells and textures have the power to transport you back to your childhood, to make you feel the way you did when you first tasted a peach, an orange or a caramelised onion and blue cheese tart. Food and emotion are inextricably interlinked. Words by Ruben Riffel

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Menu

REVOLUTIONARY Unveiled at La Colombe Explore Nature through the New “Elements” Menu Text: Adéle Minnaar Images: Michael Maherry

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F O OD

Some say that timing in life is everything, and in the

that complements the food. Each piece has been designed and hand-crafted to have the same feel, shape and style as the food displayed. Dr Landman worked with the Gugulethu Campus of the College of Cape Town as part of an upliftment project, introducing both a whisper of Africa to the design and rounding off the inspirational new menu with a social investment project. Dale-Roberts was recently voted Chef of the Year, and also scooped Restaurant of the Year, with his team, at the 2008 Eat Out Awards. Innovation is clearly an ongoing journey. As Dale-Roberts remarks: “We often say that one must never set boundaries, as this inhibits the creative process. But in this instance, putting parameters on an idea has forced us to think outside the box and we have been able to create a unique and exciting dining experience.”

shellfish and rice with soy mirin tea and ginger. “Forest” is revealed in pine smoked ox tongue, chestnut puree, black mushroom pickle, smoked garlic and thyme velouté. “Mountain” is interpreted in springbok loin with a vintage port, truffle and preserved fig jus, pan-fried foie gras and quince preserved in Rooibos and cinnamon. Dale-Roberts explains: “In conceptualising a menu, or a certain dish, there are many sources from which one can draw inspiration: the seasons, the smells permeating the kitchen, nature, a new ingredient, the weather, a recent food experience or a new plate. The first dish of the Elements menu, which took two months to develop, is the pine-smoked ox tongue – inspired by the rich and heady scent of the forest towards the end of summer. I wanted to make a dish that incorporated all the elements of a forest. The look, the fragrance, the mood.” And it is not only the food that is highly original, but also the presentation. They have teamed up with Dr Adrian Landman of the College of Cape Town’s Art Faculty and together they have designed a range of “Elements” crockery and glassware

The “Elements” menu will cost R800 per person including wine or R650 excluding wine. Dishes may vary according to seasonal availability and Dale-Roberts’ discretionary improvements. •

world of fine dining that notion would be more relevant than most. Not content to rest on his laurels at being included at number 38 in the World’s top 50 Best Restaurants, as well as garnering the highest three star rating in the 2009 issue of the acclaimed Rossouw’s Restaurants guide, Luke Dale-Roberts – executive chef at La Colombe – has just revealed a new menu with a completely original interpretation of cuisine inspired by nature. After months of experimentation and creative exploration, the new Elements menu has been introduced to diners. It is a radical departure from conventional menus – and one inspired by the elements of nature, the seasons and the senses. The “Sea” course for example, consists of Dashi braised

La Colombe will also be running the following specials valid until the 30th September 2009: • Lunch: 3 courses for R210 or 3 courses including a carafe of Constantia Valley wine for R250 • Dinner: 3 courses for R250 or 3 courses including a carafe of Constantia Valley wine for R290 La Colombe is open 7 days a week: Lunch 12:30 – 14:30; Dinner 19:30 – 21:30 (Closed for dinner on Christmas Day, New Year’s Day and Sunday evenings in the winter months) For reservations call: (021) 794 2390 or fax (021) 794 7914 Note: The Worlds Top 50 Restaurant awards is organized by the Restaurant Magazine, with a panel of 800 food writers, food critics and chefs from around the world deciding on which restaurants warrant a position in the top 50. Issue 3 / 2009

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fairview – Haven of cheese, wine and food.

Since Cyril Back first brought milking goats to Fairview in 1980, the Fairview Vineyard Cheesery has continued to grow and develop. With the assistance of Michel Agostinelli, Fairview initially began producing goat’s milk cheese, courtesy of the resident Saanan goats. Today Fairview gourmet cheeses are market leaders, and the innovation of cheese maker Louis Lourens and his team has kept the Vineyard Cheesery at the front of the pack. Now producing a range of cheeses from Goats milk as well as Jersey cow milk, they have scooped up numerous awards at local and international competitions. Their Roydon Camembert was voted best in the world for three consecutive years, at the World Cheese Awards, held in London. A wonderful compliment to their fine wines, Fairview cheeses make any event memorable. Their famous tower and herd of good natured white goats are a familiar sight to visitors at Fairview. For over 25 years Fairview’s dairy goats have supplied milk for the making of a wide variety of soft goats’ milk cheeses that have a distinctive local flavour. Today they are South Africa’s largest producer of speciality cheeses. 64

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F O OD Goat’s cheese is not only delicious to eat, but more easily digestible than cow’s milk due to the smaller fat globules it contains. Goat’s milk is also lower in fat (3.4% butterfat). Their Saanan goats, originally from the Swiss Saanan valley, but now bred and reared on the farm, are milked twice daily over a 300-day lactation period. They milk about 500 does, whose average milk yield is 3 1/2 - 4 litres each. To assist milk production, the does are on a carefully monitored feeding regime, grazing on pastures and supplemented by a balanced ration specially developed for Fairview. Because goats are seasonal breeders, there is a three-month period (July - September) each year when goat’s milk is not available, so

Welcome to The ‘Goats Do Roam’ Wine Company There’s no stopping Fairview owner/vintner Charles Back when his interest in a creative, entrepreneurial project is piqued. It all started with a suggestion by a wine buyer... the man humorously suggested the vinification of a Rhône-style blend called “Goats do Roam”. Back, already known for his panache with Shiraz and always looking for new styles of wine to woo adventurous and discerning consumers, took the ball and ran with it. Thus was born, in 1999, what was for the South African wine scene an innovative blend using Rhône varieties such as Shiraz, Cinsault, Carignan and Mourvèdre with a dash of local Pinotage, which Back had sourced from various vineyards (his own and others) around Paarl and Malmesbury. But, despite the humour of the packaging, the content of the bottle impressed with its quality, combining rich complexity with great drinkability. Since then, Goats do Roam has expanded into a fully fledged wine company with a range of nine whimsically named wines. The Spice Route Wine Company Five centuries ago the ancient mariners braved uncharted seas to round the Cape in search of exotic spices. Their nerve and dash inspired Charles Back to found the Spice Route Winery in 1997. Charles had bought the farm Klein Amoskuil,

“Their Saanan goats, originally from the Swiss Saanan valley, but now bred and reared on the farm, are milked twice daily over a 300-day lactation period.”

they introduced cow’s milk cheeses to supplement the range. Because of its superior quality, only milk from Jersey cows is used at Fairview. They use approximately 20 000 litres of Jersey milk in a day. High butterfat (4.4%) and protein levels (3.7%) give a natural yellow colour to cheeses like Brie, Camembert and blues. Strict temperature regimes are enforced in cheese making. Their milk is collected and transported at 4-5°C and held in storage tanks at 2-4°C. Automatic stirrers keep the temperature constant and the fat in solution. The milk is then clarified to remove any impurities and pasteurised at 75°C for 15 seconds. The team processes it all into cheese within 24 hours. All Fairview cheeses are made with non-animal rennet and are Kosher and Halaal. They are especially delicious when enjoyed with a Fairview wine of your choice.

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and this Malmesbury based farm is now home to Spice Route’s Swartland terrior styled wines. The Spice Route Winery has found its signature wine style in the warm rolling hills along the Cape West Coast. Matching traditional practices in the vineyards with modern, minimalist approaches in the cellar, they produce exceptionally ripe and deep-flavoured wines. The deep red soils sustain unirrigated bush vine through the long warm summers. These harsh conditions are tempered by cool Atlantic breezes rolling in overnight. In its few years since inception had a stratospheric climb into the top echelons of the South African wine industry. Visiting Fairview to taste and buy its internationally acclaimed wines and award-winning homemade, farmstyle goat cheeses? Well, now there’s still another reason to prolong your sojourn on this friendly farm on the slopes of Paarl Mountain with its views across the winelands to Cape Town landmark Table Mountain – The Goatshed. The Goatshed The Goatshed is an informal Mediterranean-style eatery offering light meals and lunches, so-named for Fairview’s cheeky herd of some 600 Swiss Saanan, Toggenberg and British Alphine goats, bred for their milk. The Goatshed menu’s main feature is an array of freshly baked breads and bagels to complement the some 25 different cheeses produced in Fairview’s cheesery. Choose from such speciality breads as rye, focaccia, ciabatta, baby marrow loaves and traditional baguettes. Most are made from naturally fermented sour dough starches derived from grape juice cultures. The choice of cheese, made from both goat’s- and cow’s milk, includes popular Camembert, Brie and cream cheeses; Roquefort and Gorgonzola style cheeses; and speciality cheeses such as Chevin (with garlic and parsley or sun-dried tomato and basil) and Fairview’s own recipes such as


F O OD the Boland Blue fusion of cheddar and blue-veined cheese. All this is enjoyed in the wonderfully relaxed, hospitable ambience of what was originally one of the old wine cellars on the farm. The rustic atmosphere, created by clay-tiled floors and wooden tables, chairs and benches, is enhanced by the eclectic collection of old Cape furniture for which Fairview’s owner/ vintner Charles Back has a passion. The interior extends onto a terrace for alfresco dining on those rare warm, still, sunny days during the usually rainy, cold Cape winter, or the long, hot, hazy days of summer in the winelands. Local champion of job creation Behind the scenes at The Goatshed is Swiss co-owner Andreas Küng, a former architect whose love of food eventually won out and saw him training as a chef. Previously owner of the Mimosa Lodge in Montagu, he has been instrumental in inspiring untrained members of the farming community on Fairview and the surrounding winelands to explore the hospitality industry as a career option. This is one of the attributes which found resonance with Charles Back, who is a local champion of job creation, upliftment and empowerment of those struggling to make a living in the Cape winelands. Some 25 formerly unemployed people work at The Goatshed as bakers, waiters and wine stewards. The Goatshed can seat up to 220 people quite comfortably – and very convivially – and is open seven days a week from 9am to 5pm. What’s for lunch? After an intense study of their delectable menu, we finally settled on a cheese and bread platter and a bowl of farm fresh baby salad leaves with roasted vegetables, croutons, cherry tomatoes, olives, toasted pumpkin seeds and seasonal fruit. A liberal dose of their famous olive oil and balsamic vinegar completed the spread.

Blue Tower Description: A full fat blue veined cheese with a mild flavour and rich creamy texture. (Gorgonzola style cheese). Possible uses: Serve on a cheese board with ripe pears and walnuts. Serve crumbed on top of baked butternut. Fresh pasta or gnocchi, with a cream sauce. General info: Shelf life is ± 2 months. Kosher & Halaal

Introduction to some of the cheeses we savoured on the day. Bleu en Blanc Description: A fusion of two classical cheese making styles. Bleu & Blanc has the outer shell of a handcrafted Camembert, infused with a marble blue heart. The blue veins provide a typical blue flavour from within. Possible Uses: Bake in phyllo pastry, served with onion marmalade. Table cheese with French bread and a mixed green salad with balsamic and extra virgin olive oil. General info: Shelf life is ± 5 weeks from day of pack Kosher & Halaal Blue Rock Description: A full fat blue veined cheese with a full favour and creamy texture. (Roquefort style cheese) Possible uses: Serve on a cheese board with green figs. General info: A lengthy maturation process ensures that the enzymes produced by the mould interact with the fats and proteins in the cheese, to give the characteristic taste and flavour. Shelf life is ± 2 months Kosher & Halaal

Bobbas Cream Cheese Description: As a young boy Charles Back was fascinated by the muslin bags which hung from their farm’s verandah. Making traditional cream cheese in these bags was one of his late grandmother Hannah’s favourite pass times. He recently found her recipe in the old family cook book and decided to recreate this cheese. Possible uses: Use on a cheese board, serve with a baked potato or bagel with smoked salmon General info: Shelf life 6 weeks from day of production Kosher & Halaal Issue 3 / 2009

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F O OD White Rock with Cranberries Description: White veined blue cheese with added cranberries and natural fruit essences. A lovely combination of sweet fruits and tangy blue cheeses. Possible uses: Best enjoyed as it is, with biscuits or fresh berries. Excellent as a dessert cheese. General info: Shelf life is ± 2 months Kosher & Halaal Camembert Description: Soft white mould cheese with a creamy “mushroom” flavour. Possible uses: Ideal for cheese boards and cooking General info: Cheese ripens from the outside towards the center. Enzymes produced by the white mould interact with the cheese proteins to give the characteristic soft texture and flavour. This will intensify with age. Shelf life is ± 4 – 5 weeks from day of pack. Kosher & Halaal. Brie Description: Soft white mould cheese with a creamy “mushroom” flavour. Possible uses: Ideal for cheese boards and cooking General info: Shelf life is ± 4 – 5 weeks from day of pack. Kosher & Halaal

Roydon Description: A Camembert made from a “secret” handcrafted traditional recipe. Soft white mould cheese handcrafted in true French style to give farmhouse flavour characteristic. General Information: Cheese ripens from the outside towards the center. Enzymes produced by the white mould interact with the cheese proteins to give the characteristic soft texture and flavour. This will intensify with age. Ideal for cheese boards and cooking. Flavour intensifies with age Shelf life approximately ± 4 – 5 weeks from day of pack. Kosher & Halaal Vat No 3 Description: Louis, Fairview’s cheese master was most horrified to discover that a young assistant had accidentally added three pales of fresh cream to the Camembert vat. After tasting its smooth, rich mouth filling texture, his initial dismay was soon turned to joy. This recipe proved to be so good that they decided to make it on a regular basis so that we too may enjoy it. Possible Uses: Bake in oven and serve with fresh summer berry compote. Make a Vat No 3, mango and mint salad. Toasted baguette, Vat No 3, black forest ham and seared cabbage salad with sundried tomatoes. Bake in puff pastry with dried apricots soaked off in brandy. General info: A high fat white mould cheese. Shelf life is ± 5 weeks from day of pack Kosher & Halaal

Try out some of their delicious recipes

Starters

A perfect way to start a meal or something light for a summer’s day. Brie with citrus and sunflower seeds Ingredients 1 Woolworths Traditional Brie 500g 1 punnet asparagus spears, blanched 1 large orange 1 large ruby grapefruit 1/2 pillow pack Woolworths salad leaves 50 g sunflower seeds, toasted 30 ml olive oil 10 ml balsamic vinegar 5 ml clear honey 3 ml salt 2 ml crushed black pepper Method 1) Peel and segment the orange and grapefruit. Toss the leaves, segments, asparagus, balsamic vinegar, honey, oil and seasoning together. 2) Place the Brie on a serving platter and pile the salad attractively on top. Sprinkle with sunflower seeds. Serves 6 as a light starter.

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Salads

Add flavour to fresh crisp salads with their range of gourmet cheeses Pasta Salad with Blue Rock Ingredients 1 pkt bow tie pasta 2 tablespoons butter ½ cup pecan nuts or walnuts 2 tablespoons sesame oil 3 tablespoons chopped chives 2 pkts rocket leaves Fairview Blue Rock, sliced Black pepper Preparation Cook pasta al dente. While cooking, heat butter in a frying pan over a low heat. Add the nuts and cook for 2 minutes. Then add sesame oil and remove from heat. Toss the drained pasta with the chives and rocket. Arrange in a dish with the blue rock and nuts, and pour over the oil and butter from the frying pan. Serve with fresh slices of Goatshed ciabatta. Main Courses Mouthwatering meals made with cheese.

Goat’s cheese, couscous and lamb loin roulade Preparation Soak 1 cup of couscous in 1 cup of hot water along with a little Fairview extra virgin olive oil and 2 pinches of salt. Soak for 3-4 minutes, and loosen up with a fork. Chop fresh coriander, Italian parsley, oregano and peppadews. Add to couscous, along with orange preserve and toasted pine nuts. Meanwhile sear lamb loin in a hot pan, with a little salt and pepper. Allow 2 minutes on each side, and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Take one sheet of nori (seaweed) and place on a sushi rolling mat. Cover ¾ of the sheet with firmly pressed couscous. Place soft Fairview Garlic & Herb Chevin along the centre of the nori sheet, place lamb loin on the chevin, and top with remaining chevin. Now roll up as you would a sushi roll. Place rolls in the oven at 200°C for 7-8 minutes. Remove and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Cut diagonally across, set on a plate and drizzle with freshly blended coriander pesto. Coriander pesto: Fairview Extra virgin olive oil, whole bunch of fresh coriander, ripe crottin, salt, pepper, pine nuts and 2 cloves of garlic.

Desserts

Try out this delectable dessert recipe. Preparation Slice a whole Grand Brie, Vintners Brie or Roydon Camembert in half horizontally. Whip mascarpone or cream till thick, adding a dash of vanilla essence and icing sugar to taste. Spread cream or mascarpone on base of brie and sprinkle with chopped walnuts or pecan nuts and chopped preserved figs, apricots or dates. Put other half back on top of the brie and mixture. Now “ice” the whole brie with cream or mascarpone and decorate with figs and / or nuts and / or chocolate vermicelli. Availability Don’t hesitate to visit Fairview, once you’re in the Paarl vicinity. Their cheeses are available from the farm, as well as selected Pick’n Pay, Checkers and Spar stores countrywide. They also supply Woolworths stores with a wide range of gourmet cheeses. Due to the seasonality of cheese production, some products may not always be available. Storage Fairview cheese should always be stored in a fridge at 4-5 degrees Celsius. Remove from the fridge 45minutes to an hour prior to serving. Once opened, store in the fridge in an air-tight container. Most cheeses should be consumed within 3 to 5 days of opening. •

Contact Physical Address (not for mail) Fairview Wines Suid-Agter Paarl Road, Suider Paarl, 7646, South Africa. Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Website:

Mailing Address Fairview Wines PO Box 583, Suider Paarl, 7624, South Africa.

+27 21 8632450 +27 21 8631536 (cheesery) cheese@fairview.co.za www.fairview.co.za Issue 3 / 2009

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REUBEN’S

restaurant

“The kitchen is territory where there are always discoveries to be made.” - Grimod de la Reynière

Text: Reuben Riffel Images: Liesel van der Schyf/TCB Group; Rina Smit

South African culinary sensation Reuben Riffel grew up in humble Groendal and is now one of the country’s best chefs. His restaurant, Reuben’s, lies in the heart of South Africa’s famous wine lands in Franschhoek, a beautiful town fast becoming known as one of the world’s premier food and wine destinations. Reuben is an instinctive chef who uses the freshest produce to create dishes that combine the flavours of his childhood with the latest cooking techniques learnt on his travels around the globe’s culinary capitals. ‘You have to have an open mind in order to experiment and create,’ he says. ‘When it comes to combining tastes and flavours, smells and shapes, and colours and textures, you never know what new experience might be just around the corner.’ He says food is time travel. It is a vehicle that has the power, through smells, tastes, colours and shapes, to take us back to another time. He believes food evokes memory and emotion like nothing else, especially when these are connected to your childhood and your mother’s cooking. It’s almost like regression therapy. ‘Creating dishes that evoke nostalgia through flavour has always been important to me. Food should awaken your senses in both a physical and a metaphysical way.’ ‘Flavours are personal. You have to cook with your own palate and everyone’s memories are different, so you can’t plan this experience, but often it just happens...things come together and create a time warp. I once cooked black bean soup for a group of Mexican tourists. It wasn’t something I had grown up with, but I used the flavours I thought would work, adding sweet balsamic vinegar. They each had two bowls before 70

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their main course, and came back to the restaurant every day for the rest of their holiday. Someone once called my restaurant menu ‘unstructured’, which in a way was a compliment. We compile the menu at the last minute and it includes whatever I find fresh that day and whatever I feel like eating. Being a good cook means being open to the opportunities presented by fresh, unexpected produce, and knowing what to do with it. Broadly, my advice is to buy what’s in season, and don’t decide what you’re making until you know what good stuff is available.’ My great-grandparents came to Franschhoek in the late 1800s and the family has lived here ever since. My grandfather was a carpenter who had nine sons and two daughters. Ouma, my grandmother, was the disciplinarian in the family, and no one ever disobeyed her. There were 40 grandchildren in all, and along the way Ouma looked after all of us while our parents were at work. I was born in Ouma’s front room and she took care of me during the day from when I was five months old. When we were older and naughty, she kept us all in line with a leather strap, which may have helped me when I became a chef, because it taught me discipline! Oupa fed his large family by growing vegetables, pumpkins, mielies, beans, potatoes and peas on his smallholding outside Groendal, among the vineyards. Every day he would walk along the railway line and work his crops. He raised pigs there, and he had donkeys to pull the cart full of vegetables that he brought home. When the peas were ready there would be a big family

outing to harvest and shell them. He had a shed where he hung onions to dry. I loved it in there. It was dark and cool, with beams of sunlight criss-crossing from the holes in the corrugated iron. He would also dry beans, and we had fun when these were ready, you toss big bunches of them in the air until all the dry skins have blown off and you’re left with just the beans. We’d keep sacks of beans for winter soup and some would be pickled and bottled, after we had supplied all the neighbours. At home, while Ouma did the cooking, Oupa would sit in his chair on the porch and peel fruit for us kids. I use a lot of fruit in my cooking, probably because of its childhood associations. We grew almost every kind of fruit. There was much baking of apples and pears. My mother and ouma would make jams and preserves, bottling gooseberries, apricots, plums, grapes, wild bramble berries and the tiny, sweet, wild grapes. Through his mother’s intermittent involvement in the restaurant industry, Reuben started work as a barman and waiter. When he was asked by Head Chef, Richard Carsons, to help out in the kitchen, the youngster was less than enthusiastic - all this meant to him was longer shifts and even less time with his friends. Slowly, the kitchen cast its spell on young Reuben. As he listened to Chef Richard the realisation slowly dawned: “This is not just a job. This could actually be interesting. This could be something you can be proud of.” He watched: a busy restaurant, patrons coming back for more of the food they enjoyed so much, Issue 3 / 2009

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and enthusiastically ending their meals with ‘Compliments to the Chef!’ – the enjoyment of the patrons, the admiration for the Chef! There was a vibe there, something that was bigger than the people, and Reuben realised that he wanted to be a part of it. He started reading, tentatively experimenting. “I still did not believe that I could do it, that I could send out a plate of my own food,” he remembers. But fate has a way of forcing the issue. The day came when Chef Richard could not make it in to work and the manager turned to Reuben. There were about twenty bookings for lunch, forty for dinner. Reuben held it together. Some patrons demanded that he come out of the kitchen so that they could deliver their compliments in person. It was a heady experience but, says Reuben with a smile: “The kitchen has a way of cutting you down to size if you become too big for your boots.” The die was cast by this time - Reuben had become conscious of his passion. Over the next few years, life took him to different kitchens, different places - Balito Bay, the Cape Town Waterfront and, eventually, back home to Franschhoek where he once again joined the team of Richard Carsons at the Franschhoek Country House. When Chef Richard moved on, the position was offered to Chef Reuben. “I still didn’t feel confident about accepting,” says Reuben. “I did not feel that I had the experience, but I decided to tackle the job step by step. Everyone in the kitchen was amazing. Even though many were not highly skilled or trained, it was such an amazing team. They made it easy.” Success and recognition followed. Within three years Reuben made it onto the IETA Restaurant Guide’s Top 100, then the Top 10 list. Reuben kept improving his game. “I did not want to be just another chef,” he says. “I wanted to be the best.” His obvious talent combined with his success and ambition translated into numerous job offers. Although Reuben was essentially happy where he was, the lure of a job offer in Cambridge, UK, eventually proved irresistible. He arrived in Cambridge to find that the restaurant was not even completed yet. For many this would have been a bitter disappointment, but Reuben rolled up his sleeves and joined the construction team. Soon the restaurant was up and running with Reuben in the kitchen, serving bobotie to fellow South Africans who stopped by. “I had a lot of fun and, because of that, the restaurant was successful,” says Reuben.

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This was when Boekenhoutskloof vintner, Marc Kent, entered the picture. He contacted Reuben and went to see him in Cambridge with an offer. Kent had purchased a property in Franschhoek for which he had big plans and he was looking for someone to partner with in creating a top-notch restaurant. The two men seemed to think alike and, after two years in England, Reuben headed back to Franshhoek. Reuben tackled this big challenge with typical gusto and within the first year he was declared Chef of the Year and Reuben’s, his restaurant, was made Restaurant Of The Year. The rest is history. “I count myself very lucky,” says Reuben. “Other chefs work as hard as I do and may never enjoy this kind of success.” What’s for lunch? Appetizer: Warm crumbed goats cheese salad with red pepper dressing, roasted tomato, artichokes, olives, rocket and pine nuts Main: Stuffed quail saltimbocca, couscous with honey roasted vegetables Dessert: Dark chocolate frattini, salted caramel, milk sherbet Review: Reuben’s–Franschhoek’s first signature restaurant– is a sophisticated brasserie, in a modern and tasteful setting. The décor is minimalist, with interesting touches like the bar counter made from the wing of an old DC10 airplane, The “Gooney Bar” provides a place to meet friends and enjoy a drink, before moving to your table. The restaurant itself is open and airy, providing a lively but elegant atmosphere during dinner. The food is masterpiece upon the canvas-like plate and presented as an array of fine art, this divine sculpture of a meal urges the mouth to water with anticipation and the inner sense of pleasure and comfort to be pampered and spoiled to a point of no return. Reuben’s Restaurant is in its essence, a console for the culinary side of the soul. Contact Physical address: No 19 Huguenot Street, Franschhoek, 7690 Tel: +27 21 876 3772 Fax: +27 21 876 4464 Email: reservations@reubens.co.za Bookings are essential and must be made two weeks in advance


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LIFEST YLE, ART S & C ULT U R E

Image: Rina Smit

lifestyle, arts and C U LT U R E All human societies produce art, even if they do not always refer to it as art. The very early communities years ago decorated the walls of caves with colours and images, and shaped figures made of clay and stone. There is clearly a basic urge in humans to make things not only because they have a practical use, but also because they satisfy by their appearance.

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Lipizzaners

The South African

breed Text: Lipizzaners South Africa Images: Michael Maherry

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LIFEST YLE, ART S & C ULT U R E

History of the South African Lipizzaners

The oldest human bred horse in the world, ancestors of the Lipizzaners, have been traced to Carthaginian and Roman horses at the time when Julius Caesar was Emperor of Rome. The Lipizzaner breed itself dates back to around 1562 when Archduke Maximilian started to breed Spanish horses in Lipica, a village in the modern day Slovenia. It was the need for military horses of unusual strength, loyalty and courage that inspired him to import Spanish, Italian and Arab-Oriental horses for his breeding programme. Out of this grew the famous white horse – the Lipizzaner – as we know it today. These animals are characterized by a perfect and noble physique, graceful movements, the ability to learn, liveliness, good nature, courage, toughness and stamina. In appearance they resemble in every respect the typical baroque show and parade horses... The history of the Lipizzaner horse is linked with an umbilical cord to one of the famous Spanish Riding School in Vienna. The

“The Lipizzaner breed itself dates back to around 1562 when Archduke Maximilian started to breed Spanish horses in Lipica, a village in the modern day Slovenia.” School dates back 430 years to the revival of the ‘Haute Ecole d’Equitation’ at the end of the 15th – and beginning of the 16th centuries, as the Renaissance was sweeping through the royal courts of Europe. Horses of Spanish origin were chosen over other breeds for characteristics they possessed which made them especially suitable for classical training. The Spanish Riding School of Vienna is the only riding academy in the world where the Renaissance tradition of classical horsemanship is preserved and cultivated to this day. The unique harmony of horse and rider achieved here is famous all over the world. In 1944 a select few Lipizzaners were rescued from wartorn Austria and brought to South Africa by Count JankovichBesan. The stallions at Kyalami are direct descendants of those horses and their predecessors. The Lipizzaner Trust is dedicated to the advancement of this proud cultural heritage and the preservation of this most ancient breed of horse. The South African Lipizzaners have earned the honour of being the only performing Lipizzaners outside Vienna recognised by and affiliated to the Spanish Riding School, and a close association is maintained between the two establishments. Over the years, the South African Lipizzaners have become an integral part of South Africa’s cultural heritage. Today, the South African Lipizzaners appear on film and television and at various public performances as well as their regular Sunday morning shows. THE HORSES The Black/Bay Stallions Lipizzaner horses are born dark. They gradually become lighter with each change of coat as they grow older, until they are silvery white. Although originally the breed represented different colours, today the Lipizzaner is almost exclusively white. Only a tiny percentage, still today, remains bay or black. Today the Lipizzaner Centre has two bay stallions to uphold the century old tradition of colour in a Lipizzaner. Both Siglavy Issue 3 / 2009

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L I F E ST Y L E , A RT S & C ULTURE Arva 1 and Conversano Arva will remain bay for the rest of their lives. In addition, a colt born in 2006, Siglavy Odaliska, shows signs of remaining black. He would take up the place of Conversana Pablo, our last black Lipizzaner stallion at the Centre, who unfortunately died in 2005 at the age of 22. Their “coloured” stallions always get trained to highest levels and form an integral part of the performance. TRAINING Basic Training At the age of three, dark grey Lipizzaner stallions are brought from the stud farm to Kyalami, to begin their formal training. These youngsters are used to galloping in the pastures, but soon they adapt to their new and exciting environment. The stallions rider-to-be begins by introducing the young horse to saddle and bridle, and eventually starts his work on the lunge. Here the young horse learns to obey commands and develops trust for his trainer. The muscles in his back develop as he learns the correct way to carry himself.

compact body, floating paces and eagerness to please, he excels at all the movements of the High School. Training takes many years and is indeed never complete. There is always more for the stallion to learn, and as the Lipizzaner is long-lived, it is not unusual to still see a stallion performing at the age of twenty-five. His work is not only to perform, but to teach young riders the movement of Classical Dressage. There is nothing more valuable than a fully trained stallion for teaching the young rider. Airs Above Ground Maestoso Erdem - Levade In this movement the horse’s forehand is elevated on deeply bent hind legs, the hocks lowered to 20 – 30cm above the ground, the lower the Levade, the more difficult it is to execute. Favory Modena – Courbette To perform the Courbette, the horse raises himself on his haunches and executes one or more forward leaps at the command of his handler. If the stallion loses his balance

“At the age of three, dark grey Lipizzaner stallions are brought from the stud farm, to Kyalami, to begin their formal training.” Once he has spent about three months on the lunge, the rider will gradually introduce her weight onto the stallion’s back, and begin his training under saddle. At all times praise and little admonishment keeps the stallion’s trust and a relationship develops between him and his trainer. In the early days of his training, the young stallion is taught to move freely forward, accepting the contact from the bit and moving away from the rider’s leg. As his training progresses, he learns the more collected paces and the lateral work, until eventually, after about seven years, he becomes a fully-fledged Quadrille horse. Work-in-hand begins when the young stallion is four years old, and this starts with developing the horse’s obedience to the whip and acceptance of the side-reins. Eventually the horse learns the piaffe and from the piaffe it is decided what, if any, of the Airs-Above-The-Ground this stallion will eventually perform. All the stallions learn the piaffe, and this helps when training

this movement under saddle. The Lipizzaner horse has for centuries been used for High School riding and is ideally suited to this work. With his strong,

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slightly, he will take a couple of walking steps forwards. He will then continue with his forward leaps. Favory Presciana - Capriole The Capriole was used during wartime to decapitate foot soldiers on the battlefield, but is today performed to show the horse’s strength and co-ordination. During the training process the horse would be required to do piaffe, he would then be asked to raise himself on his hind legs and then to kick out. Only after these are established (which could take up to two years) is the horse capable of cocoordinating all three elements in one movement. Then the stallion jumps with all four feet in the air and at the top of his leap, he kicks out with his hind legs. Upcoming Events: EVENTS Sunday Performances An outing for the whole family! Performances take place on Sunday mornings at 10h30 in the majestic Indoor Arena. Come early and browse around the Lipizzaner Shop where you can buy Lipizzaner branded clothing, children’s T-shirts, DVD’s, key rings, postcards and lots more! The performance lasts about 60 minutes without an interval. Join them in the courtyard after the performance, meet the riders and feed carrots to the stallions. Enjoy refreshments in the courtyard under the tree and browse through their second-hand book stall. A jumping castle is also provided for the children. Cost of tickets at the door R95, children under 3 free, or book through Computicket. Dates for your Diary Saturday 12 September 2009 : Special Anniversary Performance Every year that they are entrusted with the care and preservation of these noble Lipizzaners is a cause for celebration. Last year, they celebrated 60 years in Africa, and this year for the 61st anniversary celebration, they are delighted to be performing with the Welsh National Male Voice Choir! From opera to spirituals, popular songs to classics, an evening


LIFEST YLE, ART S & C ULT U R E

of choral delight and equestrian grace awaits. Performance starts at 7pm. Join them from 6pm for light supper and drinks. Bookings only through Computicket now open! An event not to be missed! Sunday 13 September 2009: Favory Merlin’s 25th birthday! A very special performance to celebrate everyone’s favourite stallion’s quarter century! Merlin is going to tell you all about his life and in case he gets a little hoarse (!!), he is going to be assisted by Ventriloquist Extraordinaire, Gareth Lush, who has completed over 200 television appearances and 8,000 live performances in South Africa (including Nelson Mandela’s 80th birthday bash!) and is ranked amongst the top ventriloquists in the world! Talking Horses, here we come! Saturday 31 October 2009: The Lipizzaner Ball For those of you who joined them last year, you will know what a wonderful evening it was! Included is gourmet catering from The House of Bonne Cuisine, dining and dancing and of course displays by the Lipizzaners around the water trough in the courtyard. This year it will be all that – and more! Tables of 10 bookings: R6,500. Individual tickets R 650. Dress code: Black tie. For bookings please e-mail tarragon@mweb.co.za Introducing the new Directors Dr Lilian Möller, BVSc., BSc.Agric.(Hons) Lilian joined the Lipizzaner Team in 1997 and is a Senior Rider and Team Leader. She is also responsible for the Breeding Programme. She is a Dressage Instructor, has received Provincial Colours for dressage on many occasions, and has competed at Advanced/Grand Prix level. She has also worked in industry with Ciba Animal Health Division and with Lopis. Adriaan van Wyk. B.Comm (Accounts) After completing his degree, Adriaan worked in industry for five years in the field of cost accounting and business law. Currently Adriaan is one of South Africa’s top dressage instructors and runs clinics for the Lipizzaner riders. He has ridden at top level for many years, has represented his province, and has represented South Africa internationally in Australia... He is the founder and owner of Gombera Stud and breeds warmblood competition dressage horses. Judy Vertue Judy runs her own executive search business. She spent 10 years with IBM SA, including 3 years as Head of Marketing Support for the PC Division, responsible for local and international

events, exhibitions, road shows and product launches. She was Chairman of Dressage for the Gauteng Province and brought in the biggest single sponsorship for dressage three years running for the Annual Freestyle Dressage to Music Festival. She has been associated with the Lipizzaners for many years, including announcing and creating music for Solo Performances. She is also a Dressage Judge. We are assisted by additional members selected for both their business and equestrian knowledge and by professionals in the auditing and legal fields. • CONTACT US Address: 1 Dahlia Road, Kyalami Tel: +27 11 7022103 Fax: +27 11 468-2718 Additional Numbers, please phone +27 72 542 5628 or +27 82 457 9725 Email: lipizzaner@hixnet.co.za Web: www.lipizzaners.co.za

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SOWETO GOSPEL

Choir

– A slice of musical heaven...

Soweto Gospel Choir was formed in November

of 2002, by promoters/presenters Andrew Kay, David Vigo and Clifford Hocking, in association with Executive Producer/ Director Beverly Bryer and Musical Director David Mulovhedzi. They celebrate the unique and inspirational power of African Gospel music. The choir is dedicated to sharing the joy of faith through music with audiences around the world. The Gospel Choir’s seven year existence has become an overnight, multi award-winning sensation. In December 2002, their first album, “Voices of Heaven”, was recorded and it went on to reach the No. 1 spot on Billboard’s World Music Chart within 3 weeks of its release in the US. They have garnered numerous prestigious awards during their existence. On 11 February 2007, the choir received probably its greatest accolade, a Grammy Award for the cd “Blessed”, in the category “Best Traditional World Music”. They were also nominated for the 26th International Reggae and World Music Awards, held at the Apollo Theatre Harlem in the category “Contribution to World Music” alongside Jimmy Cliff, Salif Keita, Youssou N’Dour and Ziggy Marley. In 2006 the choir won a SAMA in the Category “Best Live Performance DVD”, and added to their string of awards by winning the 2007 Metro FM Award for Best Gospel Album for their album “African Spirit”. In 2008 they were again nominated for a Metro FM Award, in the same category, this time for their album “Live at the Nelson Mandela Theatre”. The choir was also nominated for a One

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Text & Images: Soweto Gospel Choir

Gospel Award in the Best Choir category, and a Kora (all Africa) Award in the category Best Gospel Artist. In February 2008, the choir was honoured with the PanSALB Award for the Multilingualism and Nation Building “Album of the Decade”. On 10 February 2008, the choir received a second Grammy Award in the Best Traditional World Music Album, this time for the cd “African Spirit” - a major accomplishment for any artist, receiving two Grammy awards within two years! Incredibly, Soweto Gospel Choir received its third Grammy nomination in December 2008, this time in the category Best Contemporary World Music, for their album, “Live at the Nelson Mandela Theatre”. The song “Down To Earth”, from the blockbuster Wall-E movie, in collaboration with Peter Gabriel, won a Grammy in the Best Movie Song category. In February 2009, the choir became the first South African artists to perform at the Academy Awards, when they sang “Down To Earth”, Gabriel/Newman’s Oscar nominated song, with John Legend. But no amount of glittering international recognition and praise has diverted Soweto Gospel Choir from the mission it holds close at heart. In 2003 the choir founded its own aids orphans’ foundation, Nkosi’s Haven Vukani. With the plight of South Africa’s sick and impoverished top of mind, their foundation supports families and organisations that receive little or no government support. These destitute families and children rely


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What the world is saying about the Soweto Gospel Choir

“Soweto Gospel Choir is wonderful!! You have never seen or heard such infectious joy – guaranteed” – Brian May of Queen “Mesmerizing, beautiful and phenomenally resonant. Working with the Choir with their energy and positivity has been one of the major events of my recent years” – Robert Plant, March 2008

Above: Musician Wyclef Jean performs at the Mandela Day Concert at Radio City Music Hall on Saturday, 18 July 2009 in New York. (Image Brad Barket/PictureGroup) Main image left: The Soweto Gospel Choir & Ensemble perform on the ‘Mandela Day: a 46664 Celebration’ Concert at Radio City Music Hall on 18 July 2009 in New York City. (Image Evan Agostini/PictureGroup)

on Soweto Gospel Choir to sing all over the world for very much more than their supper. Whenever they are in South Africa, the choir performs for a variety of charitable organisations, is involved in many fundraisers, and visits with old age pensioners, aid orphans and many others less privileged than themselves, but who can be uplifted by the choir’s inspirational music and spirit. Soweto Gospel Choir is honoured to have as its patron, Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu. For more information or to obtain details of their tour schedule please contact: Beverly Bryer Executive Producer /Director Soweto Gospel Choir Tel: +27 11 783 9083 Fax: +27 11 783 9664 Cell: +27 83 249 3168 Email: eventsco@worldonline.co.za Visit: www.sowetogospelchoir.com Below: Musician Gloria Gaynor and Roachie perform on the ‘Mandela Day: a 46664 Celebration’ Concert at Radio City Music Hall on 18 July 2009 in New York City. (Image Evan Agostini/PictureGroup)

“Having the opportunity to sing with Soweto Gospel Choir during my visit to South Africa was a wonderful experience for me. They have such beautifully soulful voices, and gorgeous harmonies… and they sing with such a natural rhythm. I can’t wait to work with them again!” – Celine Dion, February 2009 “The Soweto Gospel Choir is truly inspirational, but that’s not the reason they deserve five stars. Those are simply for a flawless performance” – The Scotsman “Occasionally, a diamond of such brilliance is unearthed that you find yourself compelled to develop a near-fanatical enthusiasm for it” – Manchester News “The Soweto Gospel Choir’s performance has made me a true believer. I guess you could say I’ve been baptized by the power of perfect pitch, superior intonation and harmony clearly not of this world”.– Times Dispatch, Richmond Virginia “When they open their mouths, the sense of texture is flawless……here is energy and passion in song” – Business Day, Johannesburg “These people are striking singers with a range of vocal colours that blend and move perfectly together. Brilliant musicianship aside, easily the most fun I’ve had at a choral concert”– Herald Sun, Melbourne

The Soweto Gospel Choir will be performing in Paris, France from 3 to 8 November, 2009 at the Chatelet Theatre, Paris. For more information, go to www.chatelet-theatre.com/20092010/index.php#/soweto-gospel-choir-365-fr Issue 3 / 2009

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Dress by Marianne Fassler. Price on request. Jewellery by Jenna Clifford

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fortuin

tammy-annE

- Just a regular girl with an unmistakable touch of “Joie de Vivre”

Tammy –Anne is quirky, funny and beautiful,

but she’s also a consummate professional who has worked in television for the most part of her adult life. Right now she features on M-Net’s All Access Show. The show, which is broadcast on Thursday evenings at 19h30, gives M-Net viewers a special backstage pass to everything hot and happening, while a team of witty and knowledgeable presenters - all celebrities in their own right - will spend quality time in the presence of everybody who’s somebody in the world of glitz, glam and entertainment. She offers a personal glimpse in her daily life as we met at the One&Only resort in Cape Town. How did you start in this industry? I started as a working model in catalogue, fashion and television commercials. This came as a result of participating in the Miss SA competition in 2002 where I placed as runnerup. My model years were a period of growing up and gave me loads of life experience with travelling and actually entering the working arena. I’ll always be grateful for that, but always knew that it was only a stepping stone and a phase that would pass eventually. What do you love about the entertainment industry? In this industry, you really get to touch people and you articulate things without even knowing it at first. I have always been someone who enjoys entertaining others and my work enables me to do that. It also provides a creative outlet which I don’t think I could function well without. I love the challenging aspect of it all and knowing that you’re only as good as your last job – it pushes you to excel and improve on what you’ve already delivered. This industry is also very versatile and has so many facets on which to capitalize on, so there is never a dull moment. What is a typical week in the life of Tammy Anne like? What is your lifestyle like? A typical week will be in the office working on the current project with scheduled shoots for our productions which have to happen. No day is virtually the same, as I’d be between viewings, shoots, fittings, interviews, content meetings and possibly in the evenings, a function if I’ve been booked. I’m on a break now, but twice a week during the evenings I attend evening classes at Act Cape Town. I have learnt though, that there is great power in a well-planned schedule and an office support-system which really does make my life easier. Tell us more about the Homebrew Crew, who are they and who is responsible for what function. The company is owned by all permanent staff and our team

Text: Adele Minnaar Images: Michael Maherry

is made up of young talent who are willing to work hard and shift boundaries. We have been exceptionally lucky with our growth over the last few years and have a dedicated team working on various productions. When it comes to ROER, I work with a very talented director, assistant producer and friend, Sanet Olivier, the multi-talented and highly acclaimed cameraman, Chris Lotz and producers, Jaco Loubser and Paul Venter. All Access is a much larger production on which I produce along with Paul and Jaco and we have a dynamic team supporting us on the production from our production co-ordinator to the directors, editors, sound etc. Homebrew Films has built up a stellar reputation for productions in the natural history genre as well and have a designated team on that along with children’s programming, music videos, corporate communications, lifestyle etc. The company has remained close-knit with every single person working on a specific project with skill and enthusiasm for the work. The most important thing about this enterprise is that it makes no difference how big or small the productions have been over the years, there has always been a wonderful emphasis on quality delivery which not only keeps us in business but makes us exceptionally proud. Whose brainchild is All Access? My partners Paul Venter, Jaco Loubser and I brainstormed on the concept as we had to pitch this to our broadcaster and sell the idea. I have an incredible synergy with them and it has been fantastic watching this show grow as a result of good work ethic. There is a very close-knit team at Homebrew Films who channel input and it was never just about coming up with an idea but also, very importantly, articulating how we would translate this onto television effectively. It was a long process getting a project like this off the ground as it was tested with a pilot and focus groups. Presenters from all over were screen tested including myself, storylines and scripts were devised, content approved and of course finding that golden thread that gives it entertainment value. The M-Net team have been phenomenal in their approach to this production as we have always felt like it’s a team effort with a main focus on quality television. Tell us more about your family and are you close? Do they support you in your career? More than anyone else, my parents have always believed in me, even on my worst days. I am a middle child with two older sisters and one younger brother. I always say that my family is quite crazy and are most probably responsible for the outgoing part of my personality today, as my parents are both very strong people and they’ve raised us all to be that way. Issue 3 / 2009

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You must be one of the most down to earth celebs in this industry? How do you stay so humble and focused? I’m too busy to get a big head and honestly, I’m getting to do a job that I’ve always wanted to do which makes me feel lucky and blessed more than anything else. It’s not like I’ve found a cure for cancer or something – I’m just a regular girl who gets to be on television from time to time. What characteristics do you admire most in the celebs you have interviewed? I do admire the ones who inspire others and who are good-natured and have remained true to themselves beyond the fame. If you could take a day off in your hectic schedule, what would you do? I would try to catch up on sleep! I love sleeping late when I can and of course, go for a late lunch with friends at a scenically beautiful place which I could round off with DVD’s at my home. I find film to be a wonderful escapism for me and it’s great to just relax and not have to take calls or screen mails. You have modelled all over the world. What was your favourite destination? I have always loved the exotic locations like Greece and Malaysia. What countries would you still like to visit? I haven’t even seen half of the world yet! I want to go to Turkey, Mexico and Ireland for the scenery. What makes Tammy-Anne happy? There is no denying your unmistakable “Joie de Vivre”. My family and friends make me happy and them being in a positive space is very important to me along with things like

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buying shoes like a typical girl, my dog and of course, when all things on the work front go according to plan. What advice can you give potential aspirants in this industry? It’s hard work and there are no hand-outs. If you are prepared to put in the hours you will reap the rewards. Tell us more about the cooking programme, Roer? Roer is a Homebrew Films production and it’s been on air for about 6 years. This is my fifth year presenting the show and it’s basically a lifestyle cooking show with South African celebrities and well-known achievers. It is where I started in television and it’s still going strong. Many people often ask me what the show is all about and that it doesn’t really look like a cooking show which they actually love! Others tune in to copy the recipes or just for a laugh and that’s what makes my job so great – it’s the human element without pretence and just getting to know a celebrated person while whipping up a great dish. The show has definitely super exceeded our expectations and has managed to scoop numerous nominations from both the SAFTAS and ATKV. This year we actually won the award for best variety show in South Africa which we are all very stoked about. Where do you live? Durbanville, Cape Town When did you know that this is what you want to do? What was the turning point in your career from modelling to presenting? I think, from where I stand now, I always knew that I wanted to work in this industry. It just wasn’t always as clean-cut for me. I wanted to read the news when I was little, but I also wanted to be a lawyer, as that got the most votes with my parents. There was a time when I got consecutive distinctions for ballet and I wanted to dance for the rest of my life, but those were not practical options when leaving school. I think I knew that I loved the job when I met the team at Homebrew Films, because I had a will and they had a way. This doesn’t necessarily mean that I will do this for the rest of my life as I believe that we change as people and have the ability to transform and shift our focuses onto various things. Right now, I’m following the passion that makes me want to get out of bed every morning and brings great satisfaction. Do you think it is a matter of being at the right place at the right time or did you actively have to pursue your goals? I think that the more you actively pursue your goals, the more you’ll be at the right place and at the right time. From Miss SA I landed in the modelling world by default, which then got me noticed and called for an audition for Roer. Yes, it’s the right place at the right time but also, you don’t get that lucky to stay on air for 5 years, work on amazing productions along the way, travel and learn without hard work and dedication. Of course divine intervention comes into play as faith keeps you going when you’re working in a very competitive industry and at the end of the day, God controls your destiny. So, it’s definitely a bit of both, but you don’t get anywhere without actively pursuing your goals. Describe yourself in 6 words. Driven, compassionate, humorous, passionate, stubborn, romantic. You haven’t given up on love and relationships. What characteristics would a future partner possess? He could really be anybody who is comfortable and confident


LIFEST YLE, ART S & C ULT U R E in his own skin and of course, comfortable with what I do for a living. I suppose at the end of the day it would have to be someone who loves me for me or someone I wouldn’t mind accommodating for. Yes, there are characteristics like strength, wisdom, intelligence, charm and humour that I find very attractive too, but overall, I’ve found that I enjoy the company of people who bring a sense of calmness into my life and who I can do the same for. You have a remarkable complexion. Are there any beauty tips you would like to share with our readers. What does your beauty routine consists of? I hardly ever do spa treatments and I’m very irregular with facials these days, but I never compromise on good skincare products. I use NIMUE Skincare Technologies only. From Cleansers, to toners, to my VITAMIN C serum and of course my Day fader or Night fader. I always carry my vitamin C mist in my handbag which I can apply at anytime even over my makeup on shoots. I never leave the house without sun block (even in winter), I exfoliate twice a week and round that off with a rejuvenating mask every time. How important is being successful to you? I think that being successful is very subjective and depends on achieving the goals and objectives you set as an individual. I’ve always been the type of person to want to do something to the best of my ability. If those abilities give you satisfactory results, so be it – but I am not the type to give up completely. I enjoy challenges and growing to new heights as I feel like I have a sense of obligation to myself. Even if I gave up my career and decided to get married and have babies tomorrow, I would still want to be the best possible wife and mother I can be. That’s what being successful means to me, knowing you gave it your best shot. If you end up in a career where people give you acclaim for it, it just makes it more visible but doesn’t make it more important. • ON COOKING: I wouldn’t say that I’m a world class cook but, rather that I enjoy the recreation of it, have had my fair share of blunders in the kitchen and I can put something together when I need to. I think the most important shift I made in the kitchen was to start enjoying it. I love home-cooking and at the same time I appreciate fine dining. Please see two of my favourite recipes. It is so easy to make when entertaining family and friends. SEAFOOD CHOWDER: Ingredients: 500g corn 200ml cream 400g firm fish, cut in bite size blocks 200g raw king prawns 135g smoked salmon Handful of chives Table spoon butter 1 onion, finely chopped 400g potatoes, diced 200ml good quality chicken stock 500ml milk 1 bay leave METHOD: • Melt the butter in a large saucepan and sauté the onion. Add the potatoes, stock, milk, and bay leave and simmer for

Clothes by Angel. Jewellery by Jenna Clifford. Shot on location at One&Only, Cape Town.

5 minutes till potatoes are soft. Remove half of the potatoes and blend together with half of the corn and cream to a pulp. • Return the pulp mixture to the pan, heat through and add the fish and prawns. Cook for 1 minute. Add the salmon, rest of the corn and chives. Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste. ROAST CHICKEN THIGHS WITH HERBED GOAT’S MILK CHEESE STUFFING Serves 4 Ingredients: 4 chicken thighs, with skin and bones Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 1x 100g log chevin (Goats milk cheese) 60ml (1/4k) fresh herbs, roughly chopped 1 garlic clove, finely chopped Olive Oil, for drizzling Watercress for garnishing METHOD: • Preheat the oven to 220C. Season the chicken pieces. • Mix the cheese, herbs and garlic. Lift the chicken skin gently and stuff with the mixture. • Place chicken on a baking tray and drizzle with Olive Oil. • Roast the chicken for approximately 25 minutes until golden and crisp. Enjoy!

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Fernanda

de Lange

The Art Studio Fernanda de Lange is an artist from Gauteng, specializing in presenting art classes and workshops for the general public. It is a step by step process whereby she encourages individuals to discover their creative abilities within. These abilities are often neglected and completely ignored. Painting is an art form that inspires the spirit and provides a wonderful outlet. Ray visited her studio and in this article we focus on the symbolism in this gifted artist’ work. 86

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Above: Field of dreams The future grows in the field of dreams Symbolism: • Young boy in white T-shirt – innocence and purity • Birds – dreams, spirit, prayer • Fence – life’s troubles • Windmill – water of life “pumped” by faith, watering the fields of life – in a storm it really pumps hard • Don’t keep your eyes on the storm, but on the horizon where the promised land lies


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Below: Learning to dance on clouds The words on the painting say: I learned to dance on clouds when I closed my eyes and stepped into the future without fear. I painted this when a friend of mine went through a divorce and was filled with fear and uncertainty about the future. You can’t control what happens in life, but you can choose how you respond to any given situation.

Below: Signs and wonders In the mind of a child all things are possible and each moment of their lives is filled with moments of great beauty and imagination. Nothing is impossible; all things are within their reach… Jesus reminds us of the endless possibilities that lie within a child’s eye… Nothing is impossible, unless we think it is! Speak into the future only that, which you wish your children to discover.

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Above left: Beauty within We are so slow to recognise the beauty within ourselves and others. So often we put on masks to hide our true feelings, whilst all the while we are made beautifully in God’s sight. Above right: Sowing peace for Africa It is our duty to sow seeds of love, hope and faith. We need to take responsibility for each choice we make. We are the ones to promote change. Speak words of peace and it shall be… Left: Speak into the future only that, which you wish your children to discover Words are powerful… they become a reality… if we remember and take responsibility for the words we speak, we can truly give ourselves and our children the future we dream of. What we speak will take you into the direction of your words, think what you say and speak blessings and promises and not death and destruction. Contact Fernanda de Lange at Tel: +27 72 1833 422

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L I F E ST Y L E , A RT S & C ULTURE ANCIENT PREDATOR: THE CAT “In some figures I explore the profound sense of longing, remembrance, awakening and renewal I experience during sojourns in the wilderness. In other areas I express the anguish, foreboding and loss I have felt while watching substantial tracts of wilderness disappear during my life time. Everywhere people are debating with mounting urgency and alarm as the effects of the destruction of our environment become physically and psychologically evident. Like the wilderness that inspires them, these sculptures are enigmatic. Animal forms merge with human anatomy evoking rich mythological and psychological clusters of meaning.”

lewis

Dylan

– Bringing sculpture into the open Text & Images: Dylan Lewis

Dylan Lewis is an exciting young South African artist

who has emerged as one of the foremost figures in contemporary animal sculpture today. For twelve years Lewis focused on animal forms, particularly the large wild cat predators of Africa, before turning his attention to the human figure. Recently he became one of only a handful of living artists to have a solo auction at the prestigious international auction house Christie´s of London, putting the artist very firmly on the global art world´s centre stage.

Stellenbosch is undoubtedly among the finest cultural jewels of the Cape, if not South Africa. Dating back to 1679 and the second oldest town in the country, it boasts many fine examples of Cape Dutch, neoGothic, Georgian, Art Deco and Victorian architecture. Interestingly, where these gracious buildings now stand was once “renosterbos”, an untamed landscape inhabited by an abundance of wild animals including lion, buffalo, cheetah and leopard. It is to pay homage to these now extinct creatures and to remind us of the pristine wilderness that once was their

Lewis has received much international success, but he would like credit to be shared with the community members who work for him in the foundries where the sculptures are made. Lewis has focused chiefly on the cat as his subject and has created an unrivalled collection on this theme - ranking as one of the most important collections of animal sculpture to come out of Africa. His primary inspiration is his abiding passion for wilderness, and in all of his sculptures you will note that the surface textures are not those of animal hide or fur, but rather are inspired by landscape elements. Stellenbosch With its majestic old oak trees, thriving wine industry and the longest row of conserved historic buildings in the country,

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home that Lewis returns a selection of them to Stellenbosch, juxtaposing their great forms and spirits (now captured in bronze) with the architectural urban markers of civilization. Dylan Lewis is giving art lovers a unique experience by turning the town into an outdoor sculpture gallery. Not only will his life-size sculptures be viewed up close and personal, but in the setting Dylan will allow the animals depicted to claim back the area they once roamed freely. 23 life-size Dylan Lewis sculptures are on display in and around the main areas of Stellenbosch, including the historic town centre and


LIFEST YLE, ART S & C ULT U R E the communities of Idas Valley, Jamestown, Tennantville and Kayamandi from November 2008 until October 2009. Watch out for 21 big cats, a buffalo pair and one rhino sculpture. Wild animals will indeed be roaming the streets of Africa. When you visit the town, expect to find a rhino storming across Die Braak or a cheetah racing past you in Dorp Street... Fortunately they can’t bite; in fact they can’t even move. “During my travels internationally I have seen magnificent works of sculpture being displayed in public spaces, and I wanted to bring this concept to South Africa,” says Lewis. “Stellenbosch is a particularly beautiful town and lends itself well to being an outdoor sculpture gallery. It is an opportunity for a broader audience to interact with my work. For the past 14 years my work has reached a relatively elite audience through galleries or museums, and to see the community of Stellenbosch and visitors to the town enjoying the sculpture gives me great pleasure.” The sculptures are marked with a plaque displaying a Cell C cell phone number for callers to phone in order to learn more about the pieces on display. The audio information is available in English, Afrikaans, Xhosa, German and French. The profits from the calls will be donated by Cell C to the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), South Africa. Lewis has received much international success, but he would like credit to be shared with the community members who

but also to people passionate about the environment. Educating today’s young minds and the Stellenbosch community is also important to Dylan. While most art does not lend itself towards tactile enjoyment, Dylan encourages viewers to touch his sculptures to get a deeper understanding of art and an appreciation for the environment that inspires it. It is in untamed, wild natural areas that he feels most at home, and his subjects function as metaphors for wilderness. The exhibition has received such an enthusiastic response from the general public that the Stellenbosch Municipality has asked world-renowned sculptor Dylan Lewis to extend his outdoor exhibition to October 2009. Please visit the Stellenbosch Sculpture Tour website. Also until then, the Rupert Museum in Stellentia Avenue hosts Shapeshifting, an exhibition illustrating Dylan Lewis´ progression from wilderness, to animal, to his current exploration of the interface between animal and human. The artist With an early family background steeped in artistic influences as well as nature conservation and even taxidermy, Lewis´s forms may be metaphors for landscape and wilderness, but they are also anatomically correct in every way and exhibit great and accurate detail in their musculature and composition. Nurtured by a family of artists and inspired by his mother and grandmother, Dylan Lewis first became a painter and it was only

His primary inspiration is his abiding passion for wilderness, and in all of his sculptures you will note that the surface textures are not those of animal hide or fur, but rather are inspired by landscape elements. work for him in the foundries where the sculptures are made. His intention is for the families and friends of the workers to see what they have achieved and in turn introduce art as a form of expression and to pave the way towards nature conservation and appreciation. As Dylan takes his inspiration from the wilderness, this outdoor experience speaks not only to discerning art lovers,

after the death of his father, well-known sculptor Robin Lewis, that he started to explore sculpture. His sculptures touch the element, the pristine and the world of legend and enchantment. Lewis’s empathy with the wilderness and its living forms is evident in his ability to powerfully convey the essence of these predators and the environment in which they exist. He works

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L I F E ST Y L E , A RT S & C ULTURE Exhibition History In the summer that polymath Dylan Lewis bought 2 containers of massive bronzes of big cats, a team of 5, his own marquee and exhibition stand, for a week each here, and at Samares Manor in Jersey and sold just under £100,000 worth between the two Islands. He followed this up with a highly successful exhibition at Art London where he sold a further 54 pieces of his line in bronze nudes. 1964 – Born in Johannesburg, South Africa. 1982 – Studied Fine Art at Cape Technikon, Cape Town, South Africa. 1985 - 1989 – Studied painting under Ryno Swart, Ruth Prowse School of Art, Cape Town, South Africa. Mastered taxidermy and museum display. 1991 – International Wildlife & Natural History, Everard Read, Johannesburg. 1992 – International Wildlife & Natural History, Everard Read, Johannesburg. The Directors’ Collection, Delta Park, Johannesburg. 1993 – The AGRED Collection, Little Brenthurst, Johannesburg. 1995 – Wildlife Art, Christie’s London. International Wildlife & Natural History, Everard Read, Johannesburg. Invited to Cordova, Alaska to represent South Africa at Artists for Nature Foundation Expedition. Monumental sculpture of Black Rhino. 1996 – Commenced work on The Cat Collection Society of Wildlife Artists, Mall Galleries, London 1997 – Completed monumental sculpture of Cape Buffalo. 1998 – Opened newly renovated and expanded Stellenbosch studio attended by HRH Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands. 1999 – Premiere of International Recent Cat Sculpture Exhibition, Everard Read, Cape Town. Second International Recent Cat Sculpture Exhibition, Everard Read, Johannesburg. Art London 1999, Everard Read, Duke of York’s Barracks, London. Third International Recent Cat Sculpture Exhibition, The Manx Museum, Douglas, Isle of Man.

intensively from life, filling books with sketches, notes and drawings and the artist spends countless hours sketching in the presence of the living, breathing animal before sculpting. He is thus able to absorb both the physical details of his subject and their living being or essence – predation and the predator, instinct and primeval impulse, life, death and rebirth. This summer, Christie’s South Kensington is hosting the exhibition Shapeshifting – from animal to human. Celebrating the works of internationally acclaimed South African sculptor, Dylan Lewis, the exhibition follows Lewis’s evolution from the animal through to his work with the human form In his own words herewith an explanation of his exhibition at Christie’s South Kensington, 23 July -23 August 2009 •

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2000 – Commenced work for international travelling exhibitions Fourth International Recent Cat Sculpture Exhibition, Everard Read, Cape Town. Fifth International Recent Cat Sculpture Exhibition, Everard Read, Johannesburg. Art London 2000, Everard Read, Duke of York’s Barracks, London. Dallas international Art & Antiques Fair 2000, Miriam Shiell Fine Art, Dallas. Toronto Art Fair, Miriam Shiell Fine Art, Toronto. 2001 – Sixth International Recent Cat Sculpture Exhibition, Everard Read, Cape Town. Art London 2001, Everard Read, Duke of York’s Barracks, London. Toronto Art Fair, Miriam Shiell Fine Art, Toronto. Dallas international Art & Antiques Fair 2001, Miriam Shiell Fine Art, Dallas. Completed monumental sculpture of White Rhino. 2002 – The Cat Exhibition, Everard Read, Cape Town. Art London 2002, Everard Read, Duke of York’s Barracks, London. The Cat Exhibition, Everard Read, Johannesburg. Private Fund Raising Exhibition, Friends of Africa Foundation, Gordon Getty Residence, San Francisco. 2003 - The Cat Exhibition, Everard Read, Cape Town. ArtLondon 2003, Burton’s Court, London ArtLondon 2003, Everard Read, Johannesburg 2004 – 5th artlondon Cat exhibition ArtLondon 2004, Burton’s Court, London 2005 – Up until now, Everard Read, Johannesburg 2006 – artLondon 2006, Royal Hospital Chelsea, London, Channel Islands, Jersey and Guernsey 6th artlondon Cat exhibition. 2007 – Emergence, L’Ormarins, Franschhoek Predators and Prey – The Animal bronzes of Dylan Lewis Auction of 75 animal bronzes at Christie’s in London. 2009 – Christie’s auction Preview Exhibition Royal Geographical Society, London

Contact Pardus Fine Art P O Box 1412 Stellenbosch 7599 South Africa Tel: +27 (0)21 880 0054 Fax: +27 (0)21 880 0588 Email: info@pardus-art.co.za Website: www.dylanlewis.com


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HE A LT H

Image: Rina Smit

health

CONSCIOUS Every breath you take, every move you make, every thought you think and every action you take requires enzymes. Enzymes are the work force of the body. No vitamin, mineral, protein or hormone can do without enzymes. – Rob Vaughan

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God’s PHARMACY Text: Herman Uys Images: iStockphoto.com

I am personally convinced that there is no sickness, disease or condition we experience on earth, that is allowed to exist on our planet without our Creator already having provided an effective antidote and/or medicine for, in the form of plants, fruit or veggies, created for us earth dwellers, to be healthy and well. We simply might not know about it. Most people kill themselves with a fork, and dig their own graves with their teeth. In our funeral letters, we often write:”The Lord gives, and the Lord takes away...” when in actual fact, He gave and we take away. YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT, AND YOU ARE WHAT YOU DON’T EAT! THE VALUE OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES APPLES: ”An apple a day, keeps the doctor away”, is an ancient saying. It’s true! Apple is one of the best available anti oxidants. It cleanses the teeth, destroys bad bacteria in the body, is an excellent ointment for the intestines, helps with digestion, takes heartburn away, and relieves hernia. Drink fresh apple juice for good health every day of your life. O Blood types, be careful, not too much. 96

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ASPARAGUS: Asparagus, part of the Lilly family, is a dynamic liver tonic. It assists the excrement organs to rid the body of urine, e.g. with a narrowed bladder pipe, it will help opening it up again so that the urine can flow out of the body. Asparagus controls women’s PMS symptoms and lessens tenderness of breasts. The liver being the energy source of the body, men with Hepatitis (liver infection) should eat raw asparagus daily to experience an immediate surge of energy. BARLEY: (Barley Green) / Hordeum Sativum Vulgate): Barley is extremely rich in minerals. It’s high calcium and potassium content lowers general stress levels considerably. Barley has been used effectively since ancient times to repair damaged tissue and cells in the human body. Barley is anti inflammatory. When used regularly, Barley Green will stabilize cholesterol levels. It also absolves either constipation or a runny tummy. Barley is an excellent remedy for heart disease. FIGS (FICUS CARICA) We see that cakes of fig were used medicinally by Hezekiah, way back in Bible times. Figs are rich in vitamins and minerals.


HE A LT H

Figs have high alkaline levels, which stabilise the acidity levels in the body. Figs are full of healing power. When you pluck a fig from its branch, let the white milk drip on your warts. This serves as an excellent antifungal. Figs contain anti-cancer

Gallstones vanish when you drink lemon juice, mixed with olive oil before bedtime. If you have fever blisters, suck on a slice of lemon. If you are plagued by piles, then lemon juice is just what you need. If they bleed, apply externally. Kidney stones

Most people kill themselves with a fork, and dig their own graves with their teeth. In our funeral letters, we often write:”The Lord gives, and the Lord takes away...” when in actual fact, He gave and we take away. qualities and destroy bad bacteria in the body. It brings down body temperature and relieves inflammation. Dried figs serve as a natural laxative. To ripen a boil, split a fig in two, warm the inner flesh and press this to the boil. Doing this, will extract any

dissolve within 6-8 weeks, if lemon juice is taken with warm water in mornings and evenings (1 lemon in the morning, 1 in the evening). Lemon is a natural insect repellent. Drink the juice and apply to the skin, to repel mosquitoes and flies. A

infection. Fried figs are excellent for bleeding piles. Apply directly to the swelling. Boil 4-5 figs in a litre of water and drink this ‘juice’ to soothe a sore throat. LEMON: Lemon has been used for generations, for its therapeutic properties. Lemon is rich in Vitamin C, and has a powerful cleansing effect on the entire digestive tract. No house should be without it. A house without lemons is half a house. Lemon is a fantastic alkaline (anti acid), which stabilises the acidity levels in the body. Heartburn, for example, is the direct result of eating starch and proteins together (hamburgers, meat pies, meat and rice, meat and potatoes). The juice of half a lemon in a glass of warm water will eliminate heartburn in minutes. Lemon cleanses the liver, which is the body’s ‘trash-can’. Lemon stimulates the metabolism. Lemon acts as an antiseptic. Gargle with lemon for a sore throat. Lemon controls bladder infections, and kidney ailments, which are mainly caused by an excess of acidity. Lemon is rich in potassium which is excellent for your heart, and acts as a wonderful heart tonic. Lemon strengthens and builds the immune system, and helps fight colds and flu. Apply lemon if stung by a bee, or hornet, to stop pain and swelling.

freshly squeezed lemon, first thing in the morning, is one of the best liver tonics available. If you suffer from restless legs, lemon juice in warm water before bedtime is the answer. Use Cream of Tartar (one teaspoonful at bedtime). Lemon juice is an excellent blood cleanser, and helps get rid of acne, and also helps control an oily skin. A fantastic lemon drink for early mornings: a cup of rooibos tea, boiled with 2 slices of ginger root for 10 minutes. Add the juice of a quarter slice of lemon, and a teaspoonful of honey. Men will never complain about prostate trouble again, and the women will become regular. Use the juice of half a lemon, in half a glass of water to rinse your mouth and watch the plaque on your teeth disappear. Lemon turns yellow teeth white. Rev. Herman Uys grew up in a small town, Bethlehem, in the Free State, South Africa. He graduated from the University of Pretoria in 1984 with a BA and BD degree, and a diploma in theology. He married Gerda in 1982 and has three lovely children, Regardt, Gerdi and Reandi. Herman served in 5 congregations, in full time ministry. His interest in the field of natural healing took him on a road of intense study in this subject. His book: ‘Gods Pharmacy’ was birthed in 2003, as a spontaneous overflow, and as a result of public demand. • Issue 3 / 2009

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Good

BREAST CANCER

THE

N E W PART S 2

In this second part of The Good News, we will be discussing issues regarding the early detection of Breast Cancer using Mammography, ultrasound and how we make the diagnosis before we embark on treatment. Text: Dr Alwyn Carstens Images: iStockphoto.com

MAMMOGRAPHY

Breast Cancer has the unique and dangerous property of not being painful .It is known to be present for many years before it becomes palpable by hand. Being a hormone driven disease it grows faster in younger women with higher estrogens levels but still grows for about 5-7 years before a palpable lump is felt. In older women with lower estrogen levels

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it can take 7-10 years before a woman or her doctor feels a lump. For these reasons mammography was invented to enable us to detect Br.Ca at an earlier stage. TABAR from Sweden did extensive studies and trials that showed the following: 1) Mammography detects Br.Ca much earlier than the hand.


HE A LT H 2) The sooner the cancer is detected, the better the prognosis. National screening programs in Sweden managed to reduce Br.Ca mortality by 40% in the last 25 years. 2) Small cancers are less likely to have spread outside the breast to glands and other structures. 3) Small cancers tend to be less aggressive than bigger ones. 4) Cancers in young women grow faster and therefore mammography should be done at more frequent intervals than in the older women i.e. annually. 5) Mammography is able to detect a type of cancer that, although small, has an aggressive growth pattern. This is another good reason for having a mammogram in all cancers that are already clinically palpable. Many other reasons for this action exist. TECHNIQUE: The breast is placed between 2 plastic plates, slightly compressed and a low dose X-Ray beam is used to create a picture on a sensitive film. Or, a digital picture can be used using a photon sensitive plate which is re-usable. Digital mammography was developed over the years and is now almost as detailed as film mammography. It is however still very expensive (about 3 times the cost of conventional film mammography. At the same fee, the Radiologist using digital, must triple his turnover of patients to make his machine profitable, or must charge a higher fee. Trials, comparing digital with film mammography, have shown that experienced radiologists find no difference in detecting cancers between the two methods. It is however easier for inexperienced radiologists to detect cancers with digital, making use of the computer assisted facility on digital machines. Compression of the breasts used in both these methods should not be painful. If it is painful it usually reflects on the radiographer’s inexperience and insensitivity, or wrong compression limits on her machine. Women finding mammography to be a bad experience should go to another breast care centre as we do not want women to be put off from going for her annual check. If your mammogram was painful, rather go to another breast care facility than quitting your annual mammogram. Mammography is pointed out as the best method for early detection of Br.Ca. in many trials. It is inexpensive, noninvasive and readily available and shows a high degree of reliability compared to other methods (eg.MRI) which could give false positive (e.g. Thermography) or false negative results. Mammography, (not surgery or chemotherapy) has made the greatest advance in the treatment of breast cancer. That is due to its ability to detect cancer in a pre-metastatic phase (before it has spread). It must be stressed however that it is the experience of the Radiologist evaluating the mammogram together with other modalities (eg. ultrasound and biopsies) and not the machine, that makes the diagnosis at the earliest stage. When having a mammogram, women should keep the following facts in mind: • The procedure should not be painful. • The quality of the study depends on the experience of the breast radiologist and the expertise of the Centre’s staff as well as the equipment and processing quality used. • The diagnosis is not made by any machine. • The dedication of the personnel at the centre is of utmost importance. Listen to your women friends and do not go to a centre because it is the nearest or the cheapest.

• Accuracy of the diagnoses depends heavily on the experience of the people working at the centre and has nothing to do with the Hospital Group where the centre is located. • Every woman has the choice where she wants to go for her mammogram, and no Medical insurer or referring doctor should force her to go to a specific centre where she is not comfortable. • The sensitivity of mammography to detect cancers early is influenced by various factors. The breast density, age of the woman and parity are fixed, but there are factors that can be influenced by the women’s own decisions. • She and her physician should be aware that the use of HRT reduces the accuracy and sensitivity of the mammogram and this is of great concern to us (Radiologists) whose mission is the early detection of BR CA. What about the radiation danger of mammography? Radiation to the breast has been reduced remarkably over the years since we started doing mammograms. The risk of inducing a cancer due to mammography is small and is limited by annual inspection of our machines by the Radiation Board which licence all machines annually. The Hiroshima nuclear

“Remember that 95% of breast lumps are not cancer.”

disaster showed that the mature breast (over 40 years) is least sensitive to radiation effects regarding induction of cancer. We do not recommend annual screening mammograms on young women. The risk is small compared to the greater advantage of early detection which has been shown to reduce mortality. ULTRASOUND High frequency ultrasound of about 10-15 MHz is used to image the internal structure of the breast. It is not harmful and painless. It is used to further examine dense areas shown on the mammogram or to differentiate between solid lesions and cysts (fluid collections). A great use of US is that it helps us to accurately steer our biopsy needles into a lesion to take tissue samples deep in the breast. It is a valuable adjunct to mammography and should be regarded as part of the breast exam and mammogram. There is no additional fee in SA for the ultrasound if used together with a mammogram. US is such an important part of a breast exam and mammogram that I will go so far as to say that if the Radiologist is not able to use ultrasound guided methods to make a diagnosis, he should not be doing mammography. US has opened the way for nonsurgical interventions and must be used to help a surgeon to make a diagnosis before surgery. This leads the way to breast saving procedures which we will discuss in later issues of RAY. WHAT ABOUT THERMOGRAPHY? This method uses the assumption that cancers cause an increase in the temperature of the breast in the area where the tumour is located. A heat sensitive plate over the breast then indicates the temperature increase. This method had been investigated for years now, but failed to give us a reliable method to precisely locate a cancer. It also does not allow us to biopsy the area to confirm or exclude a cancer. The area of thermal change is too big to be precise and other existing methods (mammography and ultrasound) are still required to further evaluate the breast. Although this method does not entail radiation exposure, it does not add any sensible value or reduced costs. It is also mainly used by non-breast specialists because a medical degree

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is not required for this procedure. I regard Thermography (at this point in time) as an impractical and additional cost burden which cannot replace mammography and ultrasound as a screening method. I have a breast lump. What now? Remember the GOOD NEWS: Most lumps are not cancer!! Visit your GP and ask to be referred to a Breast Care Centre. In the past, Breast Cancer was a job for the surgeon, as no other treatment existed. Today we know that the role of the surgeon has made way for other treatments with surgery playing a secondary role. The first specialist to be referred to is a breast radiologist, who has the equipment (mammo and ultrasound) and expertise, to make a noninvasive diagnosis. That means, not cutting into the cancer or lump. We use a cutting needle biopsy method under local unaesthetic to obtain a small tissue sample from the lump. This should not be painful. The sample is send to a Pathologist who will make the correct diagnosis, whether cancerous or not. (Within 2-3 days) Cutting into a lump to obtain a diagnosis is really very archaic and is reserved for countries where no diagnostic Radiologist is available within 1000 km!! Remember that 95% of breast lumps are not cancer. Also remember that once a cancer is cut into, the chances of saving her breast is drastically reduced. Some types of cancer also become more virulent if surgery is done first (the Her-neu positive types) The diagnosis is Cancer – what’s next? Remember the GOOD NEWS: Breast Cancer is not a death sentence and can be treated and has a good prognosis!!

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Breast cancer should be managed in a team of specialists! It is no more a “one man show” like in the past when surgery was the only option. There is no rush to make a decision. We know that most cancers will be in a woman’s breast growing for 5-8 years before it is detected. So what is the rush? The dogma that “we should remove the cancer as soon as possible as it can spread” is not true and very unfair to women. Time should be spent on planning the treatment options for every specific type and women. Your type of cancer must be discussed with you by a team of specialists, consisting of the Radiologist, surgeon and oncologist before any treatment is started. The treatment appropriate to your case will be proposed to you and you will then be given time to consider it and perhaps seek more opinions. This should be international expert opinions which can be found on renowned websites. In the next issue of RAY, we will be discussing, issues like breast sparing surgery, the shrinking of larger cancers by preoperative treatments and the outdated dogmas of mastectomy and hormones. Save your RAY Magazines for your friends! • Dr Alwyn Carstens is a physician with special interest in Women’s Health and specifically Breast Health. He practices as a diagnostic Radiologist at The Eastleigh Breast Care Centre in Pretoria. Together with a specialist team, his mission is to provide First World breast cancer treatment and to empower women to take part in decision- making. He has now spent 35 years of his life in the art of Medicine. Many of these topics are discussed in more detail on his website at www.breastcare.co.za


INSPIR ATIONA L

Image: Rina Smit

available

GOD IS ALWAYS I admit that there are times That I am tempted to despair Then God speaks in all His mercy To let me know He’s there He took care of yesterday for me. Tomorrow is in His care. Today He will walk beside me In answer to my prayer. He brings constant joy and comfort To ease my concerns away. I could not go on without Him To be my companion through each day. I would just like to remind you To lean hard upon His breast. Release each trial to Him. Wait for Him to do the rest. Evelyn D. Putnam

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H E A LT H

health

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Text: Jonathan Woolf, Your Life (Pty) Ltd Images: iStockphoto.com / Your Life (Pty) Ltd

What Do You Know About Prostate Health? Natural prostate health is a vital concern for all men. Over half of men over 40 may have enlarged prostates, and eighty percent of eighty-year-olds. Enlarged prostate symptoms include problems with urination, bowel movements and sexual function.


HE A LT H

The prostate gland is a walnut-sized gland that surrounds the urethra. It produces a liquid that helps to prolong the life of sperm. It is because of its position close to both bowel and bladder that it can be such a nuisance when it becomes enlarged. Symptoms of an enlarged gland are: • a weak urine stream • difficulty starting urination • leaking urine • feeling like the bladder has not been completely emptied after urination • frequent need to urinate, especially at night • sudden, urgent need to urinate, especially at night • frequent bladder infections.

Treatment Most prostate medication has severe side-effects and is not so effective. Surgery also has severe side-effects. The most common type of surgery involves going through the urethra to reach the prostate gland and scraping away part of the gland. This reduces the enlarged prostrate glands and relieves pressure on the urethra. Risks associated with the surgery include infection, urinary incontinence, and sexual difficulties. Natural and herbal remedies are the best treatment for BPH as they are noninvasive; they have no side effects and have a 90% success rate. A healthy diet includes foods like nuts, vegetables like cabbage, broccoli and kale, fruits like apples, grapefruit and

“It is difficult to prevent an enlarged prostate, since it is often a natural part of the aging process. The best way to maintain prostate health and function is through good diet, stress management and a healthy lifestyle.” Unfortunately prostate symptoms are often ignored until they become unbearable. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) states that prostate cancer is the second most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. The incidence of prostate cancer diagnosis in young men is on the increase, however the rate of deaths from prostate cancer has been decreasing, possibly due to improved detection methods. There are three types of prostate enlargement, known as prostatitis (an infection of the prostate gland), BPH and prostate cancer. The latter is the least cause of prostate enlargement. BPH, or Benign Prostate Hyperplasia is the most common prostate problem. Simply translated, ‘benign’ means it is not cancerous, ‘hyperplasia’ means it’s bigger than normal. Reasons for prostate enlargement Poor Diet – in societies where a high fat diet is common, enlarged prostates are also common. Toxins and Testosterone build up in the Prostate gland causing it to swell. Correct nutrition assists the body in maintaining a healthy prostate and rids the gland of toxins and testosterone. Certain foods and supplements containing extracts of these foods and herbs are known to reduce BPH and maintain Prostate health. These are listed below. Environment – high estrogen levels in the environment are linked with increased risk of benign prostate enlargement and prostate cancer. Estrogen and estrogen-like compounds are found in pesticides, soy foods, plastics and hormones in meat and dairy products. (Factory farmed animals are routinely injected with hormones to promote rapid growth.) Plastics also contain estrogen-like substances, which are easily absorbed into hot or fatty food. Avoid cooking or storing food in any sort of plastic. Stress – Is the biggest factor causing BPH. Stress causes an increase of secretion of testosterone. It causes the immune system to break down and prevents proper absorption of nutrition. All of these have a direct impact on the prostate gland. Prevention It is difficult to prevent an enlarged prostate, since it is often a natural part of the aging process. The best way to maintain prostate health and function is through good diet, stress management and a healthy lifestyle.

papaya, oatmeal, fish and fish oil and seeds like flax, pumpkin, sunflower and sesame. All of these are effective in reducing prostate enlargement. Your Life’s Adam #1 contains all herbs, amino acids extracts, vitamins and minerals that are necessary for healthy and happy prostate gland and prostate function. Saw Palmetto Berry, Pygeum Africanum, Pumpkin Seed Extract are just some of the ingredients which condition, detoxify and maintain prostate health. For best results use one to two tablets per day, consistently. Each bottle contains 60 tablets. R125.00 (1 – 2 month’s supply). Contact details: Your Life (Pty) Ltd – Paulshof Office Telephone: +27 11 234 4664 Telefax: +27 11 234 4669 Email: service@yourlifesa.co.za

READER OFFER 10 Ray readers can win this amazing vitamin product.

To stand a chance to win, simply send an e-mail with all your contact details to: marketing@ray-magazine. com Subject: YOUR LIFE. Winners will be notified in person. Issue 3 / 2009

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prevention disease

– IT IS POSSIBLE!

Text: Joan van Rensburg Images: iStockphoto.com

WHAT IS DISEASE?

Disease has been described as dis-ease, the absence

of vibrant good health. Life begins at cellular level and our cells group together to form organs and systems in our body. Cellular health depends on the way we nurture and fuel our bodies with good nourishment. As we supply our cells with the right type of fuel, they then have the tools to work with to bring about healing and wellbeing. All disease begins at cellular level leading to: • Skin ageing • Body ageing, • Cellular damage • Loss of function • Cell death • Organ death • And ultimately Human death.

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THE FREE RADICAL CONCEPT OF CELL INJURY As our bodies use oxygen, the by-products cause oxidative damage to our cells. An example of oxidation is when metal rusts, or you cut open an apple or avocado pear and it discolours. A free radical is any atom with at least one unpaired electron that will stabilize itself by stealing an electron from a nearby molecule. An unpaired electron is highly reactive, potentially initiating a chain reaction as successive molecules loose and gain electrons. This disrupts normal cellular processes. Some sources of free radicals are: metabolism (exercise), environmental pollutants, disease, immune responses, UV radiation, as well as chemicals and medications that we ingest. Scientist Bruce Ames has been quoted as saying that the number of oxidative hits daily to DNA per human cell is about 10 000. Free radicals play a role in nearly every known disease,


HE A LT H

from heart disease to cancer. They are the major culprit in the ageing process. SO HOW DO WE PREVENT DISEASE? THE KEY TO LONGEVITY – ANTIOXIDANTS. Consider the following…”The amount of key antioxidants that many different species maintain in their bodies is directly proportional to their life spans.” Richard Cutler MD Research Scientist National Anti-Ageing Institute. Carotenoids and flavonoids are the compounds found in all our fruit, vegetables and salads. According to the Int Journal of Cancer in March 2002, they help stop abnormal cell division, block carcinogens, are anti-inflammatory and inhibit the initiation and promotion of cancer cells. THE ANTIOXIDANT NETWORK 1. VITAMIN C Water soluble – protects cell and blood 2. VITAMIN E Fat soluble – protects fatty portion of cell membranes 3. GLUTATHIONE – Water soluble

Carotenoids are found in your yellow and orange fruits and veggies and protect the lungs, liver, eyes and skin. Resrevetrol is found in grapes and is an overall antioxidant. Indol-3-carbonal is an excellent antioxidant for breast cancer and is found in your cruciferous veggies. A good tip here is to start each meal with a raw food. Also make every snack a raw food. For example start your day with a fresh fruit salad or a smoothie. Eat a salad with avo at lunch and dinner. Snack on fresh fruit or raw nuts. Consume an abundance of the right kind of fats. The essential fatty acids (omega3, 6 and 9) are high in Vitamin E and other antioxidants. The essential fatty acids are found in oily fish (tuna, salmon, sardines, trout and mackerel), avocado pears, raw sweet corn, nuts and seeds, olives and cold pressed oils. In the Clinical Cancer research Journal of 2005 the following was reported: A randomised, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial showed the dietary effects of flaxseed on tumour

“Scientist Bruce Ames has been quoted as saying that the number of oxidative hits daily to DNA per human cell is about 10 000. Free radicals play a role in nearly every known disease, from heart disease to cancer. They are the major culprit in the ageing process.” 4. LIPOIC ACID – Present in both 5. COENZYME – Q10 Fat soluble Antioxidants: Antioxidants are the free radical police of the body, on call whenever necessary to ‘quench’ free radicals. They engulf it and the free radical then joins the molecular structure, weakening the antioxidant. Network antioxidants can ‘recycle’ or ‘regenerate’ one another after they have quenched a free radical, vastly extending their antioxidant power. They donate electrons. Antioxidants play the following crucial role in our overall wellbeing: They preserve our genetic integrity (DNA and RNA mutation), rejuvenate an ageing immune system, can ‘turn off’ bad genes, improve mental concentration and focus, can successfully treat heart disease, rejuvenate the skin, keeps your body youthful, and bolsters your natural defences. THE BIOPHOTONIC SCANNER is a clinically proven, revolutionary, scientific and noninvasive technology. Everyone should use the BIOPHOTONIC SCANNER to learn their SKIN CAROTENIOD SCORE”. Lester Packer, PhD. The “Father of Antioxidants”. The Biophotonic Scanner is the first of its kind, the unique Nobel Prize winning Raman Spectroscopy technology provides you with an opportunity you have never had before – to learn how antioxidants can be noninvasively measured in your body, providing you with a personalized SKIN CARATONOID SCORE. This score is a general indication of your overall antioxidant status. (Journal of Nutrition 2004.) You are now able to measure your progress and improve your antioxidant defence system. SO WHERE DO WE GET ANTI-OXIDANTS FROM? According to the Journal of Clinical Oncology in 2005, the relationship between plasma carotenoid concentration (a biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake) and recurrent Breast Cancer shows that their intake may definitely be beneficial. So increase your daily intake of fresh fruit and veggies! Lycopene is found in tomatoes and protects the hormonal system in both men and women.

biological markers and urinary excretion in postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Dietary flaxseed had the potential to reduce tumour growth in patients with breast cancer. Make sure that the oils you purchase are cold pressed, extra virgin and virgin oils. These are the only oils you should consume. Try not to fry your foods as heat; hydrogenation, light and oxygen chemically alter the fat product making it toxic to our cells. Consume more dark green leafy vegetables and salads. Invest in a juice extractor and drink freshly squeezed fruit and veggie juices. Catechins and polyphenols are also part of the antioxidant family and can be found in green tea. WHY SUPPLEMENT? The question is often asked, if I eat well do I need to supplement? And which supplements are the best? Firstly very few people consume a well balanced diet today. We live in a fast food, instant society and rely on processed, microwave foods. Even our soil today is devoid of certain nutrients; foods are genetically engineered, pumped with chemicals and laced with hormones. So yes, I think we all need to look after our health and make it a priority! Drink a supplement juice made from young green barley plants. They are high in living enzymes, SOD (a potent antioxidant) and are high in alkalinity. They protect you against carcinogens and play a significant role in preventing cancer. ‘Robert Pickett MD Director Nutritional Medicine, California.’ Decaffeinated Green tea supplements are also excellent antioxidants, regulate blood sugar levels, metabolize fats and are protective against breast and prostate cancer. Supplements which use nano technology are very effective in delivering the nutrients more efficiently into the bloodstream. Always use a reputable product which is correctly balanced and scientifically proven to be absorbed. In closing remember the following: You can’t put a price tag on your health. YOUR FIRST WEALTH IS HEALTH! • Issue 3 / 2009

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Image: Rina Smit

SPIRIT

soul, body... Ever since the creation of the world, God’s everlasting power and divinity have been known in and through the things He has made. The invisible qualities of God, those things that the eye is unable to see, have been made visible to the eye of reason.


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Left: The critical moment!

WIN

The Race

Text: Derrick Hurlin Image: Charles Warner

In May 1954, Roger Bannister of Britain became the first person to run the mile in under four minutes. His time was 3:59.4 (3 minutes 59.4 seconds)! In June of the same year, John Landy, an Australian, ran the distance in 3:58. Then, on 7th August 1954, at the Empire Games in Vancouver, the big event the world was waiting for – the two ran against each other. Imagine the excitement! From the start, Landy led the field of eight runners. Towards the end, Landy was still in front, with Bannister close behind. The crowd of 30 000 went wild! With about 90 metres to go, Landy could resist it no more. He looked over his left shoulder. But Bannister was fighting to catch up – on Landy’s right! Landy lost stride for a fraction of a second, and Bannister surged ahead to win the race by a single stride. A dramatic photograph by Charles Warner froze this exact moment. The times were 3:58.8 and 3:59.6 – less than a second apart! Another famous race! Remember the fairy story about the race between the hare and the tortoise? The hare was so sure he was going to win, that he stopped to do other things on the way. Result? The tortoise won! In the fantasy book ‘Alice in Wonderland’, the Dodo

organises a strange race. The people could start and finish when they wanted to. Afterwards, they ask him, “Who is the winner?” He answers, “Everybody has won, and all must have prizes!” In 1 Corinthians 9:24, Paul tells us that our life is like a race. He says, “... all the runners run, but only one can win the prize. Run in such a way as to get the prize.” This seems a bit funny, doesn’t it? The ‘prize’ Paul is talking about is total life as followers of Jesus, yet he says only one person can win. So it sounds as if only one person is going to ‘get the prize’! Not so. Paul really means that life is not a race against other people, but against the way we live our own lives. ‘Winning the race’ means staying in front of everything that keeps us away from God. But – we must be careful not to look back like John Landy, or stop like the hare for unimportant things. We must, as Paul says in Philippians 3:13,14, “Forget what is behind ... press on towards the goal to win the prize for which God has called [us] heavenward...” Then – as in the Dodo’s race – we’ll all win the prize! • Issue 3 / 2009

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the STEEL SHIELD

Text: Derrick Hurlin

Early in my career, I was a design engineer for a chemical company. On the Natal south coast, we were building a plant to make sulphuric acid. One of my tasks was to design a paint system to protect the steelwork. Can you imagine the conditions? Tropical, damp sea air, acid fumes, fork-lift trucks. I arranged for the steel to be thoroughly cleaned by sandblasting right down to shiny bare metal. Then… • ZINC-BASE PRIMER – two coats to protect against corrosion. • UNDERCOAT – three coats of chlorinated-rubber paint to shield from moisture. Each coat a different colour for quality control. • FINISH COAT – to shield the steel from salt and fumes. Coloured eau-de-nil green for appearance. • TOUGH TAPE to protect the bases of the steel column from traffic. It was five years before re-painting was necessary. Why was the protection system so successful? Not because I was especially clever, but because I had taken the trouble to clean the steel and to shield it against all possible attacks. Aren’t we all like that steelwork? We need constant protection from the attacks of temptation. How do we do that? First, like the steel, we need to be thoroughly clean – right down 108

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to our God-made base. How? Come to God and, through the risen Jesus ... He will shiny-clean our stained souls. Then we need to be shielded from all threats to our love of the Lord. God designed a special protection system for us. • TRUTH – to protect us from false teaching. • RIGHTEOUSNESS – to lift us above temptation. • KNOWLEDGE OF THE GOSPEL – to keep us from disobedience. • FAITH – to shield us from mistrust of God. • SALVATION – to liberate us from fear. • THE WORD OF GOD – to combat doubts and unbelief. Read all about it in Ephesians 6: 13 - 18. Incidentally, Matthew Henry points out that the Armour of God has no protection for our backs! Why? Because God expects us to face onslaught against our faith. Unused and unprotected steel soon rusts away. So does unused and unprotected faith. GOD THE ARTIST – GOD THE ENGINEER Remember the Leonardo da Vinci Exhibition several years ago? Wasn’t it exciting to see the work of someone who shows his talents in so many ways? I am an engineer, so I marvelled at how clever he was to invent things that were not possible at the time. He invented an aeroplane, but there were no suitable materials to make it. But he invented the parachute – just in case! A man with vision! My wife is an artist, so she loved to see the artistry of his paintings and sculptures. Beautiful creations. How do we know they were Leonardo’s paintings? Because he signed them. Yes, Leonardo had many ways of showing his talents. It made me wonder how God shows us His talents. Well! That’s rather silly because He shows it in everything! Look through a powerful electron microscope and you will see living things a millionth the size of a pinhead. Look through a telescope and you will see stars whose light takes millions of years to get here. I can’t even visualise how far light travels in one second – 300 000 kilometres – let alone a year, a century, a million years ... These distances are so immense that we can’t hope to understand. Yet – God measures this infinity with the span of His hand! (Isaiah 40:12). And it is a wonder to us that, even though His work is so vast, He still cares for us! (Psalms 8:3 - 9) Perhaps it’s easier to look at just one example of His creation – you! You are a superb piece of engineering, and a superb piece of art! The Bible (Ephesians 2:10 – N.I.V.) tells us, “For we are God’s workmanship...”. Yes, you are God’s workmanship – His work of art! How do you know? Because He signed you! Yes He did! Ephesians 4:30 tells us of “ ... the Holy Spirit of God with whom you were sealed ...” The Good News version makes it even more clear, “... the Spirit is God’s mark of ownership on you ...” Because we are His created and signed works of art, He values us – He cares for us – He loves us. All He asks is that we do the same for Him and for others (Matthew 22:36-40). •


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Issue 3 / 2009

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of life

A medical Word-founded approach to the healing and renewing of your mind.

THE DIVINE LAW God’s Word is life and healing to your soul and renews your youth like that of an eagle. God sends forth His Word to heal us! Text: Dr Rudi Buys Images: Koos van der Lende

An orphaned baby eagle was raised in a farmer’s

chicken pen. He grew up with the other chickens and it never entered his mind that he was designed to defy gravity. His world was defined by fences, gravity and grain. His “knowledge”, his “emotions”, his eyes, his ears, all his senses, kept him in captivity. We are designed to “fly” like eagles. To defy the gravity of sin and disease, fear, worries, stress and anxieties. Why don’t we fly? Our frail mind is the captive of our senses, our thoughts and our past. Though born again, many children of God live like the orphaned eagle – in a self-imposed prison of the mind. This “deficiency” was brought on us by Adam’s choice. Instead of choosing to be led by God and His Spirit, he chose to reign in this world through his soul. He chose to perform using his soul power that is: •His own will. •Thoughts and knowledge. • Emotions that

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will assist him with passion to survive. Losing his relationship with God, his only power lay in his will to be “saved” through knowledge and the passion generated by fear and stress. That is why Jesus came: Jesus came to set captives free! In Him our spirit is reborn and we are delivered from Adam’s bondage. But we allow our soul to still be dominated by sense knowledge – the “old man” we inherited from Adam! To live the abundant life our soul must be saved from its willful passions, destructive habits and all the influences of the past. We must allow the Holy Spirit and God’s Word to restore our soul and release it from the captivity of the flesh and fear. How is this done? It is done by the renewal of your mind through the implanted Word. (James 1:21) Was Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross not enough? Jesus redeemed us completely. Our spirit is totally recreated and saved when we accept Jesus as our Saviour, but it is our responsibility


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to let our mind be renewed and to let the Word save our “inner man”. Daily we have to yield our will! We are captives of our brain’s processes. The need to satisfy the flesh is ingrained in the brain. We are captives of old thought patterns, unresolved memories and emotions, habits, hurts of the past and the brain chemicals of a biological brain. We are bound to the soul: we are influenced by our past and our senses - what we have seen, heard, touched, tasted and smelled. This can’t change overnight, just as you can’t “unlearn” riding a bicycle. Habits are formed by intricate brain connections and processes. Only a renewed mind defies the gravity of old habits, hurts and impulsive reactions. It can “fly” again by trusting and leaning on the Word’s promises with the whole personality and valuing the blood of Jesus and the power of His Spirit. Only a restored mind can respond to God’s every desire for you. It is a choice! You must choose to lay down the power of the soul. You must choose to make a life decision to develop the mind of Christ, to fix your mind on the Word, Jesus, from moment to moment. How can you do this? We know that certain events of the past made indelible imprints on our brain. The 9/11 disaster in New York is one example. The event is anchored in our soul through what we saw, heard and experienced emotionally. You remember exactly where you were when you received that news, what time it happened, who you were with, etc. Something happened in your brain. This event, with the constant “replay” and resulting inner dialogue, changed America’s (and the rest of the world’s) way of thinking in a tangible way. New brain connections and brain chemicals ingrained new attitudes, thoughts and emotions, forever! In the same way the impact of the Word, spoken by you and released in faith, plus the Word’s “dialogue” with you will

ingrain new thoughts, attitudes and emotions. It will change your thinking forever. As you choose to bind your mind to the Word you will experience restoration, healing and the presence of Jesus in a tangible way! How can this happen! Holy Spirit only needs the Word on your tongue and your daily choice and commitment to make Jesus a reality in your life. The aim is to skill you in the Word; to teach you to use your tongue, sound, your thoughts, your senses and writing ability to create a “9/11 experience” that will change your life. The reality of the Word will change the “you” in you forever. You will become a doer of the Word, and live as a new creature (James 1: 23). You will start to “see” Jesus and He will become a reality in your life. God designed us and He knows that we are strongly influenced by our senses. He knows that we need anchors for our soul to keep us grounded in His Truth. That is why God, from the beginning, dealt with His people through covenants. He knew that He had to involve the senses and the soul. That is why the covenant of communion is an anchor for your soul: your senses anchor you when you experience the taste, the smell and see the wine and bread. (Hebrews 6: 19) The army, the fire brigade, doctors, as well as big businesses, know the weaknesses of the stress driven brain. They know that the neuro-biological brain processes can cause havoc and disaster when stressed. They have contingency plans ready for any disaster. People are trained to cope with stress by using operational procedures. Operational procedures change stress to productivity. It entails certain well worked out, automatic, “thoughtless” (without thinking), rehearsed actions and responses. For example: doctors in an emergency situation are bound by strict protocols and procedures. They know that if their emotions are given free range, their memories can fail them and that it can lead to grave mistakes. Issue 3 / 2009

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I N SPI R AT IONAL Why? Stress robs energy from the thinking brain and channels it to the primitive or stress brain. All energy and brain activities are then directed towards survival. There is no energy left for reasoning power. This leads to quick and dirty fixes. Today, these ‘dirty fixes’ manifest as overreaction, aggression, a bad temper, impatience, manipulation, etc. In primitive times these quick actions saved lives; today there is no need for it. A plan of “rehearsed action” however, prevents and replaces emotional overreaction. Without procedures the psyche is vulnerable to impulsive and catastrophic reactions resulting in disaster, even the loss of life. As a medical doctor I knew about operational procedures and I saw the devastation caused by “the fires” in the mind, its effect on health and relations. I knew that I had to go to the Word to get operational tools to overcome this frail mind of ours. Over 25 years God helped me to put His operational procedures in place. Psychology can assist, but it is only the Word that can give you a single direction and foolproof “procedures”.

Every child of God and especially our children need these skills to have victory over their thought life. We are however, never mentored in how to become a doer of the Word. Every day we are involved in some sort of a “war” and encounter “emergency situations”. From the outside we are confronted with “wars” against pressure, difficult situations, demanding people, trauma, principalities, evil spirits etc. From the inside we are confronted with emotional “wars and fires” like hate, resentment, worries, anger, aggression, bad temper, memories, plus thoughts of guilt and negativity that consume our peace, joy, creativity, health and happiness. Our unrenewed minds keep us captive. We spend our whole lives acquiring certain attitudes and establishing certain mind sets. Then we build strongholds around them for the sake of survival. Your stronghold is the thing you rely on and depend on to defend your position and opinion. That forms a barrier, preventing the Holy Spirit from renewing and restoring your inner man. Furthermore our biology, our primitive brain, works against us, preventing us from having victory over anger, worries, fear, impatience or bad habits, because we don’t understand our design. Though we are born again children of God we are captives of our brain’s processes. Very little of what Jesus bought for us with His precious blood, manifests in our lives. Resolutions come to nothing. Willpower fails. This causes a lot of stress, frustration and “burnt” out people. The skill of riding a bicycle can’t be changed by an act of the will! The negative “skill” of anger, fear, worries and impatience can’t be changed by an act of the will! We have the desire and urge to have patience and self-restraint, to be free of past hurts and impulsive reactions, but we are unable to master it. We are

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captives caught up in a cycle of thoughts, which we can’t stop without skills. These patterns keep us bound to the stress or primitive brain and the natural man. We have no answers for the “wars and fires” in our minds. Paul said: Who can relieve me from this condition? I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me. … O wretched man that I am! Who shall deliver me from the body of this death? I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord... – Romans 7: 21-24 There is now no condemnation to them, who are in Christ Jesus, For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus Has made me free from the law of sin and death! – Romans 8: 1, 2 Paul found the answer. There is another law that sets us free from the law of sin and death: the law of the Spirit of Life in Christ Jesus! Rejoice! God’s “manual”, His Word, not only gives us detailed protocols and procedures to break these strongholds and replace all these old cycles and habits, but also to become successful in everything that we attempt! We need to know how to activate the Law of Life in our lives! For those who exercise, sustain a well-balanced life style meditating, voicing the Word, and acting on it, victory is on the horizon.

In Jesus you don’t have a past! You only have a future!


INSPIR ATIONA L UNCERTAINTY ABOUT ETERNAL LIFE? I’ve accepted Jesus as Lord of my life and according to His Word I have the right to be called “a child of God.” (John 1:12) with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. To be absolutely sure about your eternal destination is the most important factor in your life. Without that assurance in your heart, you’ll never have any real direction, nor experience a full and abundant life. Perhaps you’re “hoping” or “trying”. Uncertainty will add a lot of stress to your life. You can be absolutely sure! If you have made the choice to accept Jesus as the Lord and Saviour of your life, you have the evidence, the testimony thereof, in your heart: I have written to you so That you may know that you have eternal life. – 1 John 5: 13 In accordance with His Word you can proclaim: “I have accepted Jesus; therefore I am His child, according to His Word. His Word is the truth and will never ever change.” But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, To those who believe in His name. – John 1: 12 Accept Jesus and He will give you the right to be a child of God forever! This is His promise and He will never break His promise. If you accept the news you receive through the media, or the word of men, as the truth, how much more reliable is the Word of God! If we receive the witness of men, the witness of God is greater. – 1 John 5: 9 He, who has the Son, has life. – 1 John 5: 12 If you have never accepted Jesus, or invited Him into your life, and desire it with all your heart, just pray the following: I believe that You died for me and that You rose again on the third day. I am a sinner and I need Your love and forgiveness. “Jesus, I invite You into my heart. I want You to be the Lord of my life! I repent of all my sins. Thank You that Your blood cleanses me, and that You forgive me all my sins. Thank You that You have now come into my heart and will stay there forever. Thank you that I may know with absolute certainty that I am a child of God and that I have eternal life. Thank You that You have set me free. I know it because Your Word promises and says so. (John 1:12) Thank You that I am your child forever! Thank You that Your Holy Spirit will help me to continually cleanse my life and help me to leave the old things behind. I can now live in the joy that I am Your child and that I will be Yours forever, because Your Word, your “contract” is my evidence! Amen.” Today …………………. [Date] I accepted Jesus Christ as my Lord and Saviour. This is signed by me___________________ on __________ [date] and Witnessed by ____________________ The ratification starts the moment you tell this to somebody. Go and tell a dear friend that you are His child, and why you are His child. Use your tongue and say: ”I am a child of God because I’ve accepted Jesus as my Saviour and His Word, His contract, confirms it.” For with the heart one believes unto righteousness, And with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. (Romans 10:10)

Withstand the enemy’s lies with the evidence – His Word! How do you develop your relationship with Him? • Do not let His Word depart out of your mouth. Read His “love letter” to you and meditate on His promises and His advice, day and night. To think about His promises develops your relationship with Him. Fill up your mind, your whole being, with His love and His good seed. Start proclaiming His Word over your life and pray back His Word to Him. Talk to Him like a child. He promises: Blessed is the man …, whose delight is in the law [the Word] of the LORD, And in His law he meditates day and night. He shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, That brings forth its fruit in its season, Whose leaf also shall not wither And whatever he does shall prosper (Psalms 1:2) Grow in His Love and practice fellowship with your Father and Jesus. You are His disciple and therefore you have His love in you. God is love, and he that dwells in love, dwells in God and God in him (1 John 4:16) Live every day according to 1 Corinthians 13. Tell Him every day that you love Him, even if you don’t feel it, and you’ll find that your whole being will be energized with His love response! ORDERING YOUR THOUGHTS. Chain reaction of thoughts - effect of your thoughts on your inner dialogue. The inner dialogue can put the “lion” behind bars. Thought seeds. Cultivate Word seeds. God designed us in such a manner that our thoughts act as a powerful “tool,” or mechanism, to generate passion and creativity. Thoughts link up spontaneously with other thoughts and new ideas to create a thought chain. These linked thoughts create a new picture in your mind. This picture can form the basis for a new brilliant invention, or it can be a powerful motivation tool. Unfortunately, can you imagine how this creative potential of your thoughts can elaborate on negative thoughts to contaminate you. We need skills to order our thoughts and let our design work for us, not against us! Your thoughts have power! Here are some examples: • Because your thoughts have a significant effect on your body, a polygraph lie detector can detect what the effects of stress and the adrenaline response are on the body, when the stress ‘thinking files’ are challenged. • In the same manner, just thinking of an unpleasant confrontation long ago can raise your blood pressure and heart rate. • Maintaining healthy thoughts of expectation and optimism, plus the power of your laughter and sense of humour can create health. • When imagining sucking a lemon, the mere thought results in a salivary reaction. These are some examples to demonstrate that your thoughts can influence your health and creativity in a powerful way. Pessimism and negative thoughts can progress to fear, anxiety, depression, obsessions and compulsions, causing unproductivity. Negative thoughts are toxic and must be replaced with positive thoughts. Your thoughts create your personal reality: they can create a long lasting “atmosphere” of peace in your mind, or they can create a continuous state of war and stress. • To be continued in our next issue...

Issue 3 / 2009

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faith

‘But without faith it is impossible to please Him: for him that cometh to God must believe that He is and that He is a rewarder of them that diligently seek Him’ Hebrews 11:6. Text: Rina Smit Image: Koos van der Lende

God has told us that without faith it is impossible

to please Him. He has also told us how to receive faith. If we don’t have faith, we can’t blame God. To blame God for our lack of faith is ignorance on our part. If we lack faith, we are to blame. ‘Faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the Word of God’ (Romans 10:17). You cannot believe and have faith without hearing the Word. In the Bible, there is provision for every need: salvation, deliverance, safety, preservation, healing and so on. Whatever needs you have, the faith to receive your answer comes from hearing the Word of God. As you feed upon the Word continually, you will see your faith grow in order to receive the wonderful promises God has provided for His children. ‘Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen’ (Hebrews 11:1) God is telling us exactly what Bible faith is. Hebrews 11:1 says that faith is the evidence of things not seen and faith is the substance of things hoped for. In other words, faith is substance. Moffatt’s translation of Hebrew 11:1 reads: ‘Now faith means that we are confident of what we hope for, convinced of what we do not see’. Another translation

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reads: ‘Faith is giving substance to things hoped for’. What God is simply telling us is that faith is laying hold of the unseen realm of hope bringing it into the realm of reality. Too many times when it comes to receiving an answer to prayer, many people are just simply hoping they will receive it. But it’s not hoping that gets the job done; it’s believing. The Bible says, ‘Now faith is...’ If it’s not now, it’s not faith. Someone said, ‘Well, I believe I’ll get that someday.’ That’s not faith, that’s hope, because hope is always future tense or pointing to the future. But faith is now. Faith says, ‘I’ll receive right now; I believe I have my petition now when I pray’. Picture this: You’re sitting in a boat, far out on a lake and kilometres away from the nearest shore. Suddenly, you hear the unmistakable voice of God: ‘Get out of the boat and walk on the water’. What would you do? That’s what happened to the apostle Peter. When he stepped out of the boat, it was, to anyone else who may have been watching, a very illogical and perhaps even silly thing to do. But as long as Peter was responding in faith, the water might as well have been solid ground because it supported his body without a bit of trouble. However, as soon as


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Peter took his eyes off Jesus and looked at what he was doing from a logical perspective, he was in big trouble. He began to sink as if he was wearing concrete boots. Maybe what you must do, or what you are busy doing, collide with the world’s notion of logic and good sense. The truth is, when logic collides with a direct word from God, logic crumbles into little pieces while the word remains unbroken and unmoved. The Bible is full of examples of people who were willing to follow God’s word instead of logic and were blessed beyond measure because of it. For example, it was not logical for a humble person named Moses to go before the mighty Pharaoh and demand that the children of Israel be set free. But that’s what God told Moses to do, and that’s what he did. Because of it, the Israelites were able to leave Egypt and make their way to the Promised Land (Exodus 3-12). It wasn’t logic for Noah to build a huge boat so far from the nearest ocean, but he was obeying God when he did it, and as a result, only Noah and his family survived a worldwide calamity (Genesis 6-9). It wasn’t logical for Gideon to go up against the entire fury of the Midianite army with a tiny group of men, but he did what the word of the Lord commanded, and as a result, the nation of Israel threw off its oppressors and gained its independence (Judges 6:12; 7:27). Nor was it logical for Abraham to believe it when God pronounced him to be the father of many nations. After all, he and his wife Sarah were well past the age of childbearing. Abraham could have looked at himself, shook his head, and

said, ‘Lord, You must have me mixed up with someone else’. But he didn’t, and Abraham did indeed become the father of many nations, just as God had promised he would (Genesis 17:14). It was through the lineage of Abraham that Jesus Christ came into the world in the flesh, so all of us who have surrendered our lives to Christ can consider ourselves to be sons and daughters of Abraham (Matthew 1:17). Abraham is a great example of

“Whatever needs you have, the faith to receive your answer comes from hearing the Word of God.” someone who believed God’s Word in spite of what his natural mind told him. Romans 4:3 tell us that ‘Abraham believed God, and it was accounted unto him for righteousness.’ God may be speaking to you about something the same way He spoke to Abraham, but you’re struggling to trust God’s Word in the midst of the reality you see all around you. Believing plus confessing equals activated faith. Whatever it is that you are waiting for, it is done the same way, through faith. Faith is activated by believing with your heart and confessing with your mouth (Mark 11:23; Romans 10:10). God has given us His Word to get our thinking straightened out. And when we think in line with God’s Word, our believing will be correct. When we believe correctly, then what we declare with our mouths will be correct. Your confession is the expression of your faith. So don’t confess your doubts. Confess God’s Word, and God’s Word will work for you. • Issue 3 / 2009

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How are we supposed to lead our lives in these trying times?

Text: Pastor Wandi L. Hasheni Image: iStockphoto.com

RECESSION As this article is being written, believers and nonbelievers around the country are cracking their skull asking unanswered questions, wondering if they will be able to provide the kind of financial protection to their children and families this financial year. The past months have brought a recession to the country that has left many affected. The financial decline has been brought about by many factors including the decreasing value of the Rand, the mortgage crisis, and the bankruptcy of many large international investment houses. To be certain, these are tough times for the average worker, but the Christian must not cry out “the sky is falling and I am sinking.” What should be the proper response to this economic crisis? Is there wisdom that God offers? The purpose of this article is to share the wisdom of God and motivate readers on how to respond to this financial downturn. We will further explore the mind of a believer during this recession time. Recession is what everyone sees around them. Every corner of the street, in taxis, buses, boardrooms and staffcanteens you will hear about the fears that people have as a result of this financial ‘horror’. . However, God has not given us the spirit of fear but of power and boldness. Fear does not come from Him (2 Timothy 1:7). Therefore, make an effort to protect your mind from it. Take action so you can remain secure in the midst of recession and financial crises. It is very imperative of believers to guard their attitude during this season. Our attitude should be that portrayed in the Word of God. In order to develop a biblical attitude towards the current state of the economy, it is necessary to look to the Scripture to see how God has told us to handle our finances and the rest of our possessions. Firstly, we must realize that what we have is truly not our own. Everything that is ours has been given to us by the grace of God. Paul reminds the Corinthians, “For who regards you as superior? What do you have that you did not receive? And if you did not receive it, why do you boast as if you had not received it?” (1 Corinthians 4:7). We need to recognize that our belongings are God’s and it needs to show through in our actions.

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Secondly, we should guard ourselves from any temptation to covet money or material things. The Christian’s first affection is Christ. When we place money and wealth above all else, we have fallen into idolatry and have dethroned Christ as Lord in our hearts. Jesus warns us “you cannot serve God and money” (Matthew 6:24). 1 Timothy 6:9 says that “those who want to get rich fall into temptation and a snare and many foolish and harmful desires which plunge men into ruin and destruction.” It is easy for the man who pursues riches to become blinded by his quest for worldly possessions that he forgets what is most important, thus ruining his soul in the process. We must seek first His kingdom and His righteousness and that all these other things shall be added (Matthew 6:33). Our focus should be on seeking God and He will load in us all ideas that will liberate our spirits and our souls during this season of famine. Our ‘manna’ can still fall so we can be successful in our businesses and our career lives in general. With this in mind, the Christian must also work hard to provide a healthy life for his family, doing all to the glory of God. We aren’t to be lazy and just trust that God will provide, but we should work diligently and with excellence to make a living. So how are we to respond today? One thing that would be more than appropriate is prayer. We must acknowledge our utter dependence on God, the provider of every gift. 1) Pray for protection from the love of money. 2) Pray for God to provide what you need. 3) Pray that the poor would be provided for and that our leaders would handle the situation responsibly. Ultimately, we must remind ourselves that God will provide all that we need in life. He has guaranteed wealth, success, and health, as he has given us a promise that He “causes all things to work together for good to those who love Him” (Romans 8:28). God will not be unfaithful to this promise as He has always been faithful to our fathers of faith in the Bible. Christians can rejoice in the fact that no matter how difficult circumstances are, we have a God who works all things out for good. Constantly worrying about the falling stock prices is not


INSPIR ATIONA L a healthy attitude to have. Instead, it would be good for us to continually give thanks to God for granting us everything that we do have, while believing that He will continue to sustain us through this period of time. I think it is appropriate to pray for the economy. After all, God said to Jeremiah, “Seek the welfare of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its welfare you will find your welfare” (Jeremiah 29:7). When the economy is strong, people are able to work and support their families, believers have greater opportunities for generosity, and many benefit from this common grace. We can pray for integrity and wisdom for government officials who are faced with the incredibly complex task of regulating investment securities and banks in a way that is transparent and serves all of the varied stakeholders. We can pray that those who are willing to work will be able to find gainful employment. We can pray that greed would be restrained at all levels, from

the leaders on Johannesburg Stock Exchange to individual families tempted to live beyond their means. We can pray for ourselves that we will participate in the national economy that keeps in mind that the time is short and the present form of this world is passing away (1 Corinthians 7: 29-31). As we run our businesses or climb the corporate ladder, let us always be encouraged to stand in the faith that we have in God as our only source. About recession, as Christians we learn to realize the following: • Our character is shaped more effectively during the season of famine as we only have one option which is that of yielding to God • It is a form of communication between GOD and men • A channel of God’s wisdom and revelation within the framework of Kingdom Principles • A tool of analysis for Kingdom Economics •

Profile: Pastor Wandi L. Hasheni Pastor Lwandile Wandi Hasheni is a Founder and

Director of the Kingdom Prosperity Network whose sole focus is on creating a platform for Christians in business to network, share expertise and impart on each other. Pastor Wandi, as he is popularly known, has a very solid entrepreneurship background with a wealth of knowledge and expertise on a wide range of disciplines. This includes his fair amount of exposure on IT and Telecomms, Industrial Relations, Management Consultancy and Marketing. Professional Experience and Significant Achievements: Pastor Hasheni pursued his education as follows: • David Mama High Matric 1991 • University of Cape Town BsocSc 1997 • University of Cape Town PG-DIPL. (Purchasing) 1998 • Rhema Bible College Dipl. Ministry pending • Trinity University Masters in Ministry current Pastor Wandi will also be pursuing his Masters in Business Leadership at the Unisa School of Business Leadership in the coming academic year (2010). His passion has always been to empower others with his gift of teaching and counselling so they can also realize their God-given potential. His journey in the ministry of God started with a divine calling in the year 2002 where he eventually gave himself under the practical mentorship and fatherhood of Senior Pastor Gugulethu Maqetuka at the Word of Faith Ministry. This led to his ordination as a Senior Deacon and a Head of the Empowerment Ministry. The favour of God has been so much that he eventually realized that God had more for him, which then led him to active Practical Ministry Clinics under the mentorship of Rev. Elias Ndeda, immediately after his ordination in 2007 at the Christian Family Church in Soweto under the senior pastorship of Pastor Tony Mamaregane. A humble man, Pastor Jiff Perreira who leads the Apostolic Faith Mission Victory Celebration in Rosettenville in the south of Johannesburg further inspired him. It is in this ministry that he learnt more about the dynamics of leadership and the relevance of the church in the surrounding communities. Pastor Hasheni held the following offices in ministry: • Ordained Senior Deacon Word of Faith 2004 • Head of Empowerment Ministry

Word of Faith 2004-2006 • Head of Prayer & Intercession Word of Faith 2006 • Ambassador Business Ministry 2006 • Head of Pastoral Dept. Christian Family Church 2007 • Founder & Director Agape Prosperity Program 2007 to current • Founder & Director Kingdom Prosperity Network 2009 He held the following positions in business: • Executive Labour Consultant Uncedo Labour Solutions 2004-2007 • Marketing Executive Thomas Group 2007 • Marketing Executive GCNS Communications 2008 • HR Executive BNW Investment Holdings 2008 to current • Director Intellikom Networkx 2009 Pastor Wandi, brings with him a wealth of knowledge and sound strategy in the appropriate management, organization and planning of the prosperity network initiative. When Jesus approached entrepreneurs as his disciples he had a mission to transfer their skills into the Kingdom of God. Hence his proclamation that he will make them fishers of men. Outreach Projects Managed: by Agape Prosperity Programme Operation ‘Coca’ Targeted at raising crime awareness and education to youth in preparation for 2010 Excellence in Young Minds Instilling a mind of greatness and success to the youth in schools within the parameters of the Word of God. Introduced spiritual education in the schooling curriculum for a positive mind set. Dancing for Glory Launched a dance and music revolution for the glory of God. Organize young people through this vehicle so they can know God even in their lifestyles. Hands of Mercy Visiting prisons, hospices and police stations to spread the message of love, compassion, hope and prosperity for all their souls to be saved. Issue 3 / 2009

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Discipleship Text: Pastor Wandi L. Hasheni Image: iStockphoto.com

Go ye unto the world and make disciples. The word disciple is used today as a way of self-identification for those who seek to learn from the teachings of Jesus. Jesus preached the gospel to the poor, giving them hope and reminding them that the Kingdom of God is for them as well as it is for everyone. A prosperity disciple therefore, is an anointed servant of the Lord carrying a message of hope and prosperity to the people of God. A message of hope and prosperity is a message of salvation. A soul that remembers its creator is a soul that receives Jesus Christ as his/her personal Lord and Saviour. This soul is a saved, born again and becomes free from bondage and born of the Spirit of God. The saved soul is then taught of the will of God and the mysteries of the Kingdom of God. Amongst other teachings, a believer is taught about Kingdom Lifestyle, a life of abundance and prosperity. There is a general misconception of what prosperity is all about, and what it actually means. Christian folk tend to think that prosperity is only about money, material or glamour. No! Prosperity is all of this and so much more. The word prosperity describes a life of a believer who has received his/her birthright as the righteousness of God. If a believer receives Jesus Christ in his life she/he is born of God and is therefore a new creation. He then becomes a joint-heir with Christ and receives the inheritance of the Kingdom of God. The book of John 10:10 clarifies the intention and the purpose of Jesus Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection when He says; “I have come that they may have life and have it more abundantly…” Good Life God’s will is that His people may prosper and have good life. 118

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This, He revealed in His plans as contained in Jeremiah 29:11 where He declares plans of a prosperous life and hope for the future. Isn’t that awesome? God does not have poverty or lack as part of His plan. He has plans that His people may prosper and have good life! Amen! It is imperative that God’s people capture the jest of the message of ‘good life’. A perspective of the Bible in the book of 3 John 2 states; “Beloved, I wish above all that thou may prosper and be in health as thy soul prospereth”. This portion of scripture clearly displays a balance in the kind of life that a believer should live. It is this balance that is generally misunderstood and distorted by many teachers of the Word of God. Subsequently, many believers, as a result of this distortion, do generally not receive the message of prosperity. Albeit the truth in this statement: a lot of damage is caused as a result of misinterpretation of the Word of God. In other words there is a tendency by Bible scholars or theologians to come up with a number of different meanings of the word ‘prosperity,’ which God has simplified. What other possible meaning could there be? Prosperity: Taboo? A Sin or The Will of God? When God spoke to Abraham, for example, He simply promised him that if he is obedient, he shall receive blessings (Genesis 12: 1-3). The Bible in the book of Genesis 13:2 goes further to state clearly that Abraham was very rich in cattle, in silver and in gold. This man walked with God and was very rich. Why is it that prosperity teaching is such a taboo word within the Christian circles? Yet, the Bible is filled with men and women blessed by God abundantly. God has made a very clear statement in the Bible in terms of blessings, wealth and prosperity. Below is an illustration of a few men that God had chosen to use as vessels of honour and His will: • King Solomon was the richest man on earth, blessed by God in wisdom and riches (1 Kings 10:23-24). • Job was the greatest man in the East (Job 1:3). This man was simply rich and affluent. He had assets which could be interpreted to Millions of Rands in today’s monetary terms. • Joshua was favoured by God and very prosperous as he led the Israelites to the promised land. God gave him an assurance that his life will be prosperous. Joshua 1:8 puts emphasis on God’s declaration where He says “…Then you will be prosperous and successful…” • David was very close to God that he was anointed as king before time. The favour of God was so abundant in his life that he was lifted from one glory to another. The bible says that his house and his kingdom will be blessed forever (2 Samuel 7:16). It is in the light of the above few examples that this article concludes that prosperity is not a sin, as some Bible scholars and theologians portray it. God has nothing but love for His people, and yes, He blesses them mightily and more abundantly. Hence the portion of the Word in Matthew 6:33, that all we need to do is seek God and His Kingdom and allow Him to add everything else that we need. We certainly do not have to worry about anything but allow God to do it all for us. All our plans will have to be committed to Him so that they all can be successful (Proverbs 16:3). In conclusion, ‘prosperity discipleship’ is therefore a Divine Assignment guided by the principles of the Word of God, to teach God’s people about the balanced life of a believer in the Kingdom of God. •


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DESIGNER

Looking good is not just about having beautiful clothes, but wearing them with confidence. You need to know what suits your body type and character, to find your inner style and feel comfortable with how you’ve put your look together. The most important thing you can take anywhere with you, is not a Gucci- bag or Frenchcut jeans, it’s an open mind! Text: Ally Mesnard Images: Julio Moreira & Michael Maherry Hair & Make-up: Jovanka Arpino Stylist: Ally Mesnard & Noncedo Mngqibisa

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Accessories by Angel and Nomic

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Describe your signature look? My signature style is best described as a sophisticated contemporary art form that plays with the paradox between masculinity and femininity. This is achieved through the use of contrasting fits, detailing and fabrics. The focus throughout all my collections is embedded in exerting the power of a woman while magnifying the beauty, grace and style of her being and form. Give us more info on your brand. In December of my graduating year, I was approached by African Fashion International to attend an interview to look at the possibility of showcasing at the Audi Autumn/Winter Fashion Week 2008 as a sponsored New Generation Designer. Early in January I received the amazing news that my application had been successful. That March I showcased my very first collection consisting of ten looks. The media feedback was fantastic! I was awarded ‘Designer of the month’ in Elle magazine and ‘Designer to watch’ in the Cosmopolitan. This was the kick-start to my career as a young South African designer and as well as my label ‘Abigail Keats’. Since this first show I have participated in Joburg Spring/ Summer Fashion Week 08, Audi Autumn/Winter Fashion Week 09 and just recently Arise Africa Fashion Week 09. I have also been invited to New York, London and Miami to showcase my collections and have been involved in various productions such as Miss FTV South Africa. My brand, still fairly new in the market, has grown from strength to strength and has gained respect in the fashion industry in little more than a year and a half and I hope to see it expand into a very well-known brand associated with the pleasures of prestige lifestyle. What is your fashion inspiration? Where do you derive your inspiration FROM? My inspiration comes in many different forms and shapes, for instance, my love for art and self-expression as well as an appreciation for life. However my Spring/Summer 2009 collection finds inspiration in my need to innovate and create a range that reflects a personal journey of growth and discovery, while still maintaining a strong emphasis on exerting the power and grace within the female physique. I strive to not only create unique looks but also sophisticated and glamorous styles. What are the trends and colours for Spring/ Summer 2009? A brief overview of the hottest trends… • Neon’s and Brights These Neon and Bright Hues are present on most catwalks. Whether worn as part of the outfit or as an accessory, these statement colours will undoubtedly help fashionable women and


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Accessories available from Angel. Silver Deco Earrings, R65.00 Thin Stud Belt, 100cm, R165 Weekend LeatherLook Handbag, R295

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men express their style and personality. • Nudes, Neutrals and Metallics: In complete contrast to the above colour trend, fashion for Spring/Summer 2009 has also embraced a neutral palette. Balenciaga, Fendi, Alexander McQueen, Chloe, Giambattista Valli and Preen are just a few of the fashion labels to include these skin tone shades in their collections. The simplicity of these neutral shades allow for experimentation with more interesting shapes and silhouettes, and the combining of these nude shades with neon brights creates a funky and youthful look. Neutral hues can also be kept isolated to create an ethereal and romantic look. Another key colour for Spring/Summer 2009 is classical, timeless black. Black symbolizes elegance and glamour, but it is also very practical, making it a perfect choice for women/men that want to look chic. Combine black and white for a dramatic look. With regards to Metallics, gold and bronze used a lot to either create statement pieces or enrich the look of accessories. Gold is highly fashionable this season! • Sheer and Cutouts Sheer fabric and cutouts are back as one of hottest 2009 Spring/Summer fashion trends! Looking over runway collections, sheer fabrics are used in a multitude of ways: tight sheer pieces, layers, and the much sought after delicate, feminine draping. Elegance really is the key to wearing the sheer fashion trend this year. • Layering Whether it’s the layering of fashion garments or that of fabric, this trend is firmly rooted in this season. Designers such as Jonathan Saunders, Richard Nicoll, Givenchy and Karl Lagerfeld have embraced this trend creating an elegant and feminine feel throughout their collections. This trend extends itself to full-garments, isolated sections on garments (such as hemlines) and even trimmings. It can literally be applied to any fashion principle or technique. • Pleats and Frills This trend is about creating volume and texture as well as placing greater emphasis on detail. Pleats, ruffles, frills and fringing are all a part of this trend, creating detail-focused looks. • Draping Draping is a very big part of Spring/Summer 2009. Although this trend is predominantly present in dresses its important to note that draping has also extended itself into other garments, ultimately causing a change in silhouettes. Draping is all about creating shape and adding volume to establish modest bodice lines that are gaining more ground in today’s fashion.

• Prints This Spring/Summer embraces graphic patterns, rich florals, animal prints and psychedelic patterns. What are your hottest key looks for Spring/ Summer 2009? My hottest looks for this season include cropped dresses infused with metallics, feminine pleated shirts, tailored sleeveless jackets and cheeky shorts and mini’s teamed up with sheer vests. Any advice you would like to share with aspirant designers? The fashion industry is an extremely difficult one to crack, so right from the beginning apply yourself and work hard but never let go of your passion or faith in your talent, as it is this that will lead you through many difficult times. Any advice you WOULD like to share with Ray readers when they put their Spring / Summer wardrobe together? I’m sure everyone has heard of KISS – Keep It Simple Silly! Build your S/S 09 wardrobe by first purchasing classic pieces. These pieces will never go out of fashion and can always be teamed up with fashion accessories to create the feel of the season. You can then begin to incorporate what I call signature pieces – garments that are reflective of the season as well as your personality. Then simply have fun! Experiment by combining classics and signatures together, or simply team one or the other with accessories. At the end of the day, the most important thing is that you feel absolutely fabulous wearing your wardrobe! Where will the public be able to buy your fabulous clothing? You can either visit one of the below boutiques: Fizz Clothing, TZIPPORAH and ROCO COCO, Or you can contact me direct. Tell us more about your plans for the future? First and foremost, I hope to open my own boutique and secondly I then want to aim to develop ‘Abigail Keats’ into a well-known international brand that is known for its innovation in design and excellence in fit and quality. contact details. Cell: +27 82 716 5092 Email: abigail@abigailkeats.com Issue 3 / 2009

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All clothing by David Tlale. Price on Request

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5. Accessories by Angel. 1) Pierre Cardin Babydoll Skimmer, R299; 2) Busby Leather Handbag, R1,795; 3) Ring and necklace by Jenna Clifford, Price on Request; 4) Tortoise Shell Hoops, R75; 5) Bling Cheetah Sunglasses, R229; 6) Topaz Flower Brooch, R125

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From Angel: Patent Red High Heels, R299; Bracelets, Price on Request. Necklace from Nomic.

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SCHOEMAN Describe your signature look? The look is for the individual, sophisticated, glamorous, feminine and makes a statement that would turn heads. Give us more info on your brand. The brand was established during the 90s and focused on celebrities, VIPs, businesswomen, famous personalities and beauty queens. Special designs are constantly created for special occasion, matric farewell as well as bridal and retinue. A special fragrance JJ SCHOEMAN Parfum 50ml was created and is available in JJ stores and studio. What is your fashion inspiration? Where do you derive your inspiration from? People inspire me as well as fabrics. The energy of the city is a source of inspiration and everything around it. The colours are bold and bright, large prints as well as black and white. Metallic are still desirable for evening and frau frau frills. What are the trends and colours for Spring/ Summer 2009 Architecture, big, bold, asymmetric, floral prints, monotone is in. Day dresses are fashionable as well as the new short cocktail dress with clinched waist. What is your hottest key looks for Spring/ Summer 2009? The JJ Red Carpet gown with fishtail shape, the maxi dress(long and short) and the short poof cocktail dress.

Accessories by Angel. 1) Amber Set, R165; 2) Pierre Cardin Patent and Satin Trim High Heels, R299; 3) Opal Crystal Brooch, R195; 4) Expression Necklace, R185; 5) Silver and Crystal Deco ELLE Watch, R795. Opposite Page: Handbag by Europa Art Shoes, R350; Mink Dress by JJ Schoeman, R3,999; Egyptian Set by Angel, R145; Ladies Glamour Hallmark Watch, R499

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FASH ION & BEAU T Y Any advice you would like to share with aspirant designers? Learn everything you can about the industry. Jack up your skills on a daily base, focus on quality and style and sell, sell, sell. Any advice you WOULD like to share with Ray readers when they put their Spring / Summer wardrobe together? Get a few new pieces to freshen your wardrobe, add a new platform colourful shoes, and mix it all up and try not to match too much. Where will the public be able to buy your fabulous clothing? At JJ Schoeman, The Zone Rosebank, JJ Schoeman Glenfair shopping centre, Lynnwood or by appointment for made to order only at the New Doornfontein studio, Johannesburg. Tell us more about your plans for the future or future collections? Going into the New Year, we are celebrating 25 years in fashion and the next 25 years will see us launching internationally on a world stage. We are also focusing on developing the brand and branding. contact details JJ Schoeman, The Zone Rosebank 011 447 5455 Johannesburg. The Glenfair Sanlam Shopping centre, Lynnwood Manor 012 3482953 or The Studio 011 404 1503.

A fresh green, ozone fragrance with a fiery floral undertone and a subtle woody, musk base

READER OFFER 3 Ray readers can win this amazing perfume by JJ Schoeman.

To stand a chance to win, simply send an e-mail with all your contact details to: marketing@ray-magazine.com Subject: JJ SCHOEMAN. Winners will be notified in person. Accessories by Angel. 1) POLICE Alabama Watch, R1,495; 2) Gold Multi Hoops, R95; 3) Malero Snakeskin-Look High Heels, R299 Opposite Page: Her dress – Gogo by JJ Schoeman, Price on Request. His Pinstripe Suite, Tie and Shirt all by Angel, Price on Request; 4) Silver and Cubic Twin Set Necklace, R225; 5) Silver Pearl Drops, R85; 6) Metallic Croc Purse, R145

Tafeta Courset Dress by JJ Schoeman, R2,499; Large Wooden Beads from The Space, R180; Malero Patent Croc-Look Wedge Heels, R299

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Lunar is the lifestyle vision of fashion designer Karen Ter Morshuizen. Her partnership with Paul Harris saw the conception of a lifestyle store offering unique nature inspired merchandise.

Since its inception Lunar has been sensitive to environmental concerns, making use, almost exclusively of natural fibres and pigment dyes. Each collection reflects their essential design philosophy 足 Lunar is about finding inspiration in the small things around us, and emphasizing an appreciation for our environment. Karen enjoys reviving old-fashioned techniques: hand knitting, smocking, felting, African beading and hand embroidery. These crafts are often interpreted into uncomplicated clothes in luxurious fabrics with understated detailing and intelligent cutting. The result is a couture approach to ready-to-wear fashion. With these principles Lunar aspires to enter the global market where they can reach a larger audience with their message and continue to contribute, educate and inspire. Fawn Mesh Skirt and Hoodie (used as bodice), Price on Request

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FASHION & BE AU T Y Accessories by Angel. 1) Metallic Deco Necklace, R195 2) POLICE Glamour Square Gold Watch, R1,795; 3) Gold Textured Hoops R75

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Ostrich Feather Skirt and Nappa Leather Bodice, R12,500

Tafetta Gown with Wrist Cuffs, R18,000. LYDC Fashion Leather-Look Handbag, R445

Describe your signature look? Classic, sophisticated, clean lines, uncluttered. Give us more background info on your brand. (You will find most of this at www.lunarlife.co.za What is your fashion inspiration? Where do you derive your inspiration from? We are inspired by nature and often refer to the vast landscapes that South Africa has to offer from the Karoo to fynbos. What are the trends and colours for Spring/ Summer 2009? We always work with earth tones and for this season has included some Brights to cheer us up. What is your hottest key looks for Spring/Summer 2009? Lots of texture, slightly worn, almost futuristic and original floral prints. Any advice you would like to share with aspirant designers? Stay true to your style and lots of perseverance. Any advice you like to share with Ray readers when they put their Spring / Summer wardrobe together? Dress for comfort and don’t clutter.

Where will the public be able to buy your fabulous clothing? We have two Lunar stores, one in Johannesburg (+27 11 726 5558) and one in Cape Town (+27 21 674 6871). Tell us more about your plans for the future or future collections? We hope to open a few more stores and have a presence in London, Paris and New York. Contact details www.lunarlife.co.za Lunar Jhb: 44 Stanley Ave, Milpark Lunar Cape Town: 10 Cavendish Road, Claremont

1) Louvier Paris Handbag by Angel, R795. 2) Contessa Set by Angel, R225 3) Gold Feather Earrings by Angel, R65 4) Citizen Quartz Watch by Angel, R2,499

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Rademan Describe your signature look The typical “Simon Rademan” signature is very much an international trend currently. It celebrates the female form. It emphasizes femininity and challenges beauty. It is long (always full length), elegant, feminine, chic, and gloriously glamorous. Give us more background info on your brand. The brand originated more than 20 years ago and was created from the desperate need of women “not finding what they’re looking for”. We now create Couture from the likes and dislikes of a client and taking from fashion what suits them best. What is your fashion inspiration? Where do you derive your inspiration from? Fashion dictates and exaggerates all the time, and although there is so much inspiration coming to all from the runway alone, I spot and identify what remains feminine!

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FASHION & BE AU T Y Good manners, beautiful women and everyday needs of clients have inspired me over two decades, and will continue to do so. The individuality of women surrounding me is incredibly inspiring. When I am in a rut, I arrange “play dates” with my best girlfriends, during which we experiment with fabric, styles, ideas and illusions. My girlfriends are so my muse! What are the trends and colours for Spring/ Summer 2009? The main trend is that there is no trend… for now! Anything goes, as long as women remain women, and men remain men. This may sound ridiculous when put like that, but very true: there is NO unisex! The general public has now become the no 1 player, with everyone having the opportunity to publish fashion through facebook, twitter, etc. I definitely see loads of colour! Any colour as long as it is a “happy colour”! It seems like women are going to have the time of their lives. Black and white has earned its place in a timeless wardrobe, and especially in upcoming fashion. “The dress” has made a fantastic comeback and of course, loads of prints (paisley and Bollywood influences everywhere) – please do not overkill with this, but surely add one or two pieces to your wardrobe. There will be multiple heavenly (light) fabrics like chiffon and lace to choose from. Texture combinations are a huge “must have” and you are not be seen without a one shoulder look this season, nor are you to go without pleats, folds and draping that reminds of an ancient Roman, Greek inspiration. Many designers are giving the two-sleeve-look a miss. Something I do not like as a style savant, is the biker jacket that many women will wear. It is short and of leather, preferably. Fresh news are the re-invented, high waisted pants and of course another ugly, but necessary accessory: the gladiator sandal. How fantastic is fashion: here today, and gone tomorrow! What ARE your hottest key looks for Spring/ Summer 2009? My personal favourite, is that the dress is here to stay for a while, and although separates are practical for a mix and match textured look, a dress can easily be dressed up and/or down, with the simple use of accessories. Another fabulously new addition that I cannot wait for, is that lace will be showing up everywhere, even with shoes! Any advice you would like to share with aspirant designers? • Work hard. • Never stop looking for trends. • Learn to forecast where trends are moving towards. • Work hard. • Spot the gap in the market and exaggerate that. • Satisfy every single client, be it a chain of stores, or an individual. • Did I say … uhm … work hard… Any advice you like’D to share with Ray readers when they put their Spring / Summer wardrobeS together? We live in difficult economic times and should you want to remain fashionable and stylish this coming spring/Summer 2009, you’ll have to develop your ESP (Extra Sensory Perception) Emphasize, Save, Persevere. This season is full of colour, look for a colour that you’re comfortable with, that suits you, and wear it where your body looks best. This will emphasize the good…

Look for at least one item that you can wear again and again … and again! Like a little black “Audrey Hepburn” number, or a tailored jacket… or even a scarf… This will Save you money… Identify and be aware of fashion fads. Acquire items that suit YOUR figure best. Fashion fades, but true style Perseveres… Where will the public be able to buy your fabulous clothing? We design Couture by invitation/appointment only and do so from the studio in Pretoria. You can arrange/apply for an invitation by contacting us. Tell us more about your plans for the future or future collections? I live in the present, do not think too far in the future, and too easily forget the past. I am in such a fantastic creative space at the moment and cannot wait to finish the two books I am working on: an early autobiography (untitled still), and a marvellously satirical, but inspirational look at what we would have had to do without “fashionation”. I constantly strive to re-invent the wheel, so to speak, as we already do with design all the time…. Future Collections remain extremely confidential till the very last second. All I can reveal about our upcoming range is a prototype of gown sculpting as done by the Master Savants from the past! By design gods like Dior, Balmain, Valentino, Chanel…• contact details • Tel: +27 12 460 5106 • Fax: +27 12 460 9736 • www.simonrademan.com • style@simonrademan.co.za

Image: Marita Keet

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4) Black Aviator Sunglasses, R195 5) Trendy Leather Cap, R395 6) POLICE Leather Wallet, R495 7) POLICE Leather Belt, R595 8) Pierre Cardin Sports Shoe, R395 9) Pierre Cardin Leather Shoes, R699 All items available from Angel

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Top, From Left to Right: Peyton Suit by Angel, R1,195; Shirt and Belt by Fabiani, Shirt, R2,500, Belt, R799.99; Shoes by Europa Art Shoes Archangel Wings by Angel, R85; Shirt by United Colors of Benetton; POLICE Leather Belt by Angel, R595 Check Jacket by Angel, R695; Molino Cotton Rich Shirt; R195 Centre, From Left to Right: POLICE Watch by Angel, R1,495; Oregon Jeans by Fabiani, R4,500; T-Shirt by Angel Jacket by Fabiani, R3,999.99; Shirt by Fabiani, R2,500; McCann Trousers by Angel, R245 Pin-Stripe Suit by Angel, R1,395; Silk Tie by Fabiani, R699.99; Shoes by Europa Art Shoes; POLICE Watch by Angel, R1,495 Bottom, From Left to Right: Leather Jacket, Stylist’s Own; Cotton Golf Shirt by Angel, R495; Shoes by Europa Art Shoes Trendy Leather Cap, by Angel, R395; Scarf by Fabiani, R299.99; Oregon Jeans by Fabiani, R4,500; Knit Cardigan by Fabiani, R2,500; Shoes by Europa Art Shoes Issue 3 / 2009

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Small Croc Clutch Bag by Angel, R125 Gold Pearl Clip On Earrings by Angel, R85

Rainbow Set by Angel, R245

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Describe your signature look? Classic everyday wear in the latest styles and colours. Give us more Info on your brand. Our range of fashion clothing and accessories is designed to reach millions of fashion loving consumers from remote parts of Africa to big bustling African cities. We have built the Angel brand around reaching the African Nations with quality fashion merchandise that is affordable and fabulous. What is your fashion inspiration? Where do you derive your inspiration from? We are inspired by gifts from God, which can be found in nature, people, a setting, a sense or a message from Him. What are the trends and colours for Spring/Summer 2009? For spring, we worked with a grey backdrop with fresh bursts of sorbet tones to add colour. Going into summer, our theme is African glamour. We are going all out on bright colour combinations, inspired by Louis Vuitton’s latest fashion range. Your hottest key looks for Spring/Summer 2009? Key Looks for summer include lady like detail accessories such as butterflies, bows and roses. This season sees an update on vintage florals with exotic colour and bold prints. Individuality is key by combining different colours together to create colour blocks that you would not usually put together for example fuchsia, mustard, teal and baby pink. Any advice you would like to share with aspirant designers? Be bold and brave; step out with your own ideas. Share your inspiration; you’ve been blessed with the talent to create something that the world can appreciate. Any advice you like to share with Ray readers when they put their Spring / Summer wardrobe together? Take fashion tips from others but create your own style with interesting accessories. Always keep that jacket that’s out of fashion, because you never know what the next season brings. You can take an eighties inspired patent bright green leather belt and tie it around a vintage jacket that was one of your grandmothers hand-me-downs from the fifties. Wow! What a complete new look! Where will the public be able to buy your fabulous clothing? You can find our range of clothing in our fabulous Angel magazine. Tell us more about your future plans or future collections? South Africa today… Africa tomorrow. We want to reach the nations with fashion products, a business opportunity and hope. Contact details: Angel Lifestyle Tel: +27 11 234 4664 Email: service@yourlifesa.co.za Website: www.angellifestyle.co.za


FASHION & BE AU T Y

Grey Designer Sunglasses by Angel, R295 Crystal Heart Song Necklace by Angel, R165 Ladies EcoDrive Citizen Watch, R4,999 Top Right: Crushed Satin Tier Dress by Angel, R349; Shoes by Europa Art Shoes; Jewellery by Jenna Clifford Bottom Right: Bon-Bon Dress by Angel, R475; Satin Clutch Bag by Europa Art Shoes, R350; Jewellery by Jenna Clifford Below: Satin Ruched Baby Doll Blouse by Angel, R325; Satin Trim Executive Trousers by Angel, R399; Jewellery by Jenna Clifford

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1) Gold Crystal Leaf Earrings by Angel, R95; Festive Dress by MMP @ The Space, R480; Latex Tights by Nomic; Sandals by Europa Art Shoes 2) LYDC LeaterLook Handbag by Angel, R445 3) Pierre Cardin Sandals by Angel, R299 4) Fashion Belt by Angel, R145 5) Ladies EcoDrive Citizen Watch by Angel, R2,999 6) Active Sunglasses by Angel, R225

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FASHION & BE AU T Y Orange Bead Necklace by Angel, R135 Baroque Cross Pendant by Angel, R165

Ring by Nomic; Assorted Bracelets by Angel, R65 each

She is wearing: Accessories by Nomic, Outfit by Soul Spice, Price on Request; LeatherLook Gather Handbag by Angel, R295 He is wearing: Paisley Shirt by Fabiani, R2,500; Leather Belt by Angel, R395; McCann Trousers by Angel; R245

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Q&A What makes Nimue’s Skin Refirmer unique? It is based on a unique peptide complex that targets the treatment of wrinkles and expression lines for fast acting results. What is a peptide? A biotechnological ingredient based on unprecedented innovation with sophisticated amino acids that exert a positive influence on the relaxation of facial muscles. Who can benefit from this treatment? Nimue’s Skin Refirmer is targeted at the prevention and first appearance of expression lines between the age of 30 to 40 and the active anti-wrinkle and smoothing effect on existing lines and wrinkles for mature skin aged from 40 upwards.


An innovative, luxurious and multi functional rejuvenation treatment against wrinkles and expression lines in an advanced peptide complex with fast acting results.

benefits The emulsion displays a superior texture that is lightweight yet rich and creamy with an evanescent feel for great skin comfort and rapid absorption Reduces muscle contractions and helps to reduce the appearance of expression lines Multi functional treatment that also offers skin firming and hydration for long term results Smooths out the skin’s surface Relaxes facial lines


PHOTO G R A PHY

Image: Rina Smit

glimpses

CAPTURED In the heart of all good photographers is the desire to make great images. Images that communicate ideas or feelings, images that document times past or give us a glimpse of societies, people and places that we never knew existed.

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PHOTO GR A PH Y

All I have seen teaches me to trust the Creator for all I have not seen – Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Sometimes life leads you along the most

amazing paths and brings you in contact with extraordinary individuals. Such a person is Koos van der Lende, a landscape fine art master photographer without peer. He is a very spiritual being who thrives on his time alone in the wilderness with his beloved earth and God. Text: Adéle Minnaar Images: Koos van der Lende

Koos was born to Dutch immigrant parents. All the siblings were born here in South Africa. The family relocated to Holland when he was fifteen. It was a very difficult time for him to adjust to a different lifestyle and make the necessary changes. “Everything here was so conservative in comparison to the liberal element in Holland. I always had a yearning for Africa, to reconnect with my roots and after completion of my military service in 1977, I did a ten month journey through South Africa and during that time I came to the conclusion to study photography. I treasure the vastness and space of the great outdoors and also visited Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and Namibia. I reluctantly returned to Holland and studied professional photography for three years. After my studies I made South Africa my permanent home.” What inspires you? “Eight years ago I flew to New York and bought one of the first professional panoramic cameras to be used in South Africa” says van der Lende. The purchase of this essential piece of equipment enabled him to make his dreams a reality. With a 20 year history of working commercially in studios came his thorough understanding of this medium. In 2002 Van der Lende bid the well-paying world of commercial photography farewell in order to pursue his lifelong dream. “I woke up one morning and realized that what I’m about to do today are entirely for the sake of money. I would work for money instead and neglect to pursue the love of my work and the passion of my heart. I wasn’t true to myself after so many years… “It was a difficult decision”, says Van der Lende, “In faith I close my studio immediately and sold my equipment to make sure I can never return to my former lifestyle. What followed was this amazing journey where you return in a sense to your childhood, totally dependant on Him. It was just amazing how the Lord worked in me, getting rid of pride and constantly reminding me that it is not about me, it is all about Him. It is His universe. I think when you live the passion of your heart you can never give up. I really believe each and every one of us receives a unique fingerprint and only when you live it, work is no longer merely work, work is play and play is work. I’m happier than I’ve ever been. This ongoing working relationship provides me with a number of benefits, including international exposure,” says Van Der Lende. 150

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We asked him to explain his unique technique “It all resolves around light-orientated techniques. The word photography literally means painting with light and the years I spent as a commercial photographer taught me how to see light and to work creatively with it. In many of the shots I paint with light, so to speak, employing a high-powered flashlight and the slow-exposure technique to enhance the final product. The light aspect aside, visualizing composition is perhaps the most important.” He says that on every shoot he spends a great deal of time visualizing the shots. He explains: “In terms of their composition, waiting for optimal light conditions. For me, to spend 2 months in any unspoilt area humbles me for the grace I have received to have found my unique fingerprint. Praise, adoration and love pours out of my whole being for every detail that is evidence of Gods power and love. Leaving home on my journey of discovery into the bush, I have no time table or pressure to produce. No exchange of money involved in shooting. I shoot because it is my passion and whether I come home with one image or thirty stunning landscapes, is irrelevant. I don’t want to compromise because of pressure involving money.” He explains he only wants to give his best in the given situation. “It is better to get home with one excellent photograph than five compromised ones.” Any journey into a remote, pristine landscape begins with a five day walk of the area with a viewer in hand and not a camera in sight, becoming aware, acclimatized, at one with nature. “My camera of choice is a Fuji GX617 – a medium format view camera that exposes a 6cm x 17cm shot – 4 exposures to a roll of 120 film. The Fuji offers the versatility of interchangeable lenses – 90mm wide angle, 180mm and 900mm lenses are in my arsenal. For composition I use a ground-screen viewed from underneath a black cloth. A sturdy Gitzo tripod, light meter, polarizing filter reflectors and trusty Landcruiser make up the rest of my essential equipment. For two months I will live alone in my tent and average one scene shot every two days.” I set up my camera the night before and during the night I watch the elements to determine what the weather would be like. Most of my panoramic landscape work features a focal point in the foreground, usually a natural object such as a tree,” says Van der Lende. “This is to ensure that the shot has a sound compositional structure. The landscape itself still dominates the photograph as the primary focus. In some instances I made use of gold and silver reflective panels to enhance the available light. Adding artificial light where necessary allowed me to achieve a marriage between commercial studio photography techniques and landscape photography, which makes for a very interesting end product,” he explains. What was the longest it has taken to capture the perfect scene? “The longest I have ever waited for a single scene is 12 days. It was in Mapungubwe in the Sashe Limpopo Park. After following an elephant trail, I stumbled upon the most incredible stalagmite rocks. They resembled fingers and I wanted to get a pre-sunrise shot. Each day I would set up my camera in the

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PHOTO GR A PH Y afternoon, visualizing the outcome. But each time in the early morning when light would appear, so too did clouds from Mozambique and the purple streaked light will disappear simultaneously. I would pack up my equipment and repeat the whole process until on the twelve day the light conditions were perfect.” There are simply no time constraints or deadlines. His images are as they were at the time and not enhanced in post production. He makes minimal use of filters – a central grey filter to compensate for light fall off in the long format, a graduated grey filter to balance bright skies and sometimes a warming filter to pick up the cool shadows. We asked him about his unique relationship with SANParks. “When officials at SANParks – the umbrella body managing all of South Africa’s national parks – saw my work, they offered me an arrangement whereby I would be granted unlimited access to the various parks they controlled. They would use some of the photographs for promotional purposes and I could obviously add to my ever-growing portfolio of landscape work.” Subsequently Van der Lende approached the Peace Parks Foundation (PPF), an organization managing the Transfrontier Conservations Areas or so-called peace parks in southern Mozambique and their adjacent counterparts in South Africa, Swaziland and Zimbabwe. “In exchange the PPF has the right to use my photographs for promotional purposes, although I retain copyright to my work. They use what they need free of charge for marketing purposes,

but pay for photographs used in promotional material larger than brochures in scope. The arrangement works very well.” Two of his photographs gained a place in the 2008 Wildlife Photographer of the Year Awards. “It is run by London’s Natural History Museum and BBC Wildlife Magazine. It was all amazing, I never expected any recognition” remarks Van der Lende. “The first picture was of the Messum Crater, a desert area close to the Skeleton Coast. Several ancient welwitschias adorn the remote landscape. These plants could easily be 200 years old and I called it ‘Ancient Survivor’. I decided to move in as close as possible with the camera while simultaneously made use of twelve reflector boards to bounce back the sunlight in order to gain detail on the plant. The second picture was of an empty plain with only a couple of trees withstanding the incredible wind that were blowing at the time. It did not affect the tree as it was used to these extreme weather conditions and adapted by leaning to one side. I called it ‘The Fullness of being’.” Van der Lende can be compared to a motion picture director, his task defined by an elaborate staging of events. The stars of his show are the impressive landscapes he adores and intervening objects he records. It is absolute uncompromising dedication, wholly consumed by his crusade to present to us God’s beautiful world. • Visit delende.com

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Your decision...

Evolve from film to digital

Text: Michael Miller Image: Rina Smit

Until recently,

every family had at least one film camera in the household. Maybe you have a cute little Kodak Brownie box camera, or a Polaroid SX-70 instant camera, or a Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR camera. Today, however, most of those film cameras have been replaced by digital cameras. To the end user, using a point-and-shoot digital camera may be little different from using a similar point and shoot film camera, with notable exception of how the images are output, on little flash memory cards instead of on film that must be developed. One technology replaces the other in performing the same task, that of photographically documenting people, places and events. While a digital camera outwardly resembles a film camera, there are significant technological differences inside the cases. Photography, whether film-based or digital, is the process of recording images by capturing light on a light-sensitive medium. In digital photography, the light is captured on an electronic sensor. In film photography, the light is captured on light-

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sensitive film. A camera is simply the device used to capture the light onto the light-sensitive medium. According to the Photo Marketing Association, 90% of all cameras sold in 2006 were digital. Canon, Konica, Minolta, Nikon, and several other manufacturers have largely abandoned the film camera business in favour of digital cameras. So is film photography dead? The answer is: Not yet. Even on the downward trend, photographers around the world still use one billion rolls of film a year. But the casual photographer isn’t using film anymore; that market has long gone all-digital. The adherents of film photography tend to be professional photographers, typically of the fine-art variety. In today’s digital world, why continue to shoot with film? It’s a quality issue; may photographic artist insist that film simply yields a better result than digital. To these professionals, digital photos lack something: depth, saturation, and tonal subtlety, whatever it is that the eye of the beholder continues to see in film photographs. •


sport

sport

Since the earliest times, sports have also been used to help people choose their leaders, to prove fitness for war, gain popularity, settle argument and create hierarchies, without anyone actually having to be killed in order to do so.

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Born in Johannesburg in 1973, Clint Strydom is

a photographer who lives and works in KZN. In 2001 he took up photography which has led him to a career as a professional photographer. He spends a lot of time in the rural areas of Natal and enjoys spending time with the people there. The way of life is simple and harmonious, despite a limited material wealth. Soccer plays a large roll in the lives of the people in these areas and “soccer gyming” is always on the go. Clint says it is wonderful to watch because of the laughter and enjoyment evident in the game. “My photo’s often focus on the daily lives of rural people and so capturing soccer images is a natural extension of what I do. In these images I really just try to capture the love of soccer and passion for the game in these remote areas. “http://www.tanda.org is one of the charities that I have become involved with through my work in rural Natal. The Ball series was inspired by the kids of Thanda who play so long and so hard with the ball that it almost disintegrates before they give it up. I took a carload of new soccer balls to swop for their used ones. I have captured these well used soccer balls in print as fine art images, a great juxtaposition.” Some of the images were taken further south in the Transkei where players have created soccer fields of the beaches. “I love the stark simplicity of the beach as a background to the energy and enthusiasm with which soccer is played there. My hope is that these images will give rural African soccer a face in the 2010 Fifa Worldcup™’”.

Grahams Fine Art Gallery is exhibiting two ranges that form part of the 2010 African Fine Art Collection namely Clint Strydom and Bronze sculptures by Keith Calder – and are official licensed products of the 2010 FIFA World Cup™. There is also a 2010 International Fine Art Collection being assembled which will launch in early December. Graham’s is an official gallery partner of 2010 Fine Art – a South African company licensed by FIFA™ to assemble art related to the 2010 World Cup. This is the 1st time in the 80-year history of the FIFA World Cup™ that fine art has ever been licensed on this scale. It is a superb opportunity for African and South African artists to use the platform of the World Cup to bring their works to an unmatched international audience. 2010 Fine Art is still assembling the collections and interested artists should visit the website at www.2010fineart. com for more information. For more information, contact: Laurelle Baard Marketing Manager C: 079 266 1686 T: 011 465 9192 / 011 467 0649 E: Laurelle@grahamsgallery.co.za www.grahamsfineartgallery.co.za Unit 46, Broadacres Lifestyle Centre, Cnr Valley & Cedar Roads, Fourways

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Image: Rina Smit

ONLY there is joy

IN THE MIDST OF THE MIST,

When there are trials, troubles, or thunder; When calamities, collisions and clouds arrive That may darken the way you are walking today, Take joy, for Christ is alive. When you think you cannot take one more step forward, When pain, and weakness prevail, You may not have the words to cry out to the master; Do not despair; He is already there. If the mist is so thick that you cannot see through it, And the darkness is closing in fast, And you can’t even see your own hands out before you, Our Saviour is present long after it’s past. Do you think there are trials that no one has faced? Do you think no one knows how you feel? Do you think your temptations are oh, so unique? Think again; Jesus Christ knows so well. Are you thinking that suffering can just bring despair? Do you think there is no one who cares? Are you certain afflictions will not end for you? Think again; Christ the healer is there. In the midst of the mist, there is joy everlasting; Pure joy that the world may not know, In all of your trials, our Lord went before you, And through them He’s helping you grow. In the midst of the downpours and thunderous storms He is walking beside you to show That in your weakness He is your strength. Let Him guide you wherever you go. So when you are weary and longing to quit, Remember that He sees the start and the end; He loves you, and holds you and leads you along And gives joy for the journey, my friend. Penny A. Williams

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DÉ c or

Image: Hannes de Bruyn

chez MOI

As the world enters a new season, people’s lives have never been more stressful, their work styles more fragmented. Relaxation at the end of a difficult day is consequently more of a basic requirement than ever before, and to be able to wind down in comfort and style in aesthetically pleasing decorative surroundings is not so much a bonus as a necessity.

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ONE ONLY Contemporary décor and design redefines the South African experience at One & Only Cape Town

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DÉ c or

Text – One & Only Images - Barbara Kraft; One & Only and Michael Maherry

Located in the heart of Cape Town’s working harbour,

internationally acclaimed designer Adam D. Tihany collaborated with local architects Ruben Reddy and Dennis Fabian & Berman to redefine the traditional South African experience at One&Only Cape Town. Through the use of contemporary architecture and artwork, Tihany and his team capture a new and progressive energy within this historic destination. To celebrate Sol Kerzner’s triumphant homecoming to South Africa since the opening of The Palace of The Lost City at Pilanesberg in 1992, designers and architects used only local materials in the development of One&Only Cape Town. The 131key resort is the first urban property in the One&Only Collection with designs and artwork that showcase emerging artistic talent from the South Africa region. “I wanted the resort’s feel to be contemporary whilst still drawing heavily on the rich African culture and heritage that has so greatly influenced my life,” says Sol Kerzner, Chairman and CEO of Kerzner International. “Much of the resort is inspired by my own love of Cape Town. I felt confident that Adam D. Tihany would be able to capture the true spirit of a modern South Africa whilst remaining faithful to the traditional culture. His

approach to design runs parallel to One&Only’s core philosophy of providing distinctive experiences that celebrate the authentic flavour and colour of their respective locations.” Located on the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront, the hotel is designed to encourage guest interaction with the local Capetonian population whilst still providing exclusive island escapes accessible by walking bridge and private water taxi. “In the four years we worked on this project, we lived the site, breathed the air, met the people, and absorbed the richness and variety that Cape Town has to offer – from nature to art to food and wine,” says Tihany who recently completed the design of Market by Jean-Georges at One&Only Palmilla in Los Cabos, Mexico. “I was honoured to be the one chosen to conceive and execute the meaningful design of Sol Kerzner’s return to his home country. We wanted our design to embody the local sensibility, and the multi-layered contemporary and traditional cultures that make up Cape Town style. As always, we strove to create a luxurious, bespoke, and site-specific experience.” The Arrival Designed to frame the spectacular views of Table Mountain, One&Only Cape Town’s Lobby boasts expansive windows Issue 3 / 2009

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enhanced by calming cream tones and sandstone floors. A combination of contemporary and indigenous artwork decorates the space including a metal and mesh egg-shaped sculpture, wooden totem-like sculptures and contemporary paintings by leading South African fine artists and sculptors such as, Deborah Bell, Walter Oltmann and Norman Catherine. African-inspired metal balustrades separate the Lobby from an

desserts displayed in a glass box, or enjoy wine on the terrace consisting of a communal wood table surrounded by bar stools and lit by pendant lamps. Nobu Across the Lobby and Lounge, Nobu serves as the fine dining concept at One&Only Cape Town. The most notable feature is the textured, translucent origami light fixture that crawls along

“I wanted the resort’s feel to be contemporary whilst still drawing heavily on the rich African culture and heritage that has so greatly influenced my life,” says Sol Kerzner, elegant lower Lounge adorned with dark brown carpeting and African-inspired rugs. Over-scale floor lamps balance the high ceilings, and a custom chandelier with moulded crystals floats above the center bar. Again African-inspired metal balustrades separate the Lounge from a glowing bar composed of frosted glass topped with dark brown oak. maze by Gordon Ramsay To the left of the Lobby and Lounge is the three-story tri-level wine loft and maze by Gordon Ramsay. Guests enter under the functional wine wall, housing more than 5,000 bottles of wine glowing from within, into the restaurant space consisting of a dining room, patisserie and terrace. In the maze dining room, columns clad in intricately textured chocolate-brown African walnut complement a suspended grid lighting feature, which also acts as a backdrop for a custom commissioned 50-foot photographic panel entitled ‘Offering’ by South African artist, Berni Searle. The artist’s signature motifs of food and spices are abstracted into red and ochre crepe-paper forms that bleed vibrant, swirling colour into water. An open fire grill creates a warm inviting atmosphere, a signature for maze restaurants worldwide. Tactile materials in earth tones such as forest green and burgundy cover the furniture. Abstract African-inspired carpets in natural tones decorate the floor whilst cream and copper blush silk drapery frame panoramic views of Table Mountain. Bookcases situated between the windows are flanked with vertical light boxes. Upon exiting maze, patrons are encouraged to stop in the patisserie to choose from a variety of

the ceiling throughout the space. A three-dimensional metal mural sculpture by Brett Murray and Freciano Ndala covers the wall behind the maître d’ stand. Enormous ebony wooden rings between columns separate the bar and dining areas creating distinct spaces. Rich brown carpeting ascends down the metal fan-like staircase into the dining room, complementing the hunter green of velvety banquettes. Translucent silk roman shades cover windows and contemporary Japanese lanterns provide a warm amber glow. A sushi counter is located at the back wall of the dining room decorated with vertical light boxes to create a warm glow. Accommodation Local Architect Dennis Fabian maximized the proximity and panoramic views of Table Mountain in his designs, specifically with the Marina Rise’s 91 rooms and suites that face the majestic mountain. In addition to the Marina Rise, One&Only Cape Town boasts 40 island suites and an expansive spa located on their own secluded and lushly landscaped islands, surrounded by waterway and accessed only by bridge or private water taxi. These exclusive villa enclaves provide an alternative to the distinctly urban feel of the Marina Rise and feature private balconies and waterway views. Marina Rise Marina Rise houses the Presidential and Table Mountain Suite, both spanning more than 2,730 square feet. These luxurious suites boast a master bedroom with his and her bathrooms, an exercise room and a private terrace, foyer, powder Issue 3 / 2009

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DÉ c or room, full kitchen, dining area, salon, study and a second bedroom with full bath and private terrace. Warm, neutral fabric imparts a residential feeling and sumptuous pillows provide splashes of colour throughout. Other notable design details include an oversized African weave-inspired feature wall which separates the salon from the dining room. In the Presidential Suite, the central dining area is visually anchored with a series of six glass roundels by Conrad Botes. This well-known South African artist finds inspiration in comics and uses a technique of painting on the reverse side of glass to achieve luminous and profound images. Also in the dining area, guests can enjoy a panel of detailed wirework woven by Walter Oltmann, another widely acclaimed and exhibited South African artist. For this commission, he has produced an image inspired by brass plaques from the Western African nation, Benin, in the form of a crocodile. In the neighbouring study, guests can admire a coastline photograph by David Goldblatt. This colour image is one in a limited edition of ten produced by the veteran South African photographer. Guests walking into the Table Mountain Suite can admire

a custom commissioned wall sculpture by Willem Boshoff, arguably South Africa’s best-known sculptor and conceptual artist, entitled Walking the Stick Jig. The piece is constructed from 13 walking sticks made of distinctive dark and light coloured Zebrawood. The main living space features more Walter Oltmann work. For this suite, the artist created a large woven panel inspired by complex geometric patterns of Congo Kuba cloths. The space also features artwork by acclaimed artist Jeremy Wager. All Marina Rise décor features warm earthy shades of red, brown and terracotta, complemented by touches of tropical green. Doors, windows and baseboards are outfitted in natural African oak wood, while the bathroom details and furniture are stained a dark coffee. Love seats decorate the foot of each bed and are paired with an armchair and coffee table for in-room dining. Wood screens with African detail create a separate but open feel throughout the space. Ivory travertine stone covers the bathroom floors and walls complemented with silk screened frosted glass doors. Custom art pieces – from prints to sculptures and accessories – are placed throughout the rooms and bathrooms to capture a true Capetonian energy. The two Marina Junior Suites are an extension of the design concept of the typical Marina Room but with touches of green. They also offer a

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residential-looking salon, sitting and dining areas. All Marina Rise rooms feature balconies overlooking Table Mountain. Villa Island A series of bridges link Marina Rise with two separate, exclusive islands boasting 40 additional villa suites, a private infinity pool and expansive spa. In addition to the Island Junior Suites, the expansive King and Double Villas are decorated in natural sand, brown and earthy green shades. Parquet floors in African caramel coloured Kiatt wood lead to a luxurious dressing area and bathroom embellished with an oversized bathtub engulfed in a frosted glass box that glows at night. One&Only Spa Island Neighbouring Villa Island, the One&Only Spa is a serene haven located on its own private island and is decorated with the same calming, neutral tones found throughout the resort including dark brown finished woods and cream marbles. The Spa features more artwork by Berni Searle from her Home and Away series. The collection of six photographs features the artist floating in the Mediterranean Sea between Spain and the coast of Africa. Spanning more than 13,000 square feet, the Spa includes: a Salon, Relaxation room, Treatment rooms, Special Pedicure Treatments, Wet areas, Vitality pools, Steam rooms and Saunas. The atmosphere is energized with highlights of natural greens, watery blues, and earthy shades of copper and orange details. Sheer white linen frames the windows in the Treatment rooms boasting spectacular landscape views. Changing room floors and walls are coated in cream marble whilst red copper leather inserts inside locker doors offer a subtle burst of colour. Geometric wooden screens featuring a hint of African motif mingle with African art and accessories. NEO, The Boutique at One&Only Cape Town The resort’s sophisticated and original boutique design matches its unique product offering of one-of-a-kind fashions for men and women as well as custom jewelry, locally designed accessories and objects for the home. Tihany used a threedimensional polished black feature wall and polished black floors to complement a gold leaf display containing accessories, small sculptures, and artwork. Two gold leaf columns housing couture garments frame a wall of mirrors also featuring designer apparel. Directly in front of the columns, two vitrine tables displaying fine jewelry are flanked by contemporary zebra-print chairs, where guests can relax and sip cocktails from the champagne bar. An iPod stand is also available for patrons to listen to a selection of South African music. • About One&Only: Created exclusively for the luxury resort market, One&Only Resorts are conceived as hallmarks of excellence. Set in some of the most beautiful locales in the world, each award-winning resort offers guests a distinctive style and personality borne of its local culture, a genuine hospitality and a lively energy that is unrivalled. These properties include One&Only Reethi Rah, Maldives; One&Only Le Saint Géran in Mauritius; One&Only Royal Mirage in Dubai; One&Only Ocean Club in The Bahamas and One&Only Palmilla in Los Cabos, Mexico. The new One&Only Cape Town, South Africa, opened on April 3, 2009. For reservations or information, contact the resort directly at +27 21 431 5800 or Email: reservations@oneandonlycapetown.com or Visit: www.oneandonlyresorts.com


DÉ c or Compiled by Ally Mesnard Images: Micheal Maherry

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elegance

2. 3.

6.

7.

1. French chandelier (R3000), H & H Linen, Curtains & Gifts; 2. Pewter candle holder (R275), H & H Linen, Curtains & Gifts; 3. Perfume bottles (R150 – R210); Jewellery box (R130); Mirror (R370), Carné Interior Decorators; 4. Pewter bowl (R1898), Carné Interior Decorators 5. French Armoire linen wardrobe (R17900), Carné Interior Decorators; 6. Sofa: Colonial House Design, Fabrics: Tea House & Veracruz, Hertex Fabrics, (POR); 7. Mosaic bowl – (R354), Decorative bronze fruit (R83), Carné Interior Decorators. Issue 3 / 2009

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Carné

Creating spaces that have changed lives since 1990

CARNÉ Interiors (Pty) Limited was founded in 1990 and since then it has been equally successful in providing unique and personalized interior design for residential, corporate and retail spaces. The style and workmanship generated by the designs of CARNÉ Interiors are used with equal effect and beauty to change either the intimate personal space one’s home or to make a strong, indelible statement of a corporate brand. Each CARNÉ design is inspired to be personal, unique and unrepeatable. It is this approach that won us the Gold Award at the Homemaker Expo Awards in 2007 and the Silver Award in 2008. What we offer CARNÉ Interiors is proud to be able to provide a floor to ceiling one stop service of décor and design. Whether you are • young professionals wanting to establish a home that fits in with rising career expectations, • an established family needing to upgrade and expand to meet a growing family’s needs or setup a home office, • a business looking to match the competitive requirements of market growth and brand image. At domestic level we specialise in redecorating either

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DÉ c or single rooms such as living rooms, bedrooms, studies or entire homes. We recreate existing interiors by giving them a face-lift. Decorating budgets are affordable and agreed upfront with the client. For corporate clients our professional expertise and wide variety of decorating concepts allow for affordable corporate interiors, office layouts and cost-effective shop fittings. We also cover facilities such as restaurants, guesthouses, hospitals and retail outlets. Project management: CARNE Interiors’ approach is to work in partnership with our clients on a project management basis to install all interior products within agreed timelines and budgets. CARNE Interiors can satisfy client requirements by moving in at a personal level with appropriate designs which include: our Interior business that is a step above the rest, with the use of planning, designing, textures and fabric we bring colour and excitement together! We will help you to achieve the look you want, whether you prefer a modern or traditional style of décor and/or layout, for your newly planned dining room. Carne Interiors Specialise in: • Specialist one stop interior advise on colour themes, floor coverings and lighting • Creation of 2/3D visual designs • Paint techniques for interior and exteriors areas • Custom made designer furniture • Exclusive hand made curtains; we manufacture designed curtains for each area in your home or business • All types of shaped roman and/or venetian blinds in wood or aluminium • Carpeting • Soft furnishings and accessories like scatter cushions, quilts, bed frills, lamp shades, paintings, mirrors and more. CARNÉ Interiors also has a retail shop situated at Hazeldean Shopping Centre Near the upmarket residential estate of Silverlakes in Pretoria. It showcases fabrics, carpet and ornaments as well as exquisite pieces that have been acquired by Carin and her team on their travels. It is a place where a creative atmosphere spills over into sketches and conversations, plans and designs. Who are our clients? The success of CARNE Interiors has not only grown from a vision and passion for beautiful décor; it is underpinned by hard work, professionalism and sound business practices. Completing all this is the entrepreneurial spirit that makes it possible for a Pretoria-based design company to work with clients as far afield as George in the Cape, Nigeria and even Belgium. Carin personally flies to visit her prospects and discuss their requirements; she returns to Pretoria and puts together design proposals. She is in constant communication with her clients and goes back to personally supervising the installation and completion of the project. No detail is left unturned and nothing is too much trouble. Truckloads of hand made designs from curtaining, to lampshades, to furniture regularly leave the three Pretoria workshops, filled with exquisite stuff on its way to special destinations where they will change lifestyles with colour and unique design. The experience behind Carné Interiors CARNÉ Interiors is the result of the vision and the talents of its founder and Managing Director, Carin van Heerden. Since Issue 3 / 2009

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DÉ c or 1990 with her natural flair for style, Carin has been creating interior spaces for her clients. What started off with the passion of one woman working to make her own home beautiful has today become a leading business that employs more than 70 craft workers. These teams work out of three workshops in Pretoria, constantly meeting project deadlines around South Africa and beyond. Carin’s personal philosophy is to tap into the creativity of the teams who work with her. Many of them talented people who need to be trained in the use of equipment and machinery - they need a hand up. Over the years Carin has coached, mentored and empowered many crafts people and several have now opened their own business. Today they are her trusted suppliers and sub contractors and their work carries the hallmark of her standards and her style. Carin van Heerden was born in the Karoo and the enigma of that land so stark and beautiful, where the stars seem so close at night that you can touch them, has stayed with her. It fashions her sensitivity and her design of every assignment she takes on. She started her life as an occupational therapist and also worked at Unisa as a data analyst. During this time she completed various courses and diplomas in interior design and decoration. Eventually she found herself working in communications, but that was not enough. She needed to express herself through fashioning beautiful environments. CARNÉ Interiors was born. Today she lives in Pretoria with her husband and their two teenage children; she is well-respected in her profession, a sought-after as a public speaker, has appeared on television and writes a regular column for a local paper.

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Mission and values CARNÉ Interiors supports the following values: • Our business is based on sound business principles adding value to our clients through the excellence of our design and workmanship. • Service is at the heart of our business! We take pride in our work, meeting high standards which not only satisfy the client but must be the best that we can create. Every item is handmade by a team of dedicated craft workers. • Our prices are competitive and market related. • Our overriding policy is to serve our clients to the best of our ability and to establish long term relationship that last for years. • We are committed to honour our agreements and to execute our contracts with the highest possible level of professionalism and integrity. A last word from Carin on her key to success “There are two sides of this coin for me. On the one side hard work and on the other a sensitivity and strong feeling for style. For me a good feeling for style is as indefinable as a good eye for colour, a sense for proportion or a fine ear for music. Interior design and decoration is an exaltation of space and form. It creates a unity that will leave the viewer with a lasting impression.” • For more information, client references and an in-depth discussion on your residential, retail or corporate design requirements contact Carin van Heerden personally at +27 82 333 6898 or email carin@carneinteriors.co.za


DÉ c or

Easy décor tips for homeowners

Text Carin van Heerden Images Carné Interior Decorators / Michael Maherry

We all dress ourselves every day, usually with no trouble at all. So why is it that so many people seem uncertain at decorating decisions? I’ve decided to take a look at some basic fashion

rules. Most of these you’ll recognize as conventional wisdom. But did you know that these same fashion rules can apply to decorating your home as well? Invest in classic pieces. Spend the biggest portion of your decorating budget on pieces that will have a long life: a beautiful dining table, wellconstructed sofa, a classic rug, or a gorgeous armoire. Neutrals as a steady diet could be boring; spice it up with colour! Colour is easy and inexpensive! In fact, colour is free. So next time you’re tempted to paint the walls off-white (again!) – remember that a focal wall with texture, wall paper and/or colour makes a huge difference in feel, focus and ambience of a room and house! BALANCE! Too tight a fit is uncomfortable; too loose is unattractive. Scale your furnishings to your room: a huge canopy bed in a teensy room is a gamble. Likewise, a tiny settee in front of an oversize fireplace will look ridiculous. FOCAL POINTS: Highlight features. Call attention to your room’s best features by using colour, lighting, or furniture placement. Likewise, downplay less-thanattractive parts of a room by “painting them out” with matching wall paint (good for items like pipes and vent covers), or by disguising them with clever cover-ups. Have a great view or lovely fireplace? Arrange furniture so these best features are the center of attention. A well-constructed colour scheme helps bring an outfit together. Consciously work with one main colour in a room and one lesser-used secondary colour. Add a third accent colour (usually the brightest hue) in smaller amounts -- on artwork, trims, and accessories. Fabulous shoes can make an outfit. Pretty carpeting, lovely hardwood floors, or a beautiful area rug can be a terrific foundation for a room. Pull the colours and patterns found in the rest of the room together. A few great wardrobe basics can take you from day to evening, just by changing accessories. Upholstery in plain textured fabrics are like wardrobe basics – they’ll allow you to decorate around them as you change your mind, update seasonally, or move to a different home – simply by swapping out pillows and accessories. So, choose a deep caramel coloured chenille sofa for the long-term, and outfit it with orange pillows for fall, red for winter, and DUCK-EGG blue for spring. Versatility is a virtue. Choose fashions that can be worn with a variety of other

pieces; for example, a great tweed jacket that looks as good with a matching skirt as it does with jeans. Versatile pieces are worth their weight in gold. Whip off a winter slipcover and your upholstered chair will be ready for summer. A great chest of drawers or armoire can take on many roles – in many rooms -- as your needs change or you move from home to home. And a roomy ottoman can stand in as a coffee table or extra seating. These workhorse pieces will give you more than your money’s worth over time. CREATING FOCAL POINTS: A focal point catches the eye and draws your attention as you enter a room and is generally used to create mood and the feel of a room, therefore dictating the choice of furniture and accessories that accompanies it. Focal points are used to communicate the style and feel of a room. Clear anything that is not complementary or simply clashes with everything else and you will see other elements, which you might not have noticed before, come unto their own. WALLS: When it comes to wall coating, there is an abundance of choices to be made. Interior design has seen an upsurge in popularity over recent years and the home has now become a place to show off your taste and skills in this new area of fashion. A FEW DECORATING RULES • Don’t put too much furniture in a small room. • Don’t start painting unless you’ve tested a small area of the particular wall with the specific paint you want to use - check the sample in the day and the evening to test the colour in different light. • Don’t place artwork too high - the best place for it is at eye-level (of an average person). • Don’t use too many colours - use one colour to dominate and others to accentuate. Start with the colours of a key item like a painting, wall colour, colour of drapes etc. • Personalise your space around you with items that are dear to you - although those magazine pictures of rooms with only the minimum in them and nothing out of place look very smart and elegant, but they lack personality. • Choose lamps and vases that will suit the size of the tables or pedestals they stand on. • Accentuate unique architectural features in a room such as a fire place or a raw brick wall - don’t hide it, make a focus point of it instead. • If Bali furniture is the “in-thing,” you don’t have to have it. • Decorate your home for you, and not for whoever is visiting. Issue 3 / 2009

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Image: Rina Smit

ONLY believe Has that trial in your life been going on so long? That everything in you screams, ‘This is so wrong’ You can’t understand, it seems God is far away As with tears you cry out to Him every day, If you read God’s Word His truth you will see That He has a job for you and for me, ONLY BELIEVE! Is what He has to say! At His feet this problem you must lay, In His time and in His way An answer to your problem will be there one day, Keep on believing, don’t lose hope He’ll give you His grace enabling you to cope Keep your eyes on Him as to Him you cleave He has promised He will never forsake you or leave, Give Him time He had worked it all out The devil just wants you to worry and doubt, Praising Him is one thing He’s looking for To bless you is what He has store, So no matter what, even when you don’t understand ONLY BELIEVE! That’s what moves His hand. Beverly Shaffer

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MOTOR I NG

Image: Jan Verboom

road

KING OF THE

We embrace the heart and soul of luxury driving. On these pages Ray introduces you to fascinating cars and guides you towards great driving experiences.

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Franschhoek Motor Museum – In Honour of the Automobile

Text: Ally Mesnard / Franschhoek Motor Museum Images: Jan Verboom / Michael Maherry

The Perfect Setting Just under an hour’s drive from Cape Town, at the foot of the Groot Drakenstein Mountains, lies the beautiful town of Franschhoek. Literally “the French corner”, this fertile valley was originally the refuge of Huguenot settlers fleeing religious persecution in France over 300 years ago. Famous today for its breathtaking scenery, excellent wines and award-winning restaurants, it seems natural that a museum featuring some of the most beautiful motor vehicles ever made, finds its home in this majestic and historic setting. How the Museum came to be Unsurprisingly, the creation of the Franschhoek Motor Museum had its genesis in one man’s abiding passion for the automobile. Dr Anton Rupert, a pioneering businessman and conservationist, took it upon himself in 1974 to establish a

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museum that would both restore and preserve the cherished vehicles that represented the country’s automotive history. This facility was located in Heidelberg, in the Gauteng province of South Africa. Dr Rupert’s enthusiasm and love for these machines led to the acquisition of a wide-ranging and significant collection from around the country and the world. When the museum was forced to close in 2003, his eldest son Johann, who inherited his father’s love of cars, took the decision to purchase the entire collection and relocate it to Franschhoek. Our gracious host, Wayne Harley, has been with the company ever since their relocation from Heidelberg. His enthusiasm for his work is clearly evident as he accompanies us on a guided tour through the estate. He is a man with an extensive knowledge of the automobile industry and he is clearly living his passion. The Franschhoek Motor Museum offers visitors a special


MOTOR I NG

opportunity to look back at more than 100 years of motoring history with its unique and exciting collection of vehicles, motorcycles, bicycles and memorabilia in the magnificent setting of L’Ormarins. The Collection Across the length and breadth of Southern Africa, only one place can adequately portray the evolution of the automobile, The Franschhoek Motor Museum. The collection as it stands today, has grown significantly, with the continuous addition of vehicles acquired from both individuals and other collections. The museum’s collection exceeds 220 vehicles. The oldest vehicle is an 1898 Beston motor tricycle, followed closely by one of Henry Ford’s A models, built in 1903. The oldest four-wheeler on display, it pre-dates even the legendary “tin lizzy”, the famous Model T. Further along the timeline you’ll find a Type 23 Bugatti,

a model that scooped the first four places at the 1921 Italian Grand prix. American cars of this era are also well represented, two of the most impressive examples being a supercharged Auburn and it’s even more illustrious cousin, a V8 Cord 810. Despite its superb styling and impressive engineering, the high purchase price led to the Cord Company folding in 1937. The model housed at the museum is one of the very few left in the world. As evidence that this is a truly South African collection, visitors will be pleased to find a GSM Dart and Flamingo on display, as well as the less successful Protea. South African racing cars are also represented, notably by the single-seater Formula Atlantic March 78-B in which Ian Sheckter roared to victory in The South African racing drivers’ championship (one year before his brother Jody captured the world title). More than 80 exhibits will be on view at any one time, displayed in Issue 3 / 2009

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MOTOR I NG four de-humidified halls with a total floor area of 2700 m², and presented in chronological order. Many who visit the museum will be in search of the supercar, that near-mystical beast that devours the road at frightening speeds. They will not be disappointed. Three of the fastest Ferraris ever built are on display, the F-40, F-50 and the extremely rare Enzo, together with the phenomenal Porsche Carrera GT. The Franschhoek Motor museum is one of the finest facilities of its kind in the world, but there’s more to it than mere show and tell. A greater purpose lies behind it all: the preservation of history, of the living proof of man’s journey through time in the shape of these remarkable, wonderful machines.• Contact details: Address: The Franschhoek Motor Museum P.O.Box 435, Franschhoek, 7690, South Africa Telephone: +27 (0)21 874 9000 Fax: +27 (0)21 874 9100 Email: fmm@fmm.co.za Opening times: Tuesday to Friday: 10:00 to 16:00 Last admittance Saturday and Sunday: 10:00 to 15:00 Last admittance Closed Mondays Tours on the hour, every hour. Please note no motor bikes or busses (with the exception of 15 seaters) are allowed on the farm.

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MOTOR I NG

An Automotive Timeline:

ANTIQUE – built before 31 December 1904 Make: Ford Model: A Year: Probably 1903

VETERAN – built between 1 January 1905 and 31 December 1918 Make: Wolseley Model: 12/16 Limousine Year: 1910

VINTAGE – built between 1 January 1919 and 31 December 1930 Make: Bugatti Model: Type 23

POST-VINTAGE – built between 1 January 1931 and 31 December 1945 Make: Mercedes Roadster Model: Mercedes Benz 230 Cabriolet A Year: 1939

POST-45 – built between 1 January 1946 and 31 December 1960 Make: Studebaker Model: President Year: 1955

POST-60 – built after 1 January 1961 Make: Aston Martin Model: DB 4 GT Year: 1961

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Where you can find all the fabulous goodies on our pages Abigail Keats Tel: +27 82 716 5092 www.abigailkeats.com

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CheetahCHASE A short story by nature conservationist and animal lover, Hennie van Deventer

Image: Michael Maherry

The cicada beetle’s song resonates through the bush, penetrating the leafy Marula and Knob thorn trees in one continuous monotone of sound. The hot sun dries the sweat on my brow before it has a chance to cool me down. The relentless heat renders escape impossible. Irritated, an impala shakes off a nagging oxpeckers’ intent on pecking and clawing at its fur. All is resting in the shade; nothing stirs, conserving energy in the suffocating heat. As if a dream, the scene in front of me unfolds. Out of the corner of my eye I notice the twitch of an ear; a cheetah has slipped into view. Panting in the heat, she surveys the savannah from the shade of a tree. Then suddenly her gaze becomes fixed on something. Her keen eyes have picked out a newborn impala fawn, alone, in the grass. She narrows her eyes and the hunt is on. A few hesitant stealthy steps and then the cheetah’s sleek death dash is on. Her eyes are locked on her target in total concentration, completely focused as she guides her missile legs toward her prey. The last 100 meters is just a blur of speed as she silently closes in on the still unsuspecting prey. 184

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The instinct for survival takes over and there is a mad dash for life as the hapless impala fawn realizes - too late - that there is no escape. A spotted paw lashes out and the impala fawn tumbles over and over, propelled to its death by the momentum of the kill. The cheetah’s bite to the throat seals off breath and with it, precious life. A few minutes later the young impala’s life ceases to exist. An alarm call resonates in the bush but alas! It is too late. Dragging her precious spoil away from prying eyes, the cheetah retreats to the shade of an umbrella thorn. Her chest heaves and her lungs burn from the exertion of the chase in the heat of the day. The cheetah cubs join their mother on a mock kill to learn, for they will soon be on their own. High above, keen vulture eyes have already taken notice of the events below. Gracefully, they glide down to nearby trees, eager to finish up anything that is left when the cheetahs are finally done. Elsewhere in the bush, the mother of the black backed jackal cubs looks up from the shade next to her den. The vultures’ flight path tells her of death in the African wilderness; her sharp eyes follow the undertaker birds as they make their way across the sky. •


FASHION & BE AU T Y

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