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TYPE By: Michael Kochenburger


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/ Inspirations by Naoto Fukasawa and the sound of Amicola Falls...


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FIND YOUR WAY MY FRIEND...

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CHAPTER 1 CHAPTER 2

CHAPTER 3

CHAPTER 4 CHAPTER 5 CHAPTER 6 7 CHAPTER

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LOOK AROUND! LETTERS AND NUMBERS ABOUND!


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0 1 2 3

5 6 7 8


9 A B C

D E F G

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H I J K

L M N O


P Q R S

T U V W

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X K Z


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CHAPTER

Compare + Contrast (Din, Helvetica, Chaparral Pro, Gill Sans, Hoefler)


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CAPITALS

DIN

Helvetica

Chaparral Pro

Gill Sans

Hoefler Text

A AAA A Helvetica has the highest capital letter. Also the highest cross-bar. Din has the lowest cross-bar but seems super tall, almost as if it’s stretched. The thickest A out of all these is Hoefler Text. Highest contrast in strokes goes to Hoefler text.


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ASCENDERS

DIN

Helvetica

Chaparral Pro

Gill Sans

Hoefler Text

h h h h h It looks as though the pointed serif crowning the ascender on Hoefler Text makes it seem the tallest here. However a close and possibly neglible difference in height can be attributed to Helvetica.


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DESCENDERS

DIN

Helvetica

Chaparral Pro

Gill Sans

Hoefler Text

p p p p p It appears as though Hoefler Text has the lowest hanging descender of the bunch. Helvetica on the other hand being the shortest. Personal opinion is that the Gill Sans “p� is my favorite out of this group for reasons unknown. Helvetica has the largest counter space.


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X-HEIGHT

DIN

Helvetica

Chaparral Pro

Gill Sans

Hoefler Text

x x x x x The difference in the X-Heights is pretty dramatic between Hoefler and Helvetica. The Serif typefaces seem smaller than the Sans Serif brethren.


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COUNTERS

DIN

Helvetica

Chaparral Pro

Gill Sans

Hoefler Text

o o o o o Gill Sans is basically a perfect circle. Whereas all the others have an eccentric oblong counter. The strokes on the Serif typefaces is contrasted where the Sans Serif seems nearly equal all the way around


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DIN

H

As you can see the regular weight Din “H” is almost perfectly equal. It’s extremely neutral but it’s even measured qualities makes it perfect for manipulation. The H I created to the left is significantly holder. It’s also got a taste of perspective to it with it’s thickened and narrowed bar. Not really something you would want to read with but a nice display letter perhaps?


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Gill Sans

B

For the Gill Sans “B” I just took all the points handles and brought them back to their relative mother points. This made the curved “b” into a geometrive-heavy form. I also played with the inner counter spaces.


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Helvetica

P

With the Helvetica “P” I wanted to do something I might actually use in a logo. Say a company’s name is “Point” or “Perception Blah- Blah” company. This letter makes it seemlke it’s origination from the baseline, like a thought originating and bubbling up to it’s big vision which is the counter space


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Futura

N

The Futura “N” is a tricky letter. In certain ways I actually hate it. The way the points on the original letter come down farther than it’s rectangular fellow in the alternate side? What’s up with that? The deconstruction at the top is two iscoceles triangles and a parallelogram.


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Didot

M

With the Didot “M” it was hard for me to figure out what to do with it. What I ended up doing was setting up one M the copying another, reflecting it and it came out perfectly like what you see. It’s a pretty cool M to me.


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Myriad

K

Myriad “K” has got this really weird part where it connects to the vertical bar, it gets narrow and curved. I don’t like it so I got rid of it. So now all you have is three rectangles of different weights and you can still tell it’s a “K”.


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Garamond

Y

Garamond “Y� transformed into a tree looking Y.


E

E

Totally Custom E. Still retains the basic shape of an E, however it is highly stylized. Would you know off hand that it’s an E, probably not. However, if it was in a word that was similarly stylized I think the brain would make sense of it.

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CH A PT E R WORD P L AY


A

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_NV_S_BLE


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SLICED


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SAMURAI


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3D


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KIS


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IN


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C H A P

T E R 5


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GRID TYPOGRAPHY PAGE HIERARCHY + GRID SYSTEMS NUMBER 1 / ISSUE 1

2013

MICHAEL KOCHENBURGER


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WHAT IS TYPOGRAPHY? TYPEFACE: DIN

FONT: BLACK ALTERNATE ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890 FONT: BOLD ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890 FONT: BOLD ALTERNATE ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890 FONT: LIGHT ALTERNATE ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890 FONT: MEDIUM ALTERNATE ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890 FONT: REGULAR ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890 FONT: REGULAR ALTERNATE ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890


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“TYPOGRAPHY EXISTS TO HONOR CONTENT.�

Typography exists to honor content. Letters have a life and dignity of their own. Read the text before designing it. Discover the outer logic of the typography in the inner logic of the text. Choose a typeface or a group of faces that will honor the character of the text. Shape the page and frame the text block so that it honors and reveals every element, every relationship between elements, and every logical nuance of the text. Choose a basic leading that suits the typeface, text and measure.


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TYPE ADJUST AND PERFECT... Adjust the type and the spaces within the type block using typographic increments, but rely on free proportions to adjust the empty space. Keep the page design supple enough to provide a livable home for the text. Consider the medium for which the typeface was originally designed. When using digital adaptations of letterpress faces, choose fonts that are faithful to the spirit as well as the letter of the old designs. Check the weight and conformation of the letterforms at every proofing stage. Choose faces that suit the paper you intend to print on, or paper that suits the faces you wish to use. Choose faces that suit the task as well as the subject. Choose faces that can furnish whatever special effects you require. Use what there is to the best advantage. Choose a face whose historical echoes and associations are in harmony with the text. Allow the face to speak in its natural idiom. Choose faces whose individual spirit and character is in keeping with the text. Start with a single typographic family. Respect the integrity of roman, italic and small caps. Consider bold faces on their own merits. Choose titling and display faces that reinforce the structure of the text face. Pair serif and san serif faces on the basis of their inner structure. Choose your library of faces slowly and well. Don’t compose without a scale. Refer typographical disputes to the higher courts of speech and thinking.


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SOBER IS BETTER.

Consider the proportions of the page and proportions of the typeface before choosing a size set within a standard. To the mariage of type and text, both parties bring their cultural presumptions, dreams and family obligations. Accept them. Don’t use a font you don’t need. Use sloped Romans sparingly and artificially sloped Romans more sparingly still. If you wish to use text figures and small caps, choose faces actually designed to be with them.


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THE HYPHEN


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Do not indent the first paragraph of a story. In continuous text, mark all paragraphs after the first with an indent of at least one em. At hyphenated line ends, leave at least two characters behind and take at least three forward. Avoid leaving the stub-end of a hyphenated word, or any word shorter than four letters, as the last line of a paragraph. Avoid more than three consecutive hyphenated lines. Hyphenate proper names only as a last resort unless they occur with the frequency of common nouns. Hyphenate according to the conventions of the language. Avoid beginning more than two consecutive lines with the same word. Never begin a page with the last line of a multi-line paragraph. Avoid hyphenated breaks where the text is interrupted. Abandon any and all rules of hyphenation and pagination that fail to serve the needs of the text.


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N O E I T

O P P R S S V E I T L E S


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END THE TYRANNY OF TITLES!

Don’t permit the titles to oppress the text. Set titles and openings in a form that contributes to the overall design. Mark each beginning and resumption of the text. Set headings in a form that contributes to the style of the whole. Use as many levels of headings as you need: no more and no fewer. Edit tables with the same attention given to the text, and set them as text to be read. Avoid over punctuating lists. Set lists and columns of figures to align flush right or on the decimal.


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CLARITY

BALANCE CONTROL

HARMONY + ALIGNMENT

For text and other matter, choose harmonious and legible tabular alignments, If the text is meant to invite continuous reading, set it in columns that are clearly taller than wide. Shape the type block so that it balances and contrasts with the shape of the overall page. Bring the margins into the design. Bring the design into the margins. Mark the reader’s way. Don’t restate the obvious. Use a modular scale to subdivide the page. Improvise, calculate, and improvise some more.


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IMPROVISE

LEGIBLE

HARMONY

CONTRAST

MARGINS

CALCULATE

DESIGN


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THE REMAINING CLOSING STATEMENT

Change one parameter at a time. Use the best available ampersand. Consider even the lowly hyphen. Use spaced en dashes - rather than em dashes or hyphens - to set off phrases. Use close-set en dashes or three-to-em dashes between digits to indicate a range. Use the em dash to introduce speakers in narrative dialogue. Don’t use a numeral a / and then a numeral as a fraction. Use a fraction. Use a dimension sign rather than a serif x when dimensions are given. Use ellipses that fit the font. Minimize the use of quotation marks, especially with Renaissance faces. Hang quotation marks when needed. Eliminate other unnecessary punctuation. Check the type at every stage. Follow the work to the printer. Consult the ancestors. Look after the low - as well as the high-technology.

END. END.


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6 CHAPTER


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DIDOT By: Mike Kochenburger GRA: 1206C First of all it’s pronounced:

DEE’ DOUGH


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HISTORY OF DIDOT

Firmin Didot Designed the first Modern Roman in 1784.

O O OO

It is the very first modern followed thirty years later by Bodoni.

O O OO

Came out of the most important and famous french type foundry in the 18th century.

O O OO

Was deeply inspired by Baskerville’s transitional typeface, with it’s increased contrasts in the strokes.

O O OO

Was knocked off by Giambattista Bodoni. I said it but you were all thinking it.

O O OO

As opposed to Baskerville it was recieved better.


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Who is Firmin Didot? The third generation in a line of printers and publishers.

O O OO

Was born in Paris on April 14th 1764 and died in April 24th, 1836 in the city of Mesnil-Sur l’Estree, France.

O O OO

The most important french type-designer in his lifetime.

O O OO

He was also a playwright and one of his tragedies is performed at Theatre de l’Odeon.


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O O OO

STYLE

O O OO

This typeface shows characteristics of the modern/didone style.

O O OO

The stem of the typeface is extremely thin “ hair lines”.

O O OO

Straight/thin unbracketed serifs. This is what seperates it from an egyptian serif typeface, or slab serif.

O O OO

High contrast in it’s thick to thin strokes.

O O OO

Tall x-height and tall ascenders. Perfectly horizontal crossbar on the lower-case “e”


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ANATOMY tall ascender

hh

thin

O

baseline

e

thick

unbracketed thin serifs

x-height

horizontal cross-bar

K


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A N A T O M Y C O N T.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.


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A N A T O M Y C O N T. DIDOT HTF BO11 ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

DIDOT HTF BO11- Italic ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

DIDOT HTF LO11 ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

DIDOT HTF LO11-Italic ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

DIDOT HTF MO11 ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890

DIDOT HTF MO11-Italic ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890


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DIDOT

BODONI

HTF- B96 8 5 pt R om an 85p t

ABLE ABLE

O O O O


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DIDOT vs. BODONI

PP tt oo


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READ ME (READABILITY)

O O OO O O OO

Unless your using a background with strong contrast with the type, the hairline parts will vanish. Not for huge amounts of body text.

O O OO

Also I’ve noticed that I have to kern and track quite a bit.

O O OO

Elegant, yet almost understated. As if it’s contrast shows breadth of character


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PROPER USE?

WHO AM I TO KNOW? AMBIGUOS I SAY.


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LIMITATIONS

YOU CAN’T REALLY USE IT FOR A TECH COMPANY. UNLESS THE TECH COMPANY MAKES GADGETS WITH TUXEDOS ON THEM.


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O O OO

OPTICAL SIZES

O O OO

Aa Aa HTF L96-LIGHT

HTF L06-LIGHT


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DIDOT IN USE


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DIDOT IN USE


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DIDOT IN USE


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DIDOT IN USE


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DIDOT IN USE


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BIBLIOGRAPHY

www.typography.com/fonts/didot/overview http://www.fonts.com/font/linotype/ linotype-didot http://www.linotype.com/370/firmindidot. html GRAPHIC DESIGN REFERENCED by: Bryony Gomez-Palacio and Armin Vit


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CHAPTER SEVEN


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END END END


THANK YOU


Typography Book