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MICHAEL S TO R M

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER C O L L E C T E D WO R K S


MICHAEL S TO R M EDUC ATION

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER michaeljamesstorm@gmail.com | 916.296.7979 1236 Pacific Street 6D, Brooklyn, NY 11216

Columbia University GSAPP Masters of Architecture

May 2017

Award William Kinne Fellows Prize: Spaces of a Third Gender

NYU College of Arts and Science - BA in Urban Design And Architecture Studies

May 2013

Undergraduate Honors Thesis - “Defining Social Architecture, Reinterpreting the Modernist and Post Modernist Divide Through the Work of Candilis, Josic, Woods” Awards Cum Laude with High Honors Best Presentation - 39th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference Dean’s Undergraduate Research Fund Recipient

EXPERIENCE

AECOM | Urban Designer | Landscape Architecture + Urban Design | New York, NY

May 2017 - Present

Work directly with the urban design principal on proposals and research, including conceptual development, presentation materials, and schematic design. Most recently I have been managing the development of the second phase of design for a 210 Hectare new city in Sichuan China, performing detailed analysis of land use and building density requirements, developing recommendations for organizational frameworks and designing preliminary building massings. Concurrently I have been working in the Landscape Architecture arm of our office developing reports on resource management strategies. Other responsibilities include: + Interpretation zoning and land use codes in the US and China. + Collection of datasets from across the US and world wide to develop design research materials. + Designing and constructing models including coordinating 3D printing and laser cutting vendors. + Consulting with clients to develop a public engagement strategy and corresponding materials. + Coordinating work with other disciplines, including Environmental and Hydrological Engineers. Projects: + New City in Sichuan China: A 210 HA new city proposal and schematic design through massing. Responsible for conceptual design, plans, land use research, massing, and publication. + Green Infrastructure Strategic Plan: Regional storm water management plan for Meadowlands, NJ. Responsible for report structure, graphic design, and coordination with engineers. + Rebuild by Design Meadowlands: HUD funded regional resiliency plan for the New Meadowlands project. Assisted with Environmental Review documentation, graphic development + Greenpoint Monitor Park: Stabilized coastline and new public space in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. Consulted with clients on the development of a public engagement strategy and related materials. + Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency: Conceptual design for a storm surge protection project in NYC. Responsible for the design and construction of several detailed 1:20 models for public outreach. + Huntington, West Virginia: Site organization proposals for a flex industrial site. Responsible for code research, data analysis and schematic proposal development. Center for Spatial Research | Research Associate | New York, NY

June 2016 - March 2017

+ Designed a method of collecting, mapping and archiving YouTube videos based on geographic reference tags embedded in video metadata to create an interactive database for public access. + Composed a research paper describing the process of collecting videos and metadata, parsing information, and methods of using video metadata to better understand the dynamics of conflict in urban spaces. + Presented research and participated in a dialogue at Columbia GSAPP in a symposium on “Conflict Urbanism” with Eyal Weizman, Laura Kurgan and Enrico Bertini.


Studio Goetz | Intern Architect | New York, NY

June 2015 - Aug 2015

+ Managed the design and initial construction as firm representative for the renovation of interior public spaces and exterior architectural elements of a building in East Harlem, New York. + Assisted the Principal Architect, sourcing materials and preparing presentations including constructing 3d models and renderings. CIVITAS | Administrator & Project Manager | New York, NY

Sept 2012 - May 2014

+ Gained an intimate knowledge of New York City’s governance and administration while working with city agencies and community groups to improve services and quality of life projects in the cities. + Developed and executed outreach strategies to create community awareness of projects across Upper Manhattan. + Organized and assisted implementation of public input meetings for ongoing projects.

RELATED WORK

(Y)our World Workshop | TU Delft | Delft, NL

September 2016

+ Participated in a 5 day design workshop with TU Delft and IIT Chicago led by The Why Factory. Studio Mentor | Columbia GSAPP | New York, NY

Jan 2016 - May 2016

+ Aided with representational techniques, model making, and studio organization. Exhibition Design and Construction Leader | GSAPP End of Year Show | New York, NY

May 2015

+ Directed the design and construction of an exhibition installation as a summation of the studio’s work.

SKILLS

+ Design Software: Rhino3D, V-Ray, ESRI GIS (ArcMap, ArcView, ArcCatalogue, AutoCad, Adobe Creative Suite, Grasshopper (Animation, Human, Kangaroo, Evolution, Data Management), HTML Scripting + Editing + Visualization Techniques: Rendering, hand drawing, animation, casting, woodworking, CNC, laser cutting, photography + Research: Extensive education and research experience in architectural history, familiarity with interpreting building and land use codes across multiple jurisdictions. + Language: French (Intermediate)

RESEARCH

+ Twist: Designed and fabricated a foldable furniture prototype exhibited at Columbia GSAPP. + Mapping the YouTube War: Published with the Center for Spatial Research. + Coded Plumbing: Exposing the influence of gender norms on bathroom design. Installation at Columbia GSAPP and published work: http://qspacearch.com/coded-plumbing

REFERENCE

+ Christopher Stienon AIA, AICP, LEED AP | Principal, Urban Design and Planning, AECOM D: +1.212.377.8492 | christopher.stienon@aecom.com + Vineet Diwadkar, AIA, LEED AP | Urban Planner, Urban Analytics Group, AECOM D: +1.212.377.8370 | vineet.diwadkar@aecom.com + Karyssa Halstead,RLA, LEED AP | Associate, Landscape Architecture + Urban Design, AECOM D: +1.212.377.8394 | karyssa.halstead@aecom.com

Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2015


New City in Sichuan: Design Proposal AECOM | Urban Design and Planning, Buildings + Places | New York, NY This proposal for a new city is conceived as a hub for local and international high-tech companies seeking access to tech talent in the Sichuan region of central China. As a future center for existing and future tech companies, the city would need to offer the latest in contemporary “smart” city technology as well as the capacity to grow and adapt as these technologies evolve. The design for this new city pushes this idea forward by using the principles of “smart” technologies—utility planning, infrastructural capacity, mixed and flexible land use, and “smart” transportation—as guiding principles of urban design. Through a collaborative process, the AECOM team has proposed a master plan design that integrates advanced technological design with environmental sensitivity and an active public realm. I worked directly with the leadership on this project developing the conceptual narrative to be presented to the client and officials. In addition to contributing to the development of graphic content, I was responsible coordinating work among a team of designers, including communicating the vision of the principals, to ensure an on time and quality product within a very short deadline. I was in charge of assembling this content into a graphically and conceptually cohesive document for presentation to the client and the local government.


Section displaying the relationship between Districts, infrastructure micro-grids, and open spaces.

Proposed urban character. MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


The utility and mobility corridor connects the semi-independent districts and is designed to provide flexibility for future infrastructural improvements. 开发面积 60% 319 公顷 4788 亩 BUILT AREA 60% 319 HA 4788 MU

企业 41% ENTERPRISES 41% 130 公顷 HA 1963 亩MU

商业 29% COMMERCIAL 29% 开放空间 40% 213 公顷 3192 亩 OPEN SPACE 40% 213 HA 3192 MU

93 公顷 HA 1389 亩MU 零售 RETAIL

文化产业 CULTURAL / CIVIC 住宅 30% RESIDENTIAL 30% 96 公顷 HA 1436 亩MU

Distribution of land use. MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency: Public Engagement Model AECOM | Urban Design and Planning, Buildings + Places | New York, NY The Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency (LMCR) Project aims to reduce flood risk due to coastal storms and sea level rise from Manhattan’s Two Bridges neighborhood to Battery Park City. It intends to build the physical, social, and economic resiliency of the area by integrating flood protection into the community fabric through strengthening the City’s coastline while improving access to the waterfront and enhancing public spaces. I worked with the LMCR team to create several 1” = 20’ models to be presented at public meetings to describe the proposed conceptual design. This project required an extensive amount of coordination with the design team as well as budgeting, material coordination, and vendor selection and communication. Successive iteration of components was used to determine a final scale and cost for the model design. The project uses laser cutting, Resin printing, and PLA printing to create the three 2’ by 4’ models with operable flood gates and a removable freeway overpass.


Flip gates: Open

Flip Gates: Shut

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


New City in Sichuan: Phase Two Schematic Design AECOM | Urban Design and Planning, Buildings + Places | New York, NY Following the successful proposal, the new city project in Sichuan has progressed into a phase of detailed site analysis, schematic land use, density analysis, and resource management. The design continues to build on the principal of semidetached smart districts, grounding these ideas in a land use plan which responds to the existing topography and water management systems. Density analysis included extensive research into the Chinese zoning laws and existing built projects which were incorporated into the project as precedents. In addition to being the lead designer on the project working directly with the Urban Design principal, I assisted planner in charge of urban analytics in creating a detailed analysis of the land use allocations and proposed densities. I was responsible for drawing and updating land use maps and development frameworks. I was also responsible for researching precedent, interpreting Chinese building code, and designing massing studies. I assembled all of the design work for publication to the client.


MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Green Infrastructure Strategic Plan | Part of Rebuild By Design, Meadowlands AECOM | Landscape Architecture + Urban Design, Buildings + Places | New York, NY The Green Infrastructure Strategic Plan is part of the Rebuild By Design Meadowlands project, a project arising from the Rebuild By Design program led by HUD to protect people, homes, businesses and infrastructure, and to increase resilience in Sandy-affected regions as part of recovery from the Hurricane Sandy storm. This document supports the RBDM project mission to increase longterm resilience by addressing repetitive flooding challenges through green infrastructure. The work was led by the Landscape Architecture team in collaboration with hydrologists and geotechnical engineers. I collaborated closely with the Landscape team on this project, working with colleagues to develop conceptual framework of the document. I was responsible for collecting and visualizing datasets that would inform the document’s conclusions and researching relevant NJDEP regulations and standards to ensure consistency between the document and existing policies. The report also relies on existing hydrological modeling systems and I coordinated tasks between hydrological engineers and my office to ensure consistency in methodology and resultant data.


Above and following: Section 4.0 of the Green Infrastructure Strategic Plan describing the different types of recommended strategies that can be implemented in the New Jersey Meadowlands region.

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


This mapping project is specifically tailored to a lay-person audience; the lines and colors are intended to be clear, even when printed in black and white on an old printer. MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Tectonics of Void Advanced Studio VI, Spring 2017 | Columbia GSAPP | New York, NY The urban fabric of Paris is a system of generic forms, interlocking and interrelating through iterative cutting and reassembling of formal objects. Through this history of cumulative evolution, the city has developed a spatial logic of tectonic voids that interlock between and through individual buildings to form a cohesive whole. The generic expression of the Hausmannian form, while repetitive in design, expresses in its simplicity the volumetric diversity of the city’s urban fabric. The architecture of this project is a response to this generic condition. The design develops from the seams between buildings which generate the form and void of Paris, and uses them to construct a series of buildings which amplify the logic of the existing system. This extends and amplifies forms and voids to create a procession of spaces, each of which reflects the surrounding city from which this logic originated. The structure of the buildings expresses a system of internal form and void, replicating that of the site as the mass of the building undulates beneath a translucent exterior. This project is a meditation on architecture in service of the urban form, where the individual building is defined first in it’s relationship to the surrounding city.


The layered facade system on these buildings opens towards the voids, augmenting open spaces and creating an experience of tension and release moving through the site.

Ground plan showing the connection to surrounding streets.

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Typical floor plan showing housing layouts for student dormitory and 1-3 bedroom housing. MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


The voids that open up the design have a range of characters, informed by the surrounding urban fabric.

View from Boulevard Richard Lenoir to the east of the site.

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Right: Figure Ground Below: North-South Section

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Left and Above: The central building of the complex takes advantage of the Parisian building massing constraints to create a uniquely tall moment within the overall complex.

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


View from the east courtyard.

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


1:100 model composed of foam, chipboard, and cork.

1:500 Model composed of CNC milled high density foam and cast concrete.

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Mapping The YouTube War Center For Spatial Research | Columbia GSAPP | New York, NY Violet Whitney and Nadine Fatteleh, co-researchers; Laura Kurgan, Advisor YouTube has become one of the largest sources (and archives) of information about events on the ground in Syria. This project takes the massive wealth of YouTube metadata as a starting point for understanding the Syrian Civil War in the city of Aleppo. With over a million citizen video uploads, there remains questions of credibility and bias as each YouTube channel hosts its own narrative and political agendas. In some instances, YouTube is a conduit for rebel groups to communicate with sponsors and spread videos of their accomplishments for funding. While maps and satellite imagery give a broad though reductive view of events in Syria, on-the-ground cellphone footage captures an intimate though fragmented understanding. By spatializing these videos, we hope this platform will become a tool for Journalists, researchers and other interested parties to sort and search through the YouTube dataset using a new method-one which is curated spatially. Using metadata for several primary news channels producing reliable content from within the war-torn city, I developed a grasshopper script to analyze and chart thousands of video uploads by date and location.


YouTube data can be interpreted in a number of ways to create different layers of understanding. This graphic displays the relationship between videos, geolocation, and rate of upload for each period of satellite imagery available.

Developing the maps is a multi-step process involving YouTube analytics, grasshopper scripting, and data visualization.

The analysis shows both the power of this method analysis to uncover information about the conflict, as well as the potential of YouTube as a resource for understanding the roles of actors in the conflict. While YouTube processes videos from a channel as a chronological, analysis of these channels shows spatial biases important to understanding the specific relevance of each channel to the larger conflict. This project will continue with an archiving of several of the most complete YouTube Channels analyzed so far; Aleppo Media Center, Halab News Network, and the Civil Defense Aleppo, know also as the White Helmets. This, along with open source access to the methodology for processing and visualizing YouTube data will be hosted by the Center for Spatial Research. We believe that this new method of looking at YouTube videos will open new avenues of researching cities and conflicts, providing new way of spatially understanding conflict in real time. (http://c4sr.columbia.edu/conflict-urbanism-aleppo/spatializing-youtube.html) MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Accessibility

18 %

or Area: 60,000m2 Area: 990m2 : 9%

KM1 Quantities Area of Private Space m^2

28125 m^2

Area of Shared Space m^2

31875 m^2

#020 100%

Calculation

Calculation

Gross Floor Area: 60,000m2 Covered Area: 1288m2 Coverage: 13% FAR: 6 Surface to Volume Ratio: .62/1

o Volume Ratio: .58/1

on

#019 75%

Gross Floor Area: 60,000m2 Covered Area: 1680m2 Coverage: 16% FAR: 6 Surface to Volume Ratio: .60/1

KM2 KM3 KM1 KM2 Porous KM3Communities KM1 AccessibleKM2 KM3 Urban Density Density Diversity Of CommunitiesDensity Community Capacities Quantities Capacities Quantities Density Capacities Number of Shared Spaces

30

FAR

6

Volume of Built Space m^3

1,000,000m^3

Proximity to Shared Space m

35

Number of Units

1875

Collectivity

23 %

or Area: 60000m2 Area: 500m2 : 5%

Area of Private Space m^2

28125 m^2

Area of Shared Space m^2

31875 m^2

Number of Shared Spaces

37

FAR

6

Volume of Built Space m^3

1,000,000m^3

Proximity to Shared Space m

45

1875

#024 75%

Area of Private Space m^2

28125 m^2

Area of Shared Space m^2

31875 m^2

Number of Shared Spaces

21

FAR

6

Volume of Built Space m^3

1,000,000m^3

50

Gross Floor Area: 60000m2 Covered Area: 500m2 Coverage: 5% FAR: 6 Surface to Volume Ratio:.14

Low Collectivity

High Collectivity

on

Calculation

KM1 Quantities Area of Private Space m^2

28125 m^2

Area of Shared Space m^2

31875 m^2

KM2 Density Number of Shared Spaces

27

FAR

6

KM3 Capacities

Volume of Built Space m^3

500,000m^3

Proximity to Shared Space m

0

Scales Of Communities

Proximity to Shared Space m

#025 100%

Gross Floor Area: 60000m2 Covered Area: 500m2 Coverage: 5% FAR: 6 Surface to Volume Ratio:.24

o Volume Ratio:2

Number of Units

Calculation

KM1 Quantities Number of Units

1875

Area of Private Space m^2

28125 m^2

Area of Shared Space m^2

31875 m^2

KM2 Density Number of Shared Spaces

15

FAR

7

KM3 Capacities

Volume of Built Space m^3

500,000m^3

Proximity to Shared Space m

0

KM1 Quantities Number of Units

1875

Area of Private Space m^2

28125 m^2

Area of Shared Space m^2

31875 m^2

KM2 Density Number of Shared Spaces

151

FAR

6

KM3 Capacities

Volume of Built Space m^3

500,000m^3

Proximity to Shared Space m

0

Community Block | The Why Factory Advanced Studio V, Fall 2016 | Columbia GSAPP | New York, NY This studio was organized as a research studio. However, as opposed to studying the way in which different forces interact in the modern world, each student developed a scenario and explored how different variables and typical architectural forms would have to change to provide housing in line with the demands of this hypothetical reality. Through developing seemingly unrealistic situations, and researching how different architectural elements can adapt, change and aggregate to meet changing societal needs, we can begin to research how to manipulate a variety of complex variables. The ultimate end goal of these explorations is to create a system of conceptual sliders and a vast catalog of typologies, which other designers within the Why Factory can later draw on to optimize their designs for new scenarios which we have not foreseen. by: Michael Storm

In producing an abstract form-based project, this studio rigorously tested the capacity for iteration and form generation to create new architectures. This process required intensive modeling in grasshopper resulting in hundreds of iterations which applied concepts such as connectivity and water management to iterative forms.


MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


WEST BANK

ISRAEL

AL-JAMRAK CROSSING HAYT

TAL SHIHAB

JABER/NASSIB CROSSING

SYRIA NASSIB

INFORMAL CROSSINGS

JORDAN

Cities in the Age of the Refugee Columbia GSAPP - Echoing Borders Research Seminar This project investigates the nature of displacement through studying the physical transformations in the built environment through a period of intense migration during the Syrian Civil War. One point of large scale migration was the northwest border of Jordan; it is here that the UNHCR estimates at least 600,000 Syrians crossed into Jordan to seek refuge. This area of the country provided the first point of refuge for Syrians from the beginning of the conflict in 2011 until the unofficial closure of the northwest border in mid2014. This project seeks to understand the effect of this massive population growth on the built environment in Northern Jordan from 2009 - 2014 through analysis of several major cities that have been centers of migrant displacement throughout the conflict. My research focused on collected satellite image research supplemented with NGO data from the UN and Refugee organizations to compare the observed morphology of the cities with reported numbers of migrants. The report identifies areas of growth and change in the morphology as well as identifying when those changes occurred. Although the numbers of migrants crossing into northern Jordan grew rapidly during 2012, changes in the city did not keep pace, articulating the extent to which the refugee crisis is both a crisis of housing and a now embedded problem in these border cities. MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Areas of Change in Ramtha -Sequenced (L to R, Top to Bottom) 2009 - 2014

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER

Areas of Change in Mafraq -Sequenced (L to R, Top to Bottom) 2009 - 2014


The Resiliency Institute at Far Rockaway Columbia GSAPP - Resiliency Course A.L. Hu, Grant McCracken, and Jarrett Ley, Partners The Resiliency Institute at Far Rockaway provides a home for the cross-disciplinary study of the natural and social sciences, humanities, and design in relation to resilience and climate studies. Currently, Brooklyn College is temporary home to the Science and Resilience Institute. This design for a new campus on the coast of Far Rockaway proposes a set of urban systems designed to perform when under the threat of water, and an experimental planted dune landscape to test and study the short-term implementation and longterm effectiveness of land management design for storm surge protection. The design focused on the creation of a robust system of berms and dunes to protect an inland stretch of the Rockaways from storm surges and create new wildlife habitat. The buildings are clustered to the edges of the site, where the property is deepest. The buildings themselves are raised above the 100 year flood line adjusted for sea level rise, meaning that the structures can continue to perform long after the Rockaways is completely underwater.


Concept, building, and landscape plans illustrating the resiliency concepts integrated into the plan. MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Shell Theater Columbia GSAPP - Engineering Course A.L. Hu, Melody Siu, and Clara Dykstra, Partners This project uses a theater program as an opportunity to explore the integreation of multiple structural systems within a programmatically complex structure. The building is divided into three primary areas, each with a unique structural solution. The theater is contained within a precast concrete shell, supporting the accoustical armature within. The surrounding atrium is suspended from a space frame which surrounds the spherical theater. A recording studio and additional isolated programming are located in a rear wing of the theater, structurally isolated for accoustical purposes. Additional design considerations included the location of the site in Red Hook, a floodplane, and the inclusion of full MEP facilities for large assembly spaces and atriums within a relatively small Site.


Samples of the drawing set which focuses on integrating a variety of acoustic and structural systems into one design.

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Disrupting Domesticity Columbia GSAPP - Housing Studio Clara Dykstra, Partner The domestic experience is characterized by slippage and disruption as the security of home is interrupted and distorted through encounters with experiences originating outside the self. This project constructs and interacts with this intimacy by engendering disruption into the domestic experience. The building is a space of interaction across multiple scales, the presence of each person intersecting across folds in structure and space, connecting domesticity to place, neighborhood, and community. This project began with an exploration of interior architecture for engendering disruption into space. How can transformable spaces both create and destabilize spaces of domestic security and familiarity? Where can architecture utilize the density of collective housing to create communities of people who are connected by more than proximity? Spaces for habitation on the interior of the building are composed of rotating walls, which create moments of interaction and negotiation between individuals. The instability and flexibility of this system engenders a system of disruption and negotiated domesticity within the architecture of the building.


Conceptual section describing the experience of disruption in the domestic experience.

Models describing the interrelationship of spaces that can produce iterative change and interaction. MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Above: Section from the south describing the relationship between building, void, and the density of movement around each building. Below: Analysis of land use and transportation infrastructures.

MTA Arrivals, Departures, and ridership. MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Cortyard of the western building. MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER


Above: Plan of the central building. Previous: Building exposure, reflections, and massing.

MICHAEL STORM

URBAN + ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER

Michael Storm | Collected Works  

Full Portfolio of Work | 2014 - Present

Michael Storm | Collected Works  

Full Portfolio of Work | 2014 - Present

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