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MICHAEL HUMES l a n d s c a p e

a r c h i t e c t u r e


Michael C. Humes

The Pennsylvania State University Bachelors of Landscape Architecture 2014 mch5167@psu.edu www.issuu.com/michaelhumes

CFE

North-Atherton

Green + Screen

UPMC: Mercy


UPMC: Shadyside

Traverse

Flex

_Scape

Calming Storms

TopMod


CFE:

MasterPlan The masterplan for the Center for the Environment at the Pennsylvania State University was focused around looking at human impacts on the landscape and emphasizing those impacts so that they would become more apparent to the public. This was accomplished through a radial design that highlighted past human activity on the site. The mounds of earth as the visitor enters the site are an educational opportunity and replicated remnant of wood charcoal mounds that dot the landscape. Additionally, the buildings were placed in a manner that allowed for minimal site grading while also avoiding sinkholes that are located throughout the site. These buildings were oriented to face the sun—taking advantage of natural light and solar heat.

Location:

The Pennsylvania State University

Date:

Spring 2011

Instructors:

Eliza Pennypacker

Software Used:

AutoCAD, Sketchup, Photoshop


PROGRAM ANALYSIS Parking Drop off Gathering Area Research Cafe Outdoor Eating Education Center Outdoor Classroom Not To Scale

PROGRAM RELATIONSHIPS

Parking Drop Off Gathering Research Plots Research Building Service Yard Cafe Outdoor Eating Education Center Outdoor Classroom Connections Not To Scale

PROGRAM CIRCULATION Service Road Service Access Vehicular Access Pedestrian/Bike Access Sec. Pedestrian Access Main Pedestrian Access ADA Parking Bike Racks

Not To Scale


CFE:

Site Design Impact: Human Influence On The Landscape A single raindrop hitting a body of water pierces the surface and ripples outward altering the appearance and disturbing the peace of everything in its path. As humans we impact the earth everyday. Like the raindrop we alter everything in our path--forever changing the landscape. The design of The Center

for the Environment should focus around the impact that we have on the environment showing how even the smallest impacts cause a ripple effect that can spread over a wide range of land. Although the site should provoke visitors to reminisce on past human impacts it should also place an emphasis on how making environmentally conscious choices can impact our surroundings in positive ways.


Research Center

Cafe

Orchard

Grain bins used to inspire round living machine holding tanks.

Outdoor Classroom

Parking Education Center Outdoor Living Machine

Concrete Pavement Pear Tree

1/8�=1’

Ground Brick

Corten Steel

Prairie Grass


NorthAtherton The redevelopment of the North Atherton site aims to create a development that acts as a new urban core within the existing downtown framework while maintaining the aesthetic qualities and characteristics of State College. This community will accommodate a wide variety of commercial and residential uses while providing the Urban Village with new access routes while placing an emphasis on open, public gathering spaces. Goals: Create a mixed-used, high density design offering commercial, residential office, and residential units Extend the downtown atmosphere further west on College Avenue with a gradient that meets the lower density of western College Avenue Attract visitors from the downtown into the park and urban plaza by offering social and commercial opportunities, all located around the Commercial Incentive District Provide a clear hierarchy of space between the Commercial Incentive District, the park, and the residential districts

Location:

State College, Pennsylvania

Date:

Spring 2012

Instructors:

Peter Aeschbacher Sean Burkholder

Software Used:

AutoCAD, Sketchup, Photoshop


69% improved

80K

20%

31%

roads

unimproved

54%

SITE [spatial breakdown]

arterial

ROADS

21K

[sq ft]

open space

local

49K connector

26%

69% improved

roads

unimproved

SITE

69%

[spatial breakdown] improved

31% unimproved

69%

20%

improved

unimproved

SITE

54% 54%

SITE

[spatial breakdown] [spatial breakdown]

54%

roads

open space

HOUSING

[sq ft]

55%49K

24K

low income

$361,048,050.00

55%

HOUSING [demographics]

$361,048,050.00

HOUSING

05%

20% 26%

middle income [20 units]

students

20%

5%

low income

return on investment

05%

20% 26%

20% 26%

middle income [20 units]

68

720

on site

affordable

PARKING

[spaces]

return on investment

$361,048,050.00

05%

68

$344,406,538.00

return on investment

parking structures

on site

36

townhomes [interior]

32

townhomes [exterior]

$344,406,538.00

middle income [20 units]

68 on site

affordable

$344,406,538.00

$361,048,050.00

36

townhomes [interior]

32

townhomes [exterior]

5% return on investment

$344,406,538.00

643

[spaces]

720

mixed use CID

68 on site

parking structures

mixed use CID

77 RO office

36

townhomes [interior]

720

PARKING 77 RO office

643

RO office

PARKING

affordable

[demographics]

[81 units]

middle income [20 units]

05%

affordable

5%

5% 55% low income

woonerf

low income

[spaces]

students

20%

20% PARKING [spaces] 77 20% 26%

students

20%

local

connector

students

24K

55% [81 units]

21K

connector

[222 units]

[demographics]

woonerf

49K

buildings

26%

24K

arterial

local

woonerf

HOUSING buildings

RO office

connector

21K

[demographics]

26%

80K

arterial

buildings

77

local

49K

80K

ROADS ROADS

open space

21K

[sq ft]

26% [sq ft]

arterial

ROADS

open space

roads 20%

31%

woonerf

80K

buildings

20%

31%

24K

32

townhomes [exterior]

720 parking structures

36

townhomes [interior]

643 mixed use CID

32

townhomes [exterior]

parking structures

643 mixed use CID


Green + Screen This Green + Screen project took place in the heart of Pittsburgh’s arts district along Pennsylvania Avenue. Our team of 13 Penn State Landscape Architect students and 2 Penn State Alumni were tasked with the development of an aesthetically pleasing and artful way of screening off a vacant lot. We were given a budget of $5,000 of which only $500 was allocated for research and development. Our final design reflects the needs and wants of the community while maintaining our budget and creativity. The design features two undulating, linear cubes that are illuminated at night for safety. These cubes also serve as planters to create a green vertical element that establishes the screen for the vacant lot. Although many materials were considered for this design we decided to use plywood for the main structural components. Due to the properties of plywood we decided that the finish on the wood would be a white hard enamel coating that would waterproof the wood and allow for the design to be illuminated at night.

Location:

Pittsbugh, Pennsylvania

Date:

Spring 2012

Instructors:

Peter Aeschbacher

Software Used:

AutoCAD, Sketchup, Photoshop, Rhino, CNC

Concept #1

Model #1

Material Exploration

More Concepts

Exploring Elevation

Udulating Form Concept

CNC Cutting

Fabrication

Assembly


Community Involvemnet

Community Critiques

Community Presentation

Community Members

Redesign Concepts

More Community Involvemnet

Community Voting

Finalized Design

Diagram Created

Rhino Plywood Cuting Template

To be continued...

Finished Section

Testing Section

Testing Section

Testing Section

Installation: Fall 2013


UPMC: Mercy A thorough analysis of the UPMC Mercy site reveals that it is not suitable for the placement of green walls. It is an exposed site - to the sun, and to several sources of wind, including natural prevailing winds, winds generated by high speed traffic, and wind generated by arrival and departure of medical helicopters to the helipad. The high levels of wind, which are unsuitable for live plants, is ideal for a “live� kinetic wind wall. Capturing the spirit and energy created by these several sources of wind, could in fact create a visual barrier that breathes with the energy and life of the wind. As a compliment to the kinetic walls, a low planting of a vine along the retaining wall will provide a neutral background for most of the year, and will supply its own interest in the fall when it turns to a stunning crimson.

Location:

Pittsbugh, Pennsylvania

Date:

Summer 2012

Instructors:

Barry Kew

Software Used:

AutoCAD, Sketchup, Photoshop


UPMC: Shadyside Currently, the intense sound emanating from the mechanical equipment is loud enough that it could be disturbing for hospital visitor, patients, and staff. Managing sound levels was a key concern of this project. This site is in direct sun and wind, which creates limitations in regard to the plant material that will survive in this environment. In order to insure the best chance at survival, a variety of plant types will be used. There will also be a planter which will have a full foot of soil to increase the probability that the plants will survive the winter freeze. This design recalls the color, form and materials of the many bridges of Pittsburgh. The yellow color will provide year-round interest, and the structure will provide an ideal place for climbing plants to grow.

Location:

Pittsbugh, Pennsylvania

Date:

Summer 2012

Instructors:

Barry Kew

Software Used:

AutoCAD, Sketchup, Photoshop


Traverse Erie Pennsylvania has long been separated from the bayfront that once brought it economic prosperity. Over the past decade Erie has been working to reinvigorate its downtown area and n doing so the bayfront has become the incubator to jumpstart Erie’s economy again. The bayfront was once viewed as a dirty industrial zone; however, it is now seen as an amenity that everyone should be able to enjoy. Unfortunately, the Bayfront Parkway is standing in the way of reconnecting the downtown with the bayfront. This project aims at overcoming this obstacle through a series of pedestrian connections along the bayfront bluff that help traverse the bluff and the parkway while still maintain the atmosphere and views along the bluff. This new parkway system keeps people up along the ridge of the bluff so that they can take in the spectacular views of the bay. There are three main pedestrian bridges that allow for easy access to the bayfront. These pedestrian bridges are located at three distinct areas where the majority of activity along the bayfront takes place helping to promote movement between downtown and the bayfront. Location:

Erie, Pennsylvania

Date:

Fall 2012

Instructors:

Sean Burkholder

Software Used:

AutoCAD, Photoshop, Rhino, ArcGIS


Flex Energy consumption is steadily increasing, coupled with a political drive to identify affordable domestic sources of energy has lead us to exploit our finite resources with little consideration for long-term economic and environmental sustainability. The extractable Natural Gas found within the Marcellus Shale deposit provides us with a unique opportunity to meet the energy needs but also provide a bridge to greater reliance on renewable energies. In the short-term, its economic, environmental, and social longevity is limited by the characteristics of finite resources. Natural gas cannot fulfill all our long-term energy demands, but it offers us a secure capital resource that other energy sources individually cannot. Single source energy production is not the solution to our long-term energy, social, economic, and environmental sustainability; however, the combination of energy sources within a flexible framework, offer the ability to solve the problems associated with our energy demands over the long term, through responsible planning, placement and implementation of Marcellus drilling within the future alternative energy landscape. Location:

Sullivan County, Pennsylvania

Date:

Fall 2012

Instructors:

Brian Orland Tim Murtha

Software Used:

AutoCAD, Photoshop, Rhino, ArcGIS


_Scape The intent of this design was aimed at maintaining movement as an essential characteristic that defines street. However, in order to utilize the street as a functional piece of infrastructure that can adapt to needs of the future we looked past the automobile as being a dominant force within the street. Trough the combination of public transit and the use of bikes we were able to maintain the atmosphere of a public street while providing pedestrians a zone that was interesting and lively. In this regard we created a catalytic street for dynamic movement. Within these pedestrian zones we implemented gentle rolling mounds in the street as an abstraction of nature furthermore connecting back into the outlying greenbelt. This new topography has been covered with a Tartan Track—emphasizing the dominance of the zone by bikes and pedestrians. This material’s soft characteristics and multicolor application offers comfort to the pedestrians and traction for the high-speed bicycle lane while creating a unique, playful atmosphere that molds into the dynamic characteristics of Aachnerstraße.

Location:

Cologne, Germany

Date:

Spring 2013

Instructors:

Thomas Knüvener Johannes Böttger

Software Used:

AutoCAD, Photoshop, Rhino


TRAM

DESIGNATED BICYCLE

VEHICULAR

UNDERGROUND METRO

EXISTING TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM not to scale

TRAM

DESIGNATED BICYCLE

SERVICE & ACCESS

VEHICULAR

UNDERGROUND METRO

PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM not to scale


Calming Storms Spectacular views can be seen looking out from the top of the pavilion at The Pennsylvania State University Arboretum. My proposed design collects the storm water running off of the pavilion’s canopy and stores it within the a recessed secondary pavilion. This recessed pavilion also helps to hide the existing access road that cuts through the back of the arboretum. As the water rises it begins to transform he recessed pavilion into a reflection pool. When the water reaches its leveling point it is sifted off through a whirlpool drain. The water is then filtered through stones and returned to the pool. At the same time excess water flows over the retaining wall and is filtered through a natural rock waterfall feature and then returned to an underground pump. The water is then either distributed back into the system or pumped out for use in the irrigation system. As a result The Arboretum at The Pennsylvania State University is able to maintain its romantic ambiance, while also establishing good storm water management practices that are visually interactive, aesthetically pleasing and functional. Location:

The Pennsylvania State University

Date:

Fall 2012

Instructors:

Stuart Echols

Software Used:

Photoshop, AutoCAD


TOP

MOD This sculptural form started out as a way of testing out how to create an infinity symbol as a three dimensional sculpture in the program TopMod. However, after mastering the infinity symbol I decided to see what the outcome of morphing multiple infinity symbols together would be. After creating the morphed sculptural form I wanted to test the strength of the plaster in our 3d printer so I started removing slivers of the bands that made up the infinity symbol. The result is the rendered model to the right. Once I was done analyzing the solidity and smoothness of the model in Rhino I sent it off to be 3D printed. Much to my surprise the plaster was strong enough to support the long, narrow, cantilevered bands. The result was a beautiful model with an intriguing form.

Location:

The Pennsylvania State University

Date:

Fall 2012

Instructors:

Dave Celento

Software Used:

Photoshop, TopMod, Rhino


Michael C. Humes Undergraduate Portfolio 2013 mch5167@psu.edu www.issuu.com/michaelhumes


Portfolio Spring 2013