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Contents

Contributors Old City Introduction: Dining in Old City Coffee: Cafe Ole Coffee: Old City Cafe Under $10: The Bourse Business Lunch: Amada Date Spot: Ristorante Panorama Late Night: Eulogy Late Night: Buffalo Billiards Feature: Positano Coast Chinatown Introduction: Dining in Chinatown 20-21 Coffee: 22-23 Under $10: 24-25 Business Lunch: 26-27 Date Spot: 28-29 Late Night: 30-31 Feature: 32-35

3 4-5 6 7 8-9 10-11 12-13 14 15 16-19


University City Introduction: Dining in University City Coffee: Joe’s Coffee Under $10: New Deck Business Lunch: Landmark Americana Date Spot: Pod Late Night: World Cafe Live Feature: White Dog Cafe

36-37 38-39 40-41 42-43 44-45 46-47 48-51

Fairmount Introduction: Dining in Fairmount Coffee: Cafe L’Aube Under $10: Pete’s Famous Pizza Business Lunch: The Belgian Cafe Date Spot: Fare Late Night: Urban Saloon Feature: The Fairmount Arts Crawl

52-53 54-55 56-57 58-59 60-61 62-63 64-67

Temple Introduction: Dining at Temple Coffee: The Sexy Green Truck Under $10: Tai’s Vietnamese Food Business Lunch: The Draught Horse Date Spot: Maxi’s Pizza, Subs, and Bar Late Night: Undrgrnd Donuts Feature: Baker Dave Feature: Food Truck Festival

68-69 70-71 72-73 74-75 76-77 78-79 80-81 82-83

Manayunk Introduction: Dining in Manayunk Coffee: Cafe Volo Coffeehouse Under $10: Smiley’s Cafe Business Lunch: Winnie Le Bus Date Spot: Il Tartufo Late Night: Insomnia Cookies Feature: StrEAT Food Festival

84-85 86-87 88-89 90-91 92-93 94-95 96-99

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Welcome

to Philly Foodie Magazine!

Contributers: Pina Rahill Old City

Menglong Liang Chinatown

Caitlin Gamble University City

Doug Ammon Fairmount

Alex Peachey

Philly Foodie Magazine is your guide to taking a bite out of the best Philly has to offer. With food options across six different neighborhoods, there’s something in here for everyone, no matter how picky your palate. Bon AppÊtit!

Temple

Michael Buozis Manayunk

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D i n in g i n Old City

Market Street in Old City, Philadelphia.

designphiladelphia.org

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OLD CITY

Key to the Neighborhood

Cafe Ole pg. 6

Old City Cafe pg. 7 The Bourse Food Court pg. 8

Panorama pg. 12

Cafe Amada pg. 10 Positano pg. 16

Philly Foodie Magazine

Eulogy pg. 14 Buffalo Billiards pg. 15

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Coffee

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Cafe Ole

ven on a rainy day, coffee lovers in and wants to be known for her originality. “It’s around Old City will make their way to fun; it’s interesting. I love it,” she says. You Café Ole. Owner Geula Buchnik, who will, too. emigrated from Israel, opened Café Ole in 1999. She is happy that 14 years later, she still has the same energy and passion to “take care of people.” And serving 400 customers a day certainly requires energy. Shakshuka, a Cafe Ole original.

Be sure to try the shakshuka, a Cafe Ole originial dish of three poached eggs in a sauce of tomatoes, chili peppers and onions. Buchnik says that by now she knows 60 percent of her customers. One customer, enjoying a sandwich platter, said what he loves most is the changing menu.

P. Rahill

147 N 3rd Street (215) 627-2140 Mon-Sat: 7:30am-7pm Sun: 8:30am-7pm

For Buchnik, that represents a goal achieved. She

Cafe Ole offers inviting atmosphere on a rainy day.

P. Rahill

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OLD CITY

Old City Cafe

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ld City Coffee is for coffee connoisseurs. Since 1984, it has inhabited 221 Church Street, which housed the S.S. Stewart Banjo Factory from 1886 to 1899. As a tribute, this past spring on Saturdays at 3:00 p.m., the coffee shop held concerts featuring banjos and guitars. But the real attraction is the coffee. Old City Coffee brews all of its own from regions that include Africa, the Pacific Rim and the Americas. Find something you like? Buy both the grounds and a Chemex coffee maker to recreate the experience on your own. A separate room has plenty of seating and wifi. A good place for an informal meeting or just to catch up on the week’s e-mail.

The place for serious coffee drinkers.

P. Rahill

221 Church Street (215) 629-9292 Mon-Fri: 6:30a.m.–7pm Sat.: 7am–7pm Sun.: 7am–6pm oldcitycoffee.com Philly Foodie Magazine

Old City Coffee’s selection of imported beans.

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Under $10

The Bourse Food Court

The food court inside the Bourse in Old City

press.visitphilly.com

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OLD CITY LIX Ice Cream 267-968-3482 Mexico & Latin Fare 215-531-0099

Smoothie King 215-290-9059 Bain`s Deli 215-925-6646 Cafe Bravo 267-968-3482 China Express 215-629-5722 Grande Olde Cheesesteak 215925-5579 Liberty Chicken 215-629-0815 Philly Foodie Magazine

Philly`s Gourmet Cafe 215-923-4397 Sbarro 215-922-9772 Yummy Yummy Bakery 215-238-0217 Buddha Mountain Noodle Bar (no number)

111 S. Independence Mall East (215) 625-0300 Mon.-Sat. 10am - 6pm Sun. 11am-5pm bourse-pa.com 9


Business Lunch

Ouside seating at Amada restaurant on Chestnut Street.

P. Rahill

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OLD CITY

Amada avocados, and the more traditional Spanish ensalada de jamon. Recommended by the waiter, this “ham” salad was served as a mound of greens atop figs, cabrales and spiced almonds. Layered across the top were thin slices of Spanish ham, reminiscent of Italian prosciutto. Revuelto, a Spanish tapas.

T

P. Rahill

he renovated warehouse feel you get upon walking into Chef Jose Garces’ Amada Restaurant in Old City makes this a natural choice for a business lunch. The décor is rustic, simple and comfortable. The seating can accommodate large groups with two big tables that sit just inside the restaurant’s front windows. For the lone business traveler, there is a six-seat chef ’s counter overlooking the open kitchen. We started our lunch with revuelto, a traditional Spanish tapas. This perfect blend of shirred eggs, shrimp and wild mushrooms served with thinly-sliced toasted farm bread was a light and delicious first course. Next, came our salads—a traditional ensalada verde with generous portions of asparagus, favas and

Philly Foodie Magazine

We happened to be our server’s first customer ever. And even at that, the service was impeccable. The price, including tip, came in under $50, which would easily pass any expense report. Amada opened in 2005 and was Chef Garces’ first restaurant in the Philadelphia area. Today, he owns and operates more than a dozen restaurants in five cities. Chef Garces appears regularly on Food Network’s hit series “Iron Chef America”.

217-219 Chestnut Street (215) 625-2450 Sun-Thu: 11:30am-10pm Fri-Sat: 11:30am-11pm amadarestaurant.com /11


Date Spot

Ristorante Panorama

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urals of the Italian countryside, a Tuscan yellow and red palette and waiters dressed in white shirts and black vests all contribute to the romantic mood that is Ristorante Panorama. Housed within the charming and historic Penn’s View Hotel in Old City, Philadelphia, Panorama offers atmosphere, exquisite home-cooked food and a wine bar that includes the largest wine preservation and dispensing system in the world according to The Guinness Book of World Records. The food is equally impressive. The pastas are homemade. Growing up with parents who emigrated from Italy, I remember with fondness those days when my mother made her own “pasta fatte in casa.” Although there are tools today that make the process easier, it still requires more work than opening a box of ready-made pasta. The Spaghetti all Chitarra, a traditional Abruzzese dish served with sautéed pearl onions, speck, Brussels sprout leaves and toasted Marcona almonds proved that the effort is well worth it.

Owner Luca Sena opened Panorama in 1990, a move that brought him from just around the corner, where he was serving customers alongside his brothers at another Philadelphia landmark, La Familiglia.

Spaghetti alla Chitarra.

P. Rahill

Front and Market Streets (215) 922-7800 Mon-Thu: 12pm-10pm Fri-Sat: 12pm-11pm Sun: 5-9pm pennsviewhotel.com

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OLD CITY

The main dining room in Ristorante Panorama.

Philly Foodie Magazine

P. Rahill

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Late Night

Eulogy Belgian Tavern

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tep inside Eulogy Belgian Tavern in the heart of Old City and you are walking into your friendly corner bar. That you are in Philadelphia and not Europe is of small consequence. The atmosphere, food and extensive selection of beers places you in the heart of a Belgian village.

meal. For authentic Belgian fare, go for the Belgian Frietjes and dipping sauce. For something more familiar, Eulogy’s “Napoleon Burger” will not disappoint.

Belgian-owned, the tavern features over 300 international and domestic craft brewed bottle beers and 21 draught beers. Some of us went for a Duvet Single Belgium Pale Ale. Others were happy with their old standbys—a Stella Artois. The food menu will satisfy diners looking for either a quick bite with a beer or a hearty

Eulogy Belgian Tavern on Chestnut Street.

yelp.com

136 Chestnut Street (215) 413-1918 Mon-Wed: 5pm - 2am Thu-Sun: 11am - 2am eulogybar.com Eulogy Belgian Tavern on a Saturday night.

22ndandphilly.com

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OLD CITY

I

Buffalo Billiards

f you’re looking for a place to please everyone, try Buffalo Billards on Chestnut Street. Just beyond the entrance are couches and a big-screen TV. Think common area in your college dorm. For groups wanting to eat, there are plenty of booths and tables. The menu offerings are your typical snacks, sandwiches and salads. There are also pool tables, other arcadelike games and a TV for every sports statistic fanatic. The overall feel is akin to a place you’d go to after a day at the beach—casual, fun, and plenty to do— where everyone stays awhile.

Pool tables at Buffalo Billiards.

P. Rahill

Customers hanging outside Buffalo Billiards.

P. Rahill

118 Chestnut Street (215) 574-7665 Mon-Fri: 4pm - 2am Sat-Sun: 2pm - 2am buffalobilliards.com Philly Foodie Magazine

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Feature

Positano Coast by Pina Rahill

Large murals in the Positano Coast dining room transport diners to the Amalfi Coast in Italy.

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OLD CITY

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he staff at Positano Coast wants to transport you to Positano for real— a historic fishing village along the Amalfi Coast, south of Naples in the Campania region of Italy. They make a very impressive effort. With massive murals of the seaside town, a cobalt-blue tile floor and a fresh white décor, the atmosphere makes you feel like you’re in an Italian village. Marianna Coppola, Postiano’s general manager since the restaurant opened in 2005, says she wants customers to remember the atmosphere most after dining at Positano.

uwishuknew.com

Philly Foodie Magazine

Positano is one of seven restaurants in New Jersey and Philadelphia owned by one of the area’s most prolithic restaurateurs, Aldo Lamberti. Lamberti’s education of the restaurant business started at the age of 13 when he left Naples to come to the United States with his parents. He says his father taught him to make pizza, but it was his mother who taught him to make traditional Italian specialties. Lamberti continued his culinary education by returning to Italy in his mid-twenties. There, he focused on the intricacies of the seafood business.

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Feature Positano is known for its crudo menu, best described as Italian sushi. To sample, we added some raw scallops served with avocado and lemon to our crab legs appetizer. The taste was fresh and light and surprisingly delicious. The signature Positano Lemon Drop, a lemon martini, was an equally exquisite fresh taste and a perfect complement.

and a generous helping of spinach.

The chef behind this fine culinary experience is Lamberti’s son Pippo. He, too, credits his grandmother with teaching him how to cook traditional Italian cuisine. By the time the young Lamberti was 15, he was cooking meats and fish at one of the family’s restaurants. From there, an Next, we went with halibut internship under French P. Rahill served with fried eggplant Chef Georges Perrier of Positano’s signature Lemon Drop martini. crisps on top and the zucchini Le Bec-Fin in Philadelphia crab cake that came in a lemon butter sauce rounded out his culinary training.

The airy, inviting Sopra Lounge at Positano Coast.

22spots.com

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OLD CITY

‘The idea was to come up with an Italian tour.’ -Marianna Coppola P. Rahill

Crab legs with raw scallops, a crudo menu sampling.

Though Positano Coast has been around for nine years, Lamberti has occupied the second floor space on Walnut Street for over 20 years. His first contribution to Old City was Pasta Blitz. Next came Lamberti’s Cucina, which acclaimed Inquirer Restaurant Critic Craig LeBan described as uninspired. Regardless, Lamberti gets credit for continually reinventing what he offers the Philadelphia restaurant scene. Positano Coast is a gem. The atmosphere and fine food are sure to please. The Sophra Lounge, also seeped in ocean blue and white, offers an inviting place to relax and socialize either before or after your meal. In warmer temperatures, two other outdoor patios are open for drinks, snacks. “The whole idea was to come up with an Italian tour. There is Tuscany in New Jersey,” says Coppola referring to Lamberti’s Tutti Toscani in Cherry Hill. And then there’s the Amalfi Coast in Philadelphia.

Philly Foodie Magazine

Zucchini crab cake.

P. Rahill

212 Walnut Street (2nd Floor) 215-238-0449 Mon-Thu: 11:30am-10:30pm Fri: 11:30am-11pm Sat: 12-11pm Sun: 12:30-10:30pm positanocoast.com / 19


Neighborhood


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F eat ur e

11t hS t r eeti nchi nat own byMengl ongL i ang


h e l pmemo v e ‌t o g e t h e rt oe a tt h el a s tme a l . Io r d e r e das l i c e ds hi nh o tc h i l i o i l , l a mb wi t hs c a l l i o n. Heo r d e r e daLa mi a n, b u tI r e f u s e dt h a t . "Es t h e rs a i d . Ev e nt h o u g hEs t h e rd o e sno tl i v ei n Ch i na t o wna ny mo r e , wh e ns h ei sne a r b y , s h e l i k e st oh a v eab o wl o f l a mi a na taf a mi l i a r p l a c e . " Ie a th o tf o o di nt h a tr e s t a u r a nts oma ny t i me swi t hmyf r i e nd sa ndne a r l ye a c ht i meI wi l l t e a ru pf o ri t ss p i c yt a s t e , "Es t h e rs a i d . " Bu tl a s tt i me , Is h e dnot e a r sa ta l l . "

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UNIVERSITY CITY

Key to the Neighborhood

Left to right: Love sign at UPenn, map of University City (hss.sas.upenn.edu, google.com) Philly Foodie Magazine

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Coffee

Top to bottom: Barista at Joe’s Coffee, a Joe’s latte (philly.com, phillymag.com)

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UNIVERSITY CITY

JOE’S COFFEE Sister and brother team Jonathan and Gabrielle Rubinstein opened Joe’s Coffee in 2003 and served up artisanal coffee with friendly service. Joe’s Coffee quickly became a neighborhood staple and went on to open additional locations in NYC. In 2013, Joe’s Coffee came to Philadelphia. First to Rittenhouse Square in April, followed by an opening in University City in the fall.

JOE’S PURCHASING PHILOSOPHY

Sarah M. says: “The House Roasted coffee has a mild flavor and smooth texture. You can enjoy your coffee to-go or stay for a bit and sip your coffee from a big ceramic mug. The hearts and swirls in my coffee seemed effortless; it was a museum-worthy piece of coffee art. The baristas are very knowledgeable and are willing to take the time to explain the different brewing methods and bean selection.”

SUSTAINABLE working with many of the same individuals each year guarantees both quality coffee for joe and stability for wholesale partners

Joe’s Coffee is not only a place to grab a quality cup of coffee. They educate the public on topics from refining home brewing techniques to evaluating coffee using industry standards. This month, they’re offering a class on the fundamentals of latte pouring including how to make foam hearts. Classes are usually held weekday evenings for about $30.

Philly Foodie Magazine

FAIR AND TRACEABLE farmers are paid well above commodity prices and fair trade minimums for coffee purchased QUALITY stringent standards are maintained when selecting green coffee for the menu

FLEXIBLE Joe purchases coffee from various sources that all meet ethical standards (www.joenewyork.com)

3200 Chestnut St. 215-240-4577 Mon.-Fri. 7:00 - 8:00 Sat.-Sun 8:00-6:00 / 39


Under $10

Top to bottom: Group at New Deck, exterior (phillymag.com bilnkit.com)

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UNIVERSITY CITY

New Deck New Deck Tavern has been nestled on historical Sansom Street in University City, Philadelphia since 1986. The Irish pub and restaurant resides in three renovated second empire style row houses built in the late 1800’s. Stepping onto the picturesque block feels like going back in time. In fact, the block was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977 and New Deck has a liquor license dating back to 1933, the year Prohibition ended. The kitchen at the New Deck serves up generous portions everyday from 11:30 am until at least 10:00 pm. The restaurant offers a wide variety including burgers, cheese steaks, soup (the French onion is to die for!), salads and sandwiches. At New Deck, you can find traditional Irish dishes like Sheppard’s Pie as well as Irish takes on popular foods like Irish-style chicken curry. New Deck offers a wide variety of draft beers from around the world and one of the largest single malt scotch collections in Philadelphia. The European draft beer is imported from County Cork and is arguably the best pint in the city. Their Irish coffee complements their dessert menu well.

Philly Foodie Magazine

Happy hour at New Deck is known for its friendly, comfortable pub style atmosphere and its Quizzo nights are the oldest in the city, dating back to 1993. Downstairs, you may find karaoke or live music – check the calendar to find out when. All European soccer games are shown live on New Deck’s plasma tvs. The outside seating is idyllic in the warm weather. “I doubt one will ever make this a destination restaurant, but you can’t go wrong with inexpensive massive portions that are well executed. I love the atmosphere of this place. It’s akin to a MacLaren’s like in How I Met Your Mother.” - Mike L., Philadelphia newdecktavern.com

3408 Sansom St. 215-386-4600 Mon.-Sun. 11:00 pm - 2:00 am

www.newdecktavern.com

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Business Lunch

Left to right: Exterior, pizza option (www.flickr.com, urbanspoon.com) 42

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UNIVERSITY CITY

LANDMARK AMERICANA The Landmark Americana Tap and Grill, located at 33rd and Market is an ideal spot for a working lunch. They offer a wide selection of soups and salads and a full gluten free menu so there are plenty of healthy options. Those looking for something heartier will be pleased to see the burger and sandwich variety. Lunchtime sees clientele in business casual attire enjoying time out of the office. Plush, semi-circle booths can seat a group of 6-8. If you need to be getting back to the office, just grab a seat at the bar. Outside seating is available and a must on nice days - though there is a fire pit to keep warm on the chillier ones. Whether looking for a place to hit for lunch with co-workers or have a lunch meeting, you can’t go wrong with the Landmark. (www.landmarkamericana.com)

Philly Foodie Magazine

3333 Market St. 215-222-1400 Mon.-Sun. 10:00 - 10:00 www.landmarkamericana.com / 43


Date Spot

Top to bottom: drinks at Pod, interior (mccvoice.org, allieeatfood.com)

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UNIVERSITY CITY

POD Pod, known for its Asian fusion cuisine, is truly an experience. Located a few steps from the University of Pennsylvania, this Steven Starr restaurant has been around since October 2000. True to form, the ambience of this Steven Starr is one of a kind. The retro-modern décor meant to look starship-like was conceptualized by famed Manhattan designer, David Rockwell, and influenced by the films “Sleeper” and “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Stools light up when you sit down, there are private egg-shaped dining spaces (or “pods”) that change neon colors as you eat and a conveyor belt that moves colorful plates of edamame, maki and sashimi around an elongated sushi bar for you to pick up when one strikes your fancy. One of the best things about Pod is its versatility. Specializing in pan-Asian dim sum and sushi, Pod’s cuisine is great for a party of two or twelve. You can sit at the sushi bar and have your pick of the fresh, hand-rolled sushi and sashimi specials that vary daily. Or, reserve a “pod” and enjoy excellent dim sum offerings like sesamecrusted diver scallops with teriyaki sauce and wasabi aioli or spicy tempura rock shrimp with grilled pineapple and candied walnuts. Either way, you are sure to enjoy

Philly Foodie Magazine

the excellent Asian fare in what is truly a one-of-a-kind setting. Reservations can be hard to come by on Friday and Saturday nights. Come on a nice evening, put your name in an hour early and stroll the neighborhood for a while. They’ll text when a seat becomes available for you. Pod offers a superior sake selection, creative and refreshing cocktails, an extensive wine list and imported Japanese beverages along with a delectable dessert menu. Try timing your visit for happy hour when certain drinks are half price. (podrestaurant.com)

3636 Sansom St. 215-387-1803 Mon.-Thu. 11:30 - 10:00 Fri. 11:30-11:00 Sat. 5:00 - 11:00 Sun. 5:00 - 10:00 www.podrestaurant.com / 45


Late Night

Chamberlin at World Cafe Live (thefullframe.com) 46

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UNIVERSITY CITY

WORLD CAFE LIVE This multi-level venue features a casual dining and listening space, a 300-person bistro-style concert room, a music shop and WXPN’s radio studios. Settle into the sunny Upstairs Live Cafe where you can find late-night eats and drinks while enjoying live music in a city-chic setting. Downstairs, past the enormous, colorful mural and WXPN’s studios (peek into the window - you might catch the namesake show being taped), is the main performance venue featuring nationally-known artists. Downstairs Live’s muted colors, contemporary design and top-notch sound system create a lively, sophisticated atmosphere. Food and drinks are optional, but advance tickets are required. World Cafe is one of the best music venues in Philadelphia. Great sound, beautiful room, professional staff, excellent bar, and pretty decent food menu. Since it’s connected to WXPN many of the acts that come through are solid. Performances are free Fridays at noon so that’s a great time to catch an act and enjoy lunch.

Philly Foodie Magazine

Find late-night eats and drinks while enjoying live music in a city-chic setting. Callan W. says of World Cafe Live: “WCL is perfect for music lovers of all ages. If you are young and need to be up front to dance and get crazy, there is room for you. If you have seen enough bands at this point and just want to enjoy the show from your table while eating dinner, there is room for you. If you don’t want to bother with the crowds and want to just hang out in your seat in the balcony, there is room for you. There is no reason not to see a show here.” (www.worldcafelive.com)

3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400 Mon.-Sun. 10:00 - 10:00 www.worldcafelive.com / 47


Feature

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UNIVERSITY CITY

WHITE DOG CAFE White Dog Cafe was founded in 1983 by social activist, Judy Wicks. White Dog is based on values of sustainability, hospitality and delicious contemporary, American cuisine. It resides in three connected Victorian brownstones in the University City neighborhood.

White Dog Cafe is based on values of sustainability, hospitality and delicious, contemporary American cuisine. White Dog was the first sustainable restaurant in Philadelphia. Vegetarians and vegans who get bored with only salad options at gourmet restaurants will be pleased there is so much to choose from here. Try the tomato caprese sandwich – it’s loaded with sliced heirloom tomatoes, DriBruno Bros. mozzarella cheese and baby arugula! Dishes are prepared with local, organic ingredients purchased from local farms. These farms grow produce naturally, without pesticides or chemical fertilizers.

Philly Foodie Magazine

Animals are raised on pasture with kindness and respect. Wine served at White Dog is grown at American vineyards and seafood is harvested by sustainable suppliers. All tea, coffee and chocolate are Certified Organic and Fair Trade. Even cleaning products used are environmentally friendly. So if you are looking for a delicious meal that you can feel good about eating, head to the White Dog Cafe. Lunch and dinner are served daily, brunch on Saturdays and Sundays and happy hours are offered throughout the week. (www.whitedog.com)

3420 Sansom St. 215-386-9224 Mon.-Thu. 11:30 - 10:00 Fri. 11:30-10:30 Sat. 10:00- 10:30 Sun. 10:00 - 9:00 www.whitedog.com / 49


FIVE REASONS WHITE DOG CAFE BUYS LOCALLY Face it - there are plenty of restaurants to choose from. So how exactly do you know which one has the most to offer? White Dog Cafe is one of the most popular restaurants in University City, Philadelphia due to its commitment to environmental sustainability. They purchase 95% of our ingredients from local farms - no more than fifty miles from the restaurants in Philadelphia because they believe in buying local. You may be wondering why eating at a restaurant that serves local food is so important. Take a look at some of the many reasons eating locally-sourced ingredients results in large benefits.

Left to right: Exterior, Lancaster Farm Fresh Cooperative - a local farm White Dog patrons, White Dog Cafe dishes (pinterest.com, greenphillyblog.com, flickr.com) 50

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Local food is fresher. When you’re dining at a restaurant in that serves local food, such as White Dog Cafe, you’ll enjoy not only better quality food, but better tasting food as well. Purchasing food from a local vendor means it hasn’t spent much time in the back of a truck or flown in from thousands of miles away. Freshly prepared local food means less time spent from farm to table (and less preservatives). Local food supports the local economy. Eating delicious food at one of the farm-to-table restaurants in Philadelphia means money going back into Philadelphia. Local food means safer food. When there are less steps between the food’s origin and your plate, there’s less chance of contamination. When a restaurant uses locally-sourced food, they are more knowledgeable about the origin - which is important in case a harmful chemical or substance comes in contact with an ingredient. Seasonal food tastes better. Local foods are seasonal so when you pick a farm-to-table restaurant you’re enjoying the best of the best. You’ll also enjoy a menu that changes with the seasons, enabling restaurants to offer new dishes throughout the year. Local foods help establish a sense of community. When a restuarant purchases local food, they are dealing with the same vendors on a regular basis. At White Dog Cafe, one of the core values is to establish a sense of community and using local foods one way to do this. (www.whitedog.com)

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Fairmount, Philadelphia


FAIRMOUNT

Key to the Neighborhood Pete’s Famous Pizza pg. 57

Urban Saloon pg. 63

Fare pg. 61

Cafe L’Aube pg. 55

Fairmount Arts Crawl pg. 64

The Belgian Cafe pg. 59

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Coffee

Top: Menu inside Cafe L’Aube Bottom Left: Coffee and Crepe Bottom Right: Look from the street Credit: cafelaube.com, yelp.com

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Philly Foodie Magazine


FAIRMOUNT

Cafe L’Aube

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ot much goes better together than France and coffee, and Cafe L’ Aube in Fairmount takes this match made in heaven and makes it a reality. This small cafe located on Wallace Street is the perfect place to get a gourmet coffee on a cold winter day or a warm summer evening. Cafe L’Aube has a menu that sounds like it comes right from Paris, with French-blend coffee, and crepes of all different flavors. When it comes to coffee, the flavor has to match the decor where you are enjoying it and Cafe L’Aube took no shortcuts when designing the layot of this French bistro. Small in size but efficient in spatial usage, patrons get a sense of relaxation immediately when they walk in the door. Things seem simpler when inside or even at the outside tables of the cafe. The quiet atmosphere provides the perfect background for a light conversation or just to look out the window and take in the beautiful scenery that makes up most of the Fairmount area. Cafe L’Aube is also known for their wide variety of French teas. If coffee isn’t your thing then the long list of custom-blend teas may be the best option for you.

Philly Foodie Magazine

These teas come mostly from France but the cafe also has the typical favorite teas that you may be used to. Coffee is what put Cafe L’Aube on the map and allowed the owners to even open a second one in the Rittenhouse neighborhood. Coffee should be simple yet authentic; you should be able to enjoy the taste of what you’re drinking while at the same time feeling refreshed. What you get at Cafe L’Aube does all this and more, it is a coffee lover’s paradise.

1631 Wallace St 215-235-2720 Mon.-Fri. 7:30am 8:00pm Sat. & Sun. 8:00am - 7:00pm cafelaube.com / 55


Under $10

Middlet: Pete’s street view Bottom Left: Sausage Pizza Bottom Right: Philly Cheesesteak stromboli Credit: yelp.com, Doug Ammon

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FAIRMOUNT

Pete’s Famous Pizza

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airmount is known for its hole-in-the wall eateries, but most of these align with the growing trend of organic food preparation. While this trend may be healthy it doesn’t always give you your money’s worth, and often leaves you wanting more. Pete’s Famous Pizza does just the opposite. It’s hard to take a place that has famous in its name seriously, but Pete’s is truly famous. A staple in the community for over 50 years, Pete’s has weathered it’s share of change. When it comes to cheap eats, there is no better food than pizza. Grabbing a slice has been commonplace since almost all of our youths and Pete’s takes us back to the times when life was simple. A small 10-inch pizza, which is the perfect size for one, is only $5.50. That goes for a plain pizza, and toppings are only 50 cents more if you want to create your own pizza masterpiece. A pre-designed pizza that has made Pete’s a community landmark for years is their Pete’s Special Pizza. This delicious pie is sold at $9.75, and has a bundle of great toppings including pepperoni, sausage, green peppers, onions, mushrooms, anchovies and cheese.

Philly Foodie Magazine

This may seem like it could be almost too much on one pizza but Pete’s knows exactly what they are doing with it. When it comes to a meal under $10 you are not only looking for something good but also something fast. Typically these meals are eaten for a quick lunch or dinner, when work needs to be done. Pete’s provides the perfect place for this because the meals are much more than just pizza and almost all are under $10. If pizza isn’t your thing look to try Pete’s chicken cheesesteak or the bacon grilled cheese sandwich. The salads are also an enjoyable, healthy alternative to the typical fried foods.

2328 Fairmount Ave 215-765-3040 Mon.-Fri. 7:00am 12:00am Sat. & Sun. 7:00am - 12:00am petesfamouspizza.com / 57


Business

Top Left: Red door in front of restraurant Top Right: Signature print of a lion Bottom: Inside the restaurant Credit: Doug Ammon

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FAIRMOUNT

The Belgian Cafe

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hen you are meeting with clients or simply getting out of the office for a quick lunch, The Belgian Cafe is the place to go in Fairmount. A quaint place nestled underneath the large oak trees that the Fairmount area is known for, this restaurant serves as the perfect getaway to talk business. From the outside you immediately notice the red doorway that greets incoming patrons. While the color may be bright, it prepares you for what you will find inside. There is also a lion pictured on both the awing and the doorway itself when you enter. This image portrays a sense of old-world appeal, which is alluring to many. The atmosphere inside is never noisy, and the service is exceptional. Where The Belgian Cafe really makes its mark is in the menu. The place prides itself on providing traditional Belgian cuisine while at the same time fusing this European style with American favorites. The rustic ambience inside makes any patron feel as if they are getting ready to dine with Belgian royalty during the 13th or 14th century.

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Once enjoying your meal it is time to talk to business, and the ambience of The Belgian Cafe provides the perfect backdrop. It is fancy enough to appeal to sophisticated clients while at the same being comfortable so you don’t feel restricted. Tables line the walls and center of the room, but are intimate and often aren’t crowded during lunch hours. Business luncheons can be productive and fun at this quiet slice of Europe in Fairmount, Philadelphia.

2047 Green Street 215-235-3500 Mon.-Fri. 11:30am 1:00am Sat. & Sun. 12:00pm - 2:00am thebelgiancafe.com / 59


Date Spot

Left: View from the street Top Right: Chairs outside the restaurant Middle Right: Seafood pasta dish Bottom Right: Inside the resataurant Credit: Doug Ammon, fare.com

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FAIRMOUNT

Fare

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n a summer night in in the Fairmount section of Philadelphia there is no better place to enjoy a meal with the one you love than Fare. Fare is appealing from curbside, and this appeal extends to the ambience inside. The restaurant prides itself on being a self-sustaining venue, where all the food is grown locally and nothing is processed. This contributes to meals like chicken meatballs, avocado crab cakes, and wild boar. The enjoyment doesn’t end with the food as the drink menu is also great to enjoy with someone else. Fare is known for their extensive wine and beer list, with many local breweries being represented in the menu. What makes Fare such a romantic place is the setting once you’re inside the restaurant. The tables lit by candle light and the intimate portions make it a welcome place to share whatever you get and split with whoever you’re with.

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What’s a date night without dessert? Fare answers this question and more with their wonderful dessert options. Their dessert menu rotates based on season, and what is being grown locally. During the spring and summer look for unique gelato flavors, as well as a cheese cake that would make anyone’s mouth water. Once again the presentation of the food is just as important as how the food tastes, so if you are trying to impress that special guy or girl, Fare is the place to go. If you want a reasonably priced meal in an underappreciated area of the city, Fare is the your best option. No matter if this your first date or 25th anniversary, Fare has something for everyone. It will not disappoint.

2028 Fairmount Ave 267-639--3063 Mon.-Fri. 11:00am 10:00pm Sat. & Sun. 9:00am - 11:00pm farerestaurant.com / 61


Late Night

Top Left: Chili Cheese Fries Top Right: Draft Beer being Poured Bottom: Outside decor Credit: urbansaloon.com, Doug Ammon

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FAIRMOUNT

Urban Saloon

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t isn’t every day that you find a place where the atmosphere aligns perfectly with what’s on the menu. This is the case at Urban Saloon. Nestled in the busiest street in the Fairmount area of Philadelphia, aptly named Fairmount Avenue, Urban Saloon stands out immediately from first glance. The exterior of the restaurant is grimy and aged. It tries to echo the name of the place with its decor. The idea of a saloon takes patrons back to the Old West, a time where cowboys would stop by the local watering hole, before continuing on their treks across the untamed plateaus of early America. This saloon, in one of the most populated cities in America, makes sure that patrons are taken back to this time. When you walk into Urban Saloon, the lighting is always dim, whether it’s lunch at noon or on a Saturday night out with friends, which appeals to a certain crowd. The food and drink are takes on America classics. Urban Saloon truly earns its worth on those weekends when you have had a drink or two and the inevitable hunger for anything fried kicks in.

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The late night menu at Urban Saloon is the same as the dinner menu but for some reason the offerings just seem more appealing late at night. The tater tots are their signature as well as the American classic burger. These two meals are frozen classics but at Urban Saloon they are taken to a different, slightly more sophisticated level. The food presentation is simple, everything served on white plates with little or no design on them. When you are out and about in Fairmount, Urban Saloon is the perfect place to pop in and get a quick bite that will hit just the right spot. Its late night meal offerings are superb.

2120 Fairmout Ave 215-232-5359 Mon.-Fri. 5:00pm 2:00am Sat. & Sun. 12:00pm - 2:00am urbansaloon.com /63


Feature

Top Left: Crowds Walk by Eastern State Penitentary Top Right: Outside Belgian Cafe Bottom Left: Patrons enjoy outdoor seeating at Jack’s Bottom Right: Band Plays outdoors Credit: Kristina Jenkins

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The Fairmount Arts Crawl Brings out the Best in Fairmount Food

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pringtime in Fairmount begins with the annual Fairmount Arts Crawl. For this event, which takes place during the first Sunday of April, more than 70 pop-up art exhibits set up shop throughout the Fairmount area to display their crafts. Pop-up art has become a national obsession as we turn more towards boutique shopping rather than going to a big box store to buy all that we want. In an area like Fairmount, which is known for residents valuing the importance of originality, the Arts Crawl is the perfect representation of this. Art vendors line the streets of Fairmount selling their products and offering face painting to young members of the community. Another highlight of the afternoon was the live music that could be heard throughout this quaint area of Philadelphia. The soft alternative rock sounds of local bands worked perfectly in tune with the arts and crafts demonstrations taking places around the performers. Families danced with their children, and couples could be seen bobbing their heads comfortably while

Philly Foodie Magazine

by Doug Ammon

taking in the pleasing atmosphere. What made the day particularly special was the food that was available during the Arts Crawl. Over 30 local restaurants were open, and most had small food stations next to the art vendors where people could order a sample of that restaurant’s specialties. Two of the more enjoyable food options were the Tot Cart and Lil’ Pop Shop. The Tot Cart is a food truck that specializes in tater tots a favorite of any What makes the Art Crawl special is the food. Over 30 different vendors means 30 new things to try. foodie, who enjoys fried options. These are not your typical out of the box tater tots but rather something more gourmet and professional all together. The Tot Cart brought their signature drunk cheese tots,

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Feature spicy tots, and new bay tots. What’s not to love about these options? A hard thing to pass up after gobbling down one too many tots is a refreshing organic popsicle from the Lil’ Pop Shop. Like the name suggests the Lil’ Pop Shop is a boutique popsicle store that is based on S. 44th Street in the far reaches of Fairmount. What makes their popsicles special are the flavors they create. Some of the flavors that were a hit at the Arts Crawl were Lemon Blueberry Buttermilk, Coconut Hibiscus, and Mayan Chocolate. It may not be your typical popsicle that you got when you were a kid but the unique flavor combinations don’t allow you to stop with just one. Overall, the event, which lasted from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. was a massive success because of the originality of what people could do and see. Children, and adults alike were fixed to each setup, curious about what a particular vendor had to offer. This setting was perfectly

coupled with the food vendors that have made Fairmount a frequent hot spot for food lovers throughout the city. It was more than just a day to get the family out of the house, it was a total cultural journey into the area of Fairmount and what it

‘A day with the family

where popsicles and art are happening at the same time is perfect.’ - George Brooke, Arts Crawl Regular stands for. The event is scheduled to take place every year at around the same time with the possibility of a summer Arts Crawl as well. No matter what time of year good food and creative art are a match made in heaven.

Art lines the street, credit: Fairmount Arts Crawl 66 /

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FAIRMOUNT

Top: Young child gets a cupcake Bottom Left: Drunk cheese tater tot Bottom Right: Attendees enjoy outdoor dining, Credit: Doug Ammon, Fairmount cdc

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Temple University. Photo: www.temple.edu

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TEMPLE

Key to the Neighborhood Undrgrnd Donuts Pg 76 Maxi’s Pizza, Subs and Bar Pg 78

Tai’s Vietnamese Food Pg 72

The Sexy Green Truck Pg 70

The Draught Horse Pg 74

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Coffee

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Top Left: Selim Zeka gives coffee to a customer. Bottom Left: Iced and hot coffee. Right: Sign on the Sexy Green Truck. Photos: Alex Peachey

Philly Foodie Magazine


TEMPLE

The Sexy Green Truck

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he owner of the Sexy Green Truck, Selim Zeka, believes that fresh, local ingredients make for better food and happier customers. Founded in 2009, the Sexy Green Truck has been providing delicious food for affordable prices on Temple’s campus. Located just outside of the Howard Gittis Student Activity Center, on Montgomery Avenue, the Sexy Green Truck is always a bustling hub of hungry students and employees. Around noon, the line stretches across the sidewalk and clusters around the main window of the truck, as Zeka hurries to hand out brown paper bags and smiles. Come in the morning, however, and it’s the coffee that’s really flying. Roasted locally by Philly Fair Trade Roasters, the coffee at the Sexy Green Truck is not to be missed. The perfect morning pick-me-up, Zeka serves his coffee iced or hot, from small at only $1 to a large at $1.50. Philly Fair trade coffee specializes in 100% organic, hand roasted Arabica coffee. Founded in 2002 and located in the Feltonville section of North Philadelphia, roastmaster Joe Cesa has been perfected this organic blend. Smooth and rich, it

Philly Foodie Magazine

makes for a great cup of coffee. So, stop by the Sexy Green Truck if you’re looking for a boost in the morning or before class. There is no shortage of places to buy coffee on campus, but there’s a reason this one is the best. From the friendly services to the variety of options, grab an omelet or a toasted muffin while you’re here and start your day off right!

1304 Montgomery Ave 267-269-7173 Mon.-Fri. 8:00 am - 5:00pm / 71


Under $10

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Top: Chicken Pho and Strawberry Bubble TeaBottom: Customers waiting at Tai’s Vietnamese Food. Photos: Alex Peachey

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TEMPLE

Tai’s Vietnamese Food

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ooking for a quick bite between classes? Look no further than Tai’s Vietnamese Food on the 12th Street Food Vendor Pad. Sandwiched between Ali’s Middle Eastern and the Adriatic Grill, this prime campus location provides quality food for low prices. Sit at one of the many outdoor tables, or grab your lunch to go. Tai’s Vietnamese offers over 90 different options like Vietnamese spring rolls called Cha Giò, Mi Fun, a type of vermicelli served with vegetables and your choice of chicken, pork, or seafood, or Chow Fun, a stir-fried rice noodle served with vegetables and your choice of chicken, pork, or seafood. Not sure what to order? Linda, who mans the front window, usually wearing her signature red hat, will offer some suggestions.

The best dish on their menu is the Pho, a poplar street food in Vietnam a consisting of broth, linguine-shaped rice noodles called bánh pho, a few herbs, and meat. Tai’s serves up several varieties like Pho Tai, a beef broth with fresh eye round and Pho Sate, a spicier beef broth with peanut, tomato, cucumber, bean sprout, coconut milk and scallion. They also offer Chicken Pho, Shrimp Pho and Pho with beef ball. Each order comes in a deep bowl served with lemon wedges, Asian basil, chili oil and lemongrass sauce. For dessert try a delicious bubble tea; a tea based drink mixed with fruit or syrup and large, chewy tapioca balls. Tai’s Vietnamese is cash and Diamond Dollar only, so come prepared and you won’t leave disappointed.

1835 N 12th Street 215-232-3711 Monday-Friday 10:00am - 8:00pm

philadelphia.menupages. com/restaurants/tais/menus Philly Foodie Magazine

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Business

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Top: Outdoor seating. Middle Left: Mixed drinks. Middle Right: Grilled Chicken Sandwhich. Bottom Left: Beef Stew. Bottom Right: Flatbread Pizza. Photos: facebook.com/thedraughthorse

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The Draught Horse Pub & Grill

s a Temple employee, I am frequently asked by visitors where to get lunch on campus. If they look vaguely lost, or not the sort of people who would enjoy eating fast food, or outside, I direct them to The Draught Horse, located on Cecil B. Moore Ave, between Broad and 15th Street. Because it’s so close to the Liacouras Center, where people frequently come to see shows and sporting events, The Draught Horse is the perfect place to unwind before or after events at Temple. The sit down style of the restaurant, as well at the friendly wait staff, separate this spot from anywhere else on campus. They offer indoor and outdoor seating; drink specials and frequently update their menu with delicious new additions. Happy Hour is from 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm daily and The Horse is the perfect venue for campus fundraisers. Mull over their $5 Lunch Menu, which includes salads, wraps and burgers, available on weekdays from 11:00 am - 5:00 pm. The high booths give just enough privacy to get down to business, while the causal college atmosphere makes any meeting a

Philly Foodie Magazine

treat. Sometimes you just need to get out of the office, and having somewhere like The Draught Horse on campus makes picking a location for that lunch meeting easy. Having a large meeting? The Draught Horse provides party platters with enough mozzarella sticks, crab dip, buffalo wings and spinach artichoke dip for the whole office. To plan an event at The Draught Horse, contact events@draughthorse.com.

1431 Cecil B. Moore Ave 215-235-1010 Mon.-Tue. 11:00am 11:00pm Wed. & Sat. 11:00am - 2:00am Sun. 11:00 am - 8:00 pm thedraughthorse.com / 75


Date Spot

Top Left: Pizza Counter. Top Right: Chicken, Bacon, and Ranch Pizza. Middle Right: Two slices in a pizza box. Bottom Left: Outside of Maxi’s. Bottom Right: Pesto Pizza. Photos: Alex Peachey.

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MAXI’S PIZZA, SUBS AND BAR

othing says college romance like pizza and beer. Maxi’s Pizza, Subs and Bar, nestled in the heart of Temple’s campus, has both. Perfect for a limited college budget, each slice runs about $3.50. The pizza choices vary, from simple pies like Buffalo and Barbeque, to more elaborate creations, like Honey Garlic Chicken, Mac and Cheese, and General Tso’s. Their garlic knots are a campus favorite and all of their wraps and hoagies average between $6 and $7.

The atmosphere is casual, and while Maxi’s recent expansion adds room for more tables, it’s retained the cozy college bar feel. Drink specials run every day, including $2 Miller High-Life, Lionshead, and Yuengling Lite bottles and $2 Bud Lite Draughts.

If you’re looking for somewhere fun to have a night out with someone special, Maxi’s has karaoke on Tuesday nights, followed by open mic night on Wednesdays. The bar frequently hosts live bands on Saturday nights, and is the perfect place to catch a sport’s game. The relaxed atmosphere attracts everyone from students grabbing a drink before class or looking to do some homework, to teachers and staff. It’s perfect for meeting up with friends, or inviting that cute kid from class to grab a slice. So cozy up to the bar, or grab a table in the corner, and get to know your crush a little better. If it doesn’t work out, at least you have pizza.

1928 Liacouras Walk 215-204-7002 Open 7 days a week 10:30 am - 2:00am

facebook.com/MaxisTemple Maxi’s Bar. Photo by Alex Peachey

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Late Night

Top Left: Customers order donuts. Top Right: Chef Bob Rifkin promotes Undrgrnd Donuts. Bottom: The Caramel Apple Donut and the Captain Kranky Donut. Photos: Alex Peachey.

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TEMPLE

Undrgrnd Donuts

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top everything and go get a donut. “No, no,” you feebly protest, “I’m on a diet.” Perfect! Try the Caramel Apple Donut with slices of crisp Granny Smith apple sprinkled on top, or the Trail Mix Donut, with a banana dunk and a healthy dose of raisin granola. After all, donuts are shaped like zeros because they have zero calories. Undrgrnd Donuts sells them by the pair; two for $4.00. Go ahead; you deserve it.

Located outside of the Tyler School of Art on 12th Street, between Norris and Diamond, Undrgrnd Donuts serves up tasty treats on Temple’s campus every Tuesday and Thursday. This roving gourmet food truck uses only the freshest, locally sourced ingredients to make it’s handmade specialty donuts.

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After years working at the Marriot and teaching culinary classes, Chef Bob Rifkin wanted to do something new. Sick of the cupcake fade, Rifkin, owner of Undrgrnd Donuts, decided to feature a variety of creative takes on the average donut. Mix and match the ingredients to customize your own treat, or go with one of their popular options like the Homer, a hot donut with a vanilla glaze, called a ‘dunk,’ raw sugar and a sprinkling of chocolate bacon chunks. For the chocolate lovers, they have the Eruo Smash, a fresh donut with a chocolate dunk, a rich Nutella swirl and topped with chopped nuts. If you’re feeling adventurous, ask for the 420. What’s on it? “Whatever I feel like,” Chef Bob says.

12th Street, between Norris & Diamond Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:00 am - Sell Out undrgrnddonuts.com /79


Feature

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Top Left: Smoked Pork Tacos. Top Right: Grilled Cheese samples. Bottom Left: Taco Mundo Truck. Bottom right: Citrus Roasted Chicken Tacos. Photos: Alex Peachey

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Food Trucks Spice up Temple’s Cherry-On Experience Day

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ix food trucks form a circle around a cluster of picnic tables with fluttering red and white checked tablecloths in Lot #1. After the cancellation of the annual Temple Spring Fling, Student Activities teamed up with Megan Walsh, a coordinator for the Food Trust, to organize a Food Truck festival as part of the Cherry-On Experience day. Aimed at providing a safe, fun alternative to Spring Fling, the Cherry-On Experience featured laser tag, tie-dye, bubble soccer and most importantly, food. The Philadelphia Food Trust is the second highest ranked non-profit organization aimed at children’s health and nutrition in America. With farmer’s markets and night markets set up all around the city, they were able to reach out and contact some local food trucks interested in bringing their fare to Temple University. One of these trucks, Taco Mondo, managed to stand out, serving fresh creative tacos with a twist. Try their smoked pork taco, served with salsa roja,

Philly Foodie Magazine

cheese and lime creme on a corn tortilla, or their smoked chicken quesadilla, with pico de Gallo, chili creme, and salsa roja; a crowd favorite. Veggie options are also available and Taco Mondo serves a variety of Jarritos sodas, for a little exotic taste. Other trucks not to be missed were The Grill Cheese truck, with their delicious sandwiches named after Philadelphia colleges, and Johnny Bravo’s Surf and Turf, serving up spicy crab fries. The Braz-BQ truck, a Temple favorite usually visiting campus on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, served up it’s famous ‘hamburgau,’ a Brazilian take on a burger topped with potato chips.

Photo: Alex Peachey

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Feature

Temple’s Best: Baker Dave

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en years ago, Dave Okapal was starting a family and liked the idea of having relaxing summers and holidays off. When a job opened at Temple University, he jumped at the chance. “I became extremely interested in the job once I came to the interview and saw the challenge that I could tackle. When I arrived, I saw lots of mixes, and very little baking.” He soon turned that around, switching to higher quality ingredients and began to make things from scratch. After years working in hotels and resorts, like the Trump’s Taj Mahal and the Hilton, Baker Dave enjoys running his own kitchen. “Some days are spent entirely working on catering events, some for 500 plus people. Sometimes I do nothing but work on thousands of mini pastries; some days I get to do fun events like cupcake bingo, or filming a new baker Dave presents episode. Some days are spent testing

out new recipes, or coming up with ideas for plated desserts for an upcoming event.” It’s not hard to find one of Baker Dave’s delicious creations around campus. He supplies delicious cakes, cookies, donuts and pastries to locations like Morgan Hall, the Student Activity Center, and Johnson and Hardwick Halls.

“One of the things I love about my job is the lack of an average day.” - Baker Dave “I often feel like a mix between an architect, a chemist, and an artist. I might have the greatest profession in the world,” he says. His most recent experiment? Working on vegan treats that taste just as good as traditional ones. If his past creations are any indication, it’ll be great.

Temple T Donuts. Photo from facebook.com/bdsweettreats

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TEMPLE

Top Left: Baker Dave. Top Right: Creampuffs. Bottom: Raspberry Danish. Photos: facebook.com/ bdsweettreats, Alex Peachey

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Views of Main Street in Manayunk / Top: spicedpeachblog.com Bottom: outskirtsofsuburbia.blogspot.com

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Key to the Neighborhood

Volo Coffeehouse pg. 87

Smiley’s Cafe pg. 89

Il Tartufo pg. 93

Insomnia Cookies pg. 95 Winnie’s Le Bus pg. 91

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Coffee

Clockwise from upper left: Interior of Volo, La Colombe coffee varieties, a double shot of espresso, and the Volo coffee menu (volocoffeehouse.com)

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Volo Coffeehouse

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n warm days, the tables outside of Volo Coffehouse fill up early with cyclists sipping espressos and freelancers working on their laptops. The outdoor seating became so popular that last year the café blocked off two parking spots out front on Main Street and put in yellow barriers around a “parklet” filled with more tables and tall black planters.

month, they brought in sandwiches from Agiato, a Greek-inspired tapas place across the street. Now, Volo staff make the sandwiches in-house.

While Volo’s exterior presence evokes the great sidewalk cafés of New York, the interior offers more of an urban rustic European ambience. Wooden tables line the floor-to-ceiling casement windows looking out on busy Main Street. Behind a tall counter, harried barristers serve up lattes and cappuccinos with artful designs floating in the foam. A large mirror running the length of the wall behind the counter opens up the vertical space topped with classic tin ceilings. The atmosphere is always noisy with a hissing line of espresso machines and the chatter of patrons. Still, some find Volo the perfect place to get word done or read the Sunday Times or a good novel.

The prices aren’t bad either. A 16 ounce house brewed coffee runs $2.25, with a 12 ounce latte costing $4.00. Volo also serves loose leaf teas, hot chocolate, fresh squeezed orange juice and gourmet sodas. But for pure flavor, order the latte; sit in the window and watch the cyclists in full team kits roll by dodging traffic on Main Street’s cramped bike lanes.

Volo keeps it local by brewing every coffee drink with La Colombe beans. Until last

Philly Foodie Magazine

With a Starbucks just three blocks away, Volo manages to pack in customers every day with a more laidback indie feel and locavore ingredients.

4360 Main Street 215-483-4580

Mon.-Fri. 6:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m., Sat. & Sun. 7:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.

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Under $10

Top Left: Exterior of Smiley’s Café Top Right: Smiley smiling Bottom: Falafel platter (smileyscafemanayunk.com)

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Smiley’s Café

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he first thing you’ll notice about Smiley’s Café on Cotton Street, just off Main, is Smiley himself. The proprietor of this delightful restaurant featuring Mediterranean street food didn’t earn his nickname for nothing. Smiley’s cheerful catchphrase says it all: “If you feel awful, have a falafel. It’s lawful.” The second thing you’ll notice is the smell of delicious meats roasting in the special ovens Smiley had shipped from his former restaurant in Florida. Smiley cooks all his meats fresh daily. The beef shwarma glistens on a rotating spit behind the counter and gooey slices of baklava and cashew fingers fill a case near the cash register. The third thing you’ll notice, if you can get past Smiley’s demeanor and the rich aroma of the food, is just how little a good falafel or shwarma sandwich will cost you. Meat sandwiches run around $7, even less for vegetarian options. Each comes on your choice of white or wheat pita. Pick the white for its crunchy fresh-baked outer edges and perfectly soft inside. Add lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles and your choice of taziki, a cucumber yogurt sauce, or tahini,

Philly Foodie Magazine

a milder hummus sauce and you’ve got yourself a substantial meal for a fraction of the cost of anything else on Main Street, with the exception of pizza, of course. If you’re feeling adventurous, and hungry, order Smiley’s Veggie Mix which includes falafel, grape leaves, hummus, baba ghanouj, tabouleh salad and a side of pita. The menu says it’s enough for two people, but when Smiley’s in a generous mood it feeds more like four. Skip the lemonade and smoothies, but don’t skimp on dessert. At $2.50, a slice of the heavenly baklava won’t put you over $10 if you pair it with a savory chicken kebab sandwich. Manayunk needs more authentic, affordable restaurants like Smiley’s, so do yourself and the neighborhood a big favor. Eat there often.

110 Cotton Street 267-323-2098

Mon.-Fri. 6:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 7:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.

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Business Lunch

Top: The bar at Winnie’s (Natalie Donahue) Bottom Left: Entrees at Winnie’s Bottom Right: Winnie and Bob Clowry (lebusmanayunk.com)

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Winnie’s Le Bus

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hen Winnie and Bob Clowry bought the Le Bus restaurant in Manayunk more than ten years ago, the eatery was already the established linchpin of a resurging Main Street. Rebranded as Winnie’s Le Bus, the restaurant still offers a relaxed neighborhood atmosphere with some of the most consistent local and artisanal food options in the whole neighborhood. Manayunk has burgeoned in the decade since the Clowrys took over at Le Bus, but they remain the busiest restaurateurs on Main Street. Pass by Winnie’s any day – breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner – and the windows will be full of happy patrons. The centerpiece of the large, airy dining room is a semicircular bar. A pair of TVs frame the chalkboard beer and cocktail lists. Patrons line the bar in pairs or alone reading newspapers and sipping coffee or one of the many varieties of mimosa on offer. The exposed beams of the ceiling open up onto a skylight that fills the bar and nearby tables with natural light, giving the sense of an even bigger space. The dining room bustles with energy as servers dodge between the tables with heaping plates of food and patrons chatter. On

Philly Foodie Magazine

weekends, Winnie’s fills up with families, but during the week it’s the perfect atmosphere for an energetic business meeting. Plus you’ll impress your clients with the food options. Much of the menu at Winnie’s LeBus is seasonal, but you can always find a few great standbys available year-round. The salmon burger, made with Atlantic salmon, bell peppers, scallions, garlic, shallots and fresh thyme is char-grilled and topped with a honey mustard glaze. It’s not cheap, at $13.50, but the flavor is intense and satisfying and totally unique to Winnie’s. The menu also contains vegetarian and gluten-free options like the crisp pear salad with bosc pears, crumbled blue cheese, roasted peppers and spiced walnuts. The salad portions are robust and each runs between $10.50 and $13.50.

4266 Main Street 215-487-2663

Mon. – Fri. 7:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 8:00 a.m.–11:00p.m.

lebusmanayunk.com

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Date Spot

Top: Interior Il Tartufo (John S. at yelp.com) Bottom: Linguine with clam sauce (groupon.com)

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Il Tartufo

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anayunkers don’t go in much for fine dining, but when they do, there’s no better place on Main Street for a nice five-course meal than Il Tartufo. From the outside the restaurant is rather indistinguishable from a run-of-the-mill red sauce and pasta joint you might find anywhere in the city. But when you step through that front door the intimate atmosphere becomes immediately apparent. Rows of tables for two line the red clay tile floor and the red awning outside gives the sense of privacy from the pedestrians on Main Street, though the ceiling-to-floor windows let diners look out on passersby.

made cheese, tomatoes, roasted red peppers and fresh basil, each for $10. For entrees, treat yourself to fettucine con Tartufo, house-made pasta in a truffle cream sauce for $17. This dish might just be the most umami thing on Main Street. If you prefer meat, the bistecca il Tartufo, a New York strip steak, comes with the same sauce, for only $23.

Even when the dining room is packed it’s hushed and romantic, with the sound of private conversations, clinking wine glasses and the rustle of thick white napkins. The staff isn’t fussy so don’t worry if you’re not into dressing up. But the white tablecloths and elegant plating offer enough class for even the most discerning date.

4341 Main Street 215-487-2663 Mon. – Sat. 12:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

Cheap Date Alert: If those prices scare you off, Il Tartufo does lunch portions of all regular menu items for half price.

For a starter, share the carciofi alla Giudia, a good portion of fried Jewish-style arthichokes in garlic and olive oil, or the mozzarella il Tartufo, made with house-

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Late Night

Top Left: Exterior Insomnia Cookies Manayunk (dish.com) Top Right: Insomnia Cookies menu Bottom: Baking cooking at Insomnia (insomniacookies.com)

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MANAYUNK

Insomnia Cookies

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o it’s 2 a.m., you’ve been up all night doing homework and you’ve got the munchies. Who you gonna call? Ghostbusters? Not likely. Especially if you’re in Manayunk. In January, Insomnia Cookies opened its latest location right on Main Street. The brainchild of University of Pennsylvania graduate Seth Berkowitz, the chain cookie shop now boasts more than two dozen location in ten states. In 2003, Berkowitz started baking and delivering cookies to his fellow students late at night. He soon opened his first store front and the rest, as they say, is history. To be honest, from the outside Insomnia Cookies is nothing special. They sell exactly two things: fresh baked cookies and ice cream. You can mix the two and create your own ice cream sandwiches, but if you’re not in the mood for either, well, you’re out of luck. The shop screams of prefab design with a plain glass case displaying the cookies and a few tall stools askew at a counter in the corner. But Insomnia works on a different business model. Nobody else’s kitchen is open as late on Main Street. You can’t get a decent slice of pizza or a burger to soak up the exploits of your night out, so Insomnia’s

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limitations don’t matter. They’re the only game in town, wherever they open up a new store. And they deliver! Standard cookies run $1.35 each and include classics like chocolate chip, white chocolate macadamia, peanut butter, sugar, oatmeal raisin and snickerdoodle. More adventurous deluxe options include chocolate peanut butter cup, s’mores and triple chocolate and cost $2.75 each. If you’re looking for something more substantial, try the cookie cake, a 9-inch cookie in any of the standard flavors for $17.00. Skip the ice cream. Insomnia Cookies doesn’t offer much. But they’ve cornered the market on what they do offer: a cheap, convenient cure for the late-night munchies. There are better pastry shops and ice cream stands on Main Street, but none of them are open until 3 a.m.

4319 Main Street 877-632-6654 Open until 3 a.m. insomniacookies.com / 95


Feature

Top: Sum Pig truck parked in front of Pompanoosuc Mills Bottom: Food truck menus on sandwich boards (Michael Buozis)

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MANAYUNK

Foodies flood Main Street for StrEAT Food Festival by Michael Buozis

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n April 12, more than 30 food trucks lined Main Street in Manayunk for the spring StrEAT Food Festival to kick off Manayunk Restaurant Week. Visitors queued up in front of the trucks’ windows for options including international fare, local-inspired organic meats, cupcakes and new twists on comfort foods like macaroni and cheese and tatter tots.

For the more health-conscious festivalgoer, Farm Truck Philly served sesame ginger shrimp ceviche with tortilla chips. Vernalicious offered a tofu banh mi, served with fresh jalapenos, cilantro, carrot slivers and spicy Sriracha sauce for $6.50. The banh mi is Vietnamese cuisine’s answer to an old hometown standby: the hoagie.

At Mac Mart, customers lined up halfway down the block for creative renditions of macaroni and cheese, including a “Wit” Mac – macaroni and cheese mixed with Philly cheesesteak, fried onions and a drizzle of ketchup – for $6.00 for a small portion. Down the street, at Samosa Deb, Deb Dasani served customers traditional Indian street food, including samosas – whole-wheat pockets filled with potatoes, peas and carrots, and fried. The Cow and the Curd, which has garnered media coverage from local TV stations and newspapers, offered battered and deepfried cheese curds to hungry visitors.

Options included international fare, local-inspired organic meats, cupcakes and new twists on comfort foods like macaroni and cheese and tatter tots.

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Gourmet food vendors set up in lots in two closed-off side streets, selling goods

to take home, like balsamic vinegar and artisanal cheese. The festival planners couldn’t have hoped for better weather, with sunny skies and temperatures in the upper-60s. In the future, organizers might want to consider closing Main Street, or only offering

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Feature vendors spots on one side of the street. Motorists weren’t as understanding as they might be of the masses trying to dodge through traffic for gourmet hot dogs or cupcakes. However, this year’s festival avoided some of the problems encountered last year. Last year’s festival, the first to bring so many food trucks to Manayunk, started with an inauspicious delay. Vendors started serving at 11:00 a.m., the advertised start-time for the festival, but when food inspectors arrived 30 minutes later, they told all the vendors to stop serving food until they were inspected. When a food truck picks up and moves to a new location the food inspector must perform a new inspection to ensure the proprietor has proper refrigeration and cooking equipment and is meeting food safety standards. So last year, diners lined up in

front of the trucks but were unable to place orders until the food inspectors passed through. Two hours after the advertised

The banh mi is Vietnamese cuisine’s answer to an old hometown standby: the hoagie. opening of the festival, some trucks still could not serve their customers. Manayunk Restaurant Week, which starts on Sunday April 13, the day after the StrEAT Food Festival, actually runs for two weeks. Twenty-two local restaurants will offer three-course menus at three different price tiers: $15, $25 and $35.

Spot Burger parked in front of Machismo Burrito Bar (Michael Buozis 98

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MANAYUNK

Top: Delicias food truck in front of canal park Bottom Right: Artisanal foods in lot near Propper Brothers Bottom Left: Cheese E. Wagon (Michael Buozis)

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Philly food is more than just cheesesteaks ... ... but, despite what the city’s growing population of foodies has to say, the classic cheesesteak is still a big draw for diners in the city. After a ball game in South Philly (or, if you’re into high culture, a night at the opera on South Broad) there’s nothing like this Philly mainstay to satisfy your hunger. According to food historian, Andrew F. Smith, the sandwich was first sold in the 1930s by Pat and Harry Olivieri, brothers who owned a hot dog stand in South

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Philadelphia’s Italian Market. One version of the origin story has it that Pat got bored with having hot dogs for lunch every day, so he cooked up some sliced beef and onions and threw it all on an Italian roll. In 1940, Pat and Harry opened a restaurant at the intersection of South 9th Street and East Passyunk Avenue. Harry’s grandson, Frank Jr., still runs the place which competes with Geno’s Steaks, right across the street, and with a thousand other cheesesteak joints across the city.

Philly Foodie Magazine

Philly Foodie Magazine