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MICHAELANDREWSEVERETT

[ complete works ]


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[ resume ]

MICHAELANDREWSEVERETT

006

[ academic ]

Design Development: Fluid Deviation | Daegu, South Korea

022 034 044

Re-imagining the library of the technology age

CASE: Vascular Definitions | Chicago, Illinois Defining a new housing typology for Chicago

Lyceum: Oozing Sore | Cincinnati, Ohio Cleaning up Cincinnati’s Mill Creek Area

Timber in the City: liveFAB | New York, New York

Revitalizing Red Hook in a sustainable manner via low-income housing

052

Furniture Design: Prototype 7

060

Chicago Architecture Museum | Chicago, Illinois

070

Tectonics: Urban School | Hypothetical Site

078

Interacting with Ancient Earth | Oregonia, Ohio

086

Waterscraper: The Motion of Fluidity | Not Site Specific

Experimentations with the flexibility of plywood

Re-imagining the base of the Tribune Tower

Utilizing site influences to create an urban elementary school

Archeological facilities and Fort Ancient Museum

Creating a harbor-located skyscraper that expresses the fluidity of water


100 108 114

[ professional ]

094

120

132 138

Intern

EYP Inc | Boston, Massachusetts Intern

Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates [kpf] | New York City, New York Intern

The Sandbox Studio | Tahoe City, California Intern/Draftsperson

RPI SOA Publications | Troy, New York Photographer

[ personal ]

128

Method Design | New York City, New York

Competitions Hand Drawings Photography 002

003


michaelandrewseverett@gmail.com 413.297.9840 michaelandrewseverett.com http://issuu.com/michaelaeverett/

[ academic ]

[em] [ph] [web] [folio]

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, soa | Troy, New York Full time student, enrolled in Master of Architecture program Cumulative 3.85 GPA, Class of 2015

Center for Architecture, Science and Ecology | som, New York, New York

Research collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Skidmore Owings & Merrill CASE focuses on development of new building strategies while emphasizing energy efficiency and sustainability RPI M. Arch first semester: Fall 2013, 3.92 GPA

University of Cincinnati, daap | Cincinnati, Ohio Bachelor of Science in Architecture, Magna Cum Laude Dean’s List, Cumulative 3.81 GPA, Class of 2013

Minnechaug Regional High School | Wilbraham, Massachusetts 3.82 GPA, Class of 2009, Eagle Scout

[ skills ]

[ resume ]

MICHAELANDREWSEVERETT

Software

Adobe Acrobat Pro, Adobe DreamWeaver, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Lightroom, Adobe Photoshop, Apple Aperture, AutoCAD, Autodesk Maya, Autodesk Revit, Autodesk 3ds Max, Ecotect Analysis, Grasshopper, HTML code writing, Microsoft Office, Rhinoceros, SketchUp Pro + Layout, Universal Laser Systems, 3d Systems Powder Printing

Architectural Techniques

Rendering, Graphic Design, Sketching, Tectonics, Lighting, Daylighting, Passive Heating and Cooling, Materials and Methods, Woodworking and Wood Shop Equipment, Hand Tools, Physical Prototyping, Photography, Digital Fabrication, Slip Casting Ceramics


[ professional ]

Method Design | New York, New York | Intern

December 2014 through January 2015 Residential, Renovation, Furniture/Millwork Work included: 2D drafting, digital modelling, conceptual and schematic design work, visualization, millwork construction drawings

EYP Inc. | Boston, Massachusetts | Intern

May 2014 through August 2014 Higher Education Work included: Revit computer modeling, schematic design work, rendering, conceptual design/ interview prep

The Sandbox Studio | Tahoe City, California | Draftsperson

May 2013 through September 2013, June 2011 through December 2011 High-End Residential Work included: 2D drafting, electrical plans, preliminary and final submittals, plan check and resubmittals, 3D computer modeling, rendering, site analysis, conceptual drawing, design work

Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates [kpf] | New York City, New York | Intern

March 2012 through August 2012 Mixed Use, Residential and Commercial Work included: 2D drafting, MEP drawings, pricing sets 3D physical prototyping, rendering, conceptual drawing, attend client meetings

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | Troy, New York | Publications Staff

April 2014 to Current Graphic design for Architecture Publications, photography for School of Architecture functions

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | Troy, New York | Teaching Assistant Design Development Comprehensive Studio with Ted Krueger and Ajmal Aqtash Design Development Comprehensive Studio with Mark Mistur and Ajmal Aqtash Environmental and Ecological Systems with Alexandra Rempel

University of Cincinnati | Cincinnati, Ohio | Teaching Assistant Michael Zaretsky’s Sustainability & Sustainable Design course

004

005


[ academic ]

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT: FLUID DEVIATION Daegu, South Korea

A fluid deviation from traditional library ways to the newly redefined, technology age library typology.


006

007


on the cover: an interior rendering of the void space. rendered in rhino and photoshop right page: operational diagrams of the performative layout design based on a proposal by OneByNine for the Daegu Gosan Public Library Competition

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT: FLUID DEVIATION | Daegu, South Korea

[ academic ]

spring

2014: 16 weeks | professors Alexander Pincus, Lonn Combs in collaboration with: emily mcguire

This library is a fluid deviation from traditional library ways to the newly redefined, technology age library typology. The library houses library stacks in one wing of the splitting volume and computer centers and data in the other wing. At the intersection of the splitting wings is a continuous void, connecting the two and facilitating the spread of knowledge. The rather open but directed floor plan is intended to draw users into and through the building. The physical knowledge (the book stacks) are condensed and raised into the library’s cantilever as a symbolic gesture of exposing the knowledge to the community. A balance is created between this physical knowledge and

the ephemeral knowledge (data/ online knowledge) that is stored primarily in the adjacent wing of the building. The ideology behind the renowned Design Development studio at RPI is to begin by choosing a conceptual design level competition entry that has never been realized in built-form. After rigorous scrutiny and redesign of the original concept, teams of 2 students are tasked with taking the project through design development, and outputting a comprehensive drawing set and 1:50 scale physical model expressing both details and designed systems of the project. This project was done in collaboration with Emily R. McGuire.


1 Typical Library Condition

2 Fluid Deviation from Traditional Methods to New Technologies

3 Slice Ends to Reveal Library to Community

4 Create Vertical Connection

5 Expand Public Space Around Void

008

009


1

1

1

A212

A302

C2

1

A302

C3

A212

C2

C3

 

C11 C11

 

C5

 

C5

C12 C12 C6 C6 

C13



C13  

C7



C7 

 

C14 C14  









C15 C15

 

1 A210

C8

1

 

C8

A210

 

C16

       

       

C16 



1  

A211

C17

C17



 

1

1 A301

A301

C18



C18



  

C19

1

1

1

A212

A302

C2

 

1

A302

C3

A212

C2

C3

C19



C9

 

C9









C11 C11

  

C5

 

C20

C5

C12

C12

C20

C6 C6 



DN

C13



C13  

C7



C7 

 

C14







C21 C15

C15

 

1 A210



C8  



C8

A210

 

C16

C10

1



 

C14  





  

       



       

       

C21

C16 

C10



1 1

A211  

C17

A211

C17

 

1

1 A301

A301

C22 C18



C19

C18





 

C19 

C9

 

C9

 





A00 - Level 0



DN

1 : 100

0



C20



C23

  C21

C21







C10 C10

C22 C22

 

A00 - Level 0



1 : 100



0

A01 - Level 1 C23

C1

C4

1 : 100

 

C1

C1 C1

1 C23

C22



C20

 





 

 

A101

A01 - Level 1 1 : 100

C23

C4 C4

1

C4

 

A


C2

C3

C2

C3

C2 1

1

A302

A212

1

1

A302

A212

C11

C5

1 A212

A302

1

C5

A210

C12

1 A210

C3

C11

1 C12

 

C6

C6



C13

C13

C7

C7

   

 



C14

C14





C15

C15









C8

C8  

C16

 

C16

       

       

C11

       



1

1

A211

C5

A211  

C17

C17

C12

1

1

A301

C12

   

C18

C6

 

C19

C19

C9



C9

 

  

C20

C20

 





C13 C21

C21

C10

C10

C22

C22

C7 1 : 100

C1



5

A05 - Level 5 1 : 100

C23

C14

C4

C2

 



4

A04 - Level 4

1 A210

1 A301

C18

A210

C23

C1

A103



C5





C11 

C6



C13

C7

  



C14

C4



  

C3

1

1

A302

A212





C11

C11

C5 C12

C15

C15

C12

1 A210

C6

C6









C13

C13

 C7

C7



C8

C14

C14

 

  

C8





C16



C15

C15 



1 A401

C8

C8  

C16

C16

       

 



       

C16

       

       

       

       

1 A211  

C17

C17

1



A211 1

C17

A301







 

C19

C19 C9



���

 



2 A401

C20

C20 

1



A301

C18 C21

C21 C10

C22

C22

1 : 100

2

3

A03 - Level 3



 

1 : 100

C23

C23

C1

A102

C4

1 A301

C18 

  

C19

1

1

C17

C19

A212

A302

C2

C2

C3

C9

C3

1

1

A302

A212



C9

 





C11

C11

C5

C5

C20 C12

1

C20

C12

1 A210

C6

A210

C6











C13

C13

 C7

C7



C14

C14

 

  











C21

C15

C15









1 A401

C8

C8  

 

C16

C10

C16



       

       

       

C21

C10

1

1

A211

A211  

 

C17

C17 

 

1

1

A301

A301

C18

C18

C22



 



 



C19

C19 C9

C9

 







 



2 A401

C20

C20 



A04 - Level 4 

1 : 100



4



C21

C21

C23 C10

C10

C22

C22

 

 

Level 2 Ceiling Plan 1 : 100

2

A03 - Level 3



1 : 100

3 C23

C23

C1 C1

C4

C1

C4

A102



el 2 Ceiling Plan

 

C18

C18

C22

1 : 100

C4

5

FLOOR PLANS left page: levels B1, 01

 this page:  levels 02, 03, 04 (Mezz), 05



A05 - Level 5



1

301

C23

A103

010

011


CUT-AWAY SECTIONS left to right section perspective through the sliced ends of the form, the typical laminated glass curtain wall detail section perspective through the perforated panel exterior cladding system adjacent to the core section perspective through the typical exterior cladding system of the building exposing the stacks

012

013


1 A211

C11

C12

C13

C14

C15

C16

C17

C18

C19

C20

C21

C22

C23

A06 - Level 6 20000

A05 - Level 5 15750

A04 - Level 4 12250

A03 - Level 3 8750

Level 2 Ceiling Plan 5250

A01 - Level 1 0

A00 - Level 0 -3500

A00L - Level 0 LH -5250

A212 - Longitudinal Section Main Volume 1 : 100

1


A03 - Level 3 8750

01



A03 - Level 3 8750

A04 - Level 4 12250



02

 



03



02





05



 

04





05



12



  

03





  

06











07





08



09





       

08





01



13



11

10

       

DETAILED SECTIONS 

       



14 



15 16 17 18 19









 

 



Level 2 Ceiling Plan 5250

A03 - Level 3 8750





 









11





20













 

2

4

4

1

Wall Section - Foundation Detailed Wall Wall Section - Perforated Metal Detailed Wall Section - Detailed Perforated Wall Metal Section - Stacks Detailed Wall Section - Glass Wall 1 : 10

1 : 10

01 Vapor Profile 02 Panel System Steel Pin/ Angle 03 75mm Rigid Insulation R15 04 Panel System Steel Hanger 05 Gypsum Wallboard Ceiling Finish 06 Break-Formed 10mm Aluminum Panel: 5mm Perforation 07 150x50mm Extruded Aluminum Mullion 08 Vertical Girt 09 Hat Channel 10 25mm Insulated Glass Unit 11 Metal Stud 12 Break-Formed 10mm Aluminum Panel 13 16mm Gypsum Wallboard 14 50x300mm Quad Laminated Glass Mullion 15 Aluminum Pin Connection 16 10mm Aluminum Space Connection (behind) 17 Black Silicone Joint 18 Glass Interlocking Lap Joint Connection in Mullion 19 10mm Aluminum Angle Connection to Mullion 20 36mm Triple Laminated Monumental Glass 







Level 2 Ceiling Plan 5250













 

04



1 : 10

1 : 10

1 : 10

3

3











014

2

015

Detailed Wall Section Detailed - GlassWall WallSection - Foundation Wall Detailed Wall Section - Foundation Wall 1 : 10

1 : 10

1 : 10

2


C2

C3

C11

C5 C12 C6

C13

C7

C14

C15

C8 C16

TYPICAL RCP The lighting plan was conceived by the region of space that we wanted to create. First, the most public of spaces (the circulation space) need to be kept fluid in order to fit within the concepts of our design. In order to be fluid with lighting, indirect LED strips are arranged in a meandering pattern. Second, the classroom spaces are set up with indirect linear fluorescent strip lighting on a more set out grid. Finally, the remaining public spaces including the stacks, computer labs, and study areas are oriented very close to the exterior glass walls. The natural light is supplemented with minimal direct, recessed can overhead lights.

C17

C18

C19 C9

C20

C21

C10

C22

C23

C1 C4

Level 2 Ceiling Plan 1 : 100

1


C12 C6

C13

C7 C13 C14 C7

circulation lighting

furniture/task ligh

C14 A03 - Level 3 8750

C15

circulation lighting direct, recessed can overhead light

C8

C15

return air/exhaust

C16 C11

fresh air supply indirect, LED strip

C2

direct, recessed can overhead light

C8

direct, LEP strip

SYSTEMS DELIVERY

A02 - Level 2 5250

return air/exhaust

C16 C11

1

C3

A211

C17 C12 C14

C15

C2

C13

C6

A03 - Level 3 8750

fresh air supply indirect, LED strip

direct, LEP strip

C16

C17

C18

C17

C18

1

C3

A211

C17 C12 C13

C6

C18 C14 C13

fresh air supply

C15

indirect, LED strip

3---

C18 C13

return air/exhaust

C19 C14 direct, LEP strip

fresh air supply

C16

return air/exhaust

direct, LEP strip

direct, recessed can C7 overhead light

indirect, LED strip

3-

direct, recessed can C7 overhead light

---

C19 C14 1

A211

C20 C15





The ceiling over the main circulation is lowered in order C19 to accommodate C20 the main branch AC ducts. A02 - Level 2 Air- Level is5250 delivered to the main A03 3 8750 program spaces directly from the circulation ceiling cavity. This C19ceiling drop also C20helps to accent the high ceilings over the main program spaces. A03 - Level 3 The 8750 heating system is radiant through the floors, and directly connected to the city-wide district heating system. The LED strip circulation lights on the back of a dropped metal panel fin. They are housed in a reflective and curved formwork in order to direct the light produced A02 - Levelthe 2 onto adjacent fins which 5250 in turn redirects the light to the circulation spaces. are mounted A02 - Level 2 5250

 

 

 







A212

1

C2 C3

1

1

 



 



C21 C16







1

A211

C20 C15

A302

C5

C1

2

C8

furniture/task ligh

016

017

C2

C2


the second level, showing the stacks, study spaces and the cascading light of the void space

018

019


1:50 scale sectional model expressing the structural systems of the building, and an understanding of the interior spaces


020

021


[ academic ]

CASE: VASCULAR DEFINITIONS Chicago, Illinois

Defining a future housing typology for Chicago in response to cultural issues.


022

023


on the cover: an interior rendering of the greenhouse space. hand drawn and post-processed in photoshop this page: a diagram of the mixed occupancy condition that young professionals present right page: a layer diagram juxtaposing screen time with health effects

[ academic ]

CASE: VASCULAR DEFINITIONS | Chicago, Illinois fall

2013: 5 weeks | professor Demetrios Comodromos

Who? Young Professionals. Friends/strangers living together in a single household as multiple rentals. Young (20-35 year old) full-time working post-graduate professionals. Size of household occupancy can multiply according to significant others. Why? Health. In today’s world where everything is available with the touch of a finger, young people are spending more and more time behind a screen (an average of 8.5 hours per day in 2010). Continuing at this pace of increasing time would result in being behind a screen for every waking hour long before 2050 even hits. This

addiction to technology results in natural daylight deficiencies, which is tied to many health issues, including diabetes, obesity, and depression. Following current trends, these rates will skyrocket, quickly leading to an unhealthy America. How? Networking Systems. In typical housing, systems and structure are separated and hidden from occupiable space, creating wasted space and further separating us from light and air. Critical systems networked in a vascular manner are optimized for transport and then exploited as a spatial definer, creating a healthier more natural environment for living.


19

90

-2

.5

hrs

1980 40,000 230 mill

# of computers shipped us population 20 mil =

0:00

2000 ill

280

ill

0m

14

0m

ill

20

ta

10

wa

ke

-8

.5

hrs

es

13

ob

tes

en

n

ill

20

%

60

be

sp

sio

0m

hrs

%

40

dia

4

31

.5

%

20

o (pr de pre s

m 80

15

0 205 hrs 5 d) 15. jecte

44 ill

40 m

mill

TYPICAL DAY 6:00 24:00 Clock 12:00

18:00

5 hrs

- 4.7

ity

%

80 0%

10

024

025


Systems

01 02 05 04 06

TUBE SECTIONS ETFE Panel H-Section Steel Structure Fiberglass Insulation Rainwater Collection Gutter 2� High Velocity Air Duct

01 02 03 04 05 06

03

Systems 01

FABRICATION Construction of the network of systems tubes is fairly simple. Once the network has been designed and structurally engineered, prefabrication of its parts can begin. An assembly of two types of pieces is created: (1) y-joints and (2) straight members connecting them. These pieces can be prefabricated with the necessary system pathways, allowing for only simple connections on-site.

02 Fabrication

Construction of the network of systems tubes is fairly simple. Once the network has been designed and structurally engineered, prefabrication of its parts can begin. An assembly of two types of pieces is created: (1) y-joints and (2) straight members connecting them. These pieces can be prefabricated with the necessary system pathways, allowing for only simple connections on-site.

03

04


01

02 03 06

04

05

07

08 09

10 11 12

BUILDING SECTION 13

14

16

17 18

15

01 FiberOptic Tracking Solar Collector 02 BioPCM Sheet 03 FiberOptic Cables 04 Integrated Sound System 05 Rainwater 06 Exhaust Air 07 FiberOptic Task Lighting 08 Sun Shades 09 Electrical Wiring 10 Operable Air-Filled Partition 11 Radiant Heating (geothermal) 12 ETFE Window insulated/filled with exhaust air 13 Solid Insulated Panel 14 Smart Glass with flexible transparency 15 Fresh Conditioned Air from greenhouse 16 Glass 17 H-Section Steel 18 Collected Rainwater for greenhouse/grey water uses

026

027


01

02

03 04

05

06


left page: the roof plan/panel diagram 01 Solid Insulated Panel 02 Phase Change Material Panel (BioPCM) 03 Shaded ETFE Window 04 Typical ETFE Window 05 Fiberglass Shell 06 ETFE Greenhouse Roof this page: from the top, the front, rear and side elevations (hand drawn). the rear elevation shows the large air intakes

028

029


SMART GLASS Sunlight enters through the second floor windows all day long, however it is constantly being blocked by the traditional floor plate. The floor plate in the house of the future is made up of smart glass. It becomes frosted in a radius around whoever walks on it, but remains transparent at other times.

UPPER LEVEL The upper level offers complete flexibility with only operable partitions. Users select the number of cells they desire upon entering the space. Partitions remain open during the day when spaces are not occupied.

Option 1

ENTRY LEVEL The entry level offers flexibility of size and configuration of living spaces by allowing them to spill over into the greenhouse depending on users’ desires. drawings on overlay of hand drawn work and digitally drawn work.

Option 2


AIRFLOW SECTION Below shows the circulation of airflow through the building. The cold outdoor air is first warmed via geothermal heating, then is filtered through the plants in the greenhouse, then distributed through the vascular network and finally exhausted after its utilization.

Exhaust Air Intake Radiant Heating

Filter

Filter

Dispersion

Closed Loop Geothermal Heating

PARTITIONS Top Edge: The fabric of the partition slides into a small cavity in the tube along its top edge when it is open. This visually hides the partition within the tube while it is not in use. Airflow: Airflow into the cavity is warm, exhaust air. Cavity is filled, and then the valve remains open to create pressure in the cavity when air is passed by it, keeping it inflated. Air is sucked out and the valve is closed upon partition storage. Bottom Corners: The bottom corners of the partitions on tracks (within the bordering vertical tubes) that they slide down when the partition is closed, to ensure they entirely fill and create the complete partition.

Partition Open: When switch is flicked, airflow is reversed and air is sucked out of the cavity, collapsing the divider and sucking it up its tracks, into its storage cavity. Partition Closed: Airflow open into cavity, divider slides downward and fills with air

030

031


Welcome,

Tom

Welcome,

Tom

:

t today’s cells

please selec

:

t today’s cells

please selec

user enters the space and walks to the touchscreen. the user then selects the cells he/ she desires that day off a floor plan. The specific cells and total number of cells may vary based on daily use.


upon confirmation, the operable partitions around the selected cells begin to inflate.

the fully inflated partitions create private areas for each of the users.

renderings hand drawn and then post-processed in photoshop and illustrator

032

033


OHIO CINCINNATI MILL CREEK

QUEENSGATE

LOWER PRICE HILL

[ academic ]


Cincinnati, Ohio Crumbling infrastructure and flooding have caused environmental issues amplifying the deterioration of Cincinnati’s once thriving industrial area. Finding alternative strategies to dealing with leaking organic and toxic waste will begin to heal this ‘wound’ in Cincinnati’s urban fabric, and pave the way for a healthy relationship with its surrounding neighborhoods.

034

035


LYCEUM: OOZING SORE | Cincinnati, Ohio

[ academic ]

spring

2013: 6 weeks | professor Lucie Fontaine

Phase 1: Address sewage issues, gain community involvement. One of main issues behind the sewage system failures is due to undersized pipes running down the hill. Compounding this, storm drains share the pipes with sewage. Diverting rainwater from the sewage lines will greatly reduce, if not eliminate back ups. Low impact rain gardens will assist in absorption and conveyance. Additionally, EcoStations will be set up on street corners in surrounding neighborhoods. Each EcoStation will consist of a composting bin, a rain garden, and posted explanations of each.

LYCEUM: OOZING SORE | Cincinnati, Ohio spring

2013: 7 weeks | professor Lucie Fontaine


Phase 2: Address environmental cleanup. Physical trash and abandoned structures will be removed from neglected lots, allowing for cleansing the soil through phytoremediation. Heavy metal harvesting plants (wild mustard) and moisture controlling trees (poplars) will be planted throughout the lots. This process may take anywhere from 1 to 5 years, depending on the toxicity levels of the soil.

Phase 3: Implement a system of urban farming. Composted soil will enrich the abandoned lots, and plants will bring nutrients to the area further enriching the soil. Rainwater from the communities above can be utilized to irrigate the farms below. In some cases, simple concrete structures will be constructed to allow for farming above parking lots. The farming system will create numerous jobs and the products of the farms will be utilized by the surrounding neighborhoods.

on the cover: one of the CSO’s that dumps directly into Mill Creek this page: an aerial view of the industrial wasteland. Lower Price Hill is in the foreground with Queensgate just behind it and downtown Cincinnati in the background.

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EPA Hazard Site

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Area’s affected by sewage backups

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YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD IS AFFECTED BY SEWAGE BACKUPS

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Cincinnati’s sewage infrastructure is a network of combined sewers. Combined sewers are pipes that carry both raw sewage and rainwater from storm drains. combined sewer overflows (CSO’s) are release valves that allow the system to dump some of its sewage into a nearby waterway in an effort to reduce pipe ruptures and sewage backup.

CINCINNATI HAS 215 CSO’S. 83 CSO’S DUMP INTO MILL CREEK. JUST ONE CSO (#5) DUMPS 1.7 BILLION GALLONS of RAW SEWAGE into MILL CREEK ANNUALLY.

metropolitan sewer district cincinnati issues an advisory whenever .25 inches of precipitation is forecasted, or when there is potential for flooding. This advisory warns residents of a potential release of raw sewage through the CSO’s. In 2012, there were 41 days with more than .25 inches of precipitation. In 2011, there were 67.

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Phase 1: Address sewage issues, gain community involvement.

Throughout the community, sewers will be replaced with rain gardens which allow water to slowly infiltrate and be absorbed by the soil. In specific areas, rainwater will be collected and piped down to urban farming sites. A series of EcoStations will be set up. EcoStations will have a compost bin for community use, a rain garden, and explanations to promote awareness and usage throughout the city.

ECO STATION

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ECO STATION

Phase 2: Address environmental cleanup.

During this phase, empty lots will be cleaned up, and wild mustard and poplar trees will be planted to begin the phytoremediation phase. These plants will cleanse the soil by harvesting heavy metals and reintroducing nutrients. This process may take between one and five years to complete, depending on toxicity levels.


mill creek sewage plant

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Phase 3: Implement a system of urban farming. Post phytoremediation, lots can begin to be farmed and harvested. Construction of concrete structures above parking lots should be completed, and can be farmed as well. Urban farming will stimulate the economy by producing goods, creating jobs, increasing property values of lots in the area and in overlooking areas. Along with becoming and aesthetic pleasantry, Queensgate will also bring communities together by offering farmer’s markets to sell the produced goods. Additionally compost and rainwater from EcoStations of neighboring communities will be utilized in the farming processes.

COMMUNITY RAINWATER DIVERSION COMPOSTING IRRIGATION

URBAN FARMING

COMMUNITY

PRODUCTION OF GOODS

COMMUNITY

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[ academic ]


TIMBER IN THE CITY: liveFAB Brooklyn, New York

A modular low income-housing project for Brooklyn’s upand-coming Red Hook neighborhood

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on the cover: exterior rendering. modelled in rhino, rendered with v-ray and photoshop right page: sectional rendering. modelled in rhino, rendered with photoshop

[ academic ]

TIMBER IN THE CITY: liveFAB | Brooklyn, New York spring

2013: 6 weeks | professor Lucie Fontaine in collaboration with: emily mcguire

Low-income housing has been negatively identified as confining, dark, and brutalist. A number of systems will oppose these stereotypes: (1) all residential program is laid out in a modular system along view axes giving each room a view of either Manhattan, the Statue of Liberty, or the Atlantic Ocean. (2) Corridors are single loaded, with glass on one side to daylight them and allowing for views and programs of their own. (3) Corridors will be usable public space. Corridors will provide a number of different seating, studying and socializing furniture that will allow residents to occupy additional space to their individually leased apartments. (4) All floors will have a south-facing

lounge located in the circulation core tower with growing walls acting as screens. (5) Each residential tower will have a fully functioning, accessible greenhouse on its top floor. (6) All 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom and 3 bedroom apartments will have an outdoor porch that also consists of living green walls, integrating the green space with the residents of the immediate community. Residential modules can be produced on-site in the wood production facilities, or in other similar facilities. Modules are structured by high performance cross-laminated timber shear walls and floor plates.


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connect green space

raise the roof

introduce prog

extend the adjacent community farm and waterfront park space onto the site

create store frontage on Van Dyke while maintaining pedestrian access to the rooftop park

add production spa frontage on Otsego parking below


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ace and store o and access to

identify view corridors

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orient all residential modules to one of the three desired views: nyc skyline, statue of liberty, and atlantic ocean

establish building floor-plates according to apartment types and program requirements

this page: operational/ form diagram

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clt shear wall

clt floor slab

the vertical structure of the residences allows for modular building and layout in addition to vertical growing walls

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in order to increase spanning widths, the waffle creates spans ideal for the open plan of shop production and is a great interest as a storefront

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[ academic ]

FURNITURE DESIGN: PROTOTYPE 7 Experimenting with fabric-like plywood surfaces


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[ academic ]

FURNITURE DESIGN: PROTOTYPE 7 spring

This is a prototype for a Pirwi inspired stool. Its concept is making a sheet of plywood conform to the curves of your body more like a fabric than its natural state. A series of holes in the seat pan weaken the wood enough to allow it to bend. Stringing it in the weak direction then reinforces the plywood so that it will not break. The stools intended use is as a video game stool. It can be utilized in multiple ways

2013: 6 weeks | professor Jim Postell

including: sitting on, flipping the stool vertically against a wall to use the seat pan as a back pan, and as an ottoman. The stool is made of biodegradeable materials (plywood and cotton rope), and is designed to minimize material waste during construction. The wood is left raw to keep it biodegradable.


no holes / little to no deflection

drilled / too much deflection, leads to failure

strung / reinforcement in the weak direction allows the plywood to bend but not break

concept diagrams

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(2) 5’ x 5’ x 1/8” sheets of birch plywood each sheet cut perpendicular to the grain into (6) equal with strips (6) stacked sheets sheets bent and adhered to one another seat pan holes drilled strung with cotton rope, perpendicular to the grain


INITIAL TESTING prototypes one, three and four

CONSTRUCTION Each sheet of plywood is soaked individually for at least 30 minutes in hot water. Upon removal from the water, each sheet is then glued and bent around the jig, immediately being clamped in place. Clamps are to be left in place for at least 6 hours before the next layer is applied. After the fourth layer, the plywood is removed from the jig, and the hole for the seat pan is cut. After sanding the fresh cuts, it is placed back on the jig and the final two layers of plywood are adhered. After the last layer is applied, the glue should be left to dry for at least 24 hours. Then it can be removed from the jig for the final time. 3/16 inch holes should be drilled on a one inch grid across the seat pan. Final sanding should happen before the piece is strung. Working perpendicular to the grain, the cotton string shall be weaved through the holes with a know tied on each side.

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position a: seated stool utilized as a seat

position b: resting stool utilized as a backrest

position c: footrest stool utilized as an ottoman

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[ academic ]

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE MUSEUM Chicago, Illinois

Redesigning the base of one of Chicago’s most historic landmarks


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[ academic ]

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE MUSEUM | Chicago, Illinois fall

2012: 15 weeks | professor Gerald Larson

The concept of the project is to create an organic interaction to accent the juxtaposition with the adjacent Chicago Tribune Tower. Reusing portions of the existing structure accents this juxtaposition. The museum is laid out along interior paths, which allows users to see the complex overlaps in history which cannot be understood in the traditional, linear way of learning.

programmed exhibits, the museum is also designed to interact with the community of Chicago. It does this by providing studios, where designers and artists can “rent” and work free of charge, provided they produce one work every three months for an exhibit in the museum.

Along with the organic form, and the paths that make up the museum’s

The project also contains outdoor public space, an amphitheater, classroom space, research space, a library, a design shop, and a high end cafe and restaurant on Michigan Avenue.


on the cover: digital model built in rhino and maya, rendered in rhino and photoshop this page: stacked plans showing pathways flowing through the open museum volume.

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STRUCTURE The double facade in the project acts as the cavity for all of the mechanical systems and the structure. It varies in depth based on the necessary truss depth, as illustrated in the sections. Each skin is covered with smaller apertures allowing for a diffuse quality of light to enter the museum spaces. The skin turns in on itself in places where more transparency is necessary to allow for specific views.

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PANELIZED SKINS The skins attached to either side of the structure are tessellated into a pattern utilizing a controlled number of different panel sizes, shown in the wall section and corresponding elevation above. Panels are then customized to allow for larger or smaller apertures. The cavity created is lit with LED lights allowing for the museum to glow at night. The image to the right is what the intervention (3D printed) would look like on-site when viewed from Michigan Avenue


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left column: additional views of the 3D printed intervention on-sight main image: hand drawn, photoshop rendered view of the main entry hall

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[ academic ]

TECTONICS: URBAN SCHOOL Hypothetical Site

Designing an urban elementary school based on direct responses to a hypothetical site


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on the cover: model hand built and 3D powder printed, created in rhino this page: the initial drawing for the organizational and massing strategy of the intervention

[ academic ]

right page: a photoshop rendering of the drop-off zone for the school

TECTONICS: URBAN SCHOOL | Hypothetical Site winter

This project is focused around the idea of tectonics, referring to a set of three elements: mass, frame, and plane. The concept of the project is to create an elementary school in a hypothetical urban site based on the word: “centralized.� I began by analyzing the city and drawing connections through the site as organizational/ massing strategies (see above). I then created an armature that shows the conditions of the city, and holds the intervention. My site is focused around four main buildings and uses these to create a multilayered grid system. This grid created

2011: 10 weeks | professor Renee Martin three levels to work on: the lower level (inside the grid), the main level (on the grid), and the upper level (above the grid). The resulting intervention draws in information from the surrounding buildings, as well as using the grid’s information to become centralized on multiple levels both in plan and section. Formally, I created a mass that was held up by surrounding framework. This design appears as a mass when viewed in the overall context of the city, however when viewed at a closer distance, it shows a more complex design comprised of both frame and plane elements.


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this page: a plan of the lower level of the school showing its auditorium, vertical connections, and its connection to the subway. right page: a section of the school showing the classrooms and library above, open spaces (auditorium and cafeteria) on the entry level, and auditorium on the lower level.

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[ academic ]

INTERACTING WITH ANCIENT EARTH Oregonia, Ohio

Designing a combined lodge and museum for one Ohio’s oldest and ongoing archaeological sites


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on the cover: a rendering of the building’s interation with the earthworks form generated with maya, revit and photoshop rendering, technical drawings exported from revit to illustrator

[ academic ]

this page: conceptual form diagram

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INTERACTING WITH ANCIENT EARTH | Oregonia, Ohio spring

This project is located on an ancient mound site In Oregonia, Ohio. The program is to create a combined lodge and museum, which is also a hub for archeological practices and research of the site. This design draws inspiration from the ancient people’s knowledge of astronomy, and forces an interaction with the ancient mounds and frames specific views of the site. My concept comes from the ancient’s knowledge of astronomy. Many of the mounds and openings have a direct relationship to the stages of

2011: 10 weeks | professor Ming Tang the moon. The ancients knew that the moon’s rising path switches back and forth between the Southeast and the Northeast every four weeks. They also noticed that the width of this angle expands slowly for 9.3 years and then contracts at the same rate. That makes the extreme Northernmost moonrise an 18.6 year occurrence. This was the most important part of the cycle as demonstrated by the earthworks at Newark. My concept is to create a form that relates to, opens up to, and frames the occurrence of the Northernmost moonrise, while alluding to the other moonrises.


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FRAMING THE VIEW/FORCING AN INTERACTION The ancients were particularly interested in views. Fort Ancient is surrounded by views, with its location on the top of a hill, overlooking the river. They were also interested in framing certain views, like the openings that the moon would appear in. This concept is to frame a specific viewpoint that will draw people into a portion of the site that is less commonly seen. The wooden slats are both an environmental response as well as a conceptual one. They were conceived in order to blur the edges between nature, and the man-made intervention. Because the mounds are so spread out and often hard to see, most people do not get to fully understand the mounds or their presence. This concept consists of a portion of the intervention spanning over, but not touching, two mounds and their corresponding opening. This would force users to walk through an opening in the building in order to get to the viewpoint. It would give a sense of scale to the user, as well as create an understanding for what a massive undertaking building this complex was.

exposed framework

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[ academic ]

WATERSCRAPER: THE MOTION OF FLUIDITY not site specific

Expressing the fluidity of water with the verticality of a harbor skyscraper


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[ academic ]


on the cover: sectional rendering modelled in maya and revit, rendered in revit and photoshop background photo credit: http://www.portmanholdings. com/sites/default/files/ galleries/aerial_1_web_0.jpg

left: ink being dropped into water, photography by Mark Mawson right: Akaka Falls, Hawaii

WATERSCRAPER: THE MOTION OF FLUIDITY | Not Site Specific winter

2012: 9 weeks | professor Ming Tang

in collaboration with: rachael kroth

This project was to be an exercise of parametric design. As a two person team, we were tasked with designing a skyscraper to satisfy needs of the future, while using cutting edge technology and design. The concept of our design was to create a skyscraper that could be constructed in water. We designed a multi-use tower containing both offices and apartments. The aesthetics of our design were to evoke the fluidity and motion of water.

The tower consists of two main parts: the skin and the core. The precedent images above show what each part mimics. The skin mimics the fluidity and dispersal when another liquid is dropped into water. The core mimics the motion of individual water droplets. It serves as both the structure and as a partition between the atrium and the private spaces within the skin. 088

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+ the structural core: created by two intertwining systems of circular tubes, this system creates differentiating cross-bracing. the core strives to simulate the somewhat chaotic appearance of a waterfall.

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foyer living area bathroom kitchen pantry master suite master bath master closet

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lobby reception conference studio bathroom kitchen storage

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images of a study model, created from two different techniques of laser cutting the maya-made 3D model.

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[ professional ]

METHOD DESIGN New York, New York


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all renderings courtesy of method on the cover: an exterior rendering of a design for an apartment complex

[ professional ]

this page: a cut away perspective of a rowhouse interior

METHOD DESIGN | New York, New York winter

Principals: Demetrios Comodromos, Reese Campbell Work included: 2D drafting, digital modelling, conceptual and schematic design work, visualization, millwork construction drawings Method allowed me to quickly experience a number of projects of different types and scales. The majority of my work was focused

2015: 2 months | Intern

on three projects, a furniture design project, a rowhouse renovation and a facade recladding project. As a smaller firm, Method takes on projects of many different scales and scope and utilizes concept driven design to work out refined solutions and strategies. The fast pace of projects allowed for me to have a wide range of experience in just a short term of work.


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Scheme 1, Scheme 4 places the kitchen and a seating area along the north windows allowing the remainder of the mezzanine to be taken up by dining and family rooms. Placing the family room next to the living room allows Utilizing the north side (street for physical separation while front) of the rowhouse for the maintaining acoustic continuity kitchen and a informal seating and limited visual continuity.

area allows the remainder of the mezzanine to be taken up by the dining and family rooms. The diagram for the maisonette becomes a play between formal and informal spaces. The stairs up from the living room have been shifted to create and defined landing zone. Placing the family room next to the living room allows for physical separation while maintaining acoustic continuity and limited visual continuity.

LAYOUT

Utilizing a similar diagram to Scheme 1, Scheme 4 places the kitchen and a seating area along the north windows allowing the remainder of the mezzanine to be taken up by dining and family rooms. Placing the family room next to the living room allows for physical separation while maintaining acoustic continuity and limited visual continuity.

INFORMAL

INFORMAL

FORMAL

FORMAL


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[ professional ]

EYP INC

ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING Boston, Massachusetts


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[ professional ]

EYP ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING | Boston, Massachusetts summer

2014: 4 months | Intern

Principal: Jeremy Oberc Lead Designer: Kip Ellis Project Manager: Sandy Carroll

conceptual designs. The final output consisted of multiple options and multiple scales.

Work included: Revit computer modeling, schematic design work, rendering, conceptual design/ interview prep

Additionally and more in-depth, I experienced the schematic design process of a collegiate science building. The project consisted of renovation, addition, reprogramming and recladding an existing building. My work ranged from visualizations, to details, to Revit modelling, to SD set drawings.

At EYP, I experienced design in multiple stages of the process. I was asked to assist on three project interviews: fast paced, charrette style


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* PRESERVE EXISTING CAP AND SPANDREL AND BASE CONDITIONS

eypae.com

eypae.com

CONSULTANTS:

CONSULTANTS:

* PRESERVE EXISTING CAP AND SPANDREL AND BASE CONDITIONS

BREAK METAL REVEAL, PTD TO MATCH CW

EXPOSED CONC BEAM, ETR.

NEW ALUM WINDOW SYSTEM, TYP.

NEW ALUM WINDOW, TYP.

Level 3 Level 3 24' - 0" 24' - 0"

2 1/2" INSULATION, ETR.

DOUBLE TEE CLOSER

2 1/2" INSULATION, ETR.

12' - 0"

NOTE: SEE PLANS AND B.O.D. FOR INTERIOR FINISHES

12' - 0" 12' - 0"

NEW ALUMINUM CURTAIN WALL NOTE: SEE PLANS AND B.O.D. FOR INTERIOR FINISHES

PRECAST PANEL, ETR.

DOUBLE TEE CLOSER

12' - 0"

DOUBLE TEE CLOSER, ETR.

Level 3 24' - 0" CUT STONE WINDOW SPANDREL, ETR.

12' - 0"

DOUBLE TEE CLOSER, ETR.

Level Level 3 3 24' - 0"24' - 0" CUT STONE WINDOW SPANDREL, ETR.

PRECAST PANEL, ETR.

STRUCTURAL ATTACHMENT AT EXISTING BEAM

1" INSULATION, ETR.

2 1/2" RIGID INSULATION, ETR.

NEW ALUM WINDOW SYSTEM, TYP.

NEW ALUM WINDOW, TYP.

General Notes:

Existing Roof 36' - 0"

EXPOSED CONC BEAM, ETR. 12' - 0"

WOOD TRIM

PTD. EXPOSED CONCRETE BEAM

NEW ROOF MEMBRANE OVER 1/2" PROTECTION BRD, NEW 4" RIGID INSULATION, NEW VAPOR BARRIER. TAPERED LIGHT WEIGHT CONC TOPPING OVER DOUBLE TEES, ETR.

CUT STONE COPING, ETR.

CUT STONE @ WINDOW HEAD, ETR.

PRECAST WINDOW PANEL, ETR.

EXPOSED 1" INSULATION, ETR. CONC BEAM, ETR.

2 1/2" RIGID INSULATION, ETR. NEW WOOD SLAT DROP CEILING

General Notes:

Existing Existing Roof Roof 36' - 0"36' - 0"

CUT STONE @ WINDOW HEAD, ETR.

12' - 0" 12' - 0"

WOOD TRIM

* PRESERVE EXISTING CAP AND SPANDREL AND BASE CONDITIONS

NEW ROOF MEMBRANE OVER 1/2" PROTECTION BRD, NEW 4" RIGID STONE INSULATION, NEWCUT VAPOR COPING, ETR. BARRIER. TAPERED LIGHT WEIGHT CONC TOPPING OVER DOUBLE TEES, ETR.

12' - 0"

PRECAST WINDOW PANEL, ETR.

NEW ROOF MEMBRANE OVER 1/2" PROTECTION CUT STONE BRD, NEW 4" RIGID COPING, INSULATION, ETR.NEW VAPOR BARRIER. TAPERED LIGHT WEIGHT CONC TOPPING OVER DOUBLE TEES, ETR.

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NEW ROOF MEMBRANE OVER 1/2" PROTECTION BRD, NEW 4" RIGID INSULATION, NEW VAPOR CUT STONE LIGHT BARRIER. TAPERED COPING, ETR. OVER WEIGHT CONC TOPPING DOUBLE TEES, ETR.

Existing Roof Existing Roof 36' - 0" 36' - 0"

EXPOSED CONC BEAM, ETR.

EYP Architecture & Engineering Independence Wharf 470 Atlantic Ave., 7th Fl. Boston, MA 02210 Telephone 617 305 9800 Fax 617 305 9888

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* PRESERVE EXISTING CAP AND SPANDREL AND BASE CONDITIONS

ALUMINUM CAP NEW ROOF MEMBRANE OVER 1/2" PTD. PROTECTION BRD, NEW 4" ALUMINUM RIGID INSULATION, NEW VAPOR PANEL BARRIER. TAPERED LIGHT WEIGHT CONC TOPPING OVER DOUBLE TEES, ETR.

EYP/

EYP Architecture & Engineering, P.C. Independence Wharf 470 Atlantic Ave., 7th Fl. Boston, MA 02210 Telephone 617 305 9800 Fax 617 305 9888

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NEW SLATE STOOL

CAST STONE

RADIANT HEATING

3" CONCRETE TOPPING, ETR.

3" CONCRETE TOPPING, ETR.

Level 2 Level 2 12' - 0" 12' - 0"

Level 2 all renderings courtesy of eyp 12' - 0"

Level Level 2 2 12' - 0"12' - 0"

NEW 2 1/2" RIGID INSULATION

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KEY PLAN:

EXISTING BRICK TIE BLOCKING TO EXISTING CMU SHELF, REINFORCE WITHBACKUP STEEL ANGLE

CUT EXISTING SILL AND REINSTALL

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NEW INFILL ABOVE EXISTING STEPPED FOUNDATION WALL

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HUNG GYP. CEILING ON METAL FRAME

this page: detailed typical wall sections

TIE BLOCKING TO EXISTING CMU BACKUP NEW BLOCKING @ WINDOW, TYP

2" PERIMETER INSULATION BELOW GRADE, ETR.

TIE FLASHING TO EXISTING THROUGH WALL FLASHING, TYP.

5" CONC. SLAB, ETR.

CUT EXISTING SILL AND REINSTALL

CUT EXISTING SILL AND REINSTALL

NEW BLOCKING @ WINDOW, TYP

2" PERIMETER INSULATION BELOW GRADE, ETR.

6" GRAVEL, ETR.

6" GRAVEL, ETR.

Level Level 1 1 0' - 0" 0' - 0"

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NEW STEEL STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITE DECK FLOOR

Schematic Design DATE:

Tunnel -5' - 0"

Tunnel -5' - 0"

CUT EXISTING SILL AND REINSTALL

following pages: a bird’s eye rendering of the existing building, followed Integrated S Integrated Science Complex Level 1 0" by the same view0' - of the Concordia College Concordia Colleg Moorhead, Minnesota Moorhead, Minn completed renovation TIE FLASHING TO EXISTING THROUGH WALL FLASHING, TYP.

5" CONC. SLAB, ETR.

5' - 0"

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TunnelTunnel -5' - 0"-5' - 0"

KEY PLAN:

on the cover: an interior rendering of the entry, main stair, and commons beyond

NEW STEEL STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITE DECK FLOOR

12' - 0" 12' - 0"

NEW CAST STONE

SCALE: EYP PROJECT NO.: CLIENT PROJECT NO.: DESIGNED BY: DRAWN BY: CHECKED BY:

2014.08.01 1/2" = 1'-0" 1009075.02 EYP EYP EYP

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KOHN PEDERSEN FOX New York, New York


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KOHN PEDERSEN FOX | New York, New York spring/summer

Principal: Josh Chaiken Project Manager: Rebecca Atkin Work included: AutoCAD drafting, digital 3D modelling in Rhino, physical modelling (by hand as well as utilizing a laser cutter and 3D printer), rendering and conceptual drawing At KPF, I worked on an eight story mixed-use building located in New York City with 7 floors of residential and one retail level. During schematic design, I was tasked with creating a physical model that would allow the

2012: 5 months | Intern

team to view many different facade and massing iterations (see next page). Along with this, I also assisted in many different forms of digital studies, like the sectional study to the right. Upon completion of schematic design, I was tasked with keeping the floor plans up to date, and coordinating the mechanical systems. In addition, I created studies of conceptual detail drawings and models for the project. I also assisted in the production of a pricing set.


all renderings courtesy of kohn pedersen fox on the cover: an overall rendering of the project this page: a sectional rendering created to efficiently study different facade types next page: the left hand column shows the transformable physical model the main image is the penthouse level floor plan

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THE SANDBOX STUDIO Tahoe City, California


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on the cover: podium and photoshop rendering, model built in sketchup, technical drawings produced in autocad

[ professional ]

right page: a 1,200 square foot guest residence in Truckee, California. I was tasked with drafting the floor plans, modelling the project, and then creating a rendering from the SketchUp model (cover image)

THE SANDBOX STUDIO | tahoe city, california summer/fall

Principal: Scott Gillespie Project Manager: Alex Barrett The Sandbox Studio is a small residential firm in Tahoe City, California. At Sandbox, I was able to experience a wide variety of tasks in a professional setting. Work included: AutoCAD drafting, digital 3D modelling in SketchUp, material studies, conceptual design, and construction documents.

2011: 6 months | Intern

Modelling tasks: digitally modelling all 3D elements, applying and/ or creating materials, producing renderings Drafting tasks: computer drafting from hand drawings, redlines, submittal preparation, plan check, SketchUp preparation Drawings included: cover sheet, site plan, floor plans, roof plan, elevations, sections, electrical plans, and detail drawings


main level plan

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upper level electrical plan


a set of electrical plans for a 3,250 square foot custom residence in Truckee, California

upper level electrical plan

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[ professional ]

RPI SOA PUBLICATIONS Troy, New York


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[ professional ]

RPI SOA PUBLICATIONS Troy, New York spring

2014, fall/spring 2015

Publications Head: Adam Dayem Work included: Photography of all school events and archived student work, post processing, digital library setup and management, graphic design for SOA publications Being a photographer has allowed me to continuously study both light and composition. Documentation and creativity are critical, and direct connections can be made between photography, graphic design, rendering, lighting design, and many other aspects of architecture and design.


on the cover: Influx Book Launch reception this page: Influx Book Launch

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Michael Oatman Browns Gallery Exhibition


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Rhett Russo SOA Lecture

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[ personal ]

d3 HOUSING COMPETITION not site specific

Floodplain housing proposal


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[ personal ]

on the cover: a visualization of the project conveying its possibility of motion. rendered in rhino and photoshop

d3 HOUSING PROPOSAL | not site specific summer

2012 | in collaboration with: Annslee Stevenson and Emily McGuire

I worked on a 3 person team to complete a submission for the D3 Competition that involved designing for the environment. Our submission was a design for floodplain housing which can be built in areas that commonly flood, or in disaster areas after floods. Four housing units are attached to a centralized circular stair. Each unit has a floating floor slab, when the surrounding area floods, the unit will rise up the core,

and stay above water. Housing units can be made out of local materials, and adjusted to fit the specific needs of the site and the inhabitant. This proposal takes on concepts studied by Mies van der Rohe at the Farnsworth house, and brings them to the next level by allowing for continuous occupancy during flood season. This solution is ideal for sites with seasonal flooding,


16 ft

8 ft

0 ft

16 ft

8 ft

0 ft

lop: low stage/no flooding

16 ft

middle: flooding begins and the modules begin to rise up the core

8 ft

0 ft

bottom: high-stage flooding

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[ personal ]

HAND DRAWINGS


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[ personal ]

SELECTED WORKS Drawing has always been a passion of mine. Whether scratching down conceptual design ideas, doodling or sketching physical objects, I try to draw as much as possible. I believe that drawing can activate the mind in different ways than digital media can. In addition to sketching, photography is a recently discovered passion of mine. I began by shooting primarily landscapes. Through that, I have found that I am intrigued by the idea of conveying motion through still images as well as learning to professionally shoot architecture. Most of all, I enjoy the expression of subjects through my own unique point of view.


on the cover: fruit still life, drawn by hand with charcoal this page: sketch of the Zaragoza Contemporary Art Museum, Spain

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The idea behind this project was to start by drawing a series of very rough napkin sketches, and then pick one (above) to evolve into three finalized 14�x17� drawing plates. All of these plates were to be hand drawn in either graphite or ink.

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[ personal ]

PHOTOGRAPHY


Lower Manhattan New York, New York September 10, 2013

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[ personal ]

PHOTOGRAPHY


Floating into the Storm Lake Tahoe, California June 09, 2013

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Night Glow Reno, Nevada June 30, 2013

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Brooklyn Bridge New York, New York September 11, 2013

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[ academic ]


CLIFTON LITERARY CENTER Cincinnati, Ohio

Designing a combined lodge and museum for one Ohio’s oldest and ongoing achaeologic sites

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[ academic ]

CLIFTON LITERARY CENTER | Cincinnati, Ohio fall

Immersion Studio was structured around designing our first building, the Clifton Literary Center, located in Cincinnati, Ohio. Beginning with site analysis, we fully designed and developed this building in nine weeks. This design was largely a response to environmental conditions as well as the writers’ needs. In this design, the building’s atrium acts as a path through the site, which forces an interaction with the building. The design also features spaces for

2010: 10 weeks | professor Liz Riorden all writers, book stacks for inspiration and learning, office spaces and storage for staff, a conference room, a lecture/convention space, as well as a kitchen for public and catering needs, and four private writing rooms, each with their own view of their surroundings. Environmental response features include natural daylighting and the use of light boxes to keep light in and heat out, as well as a rainwater collection system.


on the cover: a rendering of the atrium space. revit rendering, technical drawings from revit, exported to autocad and illustrator this page: three iterations of form

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EAST SECTION

UNISEX RESTROOM

READING AREA

STACKS

NORTH SECTION

NORTH SECTION ATRIUM

LOBBY

FRONT DESK

OFFICE

UNISEX RESTROOM

STORAGE

STAI RS (MECTO BA HANI SEMEN T CA L)

OFFICE

first floor plan EAST SECTION

east section

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STORAGE CLOSET

CONFERENCE ROOM

LECTURE SPACE


EAST SECTION

EATING AREA

WRITING ROOM

KITCHEN

DESK AND COMPUTER AREA

WRITING ROOM

WRITING ROOM LIVING AREA

NORTH SECTION

UNISEX RESTROOM

NORTH SECTION

WRITING ROOM

second floor plan EAST SECTION

south elevation

N

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Michael A Everett [Complete Works] Portfolio