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Michaela Barnes

Journalist Of the Year

Portfolio

Part One: Photography. Pgs. 1-4 Part Two: Design PGs: 5-10 Part Three: Writing Pgs: 11-14 Part four: Editing Pgs: 15-16 Part five: Entrepreneurship & Web Pgs: 17-18


Part One: Photography

During my senior year, I became well known as a photographer among a small group of people and they requested that I take their senior pictures for them. Portrait photography and candid’s are my specialties as well as my absolute favorite thing to photograph because there is so much you can interpret from looking at portraits or candid’s. My love of candid’s and portraits stems from the many deadline inducing portraits that I have done for the Mahiscan.”

Throughout my four years on the Mahiscan, I have taken many portraits. I love taking portraits because while they are not the most artistic form of photography, you can learn so much about the person you are photographing. It’s also the perfect time to learn more about your camera and mess with the settings to get the perfect picture.

This is one of the many senior photos that I took for the graduating class of 2017. Taking student’s senior photos was beneficial for both the student and myself as I was also the one collecting all of the contributed senior photos. This photograph is the chosen senior picture of Nakeita Smith for the 2017 Mahiscan Yearbook. 8th cross Country

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Mahiscan Yearbook, Vol. 77, Published November 2016. Designed by Julianna Koster.

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I AM Invincible

here was a variety of people on the CrossCountry team with different mind-sets and goals in life, but one thing they have all agreed on is that their team was like a family who encouraged everyone to do their best and to succeed, not just in the sport but also in their personal lives and everything they want to make possible. With all the “I think the team is a motivation the team family. There is a lot of has not stopped until they became bonding that goes on the best they and everyone’s there to could be. Although an unexpected encourage you.” injury held senior -Sophomore Jazmin captain Ian Emlet from competing Chavez in several competitions, he managed to recover with a season best of 17.06. Emlet began running in the first grade through the Blossom Gulch laps program and started officially running Cross-Country in the 6th grade. Sophomore Jazmin Chavez made 5th place in the state championships. She said the main thing that led her to achieving this goal was her teammates. She said they gave her the encouragement she needed and pushed her forward. She liked how cross country was a different from other sports being a co-ed team, and her teammates ended up being more, “like brothers and sisters, so it’s like family.

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Photograph: Madison Bauer

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Photograph: Mixt

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Gabe Delgado, sophomore Kaylee Delzotti, Freshman “Cross Country has kept me up “Pain is temporary. It may last for a minute or a day or a year, but eventually it will subside and something great will take its place, but if you quit, that pain will last forever.”

and motivated all my life, and you make so many friends. It’s just so enjoyable.”

Kyran Erwin, freshman “Cross Country is like a family. We run together, we cry togther, we hug together, everyone encourages everyone, no one ever tries to hurt anyone’s feelings.”

Ian Emlet, Senior

“There’s just something about distance running that’s intrinsic... You challenge yourself and your own self will and you overcome what you never thought you could before.”

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Photograph: Madison Bauer

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Michaela Barnes 2 As the only photographer for the 2016 prom, I was worried that if my pictures didn’t come out great, that the prom page wouldn’t look very good so I spent hours practicing with my camera at night before prom so that I would be fully prepared for the event. While dancing away their time at prom, Matthew Hampton, junior, and Isabella Webster, sophomore, share a dance together. “We went to EZ Thai and got lots of compliments. The theme was a nice idea and worked well; they did a nice job,” said Webster. 7. While dancing away their time at prom, Matthew Hampton, junior, and Isabella Webster, sophomore, share a slow dance together. “We went to EZ Thai and got a lot of looks and compliments. The theme was a nice idea and worked well; they did a nice job,” said Webster. 8. To ask his girlfriend senior Heidi Baer to accompany him to Prom, Robert Tetrick plastic wrapped her car and wrote “Prom?” on 8 her windshield. 9. Kody Clark, junior, wrote a sign saying, “Rayne, of all the fish in the sea do you want to go to prom with me?” for freshman Rayne Quinones. 10. Josh Martin, senior, asked Jayla Wood, senior, to prom by performing a Spiderman act as if she were his Mary Jane. They later found out at prom that they won Prom King and Queen. 11. “Prom was fun and better 10 than homecoming musicwise. I thought it would be weird because there would be less people than at home9 coming, but it wasn’t. I also liked the theme. I thought they pulled it off nicely,” said junior Hannah Kirk who is enjoying her time with friends Connor Hammond and Kat Allison. 12. Senior Kiannah Emery and her date Leland Locken, senior, walk into prom and enjoy the night together.

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Prom

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1. The junior and senior class dancing and having a good time at their prom. 2. Shantaya Cotton and Caleb Shipley, seniors, dance together during a slow song. 3. Juniors Sage Nelson, Rosie Neilson, Anna Pedro and freshman Rayne Quinones taking their picture during their first prom. 4. As he elegantly poses for a swift photo, senior Austyn Tavernier throws up the peace sign. 5. Seniors Hannah Delgado and Dominique Randle getting into the groove at their last prom. “My last year was better than my junior year because I cared less about what people were going to think of me, and it made the dance way more fun. I liked the decorations and theme, but I still want to go to a Star Wars prom,” said Delgado. 6. Andrew Prince, sophomore, and Sarah Gayewski, junior, talk and dance with each other.

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Mahiscan Spring Book Vol 76.5 Published September 2016. Designed by Brooke Pedro & Cassidy Carr.

Homecoming

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Photograph: Michaela Barnes

1.Samantha Jackson, junior, and her guest are dancing to the beat of the music, enjoying her second to last homecoming before her graduation year. 2. After getting ready with two other friends and eating dinner at Little Italy, juniors Ellise McMartin and Kourtney Garnett encourage others to join the dance floor. “I like to dance with everyone and see all people dance.” McMartin said. They had fun dancing on the floor dancing to, “Teach me how to Dougie” by Carli Swag District 3. After entering the tropical gymnasium, Junior Cody Eastwood and his friend enter ready to dance and have a great time. 4. Looking fantastic as they enter the dance, junior Maddie Suppes and Charis Niblett join the dance after taking homecoming photos with her friend and dinning at Momoiji. “The energy of the place was easy to get caught up in”, said Niblett. 5. Meeting up with her friends, senior Tianna Dickey gets everyone together to take a photo to commemorate the night they are all waiting for whilst looking forward to the excitement that awaits them on the dance floor. 6. In midst of the great news, Senior Taylor Stark is being hugged and congratulated by her mother. Stark was announced homecoming queen. Stark along with Mackenzie Johnson, Ireland Gerber and Samantha Waldrop were a part of the senior homecoming court.

I am memorable P

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Homecoming

ete Susick Stadium was packed with students, parents, and members around the community

on September 30th to support the football team. Senior princess Ireland Gerber tells how she felt

on

the

field,

“I wasn’t nervous… just thinking about

Bailey Elkins, Senior

Choosing to save her first homecoming for senior year, senior Bailey Elkins had a blast hanging out with her band friends at local diner Kozy Kitchen before attending the dance. Elkins attended the dance with her friends as well as her date graduate Kaleb Sheline. “It was pretty fun since this was his first homecoming as well.”

Homecoming

was

great because I was

how cool of a night

with friends and we had

that I was having with

fun chillin like villians.”

all my family and

-Raven English,

friends”. Later on, we

sophomore

won against Douglas Trojans, 74 – 13. The night of Oct 1st contained tropical decorations and loud music. “Homecoming was great because I was with friends and we had fun chillin like villains”, said sophomore Raven English.

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Photograph: Michaela Barnes

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Photograph: Michaela Barnes

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She said everyone was in the moment and they had no worries so that was definitely memorable. Photograph: Yasmin Aguirre

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

Jenna Frank, Senior

“I I loved being able to get dressed up and dance like crazy with my friends. I’m so sad that this year is my last homecoming, but I made sure to enjoy every moment and I definitely won’t forget it anytime soon. I’ve never had so much fun in my entire life and i wish I wasnt a senior so I could go next year.”

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Photograph: Maria Arellano

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Photograph: Maria Arellano

7 Photograph: Michaela Barnes

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Shaylynn Jensen, senior

For her last homecoming, senior Shaylynn Jensen chose to continue a long tradition with her friends. She started off her night with dinner at her house where she and all her friends gathered for delicious food and pictures to keep the night alive forever. “The dance was fun because we always stay in a group together, laughing, singing and dancing.” Jensen continued her night with her friends hanging out, eating food and playing games at her house all through the night.

Photograph: Yasmin Aguirre

In midst of the great news, senior Taylor Stark is being hugged and 5 congratulated by her mother. Stark was announced Homecoming Queen. Stark along with Mackenzie Johnson, Ireland Gerber and Samantha Waldrop was a part of the senior homecoming court.

Photograph: Maria Arellano

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Photograph: Yasmin Aguirre

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Photograph: Yasmin Aguirre

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7. After senior Taylor Stark was announced as the Homecoming Queen, the princesses gather to the track for a group picture. 8. As other princesses take their positions on the field, Senior Samantha Waldrop and her father stand patiently with big smiles. 9. The eager senior McKenzie Johnson waits with her father to find out who the 2016 Homecoming Queen will be. 10.After announcing the Queen, sophomore Ravyn Miranda and the rest of wwprincesses spend the rest of half time talking with friends and family plus taking pictures. 11. with the seconds counting down, Junior Bailey Pederson and her father listen intently to the announcer. 12. senior Breanna England and junior Bailey Pederson are excited to see Pederson all dressed up; looking very elegant with her sash and flowers.

Mahiscan Yearbook, Vol. 77, Published November 2016. Designed by Karlie Whitson, design assistant.


Part One:Photography I was inspired to take the picture down below through a few photos I had seen in different magazines. I wanted to capture the artist at work. The cutouts down below were some of the first photographs that I took for The Marshfield Times. It was an interesting experience because it wasn’t a new experience. Finding people and taking their photograph is something I am very familiar with. N

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todos a bordo Spanish is the second most used language in the world with approximately 414 million speakers. Many students say that Spanish is a difficult class. About 50 percent of Spanish students drop out during Spanish One. Samantha Waldrop, a junior in Spanish Two, made a goal to be able to start a conversation by

the end of the year. She used flashcards to study for tests and learn new vocabulary. Dedicated students continue their Spanish education into Spanish Three and Four. Junior Chloe Tompkins, Spanish Three student, enjoyed the class because she learned more about the cultures and traditions of Spanish speaking countries.

“learning more about the culture and traditions.” -Junior Chloe Tompkins

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Photograph: Mixtli Rodriguez

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Photograph: Mixtli Rodriguez

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Photograph: Mixtli Rodriguez

Jasmine Herrera, junior in Spanish Four, 1prepares guacamole for classic tacos. Amy 3 Norton, a junior in Spanish Three looks up

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Photograph: Brittany Nelson

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

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Photograph: Mixtli Rodriguez

Samantha Jackson, a sophomore in Spanish Two, works on indirect object pronouns. 2Hannah Delgado and Angelyna Chavez, seniors in 1Spanish Four, assist each other in making chicken for the class tacos. 3 Dacia Baker and Alison Melo, seniors in Spanish Four, prepare cilantro to put on class tacos. Spencer Mead, a junior in Spanish Three, gets his face painted by junior Amy Norton for The Day of the Dead. 4

designs for her The Day of the Dead mask In Spanish Three, Señor Lorincz creates a mask to celebrate The Day of the Dead

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

Mahiscan Vol. 76. Published June 2016. Designed by Mixtli Rodriguez Spencer Mead, a junior in Spanish Three, gets his face painted by junior Amy Norton for The Day of the Dead. page 9

Feb. 2, 2017

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT:BRANSON BLOHM By Jace sPerling Design Editor Sophomore Bransom Blohm is a quiet, reserved student to those who don’t know him, but his friends appreciate his unique personality. Spencer Seevers, also a sophomore, said “weird” is a better word to describe Blohm. “He’s the kind of guy you get a weird vibe from,” Seevers said. “He just has weird outbreaks of weirdness, and it’s very unusual. I’ve never seen it from anyone else.” According to Blohm, Seevers is a good friend of his. “We’re not really complicated. We’ll do the same things for days and it won’t get boring. We’ll laugh at the same thing for years on end and it’ll still be funny,” Blohm said. “It’s not very difficult for us to get together and hang out.“ Blohm said he is good at making friends, but not for the long run. “[I am] Seclusive, energetic and patient,” Blohm said. “It takes me a while to warm up to someone. I’m quick to make friends with people, but not good friends.” Blohm said he connects with certain peo-

ple well and those few become the friends he is closest to and appreciates. Blohm’s friend, sophomore Trevor Hughes, is one of these people. According to Hughes, their connection arises from common interests. “I feel like [seclusiveness] is part of the reason we became friends,” Hughes said. “We shared common interests and he felt comfortable talking with me.” Blohm said he and Hughes both love comics and enjoy discussing them, and even sometimes drawing them. One of their favorite aspects to discuss is matching up superheroes from different universes. “What we do, is we occasionally match up people; like you know how nowadays they’re doing the whole battle things like Captain America: Civil War, or Batman versus Superman, but on a larger basis, pick random characters out of each one [Marvel and DC Universe]

to fight against,” Blohm said. “Today we were talking about Sentry vs Superman. Sentry isn’t very popular, but he’s like the Marvel version of Superman.” According to Hughes, comics are not only a bond but a retreat from reality for him and Blohm. “Comics are a good escape from a world of my own,” Hughes said. According to Hughes, Blohm is an amazing person. “Funny, smart, and amazing; he’s an amazing person all around,” Hughes said. “I really enjoy his company.” While Blohm is navigating high school, he is thinking about his future, but he is not sure what he wants to do after he graduates. He said his aspirations for the future are open to what munity college and then go from there, but just he discovers will interest him in college. “As far as I know my plan is to go to com- to get a good idea of what I want to do,” Blohm said. Blohm said his parents try to provide him guidance as well. “My parents always thought I’d be a good lineman for the electric company. That might be one thing I would do, is do two years of SWOCC and then transfer into the workforce, or an apprenticeship,” Blohm said. Blohm is also open to where he lives one day and said even weather would not prevent him from trying out some locations, even though his own parents moved to Coos Bay ten years ago to escape the heat of Medford. “My parents didn’t like the heat,” Blohm said. “It doesn’t really matter to me, specifically the weather, where I’m going to live.” Blohm said moving to Alaska is an option he has considered for his future. He plans to approach adulthood the same way he lives life now, not afraid to be himself and figure out what he -sophomore Trevor Hughes likes along the way. “I’ve always wanted to go to Alaska. I like R I L E Y K I R BY | T H E M A R S H F I E L D T I M E S the wilderness. I just thought it might be a cool Sophomore Branson Blohm loves spending time with friends and enjoys adventure. I might want to vacation there, and comic books. Above Blohm was reading a comic in the MHS Library, while at then from there see how I like it,” Blohm said. “If right he was comparing comic book heroes with his friend Trevor Hughes. I still like it, I’ll stay there. If not, I’ll move on.”

FUNNY, SMART, AND AMAZING; HE’S AN AMAZING PERSON ALL AROUND.”

Coos County s s i M

By Mckena Pederson Designer Though it may not be the Miss Universe Pageant, the Miss Coos County Scholarship Program is helping young girls in the local area. The Miss Coos County pageant is a program for teenage girls to make change in their communities. Females from ages 13-24 from all around Coos County will compete for either the title of Miss Coos County or Miss Coos County Outstanding Teen. Two Marshfield students will compete in the pageant on Feb. 18: sophomore Lindsey James and junior Kayla Wyatt. According to Wyatt, the pageant requires each girl to come up with a platform they are passionate about and hope to make positive changes for. The platform should directly affect the community as well. According to sophomore Parker Stocker, 2014 Miss Coos County Outstanding Teen, the program allowed her to be more involved with other teenagers in the community by being in parades and talking to her fellow students. “It created a lot of opportunities. It let me be in the community as a role model,” Stocker said. Sophomore Jaiden Bohanan, a former Miss Coos County Outstanding Teen contestant, said her perspective on the community changed when she worked with her platform, the Maslow Project. “I learned that there was a lot of homeless in just Oregon alone and it changed my

Junior Kayla Wyatt (left) and sophomore Lindsey James are both contestants in the 2017 Miss Coos County Outstanding Teen Program.

MICHAELA BARNES| THE MARSHFIELD TIMES

Junior Kayla Wyatt (left) and sophomore Lindsey James are both contestants in the 2017 Miss Coos County Outstanding Teen Program. outlook on everything,” Bohanan said. Wyatt’s platform is the Healthy Habits class at the Boys and Girls Club. The class teaches kids about health, nutrition and fitness. According to Wyatt, she has already felt its impact on her personally. “It has opened my eyes that I need to be more involved in my community and I think I will keep volunteering,” Wyatt said. “I may even eventually take over the Healthy Habits class.”

According to James, the program has not only made her more involved in the community, but has also helped her improve many aspects of herself. “Actually my speaking has gotten a lot better, especially talking in front of large groups. I know two years ago I would have never talked in front of the assembly [MHS pep assembly] like what I did, and I did that just fine,” James said. “I don’t have a problem standing up for myself, saying exactly what I

want or what I do not like. I am more confident with what I do.” James’ platform is the Kids Hope Center. The Kids Hope Center is a place where abused children can go to receive help. According to James, when she was choosing her platform, the idea of her future career came into play. “I started [working at the Kids Hope Center] because I wanted to become a police officer and it is kind of dealing with police work,” James said. To help out the Kids Hope Center, James is gathering stuffed animals, coloring books and crayons, and clothes for the kids. According to James, what she collects will go to children who live in foster homes in order to have something to keep them occupied. While girls are competing in the pageant they have the opportunity to earn several scholarships. Last year the program gave away more than $28,000 in scholarships. According to Wyatt, there are many different ways for contestants to earn scholarships. “I can also get a scholarship for being on time and doing everything I am supposed to and with a good attitude,” Wyatt said. “I can also get a scholarship for winning.” According to James, she would encourage every girl to participate in the pageant. “It’s a really good experience, you learn so much. You learn how to write a resume and a platform statement. You learn to speak, you learn to walk, and so many different things,” James said. “I think that every girl should try it.”

The Marshfield Times. Issue Three. Published Feb. 2, 2017


Michaela Barnes 4

Baseball is a great sport to shoot. I like the challange that it brings when attempting to get a clear shot of a baseball in motion. I went to every game with the expectation that I would try to achieve an unblurry baseball in at least one photo. To the left is a published image of my achievement.”

Below left: JV player, sophomore Will Roderick warms up before the first inning starts. Below right: Sophomore Braden Denton makes a popfly and throws it to third base.

Photo by: Michaela Barnes

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Back row: Andrew Falconer , Austin Soria, Tyler Campbell, Andrew Lawson, Braeden Denton, Juan Santiago. Middle: Coach, Hunter Campbell, Victor Lahr, Josh Phillips, Jacob Post, Nick Minton, DJ Herrington, Colby Long, Mason Jussila, Coach Carpenter. Front: John Lahr, Ben Martin, James Kellend, Chase Diabla Below, sophomore Nick Minton warms up before he’s up to bat.

Photo courtesy of Outlaw Photography

Hit, Run, Score but we don’t quite understand why. Baseball is Baseball aheard, much different sport compared to others; there’s a

There is no crying in baseball: a saying many of us have

mental toughness that comes with the bat and glove like being able to take a ball to the face or knee and walk it off and not be afraid to get back up to the plate. This is something our boys baseball teams have mastered. “The highlight of this season for me was one game I hit a bomb to the gap of center and right field and got 2 RBI’s,” said JV player junior Taylor Johnson. The Varsity team crushed Siuslaw in a double header, the first game of the season, with a close score of 12 to 11, and the second game 11-1. Our Varsity boys led the Far West League taking league champs. Every year both teams get continue to improve in every aspect and continue to amaze us all.

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Photograph: Kayla Sparkman Photograph: Michaela Barnes

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

Senior Austin Soria winds up and throws a fast ball against Siuslaw. The boys played an amazing double header with Siuslaw winning both games.

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

Junior ca t c h e r Ben Martin. anticipates the pitch ready to make a quick play when needed. Sophomore Braden Denton catches a pop fly and throws to third bse.

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

The varsity boys get into a pregame huddle and pump one another for their game. Above, JV player sophomore Will Roderick warms up before the first inning starts.

Junior Colby Long waits for his pitch and focuses on the ball.

Mahiscan Spring Book Vol. 75.5, Published September 2015 Designed by Kayla Sparkman, Managing Editor.


Part Two: Design

I had originally joined the Mahiscan for my interest in photography so I wasn’t very confident in my designs. Designing the ASB and softball pages were some of the first spreads I was tasked with creating. With such little knowledge of InDesign and Photoshop, I relied heavily on the feedback and advice from my editors so that I could produce the best work my creativity would allow.” Ready to sing a tune, senior Ashley Barbian leads the students in a “Scream and Shout” match.

Showing off her outfit, senior Katie Guetterman walks down the gym with her classmates.

Photograph: Connor Hammond

photograph: Connor Hammond

Heading it Up Senior Representatives Katie Guetterman Paige Thomas Aspen Christensen Emily Edwards

Jennifer Bunnell

Advisor

Junior Representatives

Photograph:Khalani Hoyer

The Associated Student Body, best known as ASB, groups together to talk about different issues and activities related to students. ASB officers and representatives all have an active part in the school, organizing and helping out with charity events, fundraisers, Spirit Week, Homecoming and much more. To be a part of the Student Body Government is a great opportunity for those who love leadership and like to be involved with both extracurricular and in school activities. ASB members work hard to help make school a better place for students and enjoy their school year. Photograph: Connor Hammond

Andrew Sharp Katherine Alcober Daysha Browne

Bottom left: Calling out to the crowd, senior Alex Brown pumps up the crowd for Superhero night.

Alysen Barker Cheyenne Anderson

Sophmore Representatives

Ashley Barbian

President

Juan Caballero

Vice President

Karissa Irvin

Secretary

Senior Karissa Irvin is decked out in a Mardi Gras outfit to show the new kids in school how we do Homecoming Week.

Hunter Olson

Treasurer

Photograph: Connor Hammond

Jenny Shaffer Senior Alex Brown and three junior representatives hand out the student of the month awards to Juan Caballero and Shaylen Crook for September.

Jacob Dub

Colleen Rayburn

Publicist

Brianna Patnode

Event Coordinator

Alex Brown

Activities Coordinator

Ty Bunnell Tech Coordinator

Mahiscan Yearbook Vol. 74. Published June 2014.

Batter Up

You hear the echoing of a loud ping as the ball is smacked and the crowd screams run! This year’s JV and Varsity softball teams worked hard to make progress with their young team. Practicing 3:45 to 5:30 pm daily strengthening their skills on the field. Sophomore Captain Katie Whitty said “I saw improvement in the team as the season progressed, I love my team.” Both teams won the majority of their games this year. The Varsity team was coached by Brooke Toy and the Junior Varsity by Bill Otton.

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Softball is a series of left turns. -Freshman Mackenzie Johnson

Left: Sophomore Carli Clarkson takes a swing at the ball, and is now headed to first base. Right: Sophomore catcher Nicole Cowan keeps the third baseman from stealing home plate.

Top: Sophomore Katie Whitty focuses in on the pitches as she readies herself up to bat. Left: Sophomore Sausha Hogge-Hansen in swinging position for the ball. Right: Freshman Katie Maine zeros in on the softball headed her way.

Junior Varsity

Varsity

Left: Coach Otton, Haylee Dunning,Nicole Cowan, Katie Sharp, Joanna Zuqui, Quinn Earle, Tori Tavernier, Alicha Dealmeida, Katie Maine, Sausha Hogge-Hansen, Katie Whitty, Kalianna Gilkey, Coach Brittney Prescott.

Back row: Jessica Kohl, Carli Clarkson, Katelyn Rossback, Abby Osborne Third Row: Coach Brooke Toy, Essence Botts, Jade Chavez, Coach Chelsea Burnes Second Row: Alex Gandiaga, Paige Tavernier, Khalani Hoyer First Row: Mackenzie Johnson, Sidney Baarstad.

Team Photographs Contributed by Brown’s Studio

Softball

Mahiscan Spring Book Vol. 74.5, Published September 2014


Michaela Barnes 6

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15-Love Photograph:Mackenzie Kelley

Photographs:Mackenzie Kelley

Photograph:Elizabeth Grassham

Photograph: Mackenzie Kelley

Photograph:Maria Arellano

Photograph:Maria Arellano

Junior Brett Wyatt gets down to business practicing his serve before a match. With quick reflexes sophomore Skyler Tecocoatzi hits the ball back to his opponents. Beginning the game, senior Katie Boesl gets ready to serve the ball to the other team. Senior Cornelia Scheffold gets ready to hit the ball back towards her opponent. Before the match, senior Katrina Garcia practices her serve.

Tennis

Both the boys and girls Tennis teams had their share of victory this season, the boys team being led by Greg Mulkey while Warren Boden coached the girls. The girl’s team sent 13 of their 17 players to Districts while the entire boys team went as well. The teams’ hard-work and enthusiastic spirit led to their sucess. “Live fast, die young, be wild and have fun,” replied team mate Jose Luis Duran-Garcia when asked what motivated him.

Photograph:Maria Arellano

Photograph:Maria Arellano

Junior Jose Luis Duran-Garcia concentrates on the direcction of the ball. With quick speed, sophomore Alexis Gonzalez gets ready to hit the ball. Senior Ryan Reed jumps up in anticipation, ready to hit the ball. Ready to begin, freshman Madelyn Suppes serves the game. Sophomore Jose Arellano hits the ball back to his opponents with great strength.

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Back Row: Katie Boesl, Madison Brugnolie, Katrina Garicia, Coach Warren Boden, Samantha Waldrop, Cornelia Sheffold, Sareal Strain, Middle Row: Elizabeth Kupfer, Colleen Rayburn,Desiree Guirado, Alexis Gonzalez, Elisabeth Rosales, Madelyn Suppes, First Row: Maria Arellano, Yasmin Aguirre, Kayla Wyatt, Elizabeth Grassham, Asia Costi

Back Row: Jonathan Nelson, Austin Muncy, Skyler Tecocoatzi, Coach Gregg Mulkey, Brett Wyatt, Jose Luis Duran-Garcia, Ryan Reed, Middle Row: Lianli Xu, Shawn Marshman, Jace Sperling, Jose Arellano

Mahiscan Spring Book Vol. 75.5, Published September 2015 Mahiscan Yearbook Vol. 75, Published June 2015

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Raise the Dramatics Forensics

Forensics is most commonly known as Speech and Debate where terms like Oratory and Dramatic Interpretation are used vigorously throughout the year. The team travels to tournaments all year competing in different categories. Kayla Crook is the forensics coach with assistant Josh Schierman. Juniors Nicole Cowan and Mason Blohm are the team’s co-captains. Second year forensics debater Cayce Hill comments, “It’s like a second home pretty much, essentially a whole new family. It’s a team,” when asked what forensics was to him. Forensics is a commitment not to take lightly. You’re required to do extensive work outside of school to prepare for speeches and debates as well as go to after school practices. Many of the forensics students have placement titles in different categories that allow them a freedom to learn new things they might otherwise not have known. Forensics is a great academic club for students looking for a place to go.

4: Sophomores Mathew Hampton and Riley Kirby perform their dual performance in the drama lab. 5: Bringing the Knowledge of alien invasions, sophomore April Platt convinces the judges that Taylor Swift is an alien. 6: Sophomores Sheena Eickoff and Aria Davis perform their Novice Dual Interpretation. 7: Sophomore Shyanne Bolton and Junior Chelsey Corum get heavily into character.

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Recognitions 2nd place in Dramatic Interpretation Quinn Earle with “In Living Color” 3rd place in Oratory and Humorous Interpretation- Helena Platt with “College Education and Class Disparity” and “Alice’s Adventures with Poorly Cooked Cafeteria Food”

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Finalist in Dramatic InterpretationRachel Simon with “ God, If You Are Really Out There” Finalist in Poetry- Fatima Ruiz with “Fathers”

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First Place

Pictured below is junior Quinn Earle performing at the fine arts assembly.

Helena Platt with After Dinner Speaking Mikaela Chimeo with Novice Poetry 1

Skylar Houghtaling with Novice Humorous Interpretation Nicole Cowan with Oratory Mackenzie Stueve and Quinn Earle with Open Dual Interpretation

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1: Accomplished forensics student senior Helena Platt reads one of her poems to the judge. 2: Getting ready for their tournaments, sophomores Rachel Simon, Riley Kirby, Sheena Eikoff and Nicole Keith stop for a quick picture. 3: Junior Maxwell Freeman gets into character reading off his legal pad notes.

Sheena Eickoff and Aria Davis with Novice Dual Interpretation

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I designed these two spreads my sophomore year as the photography editor’s assistant. It was very different having to follow new rules and guidelines for a new book. This was also the second time I had designed the Forensics page. I took a lot of inspiration from different look books and past yearbooks to help improve my designs.


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Tackling varsity football was my first spread as the photography editor. I was inspired by the paint that football players wear to create the scoreboard. I really wanted to capture what our football team is all about. Being able to showcase the team spirit is what has made this spread one of my very favorite pieces.

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Bait and Tackle

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Many of the players have been playing football together since their seventh grade year, and they all had one common goal: win a state championship game. Senior Ben Martin said he likes, “How I get to go out there with my friends and have fun on Friday nights, have the community support us, and how we’re supporting them by playing

good and making it as far as we can.” Now after years together he is helping to lead the team into many victories with senior co-captains Matthew McAllister, Gary Jantzer, Rylee Trendell, Justin Cooper and Corey Shaffer. They helped to not only train the team but to inspire their teammates tremendously contributing to their overall season record of 7-2.

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Photograph: Khalani Hoyer

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Photograph: Michaela Barnes

Scoreboard

Cottage Grove Sutherlin

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42-41 53-06 67-02 Win Win Win

“Be fast, Be physical, and finish.” - Senior Joey Torres

Photograph: Metzin Rodriguez

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Brookings

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45-20 15-18 27-21 Loss Win Win South Umpqua North Bend Sweet home

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

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07-10 44-14 Loss Win Win 3 50-06

Photograph: Khalani Hoyer

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After the first touchdown against South Umpqua, the team gets in a huddle to regroup for their next move. Bringing pirate pride, seniors Jenny Shaffer Cameron Trujillo, Quinn Earle, and juniors McKenna Simones, Anna Pedro, Sequoia Ford, Rosie Nielson and Mikaela Chimeo cheer for the team. In the midst of a major tackle, junior Andrew Post grabs the ball to hand over to senior DJ Herrington to get the ball further from the other team. The game begins against South Umpqua,with the first touchdown by senior Matthew McAllister. Starting off the game, senior captains Corey Shaffer, Justin Cooper, Ben Martin and Matthew McAllister walk the field to North Bend’s side. The team practices for a game against Sutherlin.

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Photograph: Khalani Hoyer

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Photograph: Mixtli Rodriguez

Photograph: Metzin Rodriguez

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Photograph: Maria Arellano

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Hit The Deck

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Ace! The JV Vollleyball team killed it throughout the year, never losing a game in their league. Their season record was 17 wins and 6 losses. The girls beat their arch rivals, the North Bend Bulldogs, all three times they played against each other. Overall, the team had a great attitude in all things they did which was especially noteworthy because they had never played together before the

season began. They learned to work together with very little notice—Gracie Brugnoli, freshman, said that it was tough to start the year off as strangers, but they grew closer as the season progressed. Brugnoli said, “As we got further into the season, we slowly started to shape up and form a team, leading to some wins along the way.” The team has many plans for the upcoming year, practicing harder and pushing further than ever before.

“playing with the same group of kids for so long has been the best part!” - Freshman gracie jensen

Photograph: Michaela Barnes

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Freshman Kenadi Rhodes looks back The team huddles toat her teammates. gether to plan their next strategy against the opponent. Freshman Kenadi Rhodes get ready to dive for the ball to save it from the ground Serving, freshman Kenadi Rhodes hits the ball for the win against Douglas at 25-9. Kourtny Garnett, sophomore, spiking against Hidden Valley, making it a very close game. Blocking against Hidden Valley, freshmen Gracie Jensen and Kenadi Rhodes are in the back ready to get the ball. The team is ready to return the serve from Hidden Valley while the team is serving.

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Photographs: Michaela Barnes

Mahsican Yearbook Vol. 76. Published June 2016

Photograph: Maria Arellano

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Photograph:Maria Arellano

Photograph:Michaela Barnes

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Photograph: Michaela Barnes

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I am incredibly proud of this volleyball spread due to the level of difficulty that it provided. There were very few usable photos that I could work with and of those that were useable, mostly contained the same few players. By the time I received this page, the volleyball season was over, making it impossible to take better quality photos. I’m proud that I didn’t give up and that I was able to produce a quality product within my restraints.


Our theme for the 2016 spring book was Diamonds & Chalk so there wasn’t any real limit to creativity. For the valedictorian & Salutatorian page, the original page designer was having trouble creating a design that would work with the amount of writing she had. I chose to incorporate two photographs of each person, one neutral stance and another of expressing their personality. I also chose to break up the writing by changing the font and color of the student names so that the text would be more readable. For the Colleges and Scholarships page, I chose to stick to tradition and name each students future college but rather than do the exact same thing as previous designs, I kept the united states as a vector in the background, instead of using it to show what states students will be in. I took the same United States outline and used Photoshop it to make it appear as if it were made with chalk.

Valedictorians & Salutatorians er Ba k ia D ac th

C ar li C la rk so n Kr aj ci r& u Zh

Ling Ling Zhu: “Being a valedictorian really helped me adjust my time since I was in dance, choir and theatre I had to know when to study” said Zhu. Although she took challenging courses, including AP US History, she was still able to get a high school and college level A. Along the way she was motivated to get her grades by her peers, “The best advice is just to enjoy your life and not live with regrets” she said.

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Carli Clarkson: was the volleyball team captain, creative cordinator for ASB, a Mr MHS senior girl, and the publicist for NHS. Although she was unable to keep a straight A average, she only got one B. “You have to dedicate your time to what you value as important. You sometimes have to choose your homework over the fun night” said Clarkson. Clarkson plans on continuing her education at Arizona State and wants to become a corperate lawyer.

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and high school at the same time. As well as recieving his high school diploma also recieved an associates degree at the same time. Although most people would expect the valedictorian to head straight off to college he made the dicision to do volunteer work before going for his bachelor’s degree.

for a year and then transferring to OSU” she said. Their were times when she to sacrifice in order to maintain her GPA. “Their were times when my friends were having a sleep over or doing something but I knew I needed to keep my GPA up” said Krajcir.

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Joel Gregory: attendended SOCC as a full time student

Kaylee Krajcir: “This coming fall I plan on attending SOCC

Lin

Rylee Trendell: was able to keep his GPA up and partake in extra curricular activities. “I am going to Pacific university up in Forest Grove to play basketball and attend school” he said. Along with basketball he was able to participate in football and track. He was also a member of the KMHS management team. He also said “My dad told me to always do the best you can do and the results will take care of the rest.”

of California Burkley, for their pre-medical program. Even while taking rigerous corses she was able to partake in cross country and track. She was also the copresident of SNHS.

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Cheyenne McNeely: was able to keep a perfect 4.0 gpa throughout high school and attend SOCC and obtain her associates degree. “ I was not able to get A’s in all my high school and college classes and since I was so close to being the valedictorian I kinda had to sacrafice {my college grades}” she said.

Isabel Groth: will be attending the University

Lin

tute of technology in Klamath Falls.”Well it was just a motivation being new to the country, and no one in my family had a proper education until then. So it was self motivation to be the first” she said. She also had to scrifice a lot of sleep.

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Natasha Karan: will be attending the Oregon insti-

Dacia Baker: “My mom {inspired me} because she did really well in school and I wanted to be better than her, I aslo kind of inspired myself because I want to be a successful perso” Dacia said. Although when she started high school she didn’t do sports due to wanting to focus on grades, she eventually joined the cheer team and was captain her senior year. She will be interning at a physical therapy center this summer to help her finalize her college major.

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Being perfect (or as much as possible) is goal set by most people as a child, but quickly we learn that it is almost impossible. One possible way to be nearly perfect is in an academic setting. The students that receive the honor are named the valedictorian and salutatorian. The valedictorians this year were Natasha Karan, Joel Gregory, Cheyenne McNeely, Rylee Trendell, Isabel Groth, Dacia Baker, and Ling Ling Zhu. The salutatorians were Carli Clarkson and Kaylee Krajcir.

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Scholarships 44 1

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In State

1. Attending Dartmouth College, Lyrra Isanburg stands with her presenter in acceptance in $61 thousand dollars 2. Waiting in suspense, Rebecca House stands in line to shake 2 Mr. Ashtons hand in thanks. 3. Kayla Sparkman and Cassidy Devoe pause from all the excitement to snap a photo to commemorate 4. Rylee Trendell received three scholarships. 5. Earning $3,500 in scholarships, Kaylee Krajcir recieves one of four scholarships in order to attend Southwestern Oregon Community College. 6. In memory of her father, Mrs. Seedborg awards Justin Cooper a scholarship to a school of his choice 5

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7. Metzin Rodriguez, Natasha Karan, Sky Solis and Bernice Cervantes were each presented with a Zonta STEM Scholarship by Judge Paula Bechtold. 8. Smiling wide, Vincenzo Tine displays his scholarship that will be used for OSU. 9. Recieving a $1,000 scholarship, Ling Ling Zhu Hugs presenter Mary Paczesniak.

Nicole Cowan Rebecca Cowan Jacob Dub Haylee Dunning Matthew Duren Logan Entgelmeier Malio Favalora Michael Fillingame Tyler Garcia Justin Gerhardt Elizabeth Grassham Cody Harkins Jessica harvey Justin Holman Rebecca House Khalani Hoyer Asha Huffman Kaitlyn James Taylor Johnson Mackenzie Kelley Casey King

SOCC

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Carelynn Albrecht Sidney Baarstad Heidi Baer Kasey Banks Tehya Benites James Bibbens Nathan Blanchard Mason Blohm Ski Brown Kianna Brueckner Madison Brugnoli Daisy Caballero Devon Carpenter Carter Carr Bryseida Carreno Raven CarreonLingana Angelyna Chavez Justin Cooper Shantaya Cotton

LCC Eastern Oregon Destiny LaPrade University Willamette Dominique Randle University Oregon State Mackenzie Stueve University Linn-Benton Cassidy Devoe Communuty College DJ Herrington Zack Escalante Vincenzo Tine University of Brett Wyatt Portland Northwest Christian Andre Deplois University Pacific James Miranda University George Fox Rylee University 7 TrenDacia Baker dell

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Mahiscan Spring Book. 76.5 Published September 2016.

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Isaiah Kingery Kaylee Krajcir Alexis Langarica Andrea Manes Shawn Marshman Ryder Mckee Taylor Mckee Alison Melo Shanderah Milton Autumn NewmanChris Pacheo Fletcher Payne Kaycie Pennington Alicia Post Serena Richarte Corey Shaffer Jenny Shaffer Kaleb Sheline Caleb Shipley Raven Skinner

Cole Smith Sky Solis Cory Spann Jacob Sterletske Kyle Tardie Robert Tetrick Audry Thorne Bridget Thurman Joey Torres Trinity Trentz Cameron Trujillo Bojames Weatherson Univeristy of Oregon Addison Alford Anya Caro Quinn Earle Austyn Tavernier Ling Ling Zhu Linfield College Jake Miles

Out Of State

Arizona State University Carli Clarkson Northern Arizona Unversity Hailee Woolsey Utah Valley University Gary Jantzer Dartmouth College Lyrra Isanberg University of Puget Sound Benjamin Martin Brigham Young University James Kelland

Berkley University Isabel Groth Work Force Chase Atkins Trent Christensen Jordan Clark Aaron Harvey Kevin Johnson Cassidy Keller Jessica Kohl Ashley mathis Ryan Mueller Dalton Osborne Sam Smith Aspen Standlee Jon Tinsley

Colleges

Portland Community College Adrien Engstrom Dominique Miller Katherine Pacquette PSU Hannah Delgado Kiannah Emery OIT Natasha Karan Lane Koster Western Oregon University Sawyer Heckard UCC Bryann Hansen

Air Force James Black Sausha HansenHogge Cody Keagle Makayla Monroe Technical School Taryn Ellingson Rebecca Fazendin Chase Goree Colby Long Rachel Mckenzie Bailey Skidmore Kyla Wall Savannah Williams Navy Jodi Zouzel

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Part Two: Design

As Editor-in-Chief, I really wanted our publication to be all about the students so I chose the theme “I AM...” to emphasize that while we all have different stories to tell, we can all say the words “I am beautiful or strong.” I wanted to tell the personal stories of those attending Marshfield High School because I wanted the student body to see that while we are not the same, we are connected in so many ways, somebody just has to be willing to share their stories and experiences. In order to maximize the number of students spotlighted, every regular spread has a feature strip spotlighting students on top of a feature spread in each section. I also wanted to follow the correct guidelines as much as possible to create a great book.

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“Being a part of the the parade was awesome.Senior July Adams

Photograph: Cody Eastwood

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Varsity Volleyball

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Jane Doe, Sophomore

Jane Doe, Senior

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This spread is the example page that I created for staff members. I wanted to showcase the options that staff members had in designing their pages. I also provided staff members with guidelines to follow. I was inspired by my favorite elements from past yearbooks and magazines to create this example. The hardest part about creating this spread was actually the folios because I didn’t want to use similar ones from the year before. We ended up using the folios I created as place holder for the example page. For the dividers I wanted the design to be on the simpler side so I just layered quotes by different people over different photographs from that section. Underneath the divider, is the 2017 cover of the Mahiscan. I created over 14 different covers showcasing different elements from our theme. Overall whilst designing wasn’t something I felt comfortable with in the beginning, throughout the years it has become one of my favorite things about journalism.


Michaela Barnes 10

Fall Sports

Mahiscan Vol. 77 2016-2017 Divider and Cover

“so many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable.� -Christopher Reeve


Part Three: Writing

While writing body copy is a small part of our yearbook and my publication prefers to focus more on photography and story captioning, I try to include my best writing into my work. Since I plan on going into journalism after high school, I knew that writing would become a much larger part of what I would be doing so I looked into the journalism programs my local community college had to offer so that I would be better prepared. Unfortunately, they didn’t have much to offer other than internships. I decided to sign up for a journalism internship only to learn that my advisor would be The Marshfield Times Advisor, Catherine Hampton. Whilst speaking to her about the internship and my disappointment in the lack of journalism classes offered at the college, I was offered a position on The Marshfield Times staff with the approval of their senior editorial staff and my yearbook advisor. Joining the newspaper staff was a great honor because my high school typically does not allow students to be on both journalism staffs. Down below is my first published piece in The Marshfield Times.”

Opinion: Beloved TV shows get a modern, new twist Television channels are bringing the past back into action. TV revivals have become popular productions among the entertainment industry. Works like Full House (1987), The X-Files (1993) and Gilmore Girls (2000) have been brought back to life years after their original air dates. Compared to previous years, TV revivals have increased dramatically with one on almost every major network. Is society driving the entertainment industry to bring decade old characters, personalities and worlds back into television, or has the entertainment sector lost its inspiration for new and improved television? While revivals can bring joy and delight, they can also bring turmoil and anger. Revivals take a great deal of planning and work to pull off because cast members have to either be willing to step into their old rolls or new cast members have to be willing to take over beloved characters. Many revivals are hit or miss situations; they can be really great or really bad, which brings us to question whether or not the entertainment industry has really chosen to give up on new ideas and reuse characters and plots instead. Revivals are a great way for younger generations to connect to older generations as most come from shows in the 90s and early 2000s. They also

By Michaela Barnes Reporter

let long-time viewers see the shift in technology from the old phones used by characters, all the way to the video quality of the revival and it gives newer generations the chance to experience what their parents or older siblings grew up with. All of these different TV shows were once loved, and they are being brought back to be shared with those who were not around to enjoy the original running, bringing a comradery to people of all different ages. Even though revivals can become a little boring and the material, at times, may seem recycled, many actors such as Holly Marie Combs of Charmed (1994) have lobbied to bring back characters they once portrayed. At the prospect of their favorite characters being brought back, many fans petition to confirm the revivals. Once confirmed, the return of old characters pushes the entertainment industry to perhaps work even harder recreating the older television shows as new and exciting revivals. As the youngest person in a three generation household, there are many things my family has in common. Our love for Full House (1987) is one of the few things we do have in common. Being able to be together during its 2016 Fuller House revival was a great way for us all to come together again. Society does control

the entertainment industry. Television revivals are an exceptional thing because they encourage people to get together to experience both the past and present in unity rather than separately.

Opinion The Times

Editoral: struggling to graduate

Providing Marshfield Oregon’s graduation rate is the third worst in High School with accurate information the nation with just 74% of the students who enand a designated roll in high school graduating four years later. While public forum for Marshfield’s graduation rate fares somewhat better student expression at 78% in 2016, seniors in the class of 2017 and the staff members who work with them are concerned that many will not meet their graduation requiremission ments in time to walk across the stage to receive It is the mission of their diploma on June 10 (see Riley Kirby’s graduaThe Marshfield Times tion story on page 1). newspaper staff to Earning a diploma at MHS requires four creddistribute monthly a its of English, three credits of math, one credit of completely studentphysical science, one credit of life science, one credit run publication that of elective science, one credit of health, one credit will inform the public, of physical education, three credits of social sciwith accuracy and ence, three credits of applied/ fine arts and six elecwithout bias, about tive credits. With these requirements creating the events and subjects concerning Marshfield framework for graduation and the general consensus High School. We will that a high school’s primary goal is to get students strive to encompass prepared for their future in four years, there is still in our text and visual a breakdown that is leaving some students staggereffects a full spectrum ing across the finish line, while others fall short of of information from completing their education. To improve graduation the artistic, athletic and academic worlds rates at MHS, students need to do their part to stay motivated, attend school, pass their classes and pay that will appeal to and impress a diverse attention to the additional information presented to student body and them. At the same time, MHS staff and adminiscommunity. Our tration could make improvements to help the trek newspaper will also toward graduation be smoother and more successful provide an open for its students. venue for individual Students at MHS should be goal-oriented and perspectives from our school population. In all endeavors we will keep our press legal and ethical, so as to achieve our ultimate goal of professional journalism. Overall, our staff makes a commitment to the reader to improve and build upon the positive qualities of yesterday’s newspaper in order to create the best publication that we can today to construct a higher foundation for the newspaper of tomorrow.

staff Rosy Cervantes Editor-in-Chief

Rachel Simon & Alli Putman Managing Editors

Micheal Ebenal Webmaster

Riley Kirby Managing Editor of Design

Phillip Hernandez

Television channels are bringing the past back into action. TV revivals have become popular productions among the entertainment industry. Works like Full House (1987), The X-Files By Michaela BarneS (1993) and Gilmore Reporter Girls (2000) have been brought back to life years after their original air dates. Compared to previous years, TV revivals have increased dramatically with one on almost every major network. Is society driving the entertainment industry to bring decade old characters, personalities and worlds back into television, or has the entertainment sector lost its inspiration for new and improved television? While revivals can bring joy and delight, they can also bring turmoil and anger. Revivals take a great deal of planning and work to pull off because cast members have to either be willing to step into their old rolls or new cast members have to be willing to take over beloved characters. Many revivals are hit or miss situations; they can be really great or really bad, which brings us to question whether or not the entertainment industry has really chosen to give up on new ideas and reuse characters and plots instead.

Catherine Hampton

them help students. PAT instructors cannot be blamed if they do not have any information to give. The whole point of having an advisory class is to have time to work on senior portfolios, CIS, scholarships, OSAC, etc. Senior meetings are planned in order to inform the senior class of upcoming dates and important information relating to graduating. In practice, they are inefficient and few seniors actually receive all the information they need. MHS staff members and administrators should better utilize technology tools to clearly communicate important dates relating to graduation, portfolios and scholarships in order to help all seniors complete their graduation requirements. This communication should start as a student is entering high school. Freshmen should know everything they need to accomplish to graduate and prepare for their next step. Programs such as ASPIRE should be revived to help students in their high school and college planning. Having someone to talk to who is trained and experienced in high school and college planning can make a real difference to students who do not have that type of support or know how to navigate life beyond high school on their own. Whether a student is going to college, into the military, attending a technical school or into the workforce, graduating from high school is the first step. If students can take graduating high school seriously, put in the necessary work and receive clearcut information and support from staff and administration, graduation rates will improve.

Revivals are a great way for younger generations to connect to older generations as most come from shows in the 90s and early 2000s. They also let longtime viewers see the shift in technology from the old phones used by characters, all the way to the video quality of the revival and it gives newer generations the chance to experience what their parents or older siblings grew up with. All of these different TV shows were once loved, and they are being brought back to be shared with those who were not around to enjoy the original running, bringing a comradery to people of all different ages. Even though revivals can become a little boring and the material, at times, may seem recycled, many actors such as Holly Marie Combs of Charmed (1994) have lobbied to bring back characters they

once portrayed. At the prospect of their favorite characters being brought back, many fans petition to confirm the revivals. Once confirmed, the return of old characters pushes the entertainment industry to perhaps work even harder recreating the older television shows as new and exciting revivals. As the youngest person in a three generation household, there are many things my family does not have in common. Our love for Full House (1987) is one of the few things we do have in common. Being able to be together during its 2016 Fuller House revival was a great way for us all to come together again. Television revivals can be exceptional because they encourage people to get together to experience both the past and present in unity rather than separately.

A R T WO R K BY C H A R I S N I B L E T T

TACKLING TWO SPORTS IN A SINGLE SEASON

As eighth graders we are told to get involved in school the moment we step through the main doors, but is it possible to become Zach Kellar & too involved? This year at Jacob Dean Marshfield three athletes Business Managers took on the challenge of participating in two sports By Sierra Ward Matthew Hampton, during one season and found Reporter AJ Lovell & out being involved has its downfalls as well as its benefits. Between two sport Jace Sperling Design Editors practices and homework, athletes must learn how to manage their time wisely. They also have to learn how to connect with both of their teams even when Liam Webster they are gone half of the time. It’s rare to see this Advertising Designer happen in sports and many coaches don’t allow athletes to play two sports during one season, but in Jessica Baimbridge certain situations some Distribution Manager coaches will allow some athletes to have this opportunity. Many have a passion for two sports but unARTISTS fortunately they are already Julia Mapilisan active in one sport for that Charis Niblett season. It is a difficult task Isabella Webster for an athlete, who quickly learns their commitment DESIGNERS to both sports is physically and mentally demanding. Jorda Harlow One huge challenge Alex Hernandez Hannah Kirk a dual athlete will face is McKena Pederson having to leave halfway Andrew Post through a practice to attend Sierra Ward the second sport’s practice, which can cause trouble for REPORTERS

ADVISER

consider how their decisions in high school will affect their life. Apathy is seen from students in the classroom, in their lack of attendance and in senior meetings. Failing basic classes and ignoring graduation requirements will bring students closer to not graduating. Students should have the mindset that graduating is necessary and important. Students should realize that their freshman year is a time to have fun, but to also work hard and start their high school career off right. Those who are motivated their freshman year will continue to be motivated and have it pay off. Having a vision for the future is what drives a student to want to succeed. Students with a plan after high school will try harder to make sure they get there. However, other students who have no vision and are ok with dropping out and finding a minimum wage job will struggle in life. Failing basic classes because one struggles with learning is understandable, but failing because of laziness is what brings down graduation rates. Shortsightedness during one’s freshman year will make senior year much more difficult. Students should not be alone in this process. The staff and administration should help push students to get excited about their future. Not all students will go to college, but MHS staff should encourage students to start planning for their future.The staff and administration at MHS should improve on their techniques on preparing students for life after high school. For one, senior and junior PAT instructors should receive training that helps

Beloved TV shows get a modern, new twist

Managing Editor of Copy

Michaela Barnes Spencer Mead Kieran Sisneros

page 2

the team if it needs to run a drill that involves the specific athlete. It is also difficult to make changes to plays or lineups if the team can not fully practice the new changes because a teammate has gone to a different practice. The absence of the athlete can cause confusion for themselves and their teams, making game day more stressful. One athlete juggling two sports affects not only their own attitude and playing time, but coaches and teammates as well. Reliability and trust among team members is a struggle for those who participate in two sports. Missing practice or being late is common for such athletes. This causes friction when members miss important opportunities to bond with their teammates. Members may become more skeptical of two-sport athletes, wary if they will actually come to their practices. The team may find it unfair if the

submission policy The Marshfield Times staff welcomes letters to the editor. It should be understood that letters published in the paper do not necessarily reflect the view of our staff or those of Marshfield High School administration. However, we expect submitted articles to always be written in good taste and appropriate for the interests of the community. To submit a letter send it to Catherine Hampton in Room 146 or mail it to: The Marshfield Times, Marshfield High School, 10th and Ingersoll, Coos Bay, OR 97420

athlete misses half of practices but is still allowed to play in games. This makes it difficult to connect and feel welcomed by team members. Going after school to be with teammates and play a sport that everyone has a passion for makes playing sports fun and exciting, but without the support from the teams it can make it hard to enjoy playing both sports. To play in both sports the athlete must be passing all of their classes but with missing school twice as much because of games, it can be hard to understand the homework and stay caught up with everything. Not being present in class makes listening and taking notes harder, and may result in the athlete falling behind in school. Athletes spend many late nights working on homework to maintain a passing grade or higher as well as avoiding getting benched in both sports. Being in two sports, athletes are committed to their school work as well as their sports because if they fail one class they will be failing both of their teams. The benefits from this lifestyle can teach the athlete about the imim portance of hard work and responrespon sibility. Athletes not only receive the satisfaction of taking on this challenge, but also have the benefit of meeting new people and havhav ing new experiences. Playing mulmul tiple sports in one season can have its advantages for the athlete. It is difficult for many people when an athlete goes back and forth between two sports within a single season, but with communication between both coaches, teams and the athA R T WO R K BY J U L I A M A P I L I S A N lete, balance can be maintained.

awards & affiliations

The Marshfield Times is a member of National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA), the Journalism Education Association (JEA), the Oregon Journalism Education Association (OJEA) and Northwest Scholastic Press. The Marshfield Times was a Pacemaker winner in 2013 and a Pacemaker Finalist in 2011 and 2012.

notice Coos Bay Public Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in its programs and activities and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Special Programs Director 1255 Hemlock Ave. Coos Bay, OR 97420 541-267-1325


Michaela Barnes 12 Being on staff and writing for The Marshfield Times was such a new and great experience for me. It was somewhat like a culture shock, haivng to get used to the different aspects of the publication. I’ve been an editor for the majority of my journalism career and not being one on staff is somewhat humbling because I was able to write this opinion piece and learn more about newspaper writing from experienced writers from the perspective of a general staff member. This allowed me to be able to be a better Editor-in -Chief for the Mahiscan.

Batter Up “

Batter Up

You hear the echoing of a loud ping as the ball is smacked and the crowd screams run! This year’s JV and Varsity softball teams worked hard to make progress with their young team. Practicing 3:45 to 5:30 pm daily strengthening their skills on the field. Sophomore Captain Katie Whitty said “I saw improvement in the team as the season progressed, I love my team.” Both teams won the majority of their games this year. The Varsity team was coached by Brooke Toy and the Junior Varsity by Bill Otton.

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Batter Up is one of the first pieces that I wrote for the Mahiscan Spring book. It was an interesting experience because I hadn’t gone to a single softball game that year nor did I know anything about softball. With limited space, I had to figure out how to make my body copy Softball interesting and to the point.

By Michaela Barnes Designer/Photographer

Top: Sophomore Katie Whitty focuses in on the pitches as she readies herself up to bat. Left: Sophomore Sausha Hogge-Hansen in swinging position for the ball. Right: Freshman Katie Maine zeros in on the softball headed her way.

You hear the echoing of a loud ping as the ball is smacked and the crowd Left: Sophomore Carli Clarkson takes a swing at the ball, screams run! This year’s JV and and is now headed to first base. Varsity softball teams worked hard Right: Sophomore catcher Nicole to make progress with their young Cowan keeps the third baseman from stealing home plate. team. Practicing 3:45 to 5:30 pm daily, strengthening their skills on the Junior Varsity Varsity field. Sophomore Captain Katie Whitty said “I saw improvement in the team as the season progressed, I love my team.” Both teams won the majority of their games this year. The Varsity Left: Coach Otton, Haylee Dunning,Nicole Cowan, Katie Back row: Jessica Kohl, Carli Clarkson, Katelyn Rossback, Abby Sharp,was Joanna Zuqui, Quinn Earle, Tori Tavernier, Alicha team coached by Brooke ToyThirdand Osborne Row: Coach Brooke Toy, Essence Botts, Jade Dealmeida, Katie Maine, Sausha Hogge-Hansen, Katie Whitty, Chavez, Coach Chelsea Burnes Second Row: Alex Gandiaga, Gilkey, Coach Brittney Prescott. Paige Tavernier, Khalani Hoyer First Row: Mackenzie Johnson, the Kalianna Junior Varsity by Bill Otton. Sidney Baarstad. Team Photographs Contributed by Brown’s Studio

Published September 2014

Writing the body copy and captions for the Varsity Football page was my first writing assignment as an editor, so I made sure that I attended many of the games and interviewed as many people as I could during, after or before the game so that any quotes I received would be raw and in the moment.

Softball is a series of left turns. -Freshman Mackenzie Johnson

Bait and Tackle By Michaela Barnes Photography Editor

Many of the players have been playing football together since their seventh grade year, and they all had one common goal: win a state championship game. Senior Ben Martin said he likes, “How I get to go out there with my friends and have fun on Friday nights, have the community support us, and how we’re supporting them by playing good and making it as far as we can.” Now after years together he is helping to lead the team into many victories with senior co-captains Matthew McAllister, Gary Jantzer, Rylee Trendell, Justin Cooper and Corey Shaffer. They helped to not only train the team but to inspire their teammates tremendously contributing to their overall season record of 7-2.

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Many of the players have been playing football together since their seventh grade year, and they all had one common goal: win a state championship game. Senior Ben Martin said he likes, “How I get to go out there with my friends and have fun on Friday nights, have the community support us, and how we’re supporting them by playing

good and making it as far as we can.” Now after years together he is helping to lead the team into many victories with senior co-captains Matthew McAllister, Gary Jantzer, Rylee Trendell, Justin Cooper and Corey Shaffer. They helped to not only train the team but to inspire their teammates tremendously contributing to their overall season record of 7-2.

Photograph:

“Be fast, Be physical, and finish.” - Senior Joey Torres

Photograph: Metzin Rodriguez

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After the first touchdown against South Umpqua, the team gets in a huddle to regroup for their next move. Bringing pirate pride, seniors Jenny Shaffer Cameron Trujillo, Quinn Earle, and juniors McKenna Simones, Anna Pedro, Sequoia Ford, Rosie Nielson and Mikaela Chimeo cheer for the team. In the midst of a major tackle, junior Andrew Post grabs the ball to hand over to senior DJ Herrington to get the ball further from the other team. The game begins against South Umpqua,with the first touchdown by senior Matthew McAllister. Starting off the game, senior captains Corey Shaffer, Justin Cooper, Ben Martin and Matthew McAllister walk the field to North Bend’s side. The team practices for a game against Sutherlin.

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Part Three: Writing Amy Norton

By Michaela Barnes Photography Editor

Keegan Holmes

Microphone checks and art competitions are just a few of the many activities junior Amy Norton was in-volved in. Since freshman year, Amy participated in the performing and liberal arts competing for choir spots and art scholarships. After years of singing, it paid off. Norton was accepted into the All Northwest Choir. All Northwest Choir has around 15,000 applicants every year and with around150 spots on the choir there was limited space, making her acceptance an amazing award. Following choir, she also participated in art competitions like the Vision Competition put on by the Coos Art Muse-um and Southwestern Oregon Community College, winning first place in her category. Norton de-cided that her future lies in artwork as she plans to attend Portland State University to major in Architecture.

Jessica Baimbridge

By Michaela Barnes Photography Editor

Originally being born Kyra Holmes didn’t stop junior Keegan Holmes from excelling in both the fine arts and academic fields. The transition to becoming a male wasn’t easy though and the process of changing was nowhere near done. He was required to go to counseling as well as make trips regularly to Portland, Oregon to see medical specialists. Apart from many doctors’ appointments, Holmes was always found hanging out in the drama lab or in the choir room practicing his lines for the play put on by the drama lab titled “You Can’t Take It With You,” or singing his heart out in sectionals, or even in the class room. Being transgendered won’t keep Holmes from achieving his dreams of going to Southwestern Oregon Community college and then transferring to Portland State University to pursue Music Education.

By Michaela Barnes Photography Editor

Writing newsworthy stories and spending hours in a drum line were a huge part of sophomore Jessica Baimbridge’s life. Baimbridge participated in all of the different band categories, Journalism, Pirate Underground and softball all while keeping a high GPA throughout the years. Band played a huge part in Baimbridge’s life. After 6 years of participating in band, at the end of her freshman year Baimbridge became a drum major. Inspiring others was what she strived to do in the band community. Baimbridge gave credit to Jane Suppes for bringing her into the world of band in the fourth grade. Baimbridge plans to continue band throughout the rest of her high school career.

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Originally being born Kyra Holmes didn’t stop junior Keegan Holmes from excelling in both the fine arts and academic fields. The transition to becoming a male wasn’t easy though and the process of changing was nowhere near done. He was required to go to counseling as well as make trips regularly to Portland, Oregon to see medical specialists. Apart from many doctors’ appointments, Hol-

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mes was always found hanging out in the drama lab or in the choir room practicing his lines for the play put on by the drama lab titled “You Can’t Take It With You,” or singing his heart out in sectionals, or even in the class room. Being transgendered won’t keep Holmes from achieving his dreams of going to Southwestern Oregon Community college and then transferring to Portland State University to pursue Music Education.

Heave Ho

bridge’s life. After 6 years of participating in band, at the end of her freshman year Baimbridge became a drum major. Inspiring others was what she strived to do in the band community. Baimbridge gave credit to Jane Suppes for bringing her into the world of band in the fourth grade. Baimbridge plans to continue band throughout the rest of her high school career.

“Being a drum major has given me the opportunity to lead people and inspire others.” -Sophomore Jessica Baimbridge

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On top of homework, National Honor Society, New Horizons, concert choir, Z club, volunteering, and holding down a job at kum yongs, Senior Ling Ling Zhu spent an accumulative 100 plus hours dancing as a cocaptain on the Upbeats dance team. Zhu helped co-captain with senior Kaylee Krajcir and coach Debbie Brown to create

new choreography for many other dancers. Zhu tried out for the dance team as a freshman and continued throughout her high school career. She loved all forms of dance but strongly prefered hip-hop. Zhu plans to continue dancing throughout college either on a dance team or in some form of hiphop group.

“It’s a lot different than just being on the team as a team member, I get to help the coach so much more.” -Senior Ling Ling Zhu

“Without my choir, i wouldn’t have been able to start thinking about coming out.” -JUNIOR KEEGAN HOLMES

Writing newsworthy stories and spending hours in a drum line were a huge part of sophomore Jessica Baimbridge’s life. Baimbridge participated in all of the different band categories, Journalism, Pirate Underground and softball all while keeping a high GPA throughout the years. Band played a huge part in Baim-

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Microphone checks and art competitions are just a few of the many activities junior Amy Norton was in-volved in. Since freshman year, Amy participated in the performing and liberal arts competing for choir spots and art scholarships. After years of singing, it paid off. Norton was accepted into the All Northwest Choir. All Northwest Choir has around 15,000 applicants every year

and with around150 spots on the choir there was limited space, making her acceptance an amazing award. Following choir, she also participated in art competitions like the Vision Competition put on by the Coos Art Muse-um and Southwestern Oregon Community College, winning first place in her category. Norton de-cided that her future lies in artwork as she plans to attend Portland State University to major in Architecture.

“When I sing, it is like the composer is standing in front of me spilling the emotion put into the piece through my voice.” - Junior Amy Norton


Michaela Barnes 14

Siren’s Song By Michaela Barnes Photography Editor

siren's song

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Senior Choir President Dominique Randle leads the rest of the combined choirs in song. Standing tall, sophomore Connor Murray and senior Matthew Park wait for instructions to sing. Sophomore Cody Pederson and freshman Frankie Harlow goof off during a break between sets to relieve some nervous tension. Banging on the bongo, freshman Sofia Munoz Baho keeps in tune with the beat of the music on her drum.

Marshfield has four choirs: Concert 2 3 Choir, New Horizons, the Marsh4 fellows and Bella Voce. The Beachcombers and Women’s Quartet also participated in choral functions. Many students were committed to rehearsing outside of school. Participants for Sec- 4 tionals practiced once a week with all sections from the choir where students sang songs like “Jenny” by Ryan Kerr 6 and Nick Myers as well as “900 Miles” arranged by Phillip E. Silvey. After a year of intense practices, perfmoranc- 76 es, and competitions, a fun tradition among the choirs is to paint their hand on the wall outside of the choir room to commemorate choir members.

Photograph: Kaylee Krajcir

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Photograph: Kaylee Krajcir

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Photograph: Maria Arellano

Photograph: Kaylee Krajcir

Marshfield has four choirs: Concert Choir, New Horizons, the Marshfellows and Bella Voce. The Beachcombers and Women’s Quartet also participated in choral functions. Many students were committed to rehearsing outside of school. Participants for Sectionals practiced once a week with all sections from the choir where students

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Sectionals “Nobody wants to go to sectionals, but everybody wants to sound good when they sing.”- Junior Austyn Tavernier

sang songs like “Jenny” by Ryan Kerr and Nick Myers as well as “900 Miles” arranged by Phillip E. Silvey. After a year of intense practices, perfmorances, and competitions, a fun tradition among the choirs is to paint their hand on the wall outside of the choir room to commemorate choir members.

“Choir is a great opportunity to express your love of music with other people in the community.” -Junior Allison Putman

“Sectionals is a good way to make new friends and learn new music.”- sophomore Barbara Elston

Photograph: Mackenzie Kelley

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Photograph: Kaylee Krajcir

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Choir members spread holiday cheer by dressing in thier festive garb for the winter performance assembly. Sophomores Holden Guzman and Andrew Prince and seniors Jane Suppes and Isabel Groth hang out at Abby’s pizza after the holiday concert to wind down from the festivities.

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Photograph: Maria Arellano

The girls choir, Bella Voce, getting ready to take action in singing to the tune of choir teacher Mrs. Bassett. The concert choir, second alto section sing along with past graduate, Karissa Irvin during the annual Christmas concert.

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Photograph: Kaylee Krajcir

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To neverland

Beginning in her sophomore year, junior Breanna England has participated in three plays including “You Can’t Take It with You”. England said, “I have always looked up to theatre and I have always loved the environment surrounding it, and I just love the art of acting.” England looks up to fellow classmates junior Jeremy Bess and senior Ceandra Nelson to help further her career in the ways of the theatre. Her goals for theatre are to better herself as an actress.

Beginning his performing arts career in his sophomore year, senior Matthew Park has excelled in choir and thespian. Park has participated in four plays including “All My Sons” and “Comedy of Errors”. He has participated in the thespian regionals three years in a row. Park credits actor Leonardo De Caprio as his role model for his acting career. Park is in New Horizons and is one of two students who made it into the All State National Choir. Park plans on moving to Colorado with his family where he plans to attend a film school program and then later attending another school to major in music and theatre.

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Dominique Randle

Starting choir in the fifth grade, senior Dominque Randlehas succeeded in earning the title of president through an election at the end of her junior year. Her goal in becoming the choir president was to bring everyone together so that they would be more than just a group of people but a family. Randle has succeeded in bringing all of the sections together in a more comfortable space. Randle considers choir to be one of her passions and would like to keep doing it for the rest of her life.

Rachel Simon

Humorous interpretation is one of the many things junior Rachel Simon participates in for Forensics. Simon has been in Forensics since her freshman year. Simon also participates in the 24 hour theatre. In Forensics Simon has been to state and nationals for her work in Humorous Interpretation. Simon is inspired by her coach and her team to do well. “The team inspires me, in Forensics it’s not an individual thing, it’s a team effort you want to get the team as many points as possible and make them look good.” Simon plans to attend a university to become an English teacher and Forensics Coach after she graduates.

By Michaela Barnes Photography Editor

Humorous interpretation is one of the many things junior Rachel Simon participates in for Forensics. Simon has been in Forensics since her freshman year. Simon also participates in the 24 hour theatre. In Forensics Simon has been to state and nationals for her work in Humorous Interpretation. Simon is inspired by her coach and her team to do well. “The team inspires me, in Forensics it’s not an individual thing, it’s a team effort you want to get the team as many points as possible and make them look good.” Simon plans to attend a university to become an English teacher and Forensics Coach after she graduates.

Writing copy for a yearbook can be tediously boring trying to figure out new and unique ways to write the same thing from previous years. I prefer to write about students because not only is there is so much that you can learn about them, you get to experience somebody else’s triumphs and downfalls. Writing about students inspired me to make all of my yearbook copy personal to the students of Marshfield High School because I realized that most students really just wanted read about themselves and their friends, so telling their personal stories on top of the facts really improved the writing quality of the publication.


Part Four: Editing

In my second year of journalism I became the assistant photography editor. I shadowed and learned from the photography editor so that eventually I could become the photography editor. Being the assistant photography editor was a really great experience for me because I was able to take on some of the work of the photography editor and learn a lot more about rules and guidelines to what a good year book is. I was also able to learn more about DSRL’s. Being the assistant photography editor led me to becoming the photography editor where I truly began my editing career.” as senior Matthew Park start9edJust running in improv, someone

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Photograph: Mackenzie Stueve

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Photograph: Mixtli Rodriguez

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1Senior Jessica Kohl gets ready for her performance by putting on the makeup for her character, Essie Carmichael, in the fall production of You Can’t Take It With You, by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. Senior Jared Davidson, senior Matthew Park, and sophomore Shawn Zousel take advantage of the Thursday lunchtime improv showdown. Park is in character as a mentally ill man asking Zousel and Davidson for money. Later in the scene, emotions escalate and one of the men gets his head chopped off. I think you can guess who. An exciting lunch for these students! Mrs. Kirby (junior Shyanne Bolton) is terrified by the snake of Martin Vanderhof (senior Maxwell Freeman). Why Vanderhof insists on keeping it on the dining room table...the world may never know. Alice Sycamore (senior Cassidy Kellar) greets her grandfather, Martin Vanderhof (senior Maxwell Freeman) with a peck on the cheek after returning home for the evening from a date with Tony Kirby (with whom she is courting). In character as junior Devan Chard’s mother, junior Elyshia Kinny tries to calm her hysterical daughter by petting her head and cuddling her. A rowdy improv session, if I do say myself! The drunken, washed up actor Gay Wellington (senior Jane Suppes) is passed out on the couch while Penelope Sycamore (senior Hannah Delgado) writes her play that features singing and dancing nuns. Ladies and Gentlemen: the 2015 cast of You Can’t Take It With You! What a fantastic autumn production.

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yelled “Stop!” He then stood midstep while the scene changed all around him. Meeting time! Senior Cassidy Keller and sophomore Shawn Zousel listen to pre-show instrustions from theater teacher Allison Bassett (not pictured).

Photograph: Mixtli Rodriguez

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Photograph: Mackenzie Stueve

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Photograph: Mackenzie Stueve

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Get into Character Every performance takes great effort from all the actors and techies: lighting, props, sound, casting... and senior Hannah Delgado had been part of it throughout her high school career. She spent hours in the Drama Lab down the hill, perfecting her performances for every role in every play she has been a part of. It was hard, stressful work that paid off. Her confidence and social skills grew immensely between her eighth and twelfth grade years because of the drama department. “When I was younger, I was very shy and would turn red really easily… I’m now more confident, whether it be in front of crowds or with strangers,” said Delgado. Sophomore

Shawn Zousel joined the theater crew after his interest peaked during Thursday lunchtime improv. While leading in You Can’t Take It With You, by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart, he gained a lot more than speaking skills. “I’ve gotten really good at [noticing] facial reactions and being able to tell what people are really thinking. It’s helped me more psychologically than it [has] acting itself,” said Zousel. Just goes to show, people got a lot out of this fun activity. As Delgado says, “It’s all about being able to separate yourself from yourself. Becoming another person, even for a just little while, is so much fun!”

“Ask me to be a chicken? I can be a chicken. You see, I have no shame!” -Senior Hannah Delgado

Out of the many spreads that I have edited, this theater page is one of my very favorites. While this spread does break a few rules, the photographs were just so innovative and well thought-out. There were small issues like lighting that were easy to fix. There is a slight graininess to some of the pictures but I thought that it added character to the spread as the play in which is the spread is about is from an older timeline. This spread also inspired me to take photographs of the next play that my school put on.


Michaela Barnes 16 12

Softball 13

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12. Varsity Team Front Row: Quinn Earle, Mackenzie Johnson, Haley Parker, Kaylee Hall. Middle Row: Khalani Hoyer, Hannah Rossback, Katie Maine, Savanah Williams, Sydney Baarstad 11 Back Row: Carli Clarkson, Coach Toy, Coach Montiel, Tori Tavernier. 13. JV Team Front Row: Parker Stocker, Jessica Baimbridge, Taylor Shay, Sierra Ward, Madison Mede. Middle Row: Erin Sharp, Georgia Sunderland, Destiny Richardson, Alex Locati. Last Row: Rylee Bauer, Coach Mackenzie, Coach Bill Hutson, Coach Rex Young, Haylee Nunez

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1. Senior Carli Clarkson, who earned second team first baseman, is up to bat has her eyes on the ball getting ready to swing. 2. Senior Khalani Hoyer, who earned first team 5 catcher for the league, stands behind Siuslaw and catches junior Mackenzie Johnson’s pitches. She said, “Coach Toy gives me a sign to where Mackenzie’s is supposed to throw and my job is to tell Mackenzie what pitch she is supposed to throw and catch it.” 3. Mackenzie Johnson, junior, pitches the ball with full force trying to get the softball to her teammate and away from the opposing teams’ swing.

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4. Senior Savannah Williams gets orders from Coach Toy to bunt the ball then races to first base. 5. Senior Sydney Baarstad runs to third base and slides before the other team tags her. 6. 10 Sophomore Hannah Rossback wears a smile on her face while exiting the dugout and entering the field knowing that they are winning eight to zero against South Umpqua. Rossback said, “In situations when we’re in the lead, I feel a little more comfortable.” 7. Parker Stocker, freshman, caught the ball and gets ready to throw it to Madison Mede at first base. 8. Freshman Alex Locati up to bat turns to Coach Bill Hutson to get instructions for their next strategy. 9. Erin Sharp, freshman, pitches the ball hoping to strike out their batter. 10. Before the games, the ladies get in a, “team circle with only us girls, not the coaches, and we talk about stuff and we cheer each 9 other on,” says Rylee Bauer. 11. Once the batter hits the ball, sophomore Ellise McMillan goes for it. “I just want to make sure that I can get to every ball that I have to, and I just think about where it’s going and where it’s supposed to go after it gets to me or whoever else it goes to,” Martin said. Once she catches the ball, she automatically throws it to Madison Mede at first base.

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Sophomores 6. Brady Rohlik, Nathan Faulkner and Bradley Easton take an selfie from a easy win to start the baseball season off right. 7. Junior Alli Putman is on the roof taking a selfie right after the senior M picture. 8. Juniors Brittani Gederos and Devin Chard goof off with snapchat in Mr.Bryant’s US history class. 9. Raven Skinner and Jonathon Tinsley, both seniors, take a selfie with Ms.Howe and annoy her during PAT. 10. Sophomore Georgia Sunderland and freshmen Jadyn Miller, Sierra Ward and 8 Kenna Jones take a selfie in the dugout during their first home JV softball game. 11. Principal Howard and his wife take a selfie together at a baseball game. 12. While trying to dodge every boy who tries to photobomb buring lunch are sophomores Zaraya Estrada, Victoria Baker, Sarah Heffner and McKayla Jeffs. 13. Sophomores Jessica Baimbridge, Connor Murray and Skylar Houghtaling have fun with snapchat on Phorenziks night. 14.Alexis Langarica, Kiannah Bruckley and Sky Solis, seniors, disect a cat in anatomy and shows it off to the camera.

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3 1: Seniors Heidi Baer and Robert Tetrick take a selfie prom night for their 2 year anniversary. 2: Sophomores Maria Arellano, Bailey Pederson and Jessica Ross make suckers in Mrs.Danielson’s chemistry class. 3: Both seniors Elizabeth Grassham and Kaylee Krajcir goof off in yearbook. 4: Seniors Mackenzie Kelley, Khalani Hoyer, James Miranda and Tay McKee at senior sunrise hanging out and playing water ping pong. 5: Matthew Hampton and Jace Sperling, both seniors, working hard in pub lab.

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Pirate Selfies

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Editing the spring book was an interesting experience for me because during this editing process, we had updated our programs. During this time, I took over as editor-in-chief learning how to edit not just the photography but the entire spread as well as how to process and export pages to send to our company.

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Part Five: Entrepreneurship & Web

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Because of my love for photography, and the work I’ve done in journalism, I embarked on creating my own photography business named Chaela Bria Photography. I was inspired by my very first editor-in-chief who is now currently the photography editor for Ethos Magazine at the University of Oregon. I aspire to follow in similar foot steps so I established my own brand and launched my website; chaelabriaphotogra.wix.com/cbphotography because I really wanted to get ahead and make a name for myself locally.

This is the front page of my website; Chaela Bria Photography


Michaela Barnes 18

Above are two of my clients album covers where you can see different photographs of them. I made sure that my website was clean and simple so that anyone would figure it out with ease. I added some of my clients published photographs for you to see as well. Creating my own business and website really helped me with my journalism career because it led me to learn even more about my camera and more about Photoshop. Having this business also helped me with time management even more because I had to work it around the different events I had. I really just want to better myself so that I could do well in my craft. Overall I feel that I am on track for a successful life in journalism.

Michaela Barnes Oregon Journalist of the Year Portfolio  
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