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Obermuller’s words he proves that being ‘only human’ isn’t something that can be brushed off as insignificant. “And the gods have fashioned for love. That is our great glory, and our great tragedy.” He uses the theme of love throughout his poem because he’s knows how it is both beneficial and detrimental to our being, He know that it is both significant and insignificant at the same time, and he exposes this through his language and style in subtle smooth fashion. Obermuller’s first poem ‘Duo Mentēs’, exposes the two minds within himself, and within these poems. His mind is impossibly spilt between brotherhood and love, shunning and upholding each element equally. Obermuller is not the only person guilt of having a split mind. We are all guilty of this, and it’s nothing to feel guilty about. That is what works great with Obermuller poems. There is a constant sense of calm within his poems. And from poem to poem his calmness either has an intensity of a soothing feel that only preserves the identity of Obermuller’s two minds. His next poem ‘The Place I Go’ shows the humanity within Obermuller. Even he is vulnerable to the outside world, even he needs a place to go, physical or not, where he can be closer to the warmth of the sun. Then there’s poem like ‘Man with the Plan’. Here Obermuller’s funny side pokes through when he exposes the irony to the ‘going out routine’ that we’ve all gone through at some point in our lives. And of course one of my personal favorites, ‘The Direwolf Named Ghost’. Obermuller personifies brotherhood through one of the greatest brotherhood’s I’ve ever known; a Stark and their wolf. Through this poem Obermuller fuses moods of intensity and epicness,

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Duo Mentes, by Michael Obermuller  

The final draft of my first chapbook, submitted for my college poetry course.

Duo Mentes, by Michael Obermuller  

The final draft of my first chapbook, submitted for my college poetry course.

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