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MICHAEL GUILIANO

School of Architecture Montana State University


MICHAEL GUILIANO

Architecture Portfolio michael.guiliano@msu.montana.edu


[RESUME]

R E S U M E | contents

Michael Guiliano 720 S. 9th St. Bozeman, MT 59715

_EDUCATION Fall 2010

Artemis Institute’s Remote Studio w/ Lori Ryker • Observed natural processes and order in the outdoors • Participated in several over-night backpacking trips • Participated in a group design-build project for the city of Livingston(including three separate structures) • Familiarized self with metal, wood, and concrete tools and machinery

Summer 2010

Rome Studio Montana State University w/ Peter Kommers • Completed a sketch diary of Italian vernacular architecture • Designed a conceptual museum for the Gismondi Model across from the Colosseum • Toured and studied in depth the entire history of St. Peter’s Basilica

2007- Current

School of Architecture Montana State University • Completed 7 design studios with various professors • Awarded AIAS Scholarship in recognition of achievement in Service and Leadership(2010-11)

_EXPERIENCE Summer 2009

Schlimgen Design Consulting Rob Schlimgen, 1551 S Kepp Ct Rapid City, SD 57702 (605)342-3388 • Conceptual drawings and renderings of Presidential Plaza Proposal


[ CONTENT ] FIRST YEAR POJECT

C O N T E N T S | resume

| SECOND SEMESTER E. Kelly Cube...........................................................................................................[05]

SECOND YEAR PROJECT |

SECOND SEMESTER Urban Infill, Downtown Bozeman, MT.....................................................................[09]

THIRD YEAR PROJECTS |

FIRST SEMESTER A Growing Place, Butte, MT.................................................................................... [13] Generating Exchange, Butte, MT............................................................................ [17]

|

SECOND SEMESTER

The EXIT Gallery, Bozeman, MT(BIM project)......................................................... [21] Cooperative Living/Performing Arts School, Bozeman, MT......................................... [25]

FOURTH YEAR PROJECTS |

FIRST SEMESTER

Rome Studio_Center for the Gismondi Model......................................................... [29]

| SECOND SEMESTER Remote Studio_River’s Edge Park Design/Build, Livingston, MT....................................... [33]

HAND GRAPHICS

|

2008-2010.........................................................................................................................[43]


F I R S T Y E A R | spring 2008

E . K E L LY C U B E _ a b s t r a c t [05]


E. Kelly Cube project was about translation of cubist art forms and patterns into three dimensional space. In this first-year conceptual design project, a simple shape was picked and from the artist. This shape is reinvented and revisited from exterior to interior of this cube. Experimentation of switching this shape from solid to void throughout the cube can be seen. Fragments of this shape were used to lead and direct one’s attention from exterior to interior on the ground plane. Light is able to enter through this shape’s voids on the exterior and is casted on it’s form in the interior. The gradiants of light and the strong shadows became the strength of this design, rather than the form and space itself.


S E C O N D Y E A R | spring 2009

U R BA N I N F I L L _ B o z e m a n ,

MT

[09]


E xt ra c t i n g h u m a n e m o t i o n

through hiearchy of wood and its relationship between stone

This commercial/residential space is intended to awaken both temporary and permanent occupants to the powerful properties that a single material can hold. How does this material affect human actions, thought process, and emotions? The contrast of wood to concrete in the gallery space leads to a heirarchy relationship between the two. Immediately, the occupant is overwhelmed by a heavy, powerful concrete facade, but upon entering, one can start to understand the realm of properties that wood holds against the concrete edifice.

Interaction

N

1/8�=1’ Site Plan

North Elevation

South Elevation

section A


Ground Floor Plan Commerical

2nd Floor Residential

Lofted Space

roof garden detail 1/4’=1’ Parapet

grass/ vegetation 4” soil base fabric separation layer 2” pea gravel Root barrier/waterproof membrane drainage mat SIPS 3 5/8” thickness in-wall drainage system structural roof joist

section B


T H I R D Y E A R | fall 2009

A GROWING PLACE,

Butte Montana

[13]


RECIPROCATING with THE N AT U R A L ENVIRONMENT CONCEPT_the idea behind reciprocating with our environment is simply recognizing our own place and identity in order to form a mutualistic bond with the environment that surrounds us. This is necessary to avoid any disruptance in the dynamic equilibrium state that this world has created. Butte is an example of this disruptance between nature and humanity; one reciprocal became overpowered while the other ignored the skewed balance of the relationship. It is important that in our planet’s future that this kind of “dominant” and “indominant” relationship never occur. Creating solutions can mend these dents and cracks that have started to reveal themselves in our environment. It is within these cracks that our duty exists in the form of rehabilitation of our natural environment.


Ground Level Plan

Structure_ The structure of

Second Level Plan

the Growing Place consists of a large mass foundation and a box truss which cantilevers over the foundation. The foundation is a prefabricated concrete panel design intended to assist the box truss that it extends out past the foundation. The box truss is an appropriate structure for the distance it cantilevers. It also provides adequate space for the retail, educational, and offices. It extends out to the side walk with it’s greenhouse hovering above exposing itself to the southern sun of Butte, Montana, as if it was extending a helping hand. Interior Perspective

Section B 1/8”=1’

East Elevation 1/8”=1’


T H I R D Y E A R | fall 2009

G E N E R AT I N G E XC H A N G E _ B o z e m a n ,

MT

[17]


GENERATING EXCHANGE BUTTE, MONTANA HAS THRIVED ON THEIR HISTORY FOR THE LAST CENTURY. IT HAS GIVEN THEM AN IDENTITY THAT CAN NEVER BE TAKEN AWAY. HOWEVER, IT IS TIME FOR BUTTE TO MOVE IN A NEW DIRECTION; A DIRECTION THAT WILL REVIVE SPIRIT AND WARMTH WITHIN EACH INDIVIDUAL. IT IS THIS SELF-COMFORT AND FULFILLMENT THAT WILL PROVIDE BUTTE, MONTANA WITH THE WARMTH THAT IT ONCE HAD AND STRIVES FOR TODAY.

MEETING ROOMS COMMUNITY CENTER KITCHEN/STORAGE

OFFICES

OFFICES

MARKET PLACE

MAINTENANCE/ MECHANICAL

SUB-STREET PARKING

DEC 7

MAR 7

SEPT 7

JUNE 7

COFFEE

LOBBY

MARKET PLACE MAINTENANCE/ MECHANICAL

PARKING

OFFICE SUITE 2

OFFICE SUITE 1

C

OUTDOOR COURTYARD

GARAGE LEVEL 3/32”=1’

SECTION A 3/32”=1’

STREET LEVEL 3/32”=1’

SECTION B 3/32”=1’

A

2ND LEVEL 3/32”=1’ B

SECTION C 3/32”=1’

3RD


Street-side Entrance Model Exterior Persepective

COMMUNITY CENTER

MEETING ROOM KITCHEN

MEETING ROOM

MEETING ROOM STORAGE

OUTDOOR COURTYARD

Street-side Entrance Model 4TH LEVEL 3/32”=1’

3RD LEVEL 3/32”=1’

N

EAST ELEVATION 3/32”=1’

Site Model


T H I R D Y E A R | spring 2010

the EXIT galler y[BIM]_Bozeman,

MT

[21]


eXit |

galler y

BIM + construction document set Ben Sawyer | Michael Guiliano

Beam grid HSS Square Columns 5”x5” powdercoated green

Steel decking roof

Footing

Foundation Slab

Bearing Diagram B1.1-1

Lifting Diagram B1.1-2

Spanning Diagram B1.1-3


Code Analysis (Reference 2006 IBC) EPDM Roofing Membrane

Occupancy Classification: B (Educational) (Chapter 3) Construction Type: V-B (Chapter 5, Table 503) No separation of occupancy. (Table 508.3.3) Occupancy Load: B. (Chapter 10) 2000sf @100 sf/person = 20 people (Table 1004.1.1) Exiting Requirements: (Chapter 6) Rating of Building Elements: None Fire Separation Distance: >30’ (no rating)

OSB Plywood sheet

Metal Decking

73'-0" 10'-0"

9'-6"

10'-0"

Tapered Steel fin

1" 11'-64

10'-0"

8'-103 4"

9'-3" Drywall fastener

Drywall

Stucco finish

D

Steel C-Channels

9'-3"

Doors D101_Double Flush 68”x80” D102_Single Flush 30”x80”

9'-3"

1" 6'-72

Steel C-Channel

7'-0"

9'-0"

Notes_

2”x4” lumber Channel Mullion

C 26'-0" 29'-8"

Wide Flange Beam

12'-6"

F.F.E. 100’-0” w/ respect to topography = 4901’ above S.L.

Curtain wall glazing

Roof Detail A5.1-1

9'-2"

17'-73 4"

B

6'-2"

Walls W1_ICP w/ foam core W2_Trombe Wall w/ exterior glazing W3_Curtain Wall Glazing

30'-2"

Windows G1_5’x6’ Glazzing Panel

7'-10"

1" 45'-74

A W6x9 Wide Flange Connector Plate 63'-6"

Guy Linking Cable Concrete Foundation

1" 69'-84

Hardwood Flooring Bolts

Floor Plan A1.2-1 0’

2

3

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

5

6

7

8

Self-Tapping Screws

North (plan)

North (actual)

Scale: 1/4”=1’

1

4’

8’

16’

5" 76'-432 1" 69'-112

4

Sun Shade Overhang 6’

T.O. Structure 114’-6”

Lateral Bracing Detail

Top of Ext. Wall 113’-0”

ICF Panels HSS Square Column 5”x5” 6'-113 16"

East Curtain Wall

Freight Door

A

EPDM Roofing Membrane

HVAC 1" 12'-52

14'-613 32"

R-42 Rigid Insulation

Hand rail 34” Under-Floor Ventilation Foundation Wall 1’

Pre-finished metal Flashing w/ cleat

Gravel

F.F.E. 100’-0”

2”x8” lumber

Top of Foundation Slab 97’-0”

OSB Plywood 3/4”

Metal Decking 1 1/2” Top of Roof 115’-10”

1

Drywall w/ stucco finish Tapered Steel Overhang

T.O. Structure 114’-6”

A5.1

Drywall fastener Top of Ext. Wall 113’-0”

East-West Section A3.1-2 Steel Plate w/ bolted connection

Scale: 1/4”=1’ 0’

4’

8’

16’

R-19 Batt Insulation

2’x4” fastened to double C-channel

Sewer Line

Welded momentum connection beam to column

Operable Heat-flush windows

6’x5’ Glass Panel

2

Climate Master_TS Right Return_7447

A5.1

Spider Glazing Connector

10” diameter ventilation ducts

8” air gap

Perpindicular Concrete walls

8” Concrete Trombe Wall

3 Electrical Supply

A5.1 Welded Moment Connection

F.F.E. 100’-0”

HSS Square Column 5”x5”

Lifted-floor stilt

Perpindicular Concrete walls

Foundation Wall Gravel

Mechanical Diagram B1.1-5 Bracing Diagram B1.1-4

South Trombe Wall Section A4.1-2 Scale: 3/4”=1’

Top of Foundation Slab 97’-0”


T H I R D Y E A R | spring 2010

COOPERATIVE LIVING/ PERFORMING ARTS SCHOOL_ B o z e m a n ,

MT

[25]


LIVE + PERFORM ARTS SCHOOL_ BOZEMAN MT community co c omm mmun unit ity providpro pr ov vidid diing in ng an an eclectic ec cllecti ec cttiic varivari va riety environments et e ty o off e nvir nv iron onme ent nts nts communicate to c to omm ommu om mu uni nica cate te by by means m me ean ans of of space sp pa ac ce e and a an nd sound soun so und und

Level_6

1/16”=1’

Level_5

1/16”=1’

Level_4

1/16”=1’

Level_3

1/16”=1’

Level_2

1/16”=1’

11

12

1

2

4 5

N. Wallace Ave.

N

Ida St.

SITE PLAN 1/64”=1’

3

6

10

E. Cottonwood St.

7

SPACIAL KEY 1. Exterior Courtyard 2. Lobby 3. Cocktail Bar 4. Restroom 7LFNHW2I¿FH 6. Theater 7. Back Stage 8. Dressing Room 9. Freight Hall/Exit 10. Music Lounge 11. Living Unit 12. Practice/Social area

9

8

Section A

N

Ground Floor/Sub-Grade Theater 1/16”=1’

Section n A 1/ 1/16”=1’ /

north/south

| section


CONCEPT_

“...a wonderful harmony is created when we join together the seemingly unconnected.� when asked to choose a dialectic concept that was site specific, sound seemed to echo as if it was calling out to be heard. since then, awareness of silence has been present. silence is present everywhere. it is what causes a chill to run down the back on a clear, crisp night; it is what allows us to think clearly, to acknowledge our existence in a metaphysical world. silence allows us to hear; to hear the birds singing in the backyard on a sunny morning, or the wind blowing through the branches in a distant grove of pines. silence is like the voids between words, allowing the interpretation of what is being verbalized. silence is like the icy rock surface in a cave that we cannot see, but only touch. it is beautiful, the way it allows us to see, with it’s lack of interruption. silence is therefor an inherent part of sound. creating a sound that is specific to ourselves such as music will awaken the silenced and bring a stronger recognition of the coexistence between silence and sound. composing a place where this potential appreciation could take place could strengthen the knowledge and meaning that music has on individuals and the community.

division of skin perforated metal screening cafe/coffee shop

outdoor seating for theater

structurally designed trusses supporting outdoor seating

acoustic panels with lighting

exterior rendering | rear entrance

interior rendering | theatre

interior rendering

| living unit

interior rendering

| practice space


F O U RT H Y E A R | summer 2010

c e n t e r fo r t h e G I S M O N D I m o d e l _ R O M E , I TA LY [29]


ROME STUDIO 456

a center for the G I S M O N D I model


F O U RT H Y E A R | fall 2010

T H E R I V E R ’ S E D G E PA R K _ L i v i n g s t o n ,

MT

[33]


remote_studio_

livingston, MT

artemis_REMOTE STUDIO provides architecture students with hands on experience as well as an oppurtunity to engage with part of nature that isn’t always as available as many of us wish it were. Through the course of a semester, we explored the wild, designed cooperativley, and built with our hands the spaces and forms which were derived from our own minds. Remote Studio touched the far ends of each component that constructs the field of Architecture. All of the following projects were designed cooperatively by Stephen Clonde, Charlie Langford, Tyler Tabish, Anthony Lieser, Alex Holzter, Chris Gorder, and myself.


VESSEL|one

This early project was incorporated into the semester inorder to provide a more intement relationship with our site in Livingston. We were to design a “vessel� in which an individual could become selfless in, absorbing his/her natural physical environment dfaonly using site-specific materials. Our group decided to use slate rock in a very basic stacking construction. Using only sand, mud, and rock, we were able to design and build a depression into the landscape. This depression focuses the observer down at an eye level view across the south side of the park, while also providing a privacy burm from the public portion of the park. This depression faces south to maximize solar thermal absorption by the slate, while providing a view of Livingston Peak.

View from vessel bench

Removing earth for stone

Looking out from vessel


GATHERING AREA_

livingston, MT


The gathering area, also defined in the program as the “ADA Platform”, is a central meeting space for larger groups(10-20). It was designed to serve multiple functions extending from yoga classes with the sun rise to cub scout meetings in the evening. It’s proximitiy and ADA access to and from the parking lot make it’s location in the park a starting point within from which to explore. On the other side of this patio, views of Livingston Peak can be seen through a natural tree-aperature created by a willow and a cottonwood. There were three segments to this project, the first being removal of earth and concrete preperation. The next was pouring and finishing the surface of the concrete. The last thing to be constructed was the ‘gabion’ wall. We used pig fencing, metal ties, and riverrock to construct the small 18”-24” walls. From this point, occupants in the park choose whether to go to the pavilion, or continue on the foot trail towards the bridge.

discoverr

Pouring/bracing slab

Finishing surface of slab

Finished meeting area


WILLOW BRIDGE_

livingston, MT


47' - 2 3/4"

42' - 9 15/16"

29' - 11 1/16" 31' - 5 21/32" 31' - 10 1/8" 35' - 10 21/32" 37' - 9 15/32" 38' - 1 5/8" 40' - 10 15/32" 43' - 1 1/8" 43' - 4 23/32"

6' - 8 3/32"

24' - 9 3/32"

6' - 2 7/16"

24' - 3 25/32"

4' - 10 15/16"

23' - 2 3/16"

18' - 8 9/16"

16' - 11 1/2"

12' - 11 5/8" 13' - 4 1/16" 11' - 2 7/8"

15' - 9 5/8" 16' - 5 31/32"

23' - 7 21/32"

8' - 8 21/32"

23' - 4 11/16"

8' - 2 21/32"

19' - 0 3/32" 16' - 7 21/32"

26' - 10"

21' - 0 15/32"

26' - 11 31/32"

28' - 11 1/2"

24' - 2 31/32"

29' - 0 1/2" 26' - 2 7/16"

29' - 10 1/8" 7' - 11 13/16"

The pedestrian bridge is a way to access multiple areas of the park. It is a transitional tool from private to public. Upon entering and parking, a visitor can walk over this bridge to access the pavilion or the southwest leg of the park. During the early summer months this area of the park floods with twelve-eighteen inches of water. The area is overgrown by willow plants that create an extremely dense space. The bridge design acknowledges this busy, unorganized arrangement of willows by sharing it’s fraid edge with the willows and it’s clean edge with the developed park. At every support point on the bridge, a grated segment of metal has been placed to interupt the rythmic pattern of the masronduba wood. The occupant will finally reach a point on the bridge where rocks branch out as a small foot path to a secluded platform entirely surrounded willows. This space was designed specifically for one individual to venture out on his/her own will and reflect his/her identity as he/she rests on the platform. The construction of the bridge was performed in a pre-assembled manner, although footing holes were to be dug before this prefabrication began. A mock-up segment of bridge was built to measure distances between footing holes in order to maintain accuracy during prefab. Supports consisting of 4” and 2” square steel columns welded together by connecting pieces of 3” angle iron stand 30” above grade. Mosronduba wood(dense) was later pre-drilled and screwed from underneath to nailers attached to the angle iron. The last part of the project included burming earth up against each end of the bridge to continue the foot path designed for the park.

Willow Bridge Model

Willow Bridge Model

i dentify Setting bridge frame


PAVILION_

livingston, MT


The pavilion provides a space for five to seven occupants to perform group mediations, small meetings, or simply a sheltered place to rest. The contrast between the slender steel and the warm douglas fur glow underneath the low winter sun. The roof became a large factor in bringing sunlight through this space. A transparent “SUNTUF� roofing material was applied to warm the space in a canopy/ filtered way. The pavilion shelters two benches that begin to reach outward into the already-existing canopy space.

Column Detail

refle fl ctt Setting Columns

Finished Pavilion


T H I R D - F O U RT H | 2009-2010

hand raphics hand ggraphics

[43]


Studying architecture in Italy provided the oppurtunity to catch a personal interpretation of these age-old edifices with pen and paper. I was able to study these old structures drawing every surface with my own hand. However, the advantage of sitting still and focusing these thoughts on paper were not the immediate results of a final sketch, but instead the satisfaction of a deep understanding and recognition of the place I was surrounded by. It quickly became aware to me that the intentions of these drawings were more than pen and paper, but music, voices, and the clatter of hard soled shoes echoing off the cobblestoned streets and the stone buildings; the same buildings that must have carried these echoes hundreds of years ago. It was while pen in hand and eyes focused intently on a subject that I realized how fortunate I was to have created such emotional bonds with these spaces.


MICHAEL

GUILIANO

michael.guiliano@msu.montana.edu


Architectural Undergraduate Portfolio