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FOREWORD J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y Well, 2016 was a bit of a punch in the face, wasn’t it? Here we are, waving good riddance to the year in which apparently every childhood hero you ever had died, with a future that looks increasingly sans-Europe and a leader of the free world who wears an omelette for a hairpiece. Still, let’s look on the bright side, shall we? Or as we’ll now call it, 2017. Because right now this is what it’s all meant to be about, isn’t it? Looking forward, moving on, forming a mental checklist of how you’ll make next year better – or what you really mean is how you’ll make yourself better. Better shape, better job, better bank balance – and so another doomed New Year’s resolution list is born. I say ‘doomed’ because generally research shows you’ll fail at pretty much all your resolutions by approximately 15th February. Also – bitter experience. I can’t remember ever fulfilling a New Year’s self-promise (unless ‘date more Europeans’ counts, in which case in 2008 I was winning). And so here goes my theory as to why you just shouldn’t bother. First, if something’s worth doing, it’s worth doing now. I also say this from experience. As you’ll find out from page 83 onwards, I’ve recently rediscovered my love of working out regularly and looking strong and feeling confident. For longer than I really want to admit, that had been lost among an extra, unwanted stone of stress and inactivity. I’d kept waiting for things to calm down a little; to be back in the head space where I could prioritise exercise again. That time never came. In the end, I just had to do what everyone else who makes

THINKING

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a lifestyle change of any kind does: bloody well get on with it. Sure, there were times when, after fitting a gym session into a 12-hour working day, I’d wished I’d never committed to it, but in the end, all I regretted was not starting sooner. Still, all that said, let’s go to my next objection. Which is: is it actually worth it? Seriously. Sometimes all that external change just isn’t necessary. Maybe things are actually pretty great the way they are. And while I knew I needed to change things up to feel good about myself again, maybe – just maybe – you’re pretty great the way you are. On page 60, you’ll find a feature all about how to give your job meaning; which is apparently pretty high up on our resolution list. It’s not telling you to pack in the 9-5 slog to teach yoga halfway up a mountain or dedicate your life to finding a cure for cancer – it’s about reframing your internal view to find meaning and worth in what you already do. Let’s take 2016. Yeah, sure it was, at times, surreally awful. But it’s also a year in which good things happened: we had our greatest ever Olympic medal performance at Rio 2016; cracks fizzed like firecrackers through the glass ceiling thanks to the likes of May, Merkel and Clinton; there have been game-changing strides forward in cancer research; pandas are no longer endangered (and tiger numbers are growing, too); Michelle Obama did Carpool Karaoke; Walnut the whippet’s final walk was heart-wrenching and warming in equal measure; Murray won Wimbledon, then became the best in the world; Taylor-versus-Kanye-gate; we got a new woman crush in the form of Olympic gymnast Simone Biles; we got a new man crush in the form of Peruvian model-turned-chef Franco Noriega (find him on YouTube – his chia pudding video is obscenely good… and just obscene). None of those outweigh the truly awful stuff, obviously. But there are still things to be celebrated. So take a moment to look for them in your own life before you draw up that list. Still want to make that change… then what are you waiting for?

Katie Mulloyy / Editor PHOTOGRAPHY: IAN HARRISON

Follow me on Twitter @JustMulloy

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J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 | I S S U E 4 0

CONTENTS R EGUL A R S 5 Ed’s Letter 10 Ask WH 146 My Week on a Plate

116

FITNESS STARS

CLEAN EATING ALICE

Meet the PT and Instar – and four more women who’ll be your 2017 fitspo

18 THE BRIEF 16 FITNESS

Gym vs sofa: you decide

18 NUTRITION

SLIM DOWN

Get bitter – it’s actually good for you

20 WEIGHT LOSS

31 GET-LEAN CLINIC

Tupperware can help you cut fat. Fact

Savvy swaps to slim down

23 HEALTH

37 CHEESED OFF

The boozy way to keep winter colds at bay

25 BEAUTY

31

It’s time to show your true colours

27 SEX

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39 NO MORE FAD DIETS

How small, manageable lifestyle changes helped one nurse shift four stone

Have you hit your sexual peak?

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We whip the cheesecake into shape to create a nutritious after-dinner treat

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EAT SMART 43 THE NEW FOOD TRENDS What you’ll be eating in 2017

124

49 BEYOND THE KALE

Not just for smoothies and salads – here’s four ways to get more out of kale

HYDROMAX

VITAGLOW

MEGABOOST

ANTI-AGEING HYDRATION

DIET AND DETOX

IMMUNITY BOOSTING

55 STRONG MIND 55 HIGH-FUNCTIONING ANXIETY COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: ZOE McCONNELL. HAIR: DESMOND GRUNDY. MAKE-UP: CARL STANLEY AND LIZ KITCHENER. ALICE WEARS: TOP, PRETTYLITTLETHING.COM; SPORTS BRA, NEW BALANCE; PANTS, MISSGUIDED.COM. ON SUBS COVER: JUMPER, AMERICAN APPAREL; PANTS, MISSGUIDED.COM

Successful and suffering? You’re not alone

60 GIVE YOUR JOB MEANING

FEATURES

Learn to love what you do, whatever it is

BEST BODY

transformation special

124 VITAMIN HOOK-UPS

WH puts the latest A-list health fad on trial

130 THE JOY OF FLEX

83 THE WH TRANSFORMATION

We meet the super-toned, super-tanned, uber strong women on the UK bodybuilding scene

WH Editor Katie Mulloy shapes up

88 STRONG AS

Get to grips with HIIT and full-body strength workouts

65

94 YOUR FIT FOOD QUESTIONS ANSWERED Expert advice on how to fuel a transformation

GOOD LOOKS 65 NEW YEAR, NEW GEAR Your excuse to hit the January sales

72 EMBRACE YOUR HAIR

Ditch the dye and accept what you’ve got

76 TURN BACK TIME

We test the latest anti-ageing gadgets

78 ON YER BIKE

96 RECIPES FOR SUCCESS

12 nutritious meals to keep you on track

108 FEEL THE BURN

Cardio training that’ll get you huffing and puffing

137

112 COOLING OFF

How to stretch it out to make sure you can go again tomorrow

114 FUN-SIZE FITNESS FUEL Snacks that won’t derail your progress

137 BEAT A RETREAT

The world’s top wellness destinations

Rev up your outfit with biker leggings womenshealthmag.co.uk

LIVE WELL

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ASK WH

Just seventeen

YO U H AV E Q U E S T I O N S ? W E H AV E A N SW E R S

We’ve all been there: spin sessions and green smoothies in January only to return to your slanket come February. The script-flipping secret? ‘Research has shown intrinsic rewards [i.e. those fluttery feelings of accomplishment] will keep you motivated,’ says Greg Whyte*, sports sciences professor at Liverpool John Moores University. ‘That means planning quantifiable goals you can hit and then surpass.’ In other words, measurable targets such as ‘deadlift 200kg’ or ‘run a half-marathon by April’ work far better than vague promises to lose weight. ‘Split targets up into medium-term goals – so, if you’re planning a half-marathon, do some 10k races as part of your training,’ says Professor Whyte. ‘Then break them down to very short-term goals – like running home from work twice a week.’ So, err, what are you waiting for?

The big QUESTION... I don’t want my ‘new year, new me’ plan to fall flat. What’s the best way to stick to it? Fran, Merseyside

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Q

Q

What’s the difference between refined and unrefined sugar?

I always seem to be thirsty before I go to bed – why?

Amy, Lymm

Susanne, Chingford If you’re getting your two to three litres of water a day, that pre-bed urge to chug a pint of H2O doesn’t necessarily mean you’re dehydrated. According to research in the journal Nature, your brain is hard-wired to prevent you waking up thirsty. However, food can also induce water cravings. ‘If you have too much salt in your food, you’ll have too much in your blood,’ says Dr Mike Papesch, a consultant at London’s Highgate Hospital. ‘This upsets the body’s balance of water and electrolytes.’ Thirst is your body’s cue to dilute, so dial down the salt at dinner. ‘Unquenchable thirst can also signal an overactive thyroid,’ says Harley Street GP Dr Martin Saweirs. ‘This increases your body’s metabolic rate, causing you to use more energy and depleting your hydration stores.’ Other signs include feeling jittery and sweaty, with a raised heartbeat – fun, no? Excess thirst is also a symptom of diabetes. ‘If you’ve upped your water intake and the feeling’s still there, get it checked out,’ says Dr Saweirs.

Just because you’ve swapped the white stuff for maple syrup doesn’t mean you can go hell-for-leather on it. ‘All sugars – brown, muscovado, coconut, maple – react in the same way,’ explains registered dietitian Jo Travers. ‘Unrefined sugars are refined carbs. Due to their high glycaemic index, they’re digested and absorbed into the bloodstream quickly, spiking your blood sugar,’ she adds. In response, your body releases insulin, sending the sugar into the tissues, where it’s stored as fat. But what about the ‘nutritional benefits’ of natural sugars? ‘Their micronutrients are so low that the claims aren’t justified,’ says Jenny Rosborough at Action on Sugar. Sweet tooth? Snack on dates. ‘Whole dates are high in fibre, which slows the digestion process,’ says Travers. ‘Have two medjool dates with a teaspoon of nut butter; the monounsaturated fats slow the sugar spike,’ she adds. Sweet.

Sweet nothings

Q

Why does the skin on my legs get itchy in the winter?

IS IT WORTH IT?

WORDS: ROISÍN DERVISH-O’KANE. PHOTOGRAPHY: BETH CRUTCHFIELD AT HEARST STUDIOS; GETTY IMAGES. *GREG WHYTE OBE IS A MERRELL AMBASSADOR

HERBAL VAPING Guilty secret: you’re still partial to the occasional cigarette. You may then assume the new wave of herbal vaping is your lesser evil. New product Envape looks like a minimalist e-cigarette, but instead of nicotine it contains ‘natural’ infusions of ginseng, ginger and echinacea. Within 10 drags, so it says, you’ll reap their respective therapeutic benefits. But medical herbalist Gabriella Clarke isn’t convinced. ‘Ignore the website’s claims; herbs don’t have a “therapeutic dose”,’ she says. ‘And when inhaled, the amount absorbed from these ingredients will be

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negligible.’ And Dr Nicholas Hopkinson, consultant chest physician and spokesperson for the British Lung Foundation, adds: ‘Nonsmokers certainly shouldn’t be encouraged to pick one up. We don’t have evidence of their long-term effects, but we know some e-cigarettes can cause short-term irritation. As you inhale the vapour, tiny drops deposit on the lining of your lungs. From there, potential irritants can pass into your blood.’ And as for those cancer sticks – why not make 2017 the year you quit for good?

Trish, Salisbury

WORTH IT NOT WORTH IT

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Oh god, opaque-tights itch. Nothing worse. ‘When skin gets less sunshine but more central heating, its structure changes,’ says Emma Wedgeworth, consultant dermatologist at the British Association of Dermatologists. ‘Drier skin means a weaker barrier and more sensitive nerve fibres. The skin on your legs is thin, with a low density of oil glands and it struggles to hold on to moisture.’ The fix? Simplifying your skin regime. ‘Using alkaline products – anything soapy or foaming – strips your skin of moisture,’ adds Wedgeworth. ‘Try fragrance-free, richer ointments with lauromacrogols.’ Avoid tight-fitting synthetics, too. ‘Try cotton tights or trousers in natural fibres,’ she advises. January/February 2017

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N E W S

Y O U

C A N

U S E

F I T N E S S / N U T R I T I O N / W E I G H T L O S S / H E A LT H / B E A U T Y / S E X

WORDS: LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES. *SOURCES: UNIVERSITY OF COPENHAGEN; NUTRITION & DIABETES; JOURNAL OF CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY

Weigh of life

SCALE DOWN YOUR APPETITE So, congrats – you got it off. But now comes the real commitment: keeping it off. The good news is your future doesn’t need to be one long showreel of denial and deprivation. In fact, if you can work on that willpower for another 12 months, your appetite will adjust accordingly*. Thanks to biology’s cruel sense of humour, the hunger hormone ghrelin spikes by 23% after you’ve shed excess weight and remains elevated for a full year before falling back to normal. To keep control of your cravings, ‘prioritise getting plenty of fibre in your diet,’ says Dr Adam Collins of the University of Surrey. A study* showed women on a diet who took a fibre supplement felt less hungry than their pill-less peers. Another winner? A scheduled cheat day. Research shows treating yourself once a week will keep you motivated. We like. |

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Heavy kettle

DON’T STEAM THROUGH STRESS

The percentage reduction in your risk of cystitis when you do moderate exercise on a regular basis. It’s thanks to all the extra water you’ll be drinking to balance out your sweaty workout – flushing the kidneys and bladder, and preventing UTI-triggering bacteria attaching to the bladder walls. Eau yes. SOURCE: MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE

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SWAP YOUR GYM BUDDY

RUN FREE

Your tried-and-tested exercise routine not cutting it any more? It could be your gym buddy – not your workout – that’s causing your fitness gains to plateau. A study* found that those who regularly change their partners hit the gym more often than their stuck-in-arut counterparts. Researchers say the perfect workout bestie is one who’s both emotionally and practically supportive. Exhausted all your friends? Use these apps to find some more:

It’s true what they say: less is more. Especially when it comes to choosing the most effective pair of trainers. A study* found shoes that make you feel like you’re wearing nothing on your feet build around 7% and 9% more leg and foot muscle respectively after six months – while providing support you don’t get from going barefoot. Strip it back with a pair of Nike Free RN CMTR iD trainers (£115).

MapMyRun Check out the routes of other local runners and connect with them. But not in a stalker-y way.

January/February 2017

WellSquad Sign up and get matched with potential workout pals based on a range of fitness criteria. Easy.

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Sweatt More of a dating app, this’ll hook you up with mates and dates who work out. Like Tinder, but sweatier.

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WORDS: LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY AND SHUTTERSTOCK. *SOURCES: UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN; HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL AND HONG KONG POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY

If a tough day at work has left you at boiling point, think twice about taking your mood out on the treadmill. A study by McMaster University in Canada found over-exercising when you’re stressed can triple your risk of heart attack. Heavy physical exertion and extreme emotions can individually raise your blood pressure and up your heart rate, reducing blood supply to the heart – but combining the two raises the likelihood three-fold. By all means hit the gym after a stressful day, just be sure not to exert yourself beyond your normal workout. Or, better yet, hit the sofa, have a cuppa, and come back when you’re feeling Zen. Best advice ever? Quite possibly.


Orange is the new Prozac

PROTECT YOUR BONES WITH SOY

For a simple way to help ward off depression, get quaffing on orange or grapefruit juice. Just two 125ml servings every day can cut your risk by 18% apparently. A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that these flavonoid-rich citrus juices reduce your chance of becoming depressed in middle age due to the compounds’ ability to tackle neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death. Happy days.

DON’T LOSE YOUR BREAD Trying to go paleo but can’t bear the thought of life without bread? Well, compromising slightly on those back-to-basics principles could mean you don’t have to forego your toast fix. Scientists found that bread made with ancient grains and seeds – including spelt, millet and chia – as opposed to refined, modern versions can lower cholesterol and blood glucose levels*, thanks to their higher antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Get your heart-healthy grains with these:

2. Biona Organic Millet Wholegrain Bread, £2.69

1. Everfresh Sprouted Spelt Bread, £2.69

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3. Pura Vida Raw Chia Bread, £4.25

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The number of degrees Celsius by which cinnamon can cool your stomach. Why would you care about that? Well, lower tummy temperatures reduce levels of stomach acid and the digestive enzyme pepsin – protecting the stomach wall and improving blood flow, digestion and gut health. Cool. SOURCE: RMIT UNIVERSITY

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WORDS: LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES. *SOURCES: STROKE; JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCES AND NUTRITION

GET A NEW ZEST FOR LIFE

No use crying over spilt milk – there’s a new bone saviour on the block. And bonus: it’s dairy free. A University of Hull study has highlighted the bone-boosting benefits of adding soy protein – found in tofu or soy milk – to your diet. Soy products can help you protect against bone loss later in life because they are rich in isoflavones, which work in a similar way to oestrogen – aiding the growth and repair of bone tissue. Researchers found that 30g of soy protein – combined with a 66mg isoflavone supplement – each day is all it takes to bolster bone tissue. Solid.


Lunch hour

EASE UP FOR GAINS Want a fat-burning workout you’ll stick to? Here’s your strategy – get the worst bits out of the way first. A study* found starting with maximum effort and then gradually reducing the intensity will make your gym sesh more enjoyable, even when you repeat the same moves. Try this workout from PT and Better Body Group director Chris Wharton:

1

2 Easy end Now with lighter weights, isolate one muscle group at a time – try bicep curls, ab cycles and leg abductions. Do three sets of 15-20 reps.

30 The percentage boost to insulin sensitivity and metabolism seen in dieting women who stick to their RDA of protein (0.8g per kilo of body weight, fyi). Atkins-style eaters who devoured 50% extra protein experienced similar weight loss, but none of the health benefits. So, you know, go easy on that sirloin

CLOCK IN AND SLIM It’ll involve serious Tupperware investment, but eating your biggest meal at lunch could nail your weight-loss goals. A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consuming half their calories at midday, and just 20% of them at dinner, helped participants shed 13lbs after 12 weeks, compared with 9lbs in those who feasted in the evening. The perfect hearty dinner turned al-desko lunch? ‘Opt for an upgraded shepherd’s pie,’ says nutritionist Angelique Panagos. ‘Go 50:50 with sweet potato and white potato, and use lentils and beans instead of lamb mince for complex carbs, fibre and lean protein – it’ll keep you fuelled up and your blood sugar levels stable.’ No more 1pm Pret scrum for you.

USE SOME FIZZ-EASE Hate to burst your bubble, but if you’re still necking those diet drinks, then now’s the time to put a cork in it (or the top back on). A study* found that those who switched up their daily diet drink for a glass of water lost more weight. Still fancy something fizzy once in a while? Then at least fix yourself a drink that doesn’t contain artificial sweeteners or additives. ‘Blend 50g of blueberries with 1tsp of honey,’ says nutritionist Pixie Turner. ‘Pour into a glass, top with fizzy water and garnish with fresh mint.’ Delightful.

SOURCE: WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

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WORDS: LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES. *SOURCES: JOURNAL OF SPORT AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY; DIABETES, OBESITY AND METABOLISM.

Tough start Once you’re warm, go straight into multi-muscle compound exercises like barbell squats, deadlifts or kettle bell swings. Do three sets of 10-12 reps, gradually decreasing resistance.


WARD OFF COLDS WITH WINE

BEAT PMT WITH YOGA Oh good, it’s that time of the month again. Bring on the cramps. But what can you do to alleviate the crotch-kicking pain if you can’t hug a hot water bottle at your desk? Well, all you need to do is practise yoga once a week. Slow, controlled, yogic breaths consume less oxygen than normal breathing, and researchers* found this encourages your brain to create and release pain-relieving delta waves, which naturally occur when you’re asleep or feeling relaxed. What’s more, just one weekly session can be enough for you to see the benefits. Feel the pain coming on? Roll out your mat and kill the cramps in under an hour:

Dry January? Not on our watch. And no, not because we’re raging alcoholics, thank you very much. But because scientists at Georgia State University have proved that red wine keeps sick days at bay. It’s all down to the compound resveratrol – also present in the skin of dark fruits – which suppresses infectious bacteria responsible for upper-respiratory infections, such as common colds, tonsillitis and laryngitis. So you see, it’s basically good for you. But what if your liver does need a little New Year break? You can also get your resveratrol fix from foods, too. Peanut butter has it in small amounts, but the dose you get in a bottle of red can be yours in just a handful of raw blueberries. So get eating. Or, better yet, drinking. Grape expectations

WORDS: LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: BETH CRUTCHFIELD AND PAVEL DORNAK, BOTH AT HEARST STUDIOS. *SOURCE: JOURNAL OF ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE

10 cycles of sun salutations These work all the major muscles, relax the mind and deepen your breath. Bonus workout, too.

5 minutes of shavasana Lie on your back with your eyes shut; let your body sink into the floor and clear your mind. Simple but effective.

5 cycles each of cat, cobra and fish If deep breathing alone just isn’t enough, these classic yoga positions can help stretch out those cramps.

30 minutes of yoga nidra Lie as though in shavasana and listen to a guided meditation, moving your focus across your body, limb by limb.

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VIN-

ONE CAPS ULE TO

PHA

RM

Resv BE TAKEN F I eratr ol 1.2 VE TIMES A D AY 5mg

600 |

The extra calories you’ll burn on an 18-hole golf course if you walk rather than take the buggy. Golf also boosts mental health and helps prevent more than 40 major chronic diseases. Almost worth the horrific attire.

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SOURCE: EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY

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70 The percentage of women who won’t leave the house without make-up. Don’t want a face full of slap though? Go natural with La Roche-Posay Effaclar Duo+ Unifiant anti-blemish cream – its mineral pigment makes skin clearer without clogging pores. It provides sheer coverage and evens skin tone so you can feel confident about going make-up free. SOURCE: MINTEL

WORDS: AMELIA JEAN JONES. PHOTOGRAPHY: BETH CRUTCHFIELD AT HEARST STUDIOS; ALAMY. *YES, THOSE ARE ACTUALLY THINGS

DIRTY WEEKEND Filthy secret alert: a recent survey revealed that 25% of Brits don’t brush their teeth at the weekend if they’re not going out. Breath issues aside, is two days sans brushing a problem? Err, yes, of course it is. According to celebrity dentist Rhona Eskander, the resulting accumulation of bacteria can lead to gum disease and a build-up of tooth-eroding acid. Grim. There’s no way around it – get brushing, pronto.

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Off your troll-y

SHOW YOUR TRUE COLOURS If you love a food hybrid (think: cronuts, mufgels and duffins*), you’ll be pleased to know the ‘neither one nor the other’ trend is hitting hair colours, too. Can’t decide between natural shades or rainbow-bright hues? Then don’t – the shades for 2017 sit somewhere in the middle. ‘If you’re going for a hybrid colour, follow your hair’s natural light and dark tones so it looks more “organic”,’ says Jack Howard, colourist at Paul Edmonds London. ‘It’s about lifting your natural tone with clever placement of muted shades.’ Not sure which mash-up to go for? Here are the new-season muted shades to try, whatever your natural colour:

If you’re A BRUNETTE Go for CHOCOLATE-MAUVE

If you’re A REDHEAD Go for ‘RONZE’

If you’re BLONDE Go for ROSE GOLD

Irregular sections of mauve and light pink balayage. Good enough to eat

A copper red mixed with a rich, bronze brown that’s so hot right now

A coppery red with a balayage of gold and pinky rose. Precious

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Happy feet

45 LOVE YOUR SLEEP

The age at which you will reach your sexual peak. So, a long way to go before you have good sex? Well, no – while you’ll probably have a higher sex drive when you’re younger, by 45 you’ll have the confidence to tell your bed buddy exactly what you want. (Um, Michael Fassbender, please.) SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

Feel guilty every time you hit snooze? Don’t. According to a study in the Journal of Family Psychology, getting more shut-eye can increase your relationship satisfaction. Researchers found that couples who sleep for longer view each other in a more positive light and get less annoyed about the negative stuff, like who screwed up the Deliveroo order. Need help drifting off? Choose room fragrances with magnolia and jasmine – the jasmine will help you get to sleep and, bonus, research* has found both of ’em boost sexual arousal. Better sleep and better sex? You’re welcome.

KEEP DATING Not really into the concept of date nights? Turns out it’s actually legitimate relationship advice. The Marriage Foundation has discovered that scheduling time for two can make your partnership more solid because it allows you to spend an evening together romantically without distractions (read: work. Or children. Or both). Struggling for time? You only need one evening a month to up your chances of staying together for a decade by as much as 14%. You don’t need to actually go out either. Just spending time together was enough to see results. So, set aside an evening. And watch Date Night. Or something actually funny.

WORDS: LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES; REX FEATURES. *SOURCES: RUHR-UNIVERSITAET-BOCHUM; PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

CO-HABIT WITH SUCCESS You’ve dropped more hints than you’ve had hot dinners, but your ring finger remains unadorned. Don’t panic: it doesn’t mean your partner is not committed. Research* has found there’s no difference in levels of infidelity between married couples and those who just co-habit – proof that a piece of paper does not necessarily make you less likely to cheat or be cheated on. Save the £30k you’d spend on the big day and follow in the marriage-free footsteps of these still-together celeb co-habiters…

1. Anna Kournikova & Enrique Iglesias Split rumours notwithstanding, she of tennis legend status and he of perfect face have lasted 15 years. With no piece of paper.

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2. Kurt Russell & Goldie Hawn Proof that unwedded bliss is good enough even for Hollywood royalty – Goldie and Kurt are still going strong after 33 years.

3. Sarah Silverman & Michael Sheen The US stand-up has been dating her Welsh ‘trophy boyfriend’ (his words, not ours) for nigh on three years. No sign of a ring yet.

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S M A RT ST R AT E G I E S FO R FA D - F R E E W E I G H T LOSS

THE RESHAPE REMEDY We may not have a prescription for shedding unwanted chub, but we do have 26 savvy tips to get your weight loss on track. The slim-down doctor will see you now

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Control yourself Bad news: we underestimate the calories in good-for-you foods by 35%*. So you should probably kick the nut-butter-straight-from-thejar habit. Nutritionist Rob Hobson reveals what your favourite snacks actually contain and shares his clever, diet-friendly swaps that will save you calories while still pleasing your taste buds.

THE SNACK

THE SERVING

THE SWAP

THE SAVING

1 heaped tbsp (20g) = 162.5 calories 1.1g fat 1g sugar

Blitz up 25g of apple purée and top with 2 tsp (10g) of flaked almonds. You keep the sugar hit but halve (yep, halve) the calories.

80

AVOCADO

One avocado = 289 calories 3.7g fat 0.5g sugar

Still enjoy your avo on rye, but just use half. See? Easy. Make it go further by pulsing it with a handful of broad beans, one spring onion, some mint and coriander for a reduced-calorie spread.

CASHEW NUTS

A 25g handful = 145 calories 2g fat 1.5g sugar

For a protein-packed snack minus the fat, roast 80g of chickpeas or soya beans with chilli or curry powder for one hour at 180°C. Be bold with the chilli if you want a bit of a kick.

250ml glass = 145 calories 0.3g fat 28.5g sugar

A veggie juice that still tastes sweet should satisfy your cravings, so go for a high-fibre carrot and beetroot blend. Add ginger; the cheeky winter warmer will fire up your metabolism.

2 tbsp = 154 calories 1.3g fat 0g sugar

Tahini is the calorie culprit in hummus, so knock up a veggie-based dip instead: blend 80g edamame beans with chilli, a small handful of coriander and 1 tbsp plain yoghurt. Done.

ALMOND BUTTER

FRUIT SMOOTHIES

HUMMUS

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8.7

The number of minutes you’ll spend mindlessly snacking in front of the telly if you get fewer than seven hours kip*. So hit the sack to ditch the snack.

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CALORIES

100

CALORIES

55

CALORIES

50

CALORIES

50

CALORIES


DOCTOR’S OR DERS

Get stuffed MUNCHOMETER

Not all hunger-quashing foods are created equal. Here’s what will fill you up – and those that won’t

NICELY FULL POTATOES Haven’t you heard? They’re back in favour. And they’re more filling than brown rice*. Add black pepper (it slows fat cells), ditch the butter. Obvs. SPINACH Hello, hunger buster. These leafy greens can nix food cravings for more than two hours due to their high water content. Snacking slayed.

20

CAYENNE PEPPER This spicy metabolism booster contains capsaicin, which quells appetite. Just ½ tsp should do the trick. Oh, and it boosts libido, too.

The percentage extra calories you could burn by walking at varying speeds instead of just one steady pace. Time to shake up your stride.

PINE NUTS Apparently these little seeds can cause halitosis*. But a handful may well deal with the munchies. Feeling full or breath like a cat? Your call. PORTOBELLO MUSHROOMS At about 20 calories each and packed with nutrients, these might seem a must. But… you’re going to need more than 200g to benefit. RICE CAKES In actual hunger-quashing tests of popular snack foods, these fared worse than chocolate. Oat cakes will work harder to curb pangs.

CONSTANT CRAVINGS

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get-trim toolkit You can’t do it all by yourself – these three must-haves will provide a helping hand

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THE DIGITAL SCALES According to researchers at the University of Manchester, people who regularly weigh themselves on digital scales lose the most weight. The Withings Body Cardio set tracks weight, fat, muscle and bone mass. Sync it to the Health Mate app to log daily steps and get tips on staying on your slim-down target. Done and dusted. £149.95, withings.com

THE SLEEP AID Just 15 minutes on this mat before bed should help you nod off easily and have a restful night. The Bulletproof Sleep Induction Mat’s plastic needles massage your back as you lie on it, setting you up for a good kip. Poor sleep can accelerate weight gain and increase stress, so it’s a win/win. Disclaimer: overnight weight loss not guaranteed. £39.95, uk.bulletproof.com

THE LEGGINGS Exercise like Ellie Goulding and Ashley Greene and make Proskins your brand of choice. Its slim leggings are made with fabric containing caffeine, vitamin E, ceramides, retinol and aloe vera. Sound like a wonder beauty cream but, in trials, wearers of them noted increased fat loss. Anti-bacterial agents keep you smelling sweet, too. From £29.99, proskins.co.uk

11

The percentage of weight you could lose by snacking after lunch, compared with morning munchers who only lose 7%. Squirrel away your fistful of nuts till 4pm.

MASTER THE MINDSET OF SLIM Just can’t avoid dessert? You need to retrain your brain. Dr BJ Fogg’s free online Tiny Habits programme† helps you on your way

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1

2

3

TAKE YOUR PICK Choose three healthy habits that you actually want – not feel you should have. If you have more than three, start with the ones you want to implement most. They should be really tiny and require minimal effort. Break them down into stages to make it easier. Reaching for the biscuit tin? Have a stash of apples handy – they’ll deal with that sugar craving.

FORM A SEQUENCE Habits aren’t about willpower, they’re about lifestyle. Anchor the habit you want to something you already do. This could be drinking water when you finish the washing up, eating low-cal bulky foods before a party (to reduce temptation at the buffet) or doing a press-up whenever you use the loo. Add it where it fits naturally into your day.

PRACTISE If you forget your new habit one day, don’t sweat it. Habit forming isn’t like beating an addiction; if you slip up, you won’t be back at square one. Instead, feel good about the times you did succeed and try again. It’s often said that it takes 28 days to create a new habit, but this isn’t necessarily the case. Some may stick instantly.

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GRAPEFRUIT Bored with breakfast? Eat half of this citrus fruit a day and you could enjoy 1.6kg of weight loss over 12 weeks, according to research by California’s Department of Nutrition and Metabolic Research, (not to mention the mega dose of vitamin C – good for staving off that cold you’re always on the edge of). Top with blueberries for added benefits. Rich in anthocyanins, they’ve been shown in trials at Harvard University to increase weight loss. Berry nice.

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DOCTOR’S OR DERS

supermarket saviours Five simple slim-down heroes to pick up in your weekly shop

Ask our expert The expert: Rosemary Ferguson Who: Harley St nutritionist, rosemary ferguson.co.uk 2

Q How can I tweak my Sunday roast to make it healthier? A Roasts aren’t unhealthy per se, but a few switches can make them better. The easiest is to swap your fat for coconut oil. Its triglycerides are used as energy and its thermogenic effects spike your metabolism, helping you burn fat faster. Try also adding a spoonful of apple cider vinegar to your gravy. Putting it on your roasties will mean they can’t break down fully into sugars so you swerve that 4pm blood-sugar spike. It’ll help stop you having seconds too and increases stomach acid to aid digestion.

3 4

3

The number of portions of dairy you should eat per day to boost fat loss by 70% (that equates to 1,200mg of calcium). Feel free to hit the cheeseboard.

2 †TINYHABITS.COM

WORDS: EMMA PRITCHARD. PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES, FLORIAN SOMMET AT FOLIO-ID.COM *SOURCES: CORNELL UNIVERSITY, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY; SCIENCE DAILY; GETTYSBURG COLLEGE, PENN, US; KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

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TOMATOES Is it a vegetable? Is it a fruit? Who cares – it’ll shave inches off your waistline. Kyoto University in Japan discovered that tomatoes contain the fat-blasting compounds 9-oxo-ODA, as well as beta-carotene and lycopene. Pack them into sauces for a smaller waist and less fat. Result.

womenshealthmag.co.uk

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SALMON Another reason to eat this burstingwith-goodness fish: research* into taking a 2,400mg supplement of omega-3 each day showed that as well as reducing the stress hormone cortisol, salmon can aid fat loss and muscle growth – in just six weeks. Not just for Fridays, then.

4

PARMESAN CHEESE Invite that waiter to sprinkle liberally. Danish research found that eating cheese activates fat-burning hormones and increases metabolism, while the protein bump will keep you feeling fuller for longer. Your best bet? Parmesan. It only has 22 calories per tbsp so it’s a naturally light option.

Q Can activated charcoal really help with a detox? A Charcoal helps clear out your system. Taken as a drink or pill, its tiny pores attract toxins which are then excreted, leaving you cleansed. The biggest concern? Charcoal can’t tell the difference between nutrients and nasties and can cause constipation, so make sure you have it with something like a juice to keep you regular. Or try spirulina. The natural green algae is packed with protein and is clinically proven to remove poisons from the body. Result.

5

WHITE TEA Upgrade your cuppa, say researchers at Nivea’s Beiersdorf Research Center. Extracts in the white variety help break down fat cells and inhibit new ones developing. Teatime etiquette? Steep the leaves in water for up to two hours for max effect. Worth the wait.

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NICE SLICE The 300 calorie cut

✘ CROP THE CREAM

CHEESECAKE

Wholesome upgrades transform this calorie-bomb dessert into a nutrient-packed after-dinner treat

Who: Rob Hobson You’ll know him as… one of the UK’s foremost nutritionists and co-author of The Detox Kitchen Bible (robhobson.co.uk)

Swap the cream cheese for coconut yoghurt. Saturated fats in cream cheese deregulate cells in the brain, increasing inflammation and the risk of obesity, according to a study*. Plus, coconut yoghurt is rich in germ-busting lauric acid*. Not to be sneezed at.

✔ HEY HONEY

Lite cheesecake Key ingredients: Coconut yoghurt • Brazil nuts • Dates Cals: 260 Sat fat: 7.1g

It might have fallen back in favour in some circles (see: bulletproof coffee), but butter sure ain’t a superfood. In fact, as the Journal of Biological Chemistry says, it contains fatty acids that disable a liver protein, which can lead to cardiovascular and fatty liver disease. Research* shows that, combined with sugar, saturated fat becomes as addictive as cocaine. Switch for coconut oil. Much safer.

Original cheesecake Key ingredients: Cream cheese • Digestive biscuits • Caster sugar Cals: 550 Sat fat: 23.1g

womenshealthmag.co.uk

Ingredients

✔ TOP DATE ✔ GO NUTS Double dose of the good stuff? Go on, then. Combine Brazil nuts and hazelnuts. Both are rich in vitamin E, an antioxidant that protects your cells against free-radical damage, cutting your risk of heart disease, hypertension and even cancer. Nuff said.

C

WORDS: ROISIN DERVISH-O’KANE. PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC AT HEARST STUDIOS. FOOD STYLING: DARA SUTIN. *SOURCES: FRONTIERS IN CELLULAR NEUROSCIENCE; JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL FOOD; NUTRITION RESEARCH I

✘ CUT THE BUTTER

Trading caster sugar for honey will benefit your waistline* and what’s more, according to the American Chemical Society, honey is packed with the same amount of plaque-fighting antioxidants as leafy green vegetables – so eating it could help protect against heart disease. Double win.

There’s good reason why dates are the swap-in sweetener of choice. They’re rich in fibre, thus cutting the chance of blood sugar spikes and as their fibres are mostly insoluble, they bind to fat and help carry the blighter out of the body, according to the journal Food Sciences and Nutrition. Lean-making pud? Sold.

Serves 8 For the base: 100g Brazil nuts • 100g hazelnuts • 100g pumpkin seeds • 20 dates, pitted and soaked • 2 tbsp coconut oil • Pinch of salt For the filling: 250g strawberries, hulled • 50g honey • 100g plain soya yoghurt • 175g coconut yoghurt For the full recipe, see womenshealthmag.co.uk/ litecheesecake

✔ MIND MINERAL Providing crunch in lieu of the biscuits, pumpkin seeds also pack magnesium: crucial for a strong mind. Better still, they ease anxiety and have restorative properties, helping people recover from depression, says Neuropharmacology.

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SHIFT IT

Then I could eat whatever I wanted

‘I DITCHED THE FAD DIETS AND SHED 4ST’ After years of 12-hour shifts as a nurse, Deborah Biggs, 35, made some small, healthy changes to her lifestyle and dropped five dress sizes

when I was growing up, thanks to an intense schedule of ballet and swimming. But when I qualified as a nurse in my early twenties, the drastic lifestyle change – 12-hour shifts, often at night and at weekends – and my consequent lack of routine caused me to gain 3 stone in two years. I’d grab snacks from the vending machine and gorge on cheese toasties when I got home. Constant attempts to restrict my calorie intake failed and my waistline kept expanding. When I got a regular nine-to-five job in 2014, I was a size 18, and out of excuses.

AS TOLD TO LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: NEAL HAYNES. HAIR AND MAKE-UP: CHARLOTTE GASKELL AND CASSIE STEWARD AT LHA REPRESENTS. LOCATION COURTESY OF 1 REBEL. *@ZOEYWRIGHTFITNESS

How I decided to avoid yet another diet and instead used the app MyFitnessPal to get honest with myself and see how much I was actually eating and how little I was moving. Weighing my food got my portions under control. I switched my meals to cereal with yoghurt for breakfast, salad with spiralised veggies and avocado for lunch, and chicken with vegetables for dinner. After a month, I had the confidence to add in circuit and spin classes three or four times a week, as well as weights sessions. Making small, healthy changes worked – I lost 2 stone in three months and reached my goal weight nine months later.

WEIGHT TO GO

Now Ditching a life of stop/start

Killer move Squats – they target the whole lower body – and press-ups for back definition.

dieting for a long-term healthy lifestyle means I’m now able to wear size 8 leggings. I listen to what my body needs – I cut down on bread and rice as I wasn’t digesting them properly, but I’ll have a curry if I’m craving one. After a strict start, I’m learning to relax. The same goes for exercise. I work out most days, but I’ll skip a session for a night out. My husband jokes that my fitness obsession is my midlife crisis – but it makes me look and feel great, so it’s a nice one to have.

Fit kit Sweaty Betty for its bright, patterned leggings and Nike for its plainer staples. Fitspo Insta star Zoey Wright* – she overcame a bowel condition to become a bodybuilding pro.

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Treat

Yourself

Everyone should be able to enjoy ice cream, even if they don’t eat dairy. Food vlogger and writer Niomi Smart showed us how at an exclusive Women’s Health event, in partnership with free-from brand Swedish Glace

W

hen it comes to serving up a surefire hit pudding, ice cream is the obvious go-to. But what to do if you, or your guests, are vegan, lactoseintolerant, or simply cutting down on dairy? Thanks to Swedish Glace, the free-from ice cream range from Wall’s, the answer’s easy. Made using soy, it’s a plant-based alternative to traditional varieties – that doesn’t sacrifice on flavour. And, as food vlogger and author of Eat Smart Niomi Smart demonstrated at exclusive

Women’s Health cookery event Well Fed, it’s proved to be a versatile ingredient, too. Niomi cooked up a plethora of vegan recipes from her latest book, as well as the show-stopper Vegan Cookie Dough Ice Cream Cake, while attendees were able to enjoy the ultimate vegan smoothie. But don’t just take our word for it, you can create your own indulgent ice cream cake in a trio of Swedish Glace flavours – vanilla, chocolate or raspberry – and share your pictures online using #swedishglace. Finger-licking goodness, guaranteed.


PROMOTION

INSIDE SCOOP Now everyone can have their cake and eat it, thanks to free-from brand Swedish Glace and food vlogger Niomi Smart, who made vegan cooking effortless with her indulgent ice cream cake and fruity smoothie recipes.

VEGAN ICE CREAM CAKE cals 287

sat fat 6.8g

sugar 30.9g

serves 8

For the cake Š 1 x 750ml tub of Vanilla Swedish Glace Š 1 x 750ml tub of Chocolate Swedish Glace. For the cookie dough pieces Š 25g rolled oats Š ½ tbsp coconut oil Š 1 tbsp maple syrup Š ½ tbsp almond butter Š 25g ground almonds Š 1 tbsp dark chocolate chips. For the sauce Š 5 medjool dates, pitted and soaked in water Š 125ml unsweetened almond milk Š ½ vanilla pod (slice the pod in half and scrape out seeds) Š pinch of Himalayan salt. The night before Š Place a 9in/23cm spring form cake tin in the freezer. For the cookie dough 1. Grind the oats to a flour in a food processor. 2. Gently melt the coconut oil, then mix with the maple syrup and almond butter. 3. Mix together ground almonds, chocolate chips and oat flour. Allow coconut mixture to cool then combine. 4. Roll mixture into small balls, pinch the sides to make small cubes and place on a baking tray/ plate. Freeze for 10-15 minutes. For the sauce 1. Soak the dates for 3 hours in a bowl of water, then drain. 2. Blend dates, almond milk and vanilla pod seeds until smooth. Stir in salt and keep it in the fridge. For the cake 1. Take out your spring form cake tin. 2. Spoon a layer of Swedish Glace into your cake tin. 3. Sprinkle over half of your cookie dough pieces. 4. Pour over half of the salted caramel sauce. 5. Pop back into freezer until Vanilla Swedish Glace is frozen. 6. Take out of freezer and spoon on a layer of Chocolate Swedish Glace. 7. Add another layer of cookie dough pieces and return to freezer for two hours. To serve Once removed from cake tin, pour over remaining fudge sauce, and decorate with chocolate shavings and/or spare cookie dough pieces. Top with blueberries.

DISCOVER SWEDISH GLACE JUST LIKE ICE CREAM AND DAIRY FREE #SWEDISHGLACE ✔ DAIRY FREE ✔ GLUTEN FREE ✔ LACTOSE FREE

✔ VEGAN


T H E L AT E S T N U T R I T I O N A L K N O W - H O W F O R A B E T T E R B O D Y

THINGS YOU’LL BE EATING IN 2017 It’s time to ditch the avo – there’s a new superfood in town. Meet the seven ingredients you need in your shopping basket for the New Year WORDS

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I

n 2016 you nailed kuzu and kefir grains; 2015 was the year of the smoothie bowl. So what food trends will we be lapping up in 2017? In the absence of a crystal ball, we spoke to the leading food trend forecasters to get the inside dish. ‘With more than 70% of us regarding healthy eating as part of our identity, it’s no longer something to be coy about,’ says Waitrose managing director Rob Collins, referring to findings in the supermarket’s latest Food and Drink Report. It also highlighted that 44% of us make an effort with our dinners (and breakfasts, and lunches and snacks), in case they end up being posted online, and one in five of us already share our meals on social media. So let’s take a peek into the foodie future at what you’ll be Instagramming the shit out of next year.

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GOAT

You’d be kidding yourself if you said you weren’t aware of the gut-friendly dairy alternatives of goats’ milk and cheese, but now it’s time to get acquainted with goat as a source of meat, too. Low in saturated fat and with twice the iron content of chicken, goat is the new meat for 2017. The amount of livestock being reared in the UK for this purpose has increased from around 70 to 10,000 in the past three years. Ocado jumped on board and Sainsbury’s has followed suit. With goat sausages, mince and chops now on supermarket shelves, you can use it in place of your current meat of choice. Goat tagine? Why not. Cardiff Sports Nutrition’s Matthew Plowman has also noticed a demand for other adventurous meats such as crocodile, zebra and ostrich. ‘Ostrich tastes beefy but is low in fat. The amino acid profile of exotic meats is often slightly higher than that of chicken,’ he says. It’s basically supermarket safari.

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FUTURE FOOD

VEGETABLE YOGHURTS

Sweet yoghurt? Kiss it goodbye; savoury is where it’s at. ‘Expect new varieties of yoghurt on supermarket shelves – they’re more like sauces than dessert,’ says food industry expert Jane Milton. ‘As our understanding of sugar-free eating continues to deepen, consumers are realising that even the so-called natural sugars (such as those in dates and coconut sugar) can affect the body negatively if consumed excessively.’ In the US, savoury yoghurts are nothing new. American manufacturer Blue Hill (bluehillyogurt.com) already makes carrot, tomato, sweet potato, butternut squash and beetroot alternatives that are gluten-free, packed with probiotics and made with milk from grass-fed cows. Okay, sounds good, but how do you use them? Dollop on jacket potatoes or stir into curries in place of sour cream.

SEEDS AND SEED BUTTERS

Sure, seeds are nothing new, but the way we’ll be consuming them is changing. According to nutritionist Vicki Edgson, author of Amazing Edible Seeds, we’re moving on from standard snacking: she recommends sprinkling caraway on your salad to prevent stomach cramps and indigestion; putting cardamom in your curry to boost immunity and help relieve colds; adding nigella (black cumin) to smoothies to aid weight loss and fight diabetes and heart attacks; and mixing fenugreek into scrambled eggs to lower bad cholesterol. Not a fan of sprinkling? Then consider seed butters. Try innovative flavours such as Tiger Boost from Jake’s Boost (jakesboost.com), which combines sunflower seeds with tiger nuts, Brazils and coconut. They’re basically the new nut butter and not so heavily loaded with sugar as some of those bad boys.

MEDICINAL MUSHROOMS

Get your goat

womenshealthmag.co.uk

Mushrooms as medicine? Yep, that’s set to be a thing, as scientists are noting the healing properties of fungi. Studies* show shiitake mushrooms can boost immunity by reducing inflammatory proteins in the body. But that’s not all. Mushroom specialist Indigo Herbs (indigo-herbs.co.uk) reported a 54% increase in 2016 in sales of Lion’s Mane mushroom powder after researchers identified its notable nerve-regenerating properties. Meanwhile, maitake is known for helping with immunity, and studies have suggested a potential link between the consumption of the Chinese mushroom ganoderma and weight loss. ‘Stir mushroom powders and blends into soups or smoothies,’ says expert nutritionist Christine Bailey. Magic. |

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FUTURE FOOD

Twistin’ my melons

HAWAIIAN POKE

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WATERMELON JUICE

Birch and maple water? #over. Cactus water? Dead and buried, thank you. The true hero staking its claim on your 2017 drinks list is watermelon juice. Full of vitamin A, containing twice as much vitamin C as fresh orange juice and naturally rich in magnesium, calcium and potassium, this little baby boosts hydration and immunity. Plus it contains an amino acid called L-Citrulline, which, according to a report in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, aids recovery from intense exercise. If it’s good enough for Beyoncé, who invested in the company Wtrmln Wtr in 2016, it’s good enough for us. Try Mello (mellodrinks.co.uk), available from supermarkets and health stores. Fruity.

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CANNED BCAAS

Been lifting heavy all year but seeking new results? Supplementing with branch chain amino acids (BCAAs) could be the secret to doubling your muscle and strength gains per workout. No longer the provision of bodybuilders and fitness models, calorieand sugar-free BCAA drinks-in-a-can are taking the faff out of measuring pills and powders. ‘Amino acids are the building blocks for protein synthesis and the number one ingredient for muscle growth,’ says Plowman. Try musclemoose.co.uk. Power on. womenshealthmag.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY; GETTY IMAGES; SHUTTERSTOCK. *SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES. AMAZING EDIBLE SEEDS IS OUT IN MARCH (£20; JACQUI SMALL); CARDIFFSPORTSNUTRITION.CO.UK

Shift over ceviche and make way for the Polynesian favourite poke (pronounced po-kay), a raw fish salad marinated with lime, soy and sesame. Bolder and less acidic in flavour than ceviche, and less cloying than tartare, poke is a high-quality marinated tuna that boasts virtually no saturated fat and is more dense in protein than salmon – while also being a good source of brain-boosting omega-3. According to the Waitrose Food and Drink Report, it looks set to beat the gills out of sushi and sashimi in 2017. Serve with a choice of rice, quinoa or kale (or go mad and use a combination).


GREEN GIANT

2

LUNCH

A K FA ST E BR

1

KALE, SWEET POTATO AND FETA FRITTATA

BABY KALE AND RADICCHIO SALAD WITH APPLE, PECANS AND PEARL BARLEY

4 ways with …

K ALE

Salad base? Sure. Smoothie ingredient? Of course. Fried to a crisp? Oh God, yes. And there’s still more you can do with the king of green leaves. Actress and recipe book author Nicola Millbank gives you fresh inspiration

4

SNACK

DINNER

3

KALE AND SHALLOT BHAJIS WITH CUCUMBER RAITA

womenshealthmag.co.uk

SAUSAGE AND FENNEL GNOCCHI WITH KALE AND ALMOND PESTO

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GREEN GIANT

LUNCH BABY KALE AND RADICCHIO SALAD WITH APPLE, PECANS AND PEARL BARLEY cals 622

sat fat 5.5g

Ingredients: 100g pearl barley 2 handfuls of baby kale Juice of 1 lemon 1 bulb radicchio 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil Juice of 1 orange 1 tsp honey Salt and pepper 1 apple, chopped into matchsticks 30g pecans, toasted

Method: 1. In a pan, cover the pearl barley with water and simmer for 25-30 mins. Drain and rinse in cold water. Contain excitement.

sugar 11.5g

BREAKFAST KALE, SWEET POTATO AND FETA FRITTATA

serves 2

2. Place the baby kale in a bowl. Mix through half the lemon juice and leave to marinate, while you prep the rest of the salad. 3. Cut any large leaves on the radicchio in half. Add the pearl barley and raddichio to the kale and pour over the olive oil, orange juice, honey, salt and pepper and the rest of the lemon juice. Toss together then mix in the apple and pecans. Lunch with crunch, done.

cals 267

sat fat 5.8g

Ingredients: 1 tbsp olive oil 200g sweet potato, peeled and cut into 1cm chunks 1 red onion, sliced 60g kale 70g feta 6 large eggs Salt and pepper Basil, to garnish

Method: 1. Heat the oil in a heavy pan and sauté the sweet potato for 5-7 minutes until it starts to soften. Add the red onion and cook for 5 minutes. 2. Remove the woody stalks

sugar 4.1g

serves 4

from the kale. Finely slice the leaves, add to the pan and heat for 2 minutes. 3. Spread the mix in an oven dish lined with greaseproof paper, crumble the feta and scatter it over. 4. Whisk the eggs and season. Pour and gently fold through the vegetables until combined. 5. Bake in a preheated oven at 200°C for 20-25 minutes, until golden and the eggs are set. Remove from the oven and leave to cool before slicing.

VOTE FOR THE GREENS… So, what actually makes this superfood so, well, super? Here’s the low-down on your green best friend…

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Like broccoli and spinach, kale has power-packed phytonutrients – the sort that can reduce cell damage from free radicals. Compounds that support liver function – the glucosinolates – are stimulated during chewing. If you have it raw, go for baby kale – older leaves will be too tough to chew.

Ditched the dairy but don’t want to end up with osteoporosis*? Then fill up on kale. It contains more calcium than milk, with 150mg per 100g, plus vitamin K, which regulates bone health and improves bone density – reducing the risk of fracture. So eat up.

3

Add 80g of kale to your diet each day and you’ll soon notice the difference it makes to your skin. ‘Kale has twice the vitamin A of oranges,’ says nutritionist Alice Mackintosh, ‘which helps control oiliness. It is also rich in vitamin C and key for collagen production.’ Just add lemon juice to aid absorption.

DINNER SAUSAGE AND FENNEL GNOCCHI WITH KALE AND ALMOND PESTO cals 723

50

sat fat 10.5g

sugar 2.6g

serves 4

Ingredients:

Method:

6 sausages 1 tbsp olive oil 2 shallots, sliced Clove of garlic 2 tsp fennel seeds Salt and pepper 100ml white wine Large handful cavolo nero, stalks removed, leaves torn 500g gnocchi Fresh parsley, chopped, to serve For the pesto: 4 leaves of cavolo nero 1 tbsp almonds 50g Parmesan ½ clove of garlic 100ml rapeseed oil Juice of ½ lemon

1. To make the pesto: pulse the cavolo nero, almonds, Parmesan and garlic. Add the oil and lemon juice. Season. 2. Remove the sausage skins. Fry the meat with the shallots until browned. Crush and add the whole garlic and the fennel seeds. After 1 min, add the wine and simmer until evaporated. Add the kale and leave to wilt. 3. Cook the gnocchi and add it to the pan of meat. Stir in 2 tbsp of pesto and serve. Voila!

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SNACK KALE AND SHALLOT BHAJIS WITH CUCUMBER RAITA

January/February 2017

cals 126

sat fat 1.2g

Ingredients: 2 eggs 2 banana shallots, sliced 30g kale 120g plain flour 1 tsp chilli flakes 1 tsp ground cumin Salt and pepper 400ml vegetable oil For the raita: ½ cucumber 4 tbsp natural yoghurt Juice of ½ lemon 1 tbsp mint Method: 1. Mix the eggs, shallots, kale, flour, chilli flakes, cumin, salt and pepper to form a batter. 2. Heat the oil in a saucepan

sugar 2.1g

serves 6-8

over a medium heat. Drop a little of the mixture in; it should fizz straight away. 3. Spoon the batter into the pan – each fritter should be the size of a golf ball. Fry on each side until golden brown. Remove and drain on kitchen paper. 4. For the raita, finely chop the cucumber. Place in a bowl and season. Squeeze out as much liquid as you can, then discard. Stir in the yoghurt, lemon juice and chopped mint and serve alongside the bhajis.

womenshealthmag.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC AT HEARST STUDIOS; GETTY IMAGES. MILLY’S REAL FOOD BY NICOLA MILLBANK IS PUBLISHED IN MAY. *SOURCE: THE NATIONAL OSTEOPOROSIS SOCIETY

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Right on

track

Fitness goals don’t achieve themselves – here’s how TomTom’s Spark 3 watch helps influencer Molly Teshuva hit hers

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lready setting your 2017 fitness goals? Well, once you have (like finally running that 10k), you need the tools to help you get there. Molly Teshuva – fitness motivator and founder of Progress Pure; a 12-week online body-sculpting method – understands how the right kit can transform January ambitions into success. ‘I’m determined to get serious about running in 2017 – and to add more muscle to my lean physique,’ she says. In order to do so, Molly needs to push her boundaries – not just when she’s training. ‘Understanding how many steps I’m taking means I’ll always choose the stairs over the lift,’ she says. ‘I get such satisfaction from knowing I’m being that little bit more active.’ What’s helping Molly truly up her fitness game? Let’s break it down.

SWEAT SOUNDS

Dropped phones and tangled wires can be a nightmare during a workout. With the TomTom Spark 3, you don’t need either – it stores your songs, which play directly into in-ear wireless headphones. For Molly’s new stepped-up fitness schedule, this has been a game-changer. ‘Music helps motivate me during long runs, which I’m trying to do more often,’ she says. But TomTom’s wireless audio technology really comes into its own when Molly hits the weights. ‘I’m really into listening to Drake when I’m lifting at the moment, and wires can really interfere. With the Spark 3 I can still have in-ear motivation, and without wires getting in the way I’m able to perform a full range of motion,’ says Molly. Like to mix it up? No problem – the Spark 3 holds 500 tracks.


PROMOTION

‘I WAS ALWAYS NERVOUS ABOUT RUNNING OUTSIDE BEFORE, BUT WITH TOMTOM’S ROUTE EXPLORATION I NOW KNOW THAT I WON’T GET LOST’

EXPLORE MORE

Alfresco runs can be intimidating, but the Spark 3 comes with an in-built compass sensor, so, wherever your path takes you, you’ll be able to navigate your way home. Clever, right? ‘I was always nervous about running outside before, but with TomTom’s route exploration I now know that I won’t get lost,’ says Molly, who’s channelled her adventurous side by discovering new running routes in her area. ‘My new favourite one is through Hampstead Heath, starting from the ponds and going up to Parliament Hill,’ she says. ‘A beautiful run that guarantees a good sweat!’

RATE YOURSELF

With high intensity interval training (HIIT), seasoned pro Molly knows that heart rate data helps her reach the right intensity to reap serious gains. With TomTom as the innovators in on-wrist heart rate monitoring tech, she knows she’s in safe hands with the Spark 3. ‘I never do a session without wearing it,’ says Molly. ‘I know how hard I am actually training just by looking at my wrist. Then I know the number to push past in my next session,’ she adds.

READY TO GET GOING? FOR MORE INFO, GO TO TOMTOM.COM/FITNESS


P O S I T I V E ST E P S TO A H E A LT H I E R O U T LO O K

ARE YOU WORRIED SICK? Impossible deadline nailed, but now you’re panicking that your work was no good. Sound familiar? You could be one of a growing number of women with ‘high-functioning anxiety’. WH lifts the lid on this secret curse... WORDS

DOLLY ALDERTON

ILLUSTR ATIONS SAM CHIVERS

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ome nights, I lie in bed and stare at my ceiling. I think about all the people who probably hate me: the bosses who believe I’m incompetent, the exes comparing notes on what a nightmare I can be and the women gossiping about what a bad friend I am. Other times, I sit on the Tube and contemplate the many illnesses I’m convinced I have. I associate every head bump with a bleed on the brain, and all those smoked cigarettes and alcohol-fuelled nights out with carcinogenic additives. I imagine a silent cancer filling my body. Is that sniffle as innocent as it sounds?

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Unless you are a very close friend or family member, you would never, ever know any of this. From the outside, I’m as easy-breezy as they get. I’m successful – I’ve had a column in a national newspaper since I was 26 – and I’m fun-loving, busy and sociable; not your stereotypical anxious wallflower. It’s not something I talk about. I’m terrified of what people would think of me if they knew. Official figures published by the journal Brain and Behaviour say 8.2 million of us in the UK suffer from anxiety in one form or another – with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder among the most common categories. But what I experience is now being unofficially coined ‘high-functioning anxiety’ – it’s where anxiety, ambition and a need for approval intersect. It’s becoming recognised as a problem affecting young

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ILL AT EASE

women like me, in particular. The 21st century, with its competitive culture and social media bragging, is the perfect melting pot for its existence. While I’m not totally debilitated by it – as someone with GAD might be – it is a constant noise in my life; some days louder than others.

*SOURCE: BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR

STRESS HEADS

‘When we are in a state of anxiety,’ explains neuroscientist Dean Burnett, author of The Idiot Brain, ‘the hippocampus and amygdala – which are respectively responsible for memory and emotions such as fear, and which form part of the brain’s “threat detection system” – are overactive. So people worry constantly and, often, unnecessarily.’ And what if, like me, you’re busy trying to cover it up? ‘Some womenshealthmag.co.uk

people can still override the increased activity in the hippocampus-amygdala with willpower – at least as far as outward behaviour is concerned,’ adds Burnett. So, for me, when I’m in a state of anxiety in a public space, I can talk and listen and appear calm, but I don’t truly absorb what’s being said because I’m too busy battling the panic narrative and stress-induced pain spiralling in my head. Yes, it’s exhausting. It perhaps comes as no surprise that sufferers are typically achievement-driven; the link between perfectionism and a strain on mental health is well documented. In 2014, a paper published in the Review of General Psychology stated that perfectionism can lead to crippling anxiety, depression and even suicide. According to Dr David Veale, a consultant psychiatrist in cognitive behaviour therapy at The Priory, the roots of anxiety, however, are hard to pinpoint. ‘It could be because of genes, an early life experience or trauma,’ he says. Women are particularly at risk: we are twice as likely to experience anxiety disorders as men and form a chunk of the 60 million plus people in the EU with phobias or obsessive compulsive disorders*. NHS figures reveal that 19% of women have reported symptoms of mental health problems. ‘There is so much pressure for young women to be perfect all the time,’ says Burnett. ‘But such stress can make you more vulnerable to anxiety.’

and paranoia about what people think of me. In times of acute stress, I start thinking about spontaneous combustion. It feels like a wave of heat is rising within me and I am convinced I’m about to burst into flames. ‘Most people have an optimistic bias – it helps us to get more done if we assume we can achieve it,’ says Burnett. ‘But people with anxiety tend to have this flipped, so you overhear a stranger talking about someone and you assume they are talking about you. You make links to things that stress you such as the thought of having cancer or AIDS – all worst-case scenarios.’ And the physical effect of that? Personally, I lose sleep and my appetite, and I get palpitations. I become forgetful, I can’t concentrate and I find it difficult to take things in. It all tallies with what the experts say. ‘When we sleep, the parts of the brain controlling consciousness, mostly found in the frontal lobe, like the pre-frontal cortex, are “shut down”, or the activity in these at least changes to a more rhythmical type,’ explains Burnett. ‘The problem with anxiety is it’s a highly “aroused” state, so you’re looking for dangers, planning escapes, obsessing over concerns and so on. This keeps the higher consciousness parts of the brain active, which hinders or prevents the slowing and synchronising of these brain regions, which are needed for sleep.’ This increased alertness is to give you the urgency if you, say, needed to run away from a bear (a danger I don’t often have to face in London). Meanwhile, Burnett tells me it’s also very common for your heart rate to increase: ‘When you’re anxious, you’re overly aware of stressors and threats beyond what is logically necessary. This causes the threat detection and reflexive “hard wired” areas of the brain to engage the fight-or-flight response. This releases adrenaline, which increases heart beat. The constant but irregular release of adrenaline causes your heart to start firing off at random points.’ Burnett also says an awareness of this particular physical symptom can trigger further stress. ‘You can tell when your heart isn’t behaving normally and someone prone to anxiety will no doubt find this extremely worrying, causing further stress and alarm, resulting in more adrenaline being released. So the cycle ends up being self-sustaining.’

‘I DEVELOP OBSESSIVE THOUGHTS OF IMPENDING DISASTER’

PANIC STATIONS

Let me talk you through my thought process. Say I’ve lost something, or an editor has sent a piece of work back with some constructive criticism. Very quickly I develop obsessive thoughts of impending disaster (either in my life or globally), severe hypochondria

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ILL AT EASE

A-LIST ANXIETY Discover the coping mechanisms of these women at the top of their game

LENA DUNHAM KILLS ANXIETY WITH EXERCISE ‘I value my health and happiness. And I’ve realised exercise can give me both of those things.’ Research* shows physical activity reduces anxiety (and gives Lena the chance to post lots of leggings selfies) #notafraidofaboldprint.

AMANDA SEYFRIED COUNTERS ANXIETY WITH MEDICATION Seyfried recently spoke about taking the drug Lexapro for the past 11 years. ‘I don’t see the point of getting off it – I don’t want to risk it. And what are you fighting against? Just the shame of using a tool?’ Bravo, Amanda.

ADELE SLAYS STAGE FRIGHT WITH DISTRACTION Even superstars can panic at the thought of performing. ‘It [stage fright] feels like it’s getting worse, because it should’ve got better by now,’ Adele says. She beats it with distraction techniques – try playing a brain game on your phone.

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THE GREAT COVER-UP

The good news is that women are often better than men at speaking up about mental health issues; although Stephen Buckley, head of information at the mental health charity Mind, highlights that many choose not to: ‘If you’re living a busy life with a demanding job, there may be a temptation to discount signs of anxiety as stress,’ he says. But the mental effort of concealing anxiety is perhaps as damaging as the anxiety itself. ‘Constant anxiety results in the release of cortisol – a precursor hormone to the fight-or-flight response,’ says Burnett. ‘It interferes with memory processing, impedes focus, puts strain on the heart and affects temperament. Its damage to the nervous system and body can be long term.’ The consequences of dissociating your outward appearance from what’s going on in your head could be even worse still: ‘One of the more fundamental types of learning that the brain does is associative,’ adds Burnett. ‘A behaviour is performed, a reaction occurs and the brain links the two. So, if you are constantly behaving in a way that would normally elicit a certain reaction – being friendly towards someone making you feel happy, for example – but it no longer provokes the expected response, your brain will slowly lose the association, making it harder for you to form genuine connections and enjoy social engagements at a later point.’

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Despite all this, those with high-functioning anxiety tend not to isolate themselves, which can help them cope with the condition. ‘Being socially isolated at home is more of a problem than staying at work,’ says Professor Roz Shafran, a psychologist at UCL and author of Overcoming Perfectionism. ‘At work you get distraction and self-esteem reinforcement, which could, in itself, act as a form of therapy.’ Translation: being around people in the office can make you feel better. Shafran and Burnett agree that the best way to attempt true control over anxiety, rather than cultivating a superficial veneer of wellness, is to seek help in the form of behaviour therapy, which is available on the NHS. ‘The majority of people can transform their lives within 12 sessions so there really is no need to suffer,’ says Shafran. Ultimately, how manageable high functioning anxiety truly is depends on your parameters of what it means to function properly. I once told a friend that my fears weren’t impinging on my life in any way, they just made me feel rubbish. Her response? ‘If it’s making you feel rubbish, it’s impinging on your life.’ Perhaps it is time we looked beyond what the verb ‘to function’ actually means; more than being able to meet deadlines, leave the house or go to a gym class, but having a semblance of peace in your mind. I wonder how truly high functioning I could be, both externally and internally, if I took steps to free myself from anxiety.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES; REX FEATURES. *SOURCES: EUROPEAN LUNG FOUNDATION; LUND UNIVERSITY; MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

SUBTLE BENEFITS EMMA STONE BEATS PANIC BY BAKING ‘I felt out of control of my surroundings. I was just baking all the time. It made me feel, “If I put these in, I’ll know what will come out.”’ Baking is a form of mindfulness as effective as CBT*. No wonder Mary Berry is so relaxed.


PROMOTION

MY YOGA MANTRA Don’t force it: Yoga isn’t about the pose – don’t push your body into extreme positions

The

balancing act As a yoga-teaching DJ, Jessica Skye knows a thing or two about busy schedules – discover how she stays on top of her game

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YUMMY YOGI SMOOTHIE

oga makes me feel euphoric – but the benefits continue off the mat. Increased core strength means I no longer suffer from aches and pains after being hunched up on planes – or stood behind DJ decks. Mentally, it’s taught me to respect my body by preserving my energy – and feeding it properly. You wouldn’t put the wrong fuel into your car and it’s the same with your body. I eat a balanced diet throughout the day – lunching on a veggie-packed falafel flatbread, and making a big Vietnamese noodle soup for dinner. Protein is key at breakfast, so I always make sure I have some Arla Protein in the fridge. Without enough protein, I’d feel weak – and I’ve got no time for that!

YOGA WITH BENEFITS Superman pose

Chair pose

A) Lay face down, reaching your arms behind you, palms facing up. Rotate your inner thighs towards each other, squeezing your glutes. B) Hold your core tight and lift your legs up. Next, raise your chest up from the floor, reaching your arms back behind you. Hold for 5-10 breaths, release then repeat for three sets.

A) Stand with feet together, then bending and squeezing knees together, shift the weight into your heels. B) Squeeze your inner thighs together and drop your tail bone towards your heels. Engage your core by drawing your navel to your spine, then raise your arms to your ears. Hold for 10 breaths, then release by standing up straight... 6 sets should do it.

• 1 frozen banana • Handful of frozen raspberries • Half an avocado • 1 bottle Arla Protein Chocolate flavoured milk On a weekday, I need a speedy breakfast. All I have to do for this smoothie is add the ingredients to a blender, grab, then go. With healthy fats from the avocado, the banana’s carbohydrate – and 25g of protein from Arla Protein chocolate milk, it’s perfect stay-full fuel. Less time in the kitchen, more time on the mat.

Find us in selected supermarkets, and visit arlafoods.co.uk for more information. #fuelforfitness


MEAN BUSINESS

DO WHAT YOU LOVE (without quitting your job) Daily routine left you feeling like it’s Groundhog Day? Don’t worry, there are plenty of ways to find meaning in what you do – WH reports

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hat makes a job dreamy? A hefty pay cheque? colleagues that are a laugh? A boss who doesn’t crush your self-esteem by 11am? Yup, sure. But higher up on that list – even higher than, oh, an intern who’ll actually make a cup of tea once in a while – is the rather lofty concept of meaning. Apparently, in this increasingly meaningless world – you know, where Snapchat filters are a hobby and the advocation of ‘pussy grabbing’ can predicate a presidency – we now want our jobs to have purpose beyond just paying the rent.

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‘Finding your work worthwhile, feeling that it benefits society or that you’re doing something others appreciate is becoming the driver that can provide the biggest increases in happiness at work,’ says Nic Marks, founder of Happiness Works, a workplace analytics company. Indeed, survey findings from the Energy Project, which focuses on workplace fulfilment, found staff who derive meaning from their work are more than three times as likely to stay in their jobs as those who don’t. They also report 1.7 times higher levels of job satisfaction. But, with 37% of us finding our jobs meaningless*, what’s a girl to do?’

your GetOff down troll-y to work

A HEALTHIER OUTLOOK

First thing’s first – why does meaning matter? Log on to Instagram and you’ll notice a shift from popular happiness hashtags #soblessed and #happy to ones like #liveyourpurpose and #maketodaycount. It certainly appears to be a more realistic goal than the permanent state of happiness we’ve been encouraged to strive for. As Oliver Robinson, lecturer in psychology at the University of Greenwich and author of Development Through Adulthood, puts it: ‘It’s not appropriate or healthy to be happy all the time, particularly when unjust or cruel things happen.’ Robinson believes meaning – unlike happiness – is a cause to which you can feel committed. ‘The pursuit of meaning should be a longer-term aim, which allows bad times to be thought of as part of that.’ Or, to put it differently, it’s the balance of pleasure and purpose; something behaviour scientist Paul Dolan discusses in his book Happiness By Design. Dolan cites parenthood as a prime example. Babies, it turns out, are seriously damaging to your ‘pleasure resources’ (less money, less spontaneity, more wearing stuff the colour of baby puke) but because of the purpose they give (keeping another

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actual human being alive) they enrich your life with meaning – and thus happiness. Now apply that to your job. Nobody expects their job to be fun all the time, but if you still feel you’re doing something worthwhile, the downtimes won’t be quite so soul destroying. In fact, it can be actively good for you. ‘People who have meaning tend to live longer and it helps with mental health because you have something that drives you,’ says Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning. Which is all well and good if you’re naturally an altruistic type, but we’re not all built to care for the sick and needy or, you know, run a yoga retreat in Ibiza. The good news is that meaning is a far wider-reaching concept than we’ve traditionally entertained. Even the most dark-hearted of us can add a little more to our working lives.

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‘Authenticity is when you follow your own direction,’ says Professor Stephen Joseph, author of Authentic. ‘Catering for the needs of others can cause anxiety that your life isn’t your own.’ And it could also lead to a state of physical and mental exhaustion. ‘Look at your tasks and abilities and identify those that give you joy and meaning. Expand those to make them bigger,’ says Professor Joseph. Has your managerial position taken you away from your passion of talking to customers? Vow to spend 15 minutes each day on the shop floor. Is organisation your thing? Get involved with putting systems in place that improve the day-to-day running of your department. As for how you can ask your boss to support you in this? ‘If you can approach your manager with novel ideas and better ways of working, they might be more open to your suggestions than if you just present them with the problem,’ suggests Professor Joseph. ‘A good manager knows it is in the company’s best interests to ensure people are working to their strengths.’ He also advises speaking to colleagues to find out if you could be supporting each other to be more effective. ‘Are there tasks that you do that would be better suited to someone else or vice versa?’ he says.

THE PUB CAN HELP

WORDS: NAOMI REILLY. PHOTOGRAPHY: LUCIA GIACANI AT FOLIO-ID.COM. *SOURCE: YOUGOV POLL 2015

AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH

First: mindset. Smith says we can approach our jobs in three ways: materialistically – you do it just so you can support yourself and your family; in a career orientation way – with the aim of climbing the ladder; or as a calling – knowing what you do makes the world a better place. She says you can find meaning in all three. ‘In a study of Mexican women working in a factory processing coupons, their apparently monotonous job wouldn’t scream “meaning”,’ she says. ‘But people spoke of the worth they derived from being able to support their families; their jobs had a strong sense of giving back.’ Smith also talks of how to reframe your job to get more meaning. ‘When President Kennedy visited NASA in 1962, he asked the janitor what his job was. “I’m working to help put a man on the moon,” the janitor said. He obviously felt he was part of something bigger – and that will have affected the meaning he got from his work.’ Finally, she suggests developing a ‘service mindset’. ‘The people who rate their jobs as womenshealthmag.co.uk

the most meaningful are those who serve others – teachers, nurses, the clergy,’ she says. ‘But even if you don’t directly work in caring industries, you can still benefit. It’s about figuring out how your job contributes to the lives of others. That could be supporting family, for example, or mentoring an inexperienced colleague. New research from the Universities of Zurich and Leipzig shows that burnout can also be caused by a mismatch between a person’s subconscious needs and job opportunities. If you’re an introvert in a leadership role, or in a desk-bound job when you crave social interaction, it’s hardly surprising if you feel unfulfilled. However, psychologists talk of job crafting – fine-tuning your role to suit your needs.

Finding meaning at work doesn’t just have to take place in the office. Steve Stark of productivity consultancy Then Somehow, says increasing personal relationships with colleagues is a contributory factor. ‘The way we treat our co-workers and are treated by them has so much impact on our wellbeing,’ he says. ‘And feeling part of a team and taking the time to get to know your colleagues can bring meaning to your working life. Try a book group, start a lunchtime running club or volunteer somewhere together,’ suggests Stark. Post-work glass of Pinot? That can help, too. ‘There is a link between people who spend time in groups and feeling happy,’ he says. Of course, meaning is not a new concept. It’s something we’ve yearned for since the beginning of time. It got a little lost in the global ‘pursuit of happiness’ over the past two decades – and to little avail: a University of Chicago report shows self-reported measures of happiness have remained stagnant for 40 years. But we’re ready to bring meaning back. And since it may well be found in the pub, that’s a pretty good place to start, right?

‘PEOPLE WHO SERVE OTHERS GET THE MOST MEANING’

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C H A N G E S ,

G O R G E O U S

R E S U LT S

GE A R W E N

Meet the 20 m ost cov et

HAPPY

S I M P L E

ieces to kick off 2 kit p 017 t fi e l ab

STYLING CHARLIE LAMBROS PHOTOGR APHY K AT PISIOLEK

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THE ‘IT’ GYM BAG (ON PREVIOUS PAGE), £195, MONREAL Just shy of £200 for a gym bag? Hear us out: water-resistant mesh so your kit can ‘breathe’; a wipe-clean interior for your muddy trainers; on-trend neon straps. See – it’s basically paid for itself.

04 THE REFLECTIVE CYCLE JACKET, £195, VULPINE CYCLING For the cyclist who demands substance from their kit, as well as a flattering cut, we give you this reflective jacket. It’s been tested in situ: the team literally followed cyclists down many a dark road, making sure they stayed in clear sight.

02 THE EASY-TO-STORE CYCLE HELMET, £110, CLOSCA FUGA Remember those collapsible cups from the 80s? Well, this foldable helmet is exactly the same, only you will actually want to use it. Sure, a helmet that collapses doesn’t inspire confidence, but it’s passed all the proper checks. Safe.

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THE EVERYDAY LEGGINGS, £180, HEY JO Gym, office, Tinder date; these are so comfy, you’ll want to wear them all the time. It’s all down to the ‘quick shape recovery’ Lycra (it’s a real thing, trust us). Leggings as workwear? Sure.

03 THE NEXT-GEN FITNESS TRACKER, FROM £369, APPLE/NIKE The original might barely be a year old, but the new Apple Watch Nike+ is worth a look. You get a built-in GPS tracker, plus the Nike+ Run Club app, all in the palm of your hand (or rather, on your wrist).

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GET IN GEAR

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THE WATERPROOF RUNNING JACKET, £100, SAUCONY Lightweight, waterproof, nice to look at – triple whammy. This Razor running jacket will keep you bone dry even when the heavens open, thanks to its sealed interior seams. All this and it weighs less than a pound coin.

07 THE NEW KICKS ON THE BLOCK, £145, APL When these were launched five years ago, they were banned by the NBA for giving players an ‘undue advantage’. The latest incarnation captures the energy of your foot upon impact and springs it back on lift-off. It’s not cheating. Promise.

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08 THE WIRELESS HEADPHONES, £199.95, MONSTER No headphone port? No problem – just go wireless. As well as being sans wire, the iSport Freedoms are totally sweat resistant, have a 24-hour battery life and come with a two-year guarantee. Sounds good.

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09 THE OLYMPIC THERMALS, £50, UNDER ARMOUR This brand had more exposure at Rio 2016 than Michael Phelps has medals. And this top has a clever CoolSwitch coating that pulls heat away from the skin, enabling you to double your workout time. Winner.

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THE NO-BOUNCE SPORTS BRA, £40, SHOCK ABSORBER If breasts that cannot be tamed stop you going for that run, you need this sports bra in your life. Three semi-rigid fabric panels reduce bounce by up to 75%. No more black eyes for you.

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THE SUPPORTIVE RUNNING SHOES, £100, NEW BALANCE Tested by bio-mechanics, the Fresh Foam 1080 trainers provide ultimate cushioning with a thick foam mid-sole, while boosting your run with a fully flexible sole. Need another reason to invest? They’re produced on English soil. #Brexit

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THE TOTALLY WEARABLE UNITARD, £210, LUCAS HUGH This once-piece retains its shape during ambitious stretches and the built-in sculpting shorts avoid any unfortunate camelly issue.

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THE QUICK-DRY GYM VEST, £45, EVERY SECOND COUNTS Nice when your vest is as hard-working as you are. The ‘Drirelease’ fabric dries four times faster than other materials and it’s odour-blocking, too. So you could get away with wearing it post-workout. We did. Don’t judge us.

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THE MASTER YOGA MAT, £85, LIFORME Consider this yoga mat your key to busting out the perfect downward dog. Its alignment markings guide your body into the perfect postures, and the non-slip, non-abrasive surface will prevent you falling out of tree pose, too. Full marks.

16 13 THE GO-TO YOGA PANTS, £93.20, ALO YOGA Yoga leggings that suit any size? Yep, they actually do exist. Alo Yoga bottoms are tested on models of every shape and size before they’re put into production. Oh, and these white ones have zero show-through. Result.

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THE TECHNICAL RUNNING SOCKS, £15, FALKE Ultimate running socks = comfort + odour control. Good news: these fit the bill perfectly. A mix of polypropylene, wool, and cotton transports sweat from the foot. Plus the toe, heel and sole cushions protect on impact. Job done.

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THE HARD-WORKING TOP LAYER, £65, TRIBE ELITE A true multitasker, this has high-breathe fabric in the sweatiest areas, with lighter-weight fabric on the joints. Plus, it’s anti-bacterial, quick drying and has non-chafe flat seams, too. That enough for you?

THE GYM-TO-SWIM BIKINI, £135, LNDR Whether you’re competing in an actual triathlon, or merely need an outfit for cycling, swimming and running, this is your new best friend. It’s made with lightweight breathable fabric that lets you move more freely. And, you know, it looks nice, too.

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THE SMART COMPRESSION LEGGINGS, £150, SKINS What do you get when you cross running tights with NASA boffins? The smartest leggings ever created, that’s what. Their built-in support bands allow you to control your motion for a longer period of time. It’s not rocket science. Oh, wait.

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20 THE COOL-AS-ICE UNDERWEAR, £20, ODLO Sure, you can deal with bad gym hair, but a sweaty undercarriage is a workout worry you could do without. Enter Ceramicool by Odlo – a textured fabric that siphons away body heat. Cool.

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STRENGTH & CONDITIONING

Drastic dye jobs? Ditch ’em. Chemical straightening? Forget it. If you’re still fighting against the gifts Mother Nature bestowed on you, it’s time to go back to your roots

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NEW STR ANDS

FINE HAIR THE COMPLAINT Scalp glinting through your strands can make you self-conscious, but 40% of people with thinning hair are women* and more than a fifth of UK women over 25 have thinning locks*. THE QUICK-FIX FAIL What hair extensions give with one hand they take away with the other. They pull out hair at the roots, causing traction alopecia. And while you might think a ‘volumiser’ would add guts, but adding too much can weigh down fine hair leaving it flatter to the head.

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he first rule of sculpting your dream body? Learn to work with what you have. There’s no point punishing yourself in pursuit of impossible goals. Same goes for your hair. According to a recent survey, the average woman spends £548* on her barnet every year, which begs the question: is it worth it? ‘By trying to fix a so-called problem, you can sometimes exacerbate it,’ says consultant trichologist SallyAnn Tarver of the Cotswold Trichology Centre. ‘Repeatedly straightening curly hair, for example, makes it drier and coarser, resulting in more of the frizz you’re trying to get rid of.’ We asked the professionals for people’s biggest gripes – and their insider tricks on solving them.

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THE NEW STRATEGY One thing that could be causing your locks to look lacklustre is malassezia globosa, a fungus that lives on the scalp, eating sebum and excreting oleic acid. For 50% of people it doesn’t pose a problem, but for the other half it causes clogged pores and follicles and accelerates hair loss. Kill it with micro-zinc and selenium sulfide in Head & Shoulders 3-Action formula (£2.99 for 200ml). A good diet – including protein, carbs, zinc and iron – is essential for good hair. Aesthetic practitioner Natalie Kelly says: ‘Stress or illness will divert nutrients from the scalp to the area that needs it because hair isn’t essential for survival.’ Kelly offers PRP Vitae Hair Rejuvenation at OMNIYA Mediclinic, which starts at £400. It uses marine collagen supplements and a platementrich plasma, where the client’s own blood is extracted then injected into the scalp to infuse follicles with nutrient-rich blood. The results? Increased blood flow makes hair strands more vertical rather than lying flat to the head, and follicles are energised. Want something less invasive? Regaine Once a Day Scalp Foam (£34.99), which contains 5% minoxidil that causes blood vessels to dilate at a level that is proven to make the growth/shedding cycle work in your favour.

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NEW STR ANDS

CURLY HAIR THE COMPLAINT Those of us with poker-straight strands would kill for tumbling curls. The reality? Far less glossy. ‘Curly hair is more prone to dryness than straight because it’s harder for scalp oils to wick down the coiled strands,’ says Kathy Rogerson, P&G’s head of scientific communications. ‘Normal washing and styling can disrupt the layered outermost cuticle of the hair. Messing up this usually flat coat can leave hair frizzy and dull.’ More Phil Spector than Farrah Fawcett. THE QUICK-FIX FAIL Most curly hair can’t take the heat from straighteners. ‘High temperatures alter the proteins that give curls their shape, leaving them limp,’ says Rogerson. And the alcohol in styling mousses and sprays will leave you with a crunchy mess like a packet of dried noodles.

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The expert: Bobbi Brown Who: Make-up artist, founder and CCO of Bobbi Brown Cosmetics

Q Pregnancy glow? I’m exhausted and spotty – help!

GREY HAIR THE COMPLAINT Nowadays a silver mane is the epitome of follicular chic, but glistening grey locks don’t appear overnight. Apparently, 32% of women discover their first unwanted silver strands before they’re 30. A study in the British Journal of Dermatology reported the cells of those pesky older strands grow at twice the rate of younger hair, leaving you looking more skunk than sleek. THE QUICK-FIX FAIL Colouring covers something that may be naturally beautiful, and it doesn’t always go to plan. ‘The cuticles of grey hair can be packed so tightly that it’s difficult for cosmetic pigment to get in there,’ says Tarver. The result? ‘Greys will remain a slightly different shade to the rest of your hair.’ And what about that badger-like texture? ‘Women who go grey tend to cut their hair short because it’s coarser and less malleable,’ explains Stafford. ‘But these aren’t dry ends you can just snip off. Cutting strands does nothing to alter the texture of grey hair.’

January/February 2017

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THE NEW STRATEGY If you’re ‘transitioning’, painting lighter pieces around your parting can disguise greys that won’t take colour. Warming hair slightly with a blast from your dryer will open the cuticle, allowing the hair colour molecules to penetrate then close during the conditioning process. Wait until you’re 75% grey before weaning yourself off artificial colour for good. And what about your texture? ‘Elasticising products and oils that might have been too heavy before can have a massive impact and help hair appear softer and shinier and make it stay where you want it,’ says Stafford. Look for softening agents like the ones in Phyto Phytargent shampoo (£12.50). It’s formulated with 50% cornflower, which softens hair, while antioxidant walnut leaf neutralises discolouration caused by pollution that can leave greys looking grimy. Go for pre-wash treatments containing natural humectants, such as Philip Kingsley Elasticizer Pre Shampoo Treatment (£30). It contains castor and olive oil, which draws moisture into the hair shaft and keeps it there.

A When your body is going through massive changes, it’s bound to affect your face, too. You might not feel so radiant after a morning hunched over the loo, but my subtly pearlescent Extra Illuminating Moisture Balm (£42.50) used under make-up reflects light and injects energy into skin. You’ll need more concealer to disguise blemishes and a higher coverage foundation should help instil confidence. Spray tans aren’t safe when you’re carrying, but bronzers might help you feel like you. Q How do I do ‘no make-up’ make-up? A It actually takes a lot of product to make it look as if you’re not wearing any. First, exfoliate to avoid your base looking patchy but swerve grainy scrubs, which can cause redness. Foundation next. Put it only where you need it and dust in circular motions over a mineral powder for an undetectable veil. Pick a cream blusher that’s close to your post-exercise glow and apply a small amount to the lips. Stick to brown mascara, unless your lashes are very dark, and don’t exceed two coats. Comb colour sparingly through brows – any on the skin beneath is a dead giveaway. Gorgeous.

womenshealthmag.co.uk

WORDS: AMELIA JEAN JONES. PHOTOGRAPHY: BETH STERNBAUM/LICENSINGPROJECT.COM; ALEXANDER STRAULINO/TRUNKARCHIVE.COM. *SOURCES PHILIPS; AMERICAN HAIR LOSS ASSOCIATION; PHILIP KINGSLEY

Fade to grey

THE NEW STRATEGY Appreciating your curls means you can embrace your kinks. Avoid shampoo with sulfates or sodium laurel sulfate – the key ingredients in foamy ones – it’s too harsh for kinky strands. Instead look for sodium lauroamphoacetate. It’s gentle and bubble-free, yet cleanses effectively. Try it in Oribe Ultra Gentle Shampoo (£24). ‘Play with your curls while your hair’s wet and twist them until they look the way you want,’ says celebrity hairdresser Lee Stafford. ‘Dry curls uniformly using a diffuser rather than overdoing one section and damaging it.’ Just avoid touching your hair as you dry because as the cuticle lifts during the drying process, moisture sitting on wet strands can enter the hair, swelling and causing frizz. When there’s not a drop of moisture left, gently and quickly tong the wonky bits into submission with a barrel that’s the same diameter as your natural curl and at a temperature no higher than 200°C. This helps the cuticles lie flat and should even add a bit of shine. Voila!

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Ask our expert


TIME MACHINES

WH Tests

ANTI-AGEING DEVICES The wrinkle-busting, skin-plumping gadgets that’ll help keep the Botox at bay

BEST FOR SKIN TIGHTENING

FACEGYM PRO £399

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Experience Results Value for money They say: Like a personal trainer for your face, electrical stimulation targets facial muscles for instant lifting, tightening, sculpting and wrinkle reduction. Paired with an enhanced primer gel, the FaceGym Pro provides dramatic results in just 10 minutes, four times a week. Amelia says: Not as painful as the other treatments, but the twitching is not attractive – maybe not one for the gym changing room. The day after using it, my face felt fatigued and sore, a bit like facial DOMS. But, like a regular workout, with the cumulative results, you’ll never regret a session.

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BEST FOR INSTANT SMOOTHNESS

NUFACE TRINITY FACIAL TRAINER KIT £300† Experience Results Value for money They say: This handheld, multi-solution device is clinically proven to improve facial contours and skintone and reduce the appearance of wrinkles in just five minutes a day. Amelia says: Felt like hot fat spitting onto my face, but I think it was worth it. Although expensive, the infrared ‘Wrinkle Reducer’ and the lip and eye heads yielded results for the price of a single facial appointment. After wiping off the gel, my skin immediately appeared refreshed. Like a medical-grade skin treatment from your own bathroom.

womenshealthmag.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHY: PAVEL DORNAK AT HEARST STUDIOS. *SOURCE: MINTEL. †WITH EXTRA ATTACHMENTS FROM £135

Me? I love a gadget. If there’s a handheld gizmo that can make my life easier, I’m all over it. The iPod? Meant I could ditch the Who: Amelia Jean Jones CD rack. The You’ll know her as… iPhone? Meant WH’s Health and I could lose the Beauty Editor iPod. The Fitbit? Now I can track everything from calories to cardio and kip. So why not apply those very same forward-thinking principles to your skincare? An effective gadget can transform your results from the everyday to those you’d expect from a professional clinic. That’s probably why market research* shows a third of women are currently interested in buying one. This month I give you those that can smooth you out and tighten you up.


BEST FOR AN EYE LIFT

BEST FOR CROW’S FEET

TALIKA TIME CONTROL £79

TRIA AGE-DEFYING EYE WRINKLE CORRECTING LASER £269

Experience Results Value for money They say: The effects of this tiny tech are fourfold: it regenerates fragile skin around the eye, targets inflammation and wrinkles, stimulates cellular exchanges and an ionic charge increases eye cream’s effectiveness. Amelia says: Considering this was doing so much, I hardly felt a thing – the massaging vibration was actually quite nice. Now, call me a masochist, but I like to leave my dermatologist feeling and looking like I’ve been punched in the face. Somehow it just feels like the results will be more dramatic.

womenshealthmag.co.uk

BEST FOR SKIN PLUMPING

NEO ELEGANCE FACE LIFT PRO £249 Experience Results Value for money They say: Hailed the ‘no-needle mesotherapy treatment’, this device uses the same technology found in professional salons and skin clinics, emitting low-frequency electrical impulses to tone, lift and tighten the skin. Amelia says: Sure, it felt like donning a balaclava of angry bees, but this treatment got to those deep layers of my dermis. Four LED light treatments target different layers of the skin, as electrical impulses made my face burn and muscles twitch. But noticeably plumper skin the following day helped ease my pain.

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Experience Results Value for money They say: An anti-ageing laser designed for the delicate eye area. The laser only fires when in contact with the skin and targets fine lines and wrinkles around the eyes for results in just two minutes per day. Amelia says: As I near 30, the crow has clawed and stamped its miserable feet all over my poor eye area, so I had high hopes for this one. It was by far the most painful and I really had to psyche myself up for it. The results: a swollen red stripe around the eye, but smoothed-out wrinkles the next day. Pain is beauty.

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EASY R IDER

THE BIKER LEGGINGS

They’re the leggings of the season – and you don’t need to be on the back of a Harley to pull them off. PT and fitness blogger Adrienne Herbert shows you how to rev up your ensemble in and out of the gym

From sport…

• Coat, £199, H&M • Shirt, £60, Topshop • Clutch, £110, LK Bennett • Brogues, £59, Dune

Biker leggings you say? Yep, it’s all down to the panelling and padding on the knees. The bonus? The quilting will provide extra cushioning during floor work, so you can kiss goodbye to bald patches (and sore knees). And the stretchy jersey lets you move freely. Style it • Deep, rich colours like aubergine, kale and midnight blue have all the slimming effect of black and none of the boredom factor. • Look for quilting that sits diagonally across your legs. It will draw the eye in, creating an elongating effect. • Toned arms? Lucky you. A sports bra with thin straps will show off all your hard work.

Wear leggings with a shearling coat over a floaty blouse to promote them to legit fashion item. With brogues and a clutch, no one will know you’re just seconds from the perfect burpee.

• Sports bra, £55, Ana Hart • Trainers, £125, Asics

ADRIENNE WEARS… Leggings, £165, Monreal ‘This colour has just enough detail to make me feel dressed up.’ Insta-stalk Adrienne @adriennetmm

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Style it • A top that reaches mid thigh will banish camel toe and cover the widest part of your leg. • Go for nude. The unbroken line from shoe to leg has a lengthening effect. • Choose a coat with three-quarter length sleeves, allowing the top to poke out below the cuff. More boho than Big Ron from EastEnders.

womenshealthmag.co.uk

STYLING: PAMELA HARRIS. PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC AT HEARST STUDIOS. HAIR AND MAKE-UP: GIGI HAMMOND AT UNTITLED ARTISTS LONDON USING NARS

…to street


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Lay it


DRY SKIN Carly Rowena Personal Trainer ‘I’m not a huge fan of piling on make-up, so I rely on my complexion to give me confidence. I work hard to keep my skin in check; with dehydrating air-con in the gym, I have become really fond of my skincare routine.’

DITCH DRY SKIN WITH... SkinLongevity™ Vital Power Infusion ■ Pure Plush™ Gentle Deep Cleansing Foam ■

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CARE AND REPAIR Visit womenshealthmag.co.uk to see how the ambassadors got on with their bareMinerals regimes, and find your nearest bareMinerals counter at bareminerals.co.uk/stores to claim your free skincare sample* with consultation.

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Amy Hopkinson WH Digital Editor ‘My skin has more hormonal issues than a teenage PE class, so my skin routine follows that of my workouts – strong and simple.’


PHOTOGRAPHY: IAN HARRISON; KAT PISOLEK AT HEARST STUDIOS. HAIR AND MAKE-UP: CHARLOTTE GASKELL AT LHA REPRESENTS. KATIE WEARS: TOP, £50, VARLEY; PANTS, £16, SWEATY BETTY

NOW FIND OUT HOW

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EVENT

BOOK NOW! THURSDAY 9 MARCH VICTORIA HOUSE, LONDON 5:30 – 9:30PM TICKETS ONLY £29

presents Get your sweat on in style and be part of the first ever Women’s Health Fit Night Out, an exclusive evening of workouts and wellness. Train with the UK’s hottest PTs, get top tips from your favourite foodies, discover the latest health must-haves and much more. Full line-up to be announced soon!

YO U R T I C K E T I N C L U D E S :

REGISTER NOW AT WWW.WOMENSHEALTHMAG.CO.UK/FNO


Special

BEST BODY

PHOTOGRAPHY: IAN HARRISON. KATIE WEARS: TOP, £50, VARLEY; LEGGINGS, £32.95, ADIDAS; TRAINERS, £141, APL

I

t shouldn’t happen to a Women’s Health editor. But a few months ago, I had to admit that it had. It was hardly an original story. A busy period at work had meant more desk time and less gym time. Stressed, I lacked the brain space to make consciously healthy eating choices – ease and comfort became the main drivers. A few extra pounds turned into an extra dress size. At a 12, I was hardly obese – although, at almost 29% body fat, I was very close to being officially overweight. But I can honestly say it wasn’t the numbers on the scale or clothes labels that bothered me. It was simply feeling constantly crap about myself. Aside from having half a wardrobe of clothes I could no longer fit into, I felt viscerally weak. When I went for a run my legs felt heavy. I avoided HIIT classes because I knew I simply couldn’t do it. Things that shouldn’t have been an effort were. So eventually I asked the team at London’s Third Space gym for help. They introduced me to PT Chiara Pellegrino and, 10 weeks later, here we are. I’ve lost almost 10% body fat; down to just over 19%, which is, thanks very much, in the athletic range for women. When I started, I thought 10 weeks would be plenty of time for me to sculpt the abs of a fitness model. The reality is that perhaps it would have been if I’d wanted this to be 10 weeks of pure denial and restriction. But that was never the point; I wanted this to be sustainable. I still wanted to have some semblance of a social life, to enjoy my weekends and to look forward to meal times. So I trained five or six times a week – a mix of resistance work and high-intensity cardio – and my calorie intake was around 1500-1600 a day, six days a week. The guys from food delivery company Fresh Fitness Foods helped me work out my macros to ensure that I got the right amount of protein, carbs and fat to be able to slim down, build lean muscle and have enough energy to work out. And then one glorious day a week I’d do, eat and drink whatever I liked. Sounds doable? It totally was. And while I’m absolutely aware I don’t look anything like a fitness model, I feel strong, motivated, confident and so much happier than I was before. And that’s worth every bead of sweat.

Katie Mulloyy / Editor

womenshealthmag.co.uk

WEIGHT

BODY FAT

BMI

BEFORE

68.5kg

28.5%

24

AFTER

63kg

19.2%

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TR ANSFORM IN WEEKS

10

Where do you start with your 2017 body goals? Right here. Over the next 28 pages, you’ll find all you need to kick-start your New Year reshape

S

o here’s the deal: the first two weeks of the plan are printed here for you to follow. Want more? Of course you do. In that case, go to womenshealthmag.co.uk where you’ll be able to access all the moves in motion and sign up to follow the full 10-week transformation plan. You can watch the videos on your phone in order to work out at home or at the gym.

Chiara Pellegrino, 28, is part of the crack team of PTs at London’s exclusive Third Space gym, Soho, (thirdspace.london) and the creator of the WH 10-week transformation plan. ‘This programme combines traditional bodyweight exercises with sculpting, barre-inspired moves and fat-melting, high-intensity cardio,’ she says. ‘Each workout offers something different in order to keep your body guessing and your progress moving in the right direction.’ Both the cardio and resistance workouts use minimal kit (see opposite panel), but if you do have access to a gym or some meatier equipment, then you can also work heavy weights sessions and TRX toning into the plan. Struggling with motivation? ‘Always come back to the reason why you decided to start,’ says Chiara. ‘It was your decision to embark on this journey and there’s a good reason. Write it down if you have to so you can revisit it when things get tough. Be patient and consistent and persevere.’

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Okay, your aim is to work out five or six times a week, mixing up fat-torching, high-intensity sessions with body-sculpting resistance work

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DAY 1

DAY 2

HIIT CIRCUIT 1

RESISTANCE

womenshealthmag.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHY: IAN HARRISON. HAIR AND MAKE-UP: CHARLOTTE GASKELL AT LHA REPRESENTS. CHIARA WEARS: TOP, £45, SWEATY BETTY; LEGGINGS, £90, SWEATY BETTY

MEET THE TRAINER


BEST BODY

Special

GET KIT, GET FIT Want the most out of your 10 weeks? You’ll need the right tools

WH DUMBBELLS, £11.99 each (argos.co.uk)

Choose a weight between 4kg and 6kg for week two WH RESISTANCE BANDS, £5.99 (argos.co.uk)

Turn your home into an iron-free weights room WH YOGA MAT, £19.99 (argos.co.uk)

You don’t want to be slipping on the lino or burying your face in the carpet, do you? STEP, £150 (escapefitness.com)

BANDS AND DUMBBELLS AVAILABLE FROM 20 JANUARY; BUY ONE DUMBBELL, GET ONE HALF PRICE

Anti-slip with a built-in back rest; it’s all about the multi-tasking

DAY 3

DAY 4

DAY 5

REST/CLASS

HIIT CIRCUIT 2

RESISTANCE/ GYM SESSION

womenshealthmag.co.uk

DAY 7

DAY 6 REST

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HIIT CIRCUIT 1

You’ll need: Plyometric box (optional), step-up bench Do: 5 sets (8, 12, 16, 12 then 8 reps) for every move

W E E K O N E

It’s time to bite the bullet. Ready? Of course you are, you crazy little fat burner

1

TEMPO LUNGE SWITCH (a) Step your right foot forwards into a lunge, bending at a 90° angle at the knee, ensuring it doesn’t overshoot your toes, and lowering until your thigh is parallel to the floor. (b) Jump so both feet leave the floor, and switch sides so that your left leg is lunged forward.

2

3

SIDE-TO-SIDE BENCH JUMP (a) Stand parallel to the right of a bench. Keep your position and place your left foot onto the bench. Push up through your right foot and place it next to your left on the bench. (b) Step your right foot down onto the floor, before returning it next to your left. Then step your left back down to its original position. At least one foot should be on the bench at any one time.

4 BOX JUMPS (a) Stand facing a box (or your step) with your feet shoulderwidth apart and toes facing forwards. Squat down before pushing through your heels to jump onto the bench, landing in a squat, ensuring both feet are fully on the box. Then stand up straight. (b) Squat, then jump backwards onto the floor to return to starting.

5

CRAB WALK AND PRESS-UP (a) Start in a high plank with your arms straight and legs extended behind you. Place your left hand out to the side, followed quickly by your left leg, then right hand and right leg as though scurrying sideways like a crab. (b) Pause, with legs wide, and lower your upper body down into a press-up, then come back up and move in the opposite direction.

BENCH CRUNCH (a) Sit lengthways on a bench in a V shape with your torso slightly reclined and your legs in a table top position. Hold each side of the bench for support. (b) Lower your upper body by bending your elbows to 90° and straighten your legs out in front. Bring your knees and torso back up to recreate the V shape.

womenshealthmag.co.uk


Special

BEST BODY

RESISTANCE

You’ll need: Bench, mat and resistance band Do: Repeat each superset, or giant-set, three times

SUPERSET ONE

1A

BENCH LUNGE Do: 10 on each side (a) Start in a lunge position with your left foot on a bench behind you and your right foot on the floor in front. Bend your right leg to 90°, ensuring your knee stays in line with your toes. (b) Push through the heel of your right foot to straighten your leg.

1B

SUPERSET TWO

2A

WALKOUT Do: 10 reps (a) With legs hip-width apart and toes facing forwards, keep your legs straight and reach down, touching the floor. Walk your hands into a high plank. Keep your back straight. (b) Walk your hands back towards your feet, keeping your legs straight. Return to standing.

2B

SUPERSET THREE

3A

ARM BAND EXTENSION Do: 15 reps (a) Stand with feet wide, toes turned out. Straighten your arms in front of you with the ends of a taut resistance band in each hand. (b) Lower into a wide squat as you move your hands outwards and away. Reverse movement and push up to standing.

GIANT-SET FOUR

4A

FOREARM PLANK ROCK Do: 10 reps (a) Start in a plank. Keep your back straight and parallel to the floor, use your toes to slowly rock forwards to bring your shoulders in front of your elbows. (b) Rock back to starting position. Engage your hamstrings to keep your body level.

4B SIDE PLANK Do: 10 reps on each side (a) Lie on your left side, stack your right foot on top of the left and lift yourself up onto your left forearm, hips away from floor. (b) Lower your left hip to tap the floor. Lift your hip back up again.

3B

4C BODY WEIGHT SQUAT Do: 15 reps (a) Stand with legs hip-width apart, bench behind you. Keeping your chest upright, bend at the knees, lowering down into a squat until your thighs are parallel to the floor and your bum taps the bench. Cheeky. (b) Push through your heels to straighten your legs. Squeeze your glutes at the top.

womenshealthmag.co.uk

BRIDGE LEG RAISE Do: 10 reps, 10 pulses (a) Lie on your back with your knees bent and feet hip-width apart. Straighten and point your right leg straight up. From the base of your spine slowly peel your lower back into a bridge position. Squeeze your glutes. (b) Reverse your lower back onto the mat. Then lower your leg to hover above the floor and pulse.

BENT-OVER ROW Do: 20 reps a. Stand on the resistance band, feet hip-distance apart, knees bent. Cross over the band and hold one end in each hand. b. Pull your elbows up until they are level with your shoulders. Lower your hands towards your feet to return to the starting position. Breathe a massive sigh of relief.

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REVERSE FOREARM PLANK CRISS CROSS Do: 20 reps (a) Sitting on a mat, lean back onto your elbows, straighten your legs and raise them off the floor. (b) Engaging your core and keeping your upper body still, scissor your left leg over your right, with control, then reverse.

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HIIT CIRCUIT 2

You’ll need: Mat, stopwatch Do: 45 seconds for each move and 15 seconds rest. Repeat each round twice

ROUND TWO

ROUND ONE

1A

1C

ROPE CLIMBER HIGH KNEES (a) Stand with your feet together and arms and hands in front of you at shoulder height. Imagine you are gripping a vertical rope with one fist on top of the other. (b) Lift your right knee above waist height, then your left. At the same time move your hands in an upwards motion as if you’re climbing the rope.

1B

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W O M E N ’ S H E A LT H

DIAGONAL SQUAT WITH FRONT KICK (a) Stand with feet wider than hip-distance apart and lower into a deep squat. Push up through your heels and balancing on your left leg, kick your right foot high into the air to your side. (b) Bring your right foot back to the floor then jump into the air landing back in a deep squat. Repeat on the other side.

1D

2B HIGH-KNEE SIDE-TO-SIDE (a) Start with feet hip-width apart. Raise your right knee above your waist. (b) Stride to your right before bringing your right knee up high.

SIDE BURPEE AND 180° JUMP (a) Stand with your feet together. Crouch down, hands on the floor. Jump your feet back into a high plank. Lower your chest to the floor in a press-up, then go back up to your plank. Jump your feet towards your hands. (b) Stand up straight and jump, turning 180°. Repeat the entire burpee movement facing the other way.

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January/February 2017

2D

RUN ON THE SPOT (a) Stand with feet together and knees slightly bent. (b) Run vigorously on the spot while pumping your arms. Go.

2C

TRICEP CAN-CAN (a) Sit on a mat with your legs bent in front of you, feet flat on the floor. Place your hands behind you, fingers pointing forwards, elbows slightly bent. (b) Lift your bottom slightly off the floor and quickly kick your feet into the air, one after the other. This one will hurt.

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2A

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PLANK SKI JUMP (a) Starting in a high plank with your arms straight, bend your knees before pushing both feet into the air and landing them together on your right side. (b) Do the same on your left side.

PLANK TOE TOUCH WITH POWER LEAP (a) Stand with feet hip-distance apart. Place your hands on the floor and jump back into a high plank with your arms straight. Bring your right foot towards your right hand and push off it into the air, bringing your left knee high for extra momentum and swinging your arms. (b) Repeat on the other side.

womenshealthmag.co.uk


Special

BEST BODY

GYM SESSION

You’ll need: TRX rope, mat Do: Repeat each superset three times Loop the TRX rope around something sturdy enough to support you, ensuring it can carry your weight. Adjust so the handles hang at knee-height. SUPERSET ONE

SUPERSET THREE

SUPERSET FOUR

1A

2A

3A

4A

SUSPENDED LUNGE Do: 10 reps on each side (a) Stand one stride in front of the TRX, facing away from it. Placing all your weight on your left leg, raise your right leg back and insert your foot into the loop. (b) Lower into a deep lunge, knees over toes. Push up through your left foot to return to the start. Now switch sides.

HAMSTRING CURL Do: 10 reps (a) Lie on the floor with the TRX rope in front of you, arms at your sides and heels in the loops. Raise your legs, bottom and lower back off the floor, then draw your knees up and towards you until your legs form a table-top position. Dangling never looked so good. (b) Slowly push your feet away from you until you’re back at the starting position.

SUSPENDED PRESS-UP Do: 8 reps (a) Lying on your front on a mat, place your feet in the rope’s loops behind you. Push up into a high plank with arms straight. (b) Bend your elbows and lower your chest to the floor again.

CRUNCH Do: 10 reps (a) Lie on the floor with the TRX in front of you, feet in the loops and knees bent at 90°. (b) Crunch your body up to your knees in a V-shape, reaching your hands towards your feet. Hold for two breaths, gently lower.

1B

WORDS: LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: IAN HARRISON

SUPERSET TWO

PISTOL SQUAT Do: 10 reps on each side (a) Stand on your right leg with a TRX handle in each hand. Bend your right knee to squat down and lift your left leg straight out in front of you, foot flexed. Keep your weight in your right heel, chest up. (b) Pushing through your heel, return to the starting position. You guessed it: switch sides.

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4B

3B

2B BRIDGE Do: 10 reps (a) Lying on the floor with the TRX in front of you and arms on the floor, place your heels in the loops. Your knees should be bent almost at a 90° angle. (b) Pushing your palms into the floor, raise your bottom and lower back until your torso and thighs align. Squeeze your glutes for a couple of seconds before returning to the starting position.

ROWS Do: 10 reps (a) Stand in front of the TRX with a handle in each hand. Lean back on your heels, elbows bent and tucked into your sides, hands by your chest, until the rope is taut. (b) Stretch your arms out straight and lean back towards the floor, engaging your core to maintain a neutral posture. Pull on the handles to lift yourself up again. Good for your guns, OK?

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OBLIQUE ELBOW REACH Do: 8 reps (a) Adopt a high plank position in front of the TRX, feet in the loops. (b) Unloop your right foot and bring your right knee towards your left elbow, keeping your body level. Straighten your right leg out to the side. Return to plank, put your foot back in the loop and repeat on the other side. Your core will love you.

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THE FOOD RULES

Want to see results in the gym? Then you need to make some changes in the kitchen. We asked the experts for their pro tips on fuelling your transformation

Q

Q

How soon should I eat before I train?

Do I need to tailor my food for each workout?

There’s no point in having an optimal balance of nutrients if you’re eating them at the wrong times. ‘Wait two or three hours after a main meal before you work out,’ says Emma Rose, nutritionist at Fresh Fitness Food (freshfitnessfood.com). Snacks are a different matter: hit those 30-40 minutes beforehand (within reason). ‘Avoid food high in fat, which doesn’t sit well in the stomach. High-fibre foods can also cause discomfort if you’re training hard,’ says Rose. So ditch that nut butter and grab a banana.

‘Don’t overthink it,’ advises Kevin Currell, head of performance nutrition at the English Institute of Sport. ‘A balance of protein, carbs and fats is the ideal whatever you’re doing later.’ Think: a piece of salmon, brown rice and stir-fried greens. Carbs are key. ‘They provide your muscles with glycogen, a sugar that enables you to maintain intensity when you’re working out,’ says Currell. Off to a sweaty spin class? ‘You’ll burn up more glycogen, so load up on grains,’ adds Rose. But lay off the starch if you’re lifting.

Q

Is training on an empty stomach ever worth it?

Sorry, but there’s no consensus on this one. ‘The theory is that by not eating, and not stocking your muscles with glycogen, your body will use its fat stores for fuel instead,’ says nutritionist Aisling Pigott. ‘But this hasn’t been proven.’ If running on empty does work for you,

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be mindful. ‘It’s possible your muscles are more injury-prone when you’re exercising in a fasted state – because you haven’t replenished your glycogen stores,’ she says. So don’t make this the morning you push for a weights-room PB, and pay attention to form. January/February 2017

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Q How should I count my macros; and why should I bother? Sculpting your physique can’t be achieved just by counting calories. That’s where counting macros comes in. So, get comfy, take a deep breath and let Rose explain it in layman’s terms. 1. Work out your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) To do this you use the Harris-Benedict equation. The formula: 655 + (4.35 x your weight in pounds) + (4.7 x your height in inches) – (4.7 x age). 2. Multiply by your activity Little or no exercise: 1.2; light exercise a few times a week: 1.375; moderate exercise 3-5 times a week: 1.55; heavy exercise 6-7 times per week: 1.725. The number you’re left with? That’s your daily amount of calories. 3. Get the fit-body ratio To stay lean while adding muscle, I’d suggest a 40/30/30 (protein/carbs/fat) macro split. This provides your fix of carbs to fuel workouts, protein to build and repair muscle – and healthy fats to maintain optimal hormone production – vital for staying lean. 4. Personalise your formula Protein and carbs provide four cals, while fats provide nine cals. Here’s how a 1800-calorie diet would look like on 40/30/30: Protein 1800 x 0.4 = 720kcal / 4 = 180g Carb 1800 x 0.3 = 540kcal / 4 = 135g Fat 1800 x 0.3 = 540kcal /9 = 60g. See? Simple. Sort of.

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BEST BODY

Special IT’S THE LITTLE THINGS Bite-size health hacks that keep the pros on target

1 SHOP ON AUTOPILOT ‘Write a default weekly shopping list, containing enough ingredients for 60-80% of your meals,’ advises nutritionist Drew Price. ‘It forces you to plan ahead – and helps with staying on budget.’

2 PREP YOUR POST-SWEAT BREAKFAST ‘Fill a pot with Greek yoghurt, oats, cashews and blueberries and put it in the fridge overnight,’ says Currell. ‘Much less sugar than shop-bought bircher pots.

Q

3

What should I eat after an evening workout?

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4 BE FIT FOOD SHREWD ‘Healthy’ energy bars often aren’t all they seem. ‘Read the label: the sugars should be no more than half the carb content,’ says Currell. ‘Swerve any sweeteners you can’t pronounce.’

COMPILED BY: ROÍSIN DERVISH-O’KANE. PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES

‘Protein is essential,’ says Currell. ‘Its amino acids trigger muscles to build and repair where they’ve been broken down.’ Not counting macros? Rose suggests aiming for 30g of chicken, fish, eggs or plant-based protein like tofu. ‘Carbs are important for two reasons,’ says Pigott, a registered sports nutritionist and BDA spokesperson. ‘First, muscles needs glucose to replenish glycogen storage lost during exercise. Second, in order to transport the protein into the muscles, your body needs to release insulin, which is triggered in response to glucose, which you get from eating carbs,’ she adds. The takeout: skip the starch; skip the muscle gains. As before, you’ll need more carbs after treadmill sprints than 45 minutes at the squat rack.

TRACK YOUR MACROS The My Fitness Pal app isn’t just for calorie counting. ‘It has the macros of almost any product,’ says Rose. ‘It adds everything up so you can keep a running tally.’

January/February 2017

5 PLAN FOR PERIOD CRAVINGS ‘Ensure you’re eating enough food – and at regular intervals – to keep blood sugar levels steady and support your decision-making capacity,’ says Pigott.

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These 12 recipes from meal delivery service Fresh Fitness Food will help you nail your macros

THE MEAL PLAN

BREAKFAST The supercharged way to fuel your workout (and whatever else you have in store)

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BEST BODY

Special

Tweak your full English like this: ‘Swap bacon for turkey – it slashes the fat content and the eggs are full of B vitamins to increase energy,’ says nutritionist Emma Rose of Fresh Fitness Food. protein 33g

carbs 14g

fat 23g

INGREDIENTS 3 rashers of turkey bacon 1 tomato halved 1 flat mushroom 90g mixed beans 1 tbsp Cajun spice 2 eggs ½ tsp chopped chives METHOD 1. Turn grill to a medium heat and place bacon, tomato and mushroom under it. 2. Put beans and Cajun spice into a pan over a low heat for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. 3. Lightly whisk the eggs and scramble them into a lightly oiled pan on the stove. Add the chives. Serve, eat, enjoy.

Start your day with a powerpacked pot. ‘Full of fibre and healthy fats, chia seeds help balance blood sugar, stopping those cravings,’ says Rose. protein 32g

carbs 40g

fat 19g

INGREDIENTS 2 tsp chia seeds ½ tsp matcha powder 50ml almond milk 350ml coconut yoghurt 15g vanilla whey protein fresh fruit 100g granola mango slices

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METHOD 1. Mix the chia seeds and matcha powder with the almond milk and leave overnight to soak. 2. Combine the coconut yoghurt with the protein powder. 3. Place fresh fruit in the bottom of a serving jar and layer the chia mix, yoghurt and granola on top. 4. Garnish with slices of fresh fruit. Breakfast is served.

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Satisfy a grumbling tum with a double protein punch. ‘The yolks are full of vitamins and minerals,’ says Rose. ‘And the fat helps the greens’ vitamins absorb better.’ protein 32g

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carbs 40g

fat 19g

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INGREDIENTS 45g diced chicken breast 3 eggs ½ spring onion, chopped 1tsp chives, chopped 5 asparagus spears handful of watercress handful of spinach

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METHOD 1. Cook the diced chicken breast in a little coconut oil. Set aside. 2. Crack the eggs into a bowl and whisk lightly, add the spring onion, spinach and chives and season with salt and pepper. 3. Pour the mix into a hot pan,

add the cooked chicken and heat for 3-5 minutes. 4. Steam the asparagus over boiling water for 5 mins. 5. Serve the omelette piping hot, with the steamed asparagus and watercress salad. Greens with greens? Done.

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Special

BEST BODY

When only a sweet breakfast will do. ‘Whey protein and creamy quark help keep you full – and the sweetness of bananas means you don’t need refined sugars,’ says Rose. protein 45g

carbs 26g

fat 28g

INGREDIENTS For the pancake: 1 egg 30g vanilla whey protein 1 tsp gluten-free baking powder 50g gluten-free flour 50ml almond milk 1 banana For the topping: 20g vanilla whey protein powder 2 tbsp quark Fresh fruit 2 tbsp chopped nuts maple syrup (optional) METHOD 1. Combine the pancake mix ingredients in a blender until smooth. 2. Heat a non-stick pan and brush with coconut oil. 3. Using a ladle, spoon the batter mix into the heated pan. Cook until small bubbles appear on the surface, then flip and repeat on the other side. 4. Whip together the strawberry protein powder and quark. 5. Pour mix over the pancakes add fresh fruit and top with the chopped nuts. Not just a weekend treat.

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An Insta-ready brunch needn’t be a blow-out. ‘Smoked salmon has omega-3 that keeps your joints supple,’ says Rose. And the eggs are extra protein, too. sprotein 45g

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carbs 26g

INGREDIENTS 2 eggs 30g smoked salmon ½ tsp chives, chopped 6 cherry tomatoes ½ tsp oregano Handful watercress

fat 28g

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METHOD 1. Crack the eggs into a bowl and lightly whisk, add the salmon and chives and season with salt and pepper. 2. Season the tomatoes with salt, pepper and oregano, then roast at 180°C for 20 minutes.

3. Pour the egg mix into greased muffin tins. 4. Bake at 180°C for 10 minutes or until the muffins are set. 5. Serve the hot muffins and roasted tomatoes with a handful of watercress. Yum.

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BEST BODY

MAINS Refuel with these perfectly-proportioned, nutrientpacked plates that’ll slay hunger pangs

Curry is fine, just strip away all the sundries. ‘Spices bolster immunity – which can suffer when you’re training hard. Packed with vitamin C, chillies rev your metabolism,’ says Rose. Hot! protein 45g

carbs 26g

fat 28g

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INGREDIENTS 100g beef bavette 1 red chilli, chopped 100ml coconut milk 95g broccoli 100g brown rice 1 tsp lemongrass 1 tsp ginger 1 tsp parsley, chopped METHOD 1. Heat a little olive oil in a large frying pan and sear the beef until

browned on both sides (the colour you get now will boost the final flavour of this dish). 2. Add half the chopped chilli and cook for another minute. 3. Pour in the coconut milk, bring to the boil, cover and then reduce to a simmer for 30-45 minutes until the beef is tender. 4. Sprinkle the rest of the chilli (if

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you like it hot) over the broccoli and roast for 20 minutes at 180°C. 5. Cover the rice with cold water, and add lemongrass and ginger. 6. Bring to the boil and turn off the heat. Cover and let fluff up. 7. Serve the curry, rice and veg and garnish with freshly chopped parsley. It’s as if you’re in Bangkok.

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BEST BODY

‘One in five of us are vitamin-D deficient – and salmon is one of few natural sources. With the slow-release carbs in the greens, this dish gives all-day energy release,’ Rose explains. protein 33g

carbs 15g

fat 33g

INGREDIENTS handful of hazelnuts 1 tsp white sesame seeds ½ tsp cumin powder ½ tsp matcha powder 100g salmon 40g broccoli 30g white cabbage 5 asparagus spears ¼ avocado 1 tbsp olive oil METHOD 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. 2. Crush the hazelnuts in a bowl and add sesame seeds, cumin, matcha powder and salt and pepper. 3. Layer the mixture on top of the salmon. 4. Bake for 15-20 minutes. 5. Steam the broccoli, cabbage and asparagus for 6-8 minutes. 6. Mix the avocado and olive oil together in a blender until smooth. 7. Pour it over the salmon and vegetables. Now enjoy.

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Follow the Japanese – where people have eaten clean’ for years. ‘Protein fills you up, fermented miso builds healthy bacteria and green and red veg provide antioxidants,’ says Rose. protein 42g

carbs 32g

fat 5g

INGREDIENTS 1 tsp tamari sauce 1 tsp ginger chopped 1 tsp star anise chopped 1 tsp spring onion, chopped 1 tsp honey 100g chicken breast 40g beetroot 1 tsp fish sauce 1 clove of garlic 1 tsp miso paste 1 tsp sesame oil 1 tsp lime juice 100g rice noodles 20g bean shoots 1 tsp sesame seeds

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METHOD 1. Preheat the oven to 200°C. 2. Roast the beetroot for 40-50 minutes. 3. Mix together the tamari, ginger, star anise, spring onion and honey. 4. Coat both sides of the chicken with this dressing, place on a tray and bake for 10 minutes. 5. Turn the chicken and bake for a further 15 minutes. Meanwhile… 6. Combine the fish sauce, garlic, miso, honey, sesame oil and lime. 7. Simmer noodles for 8 minutes. Garnish with bean sprouts, sesame seeds. Serve.

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Just a few swaps and a burger can be healthy, thanks very much. ‘The beans provide protein and fibre to keep blood sugar levels steady,’ says Rose. Cravings? Gone. protein 28g

carbs 22g

fat 14g

INGREDIENTS ½ white onion 2 cloves garlic 90g tinned mixed beans 1 tsp dill 1 tsp chopped thyme 3 egg whites 30g butternut

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squash 30g carrot ¼ red onion 30g tomatoes 1 tbsp tomato paste ½ tsp chilli flakes ½ tsp curry powder ½ tsp dried thyme ½ tsp ginger METHOD 1. Preheat the oven to 200°C. 2. Chop the butternut squash and the carrots into chunks and roast for 40-50 minutes. 3. Chop the white onion and lightly fry until soft.

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4. Finely chop one of the garlic cloves, add to pan for one minute. 5. Drain the beans and mash. 6. Add the beans to the pan, cook for one more minute, sprinkle over the chopped dill and thyme. 7. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside to cool. 8. Once cooled, stir in the egg whites – these will hold the patties together. 9. Form into individual burgers.

10. Place on a baking tray and bake for 6-8 minutes on each side. For the sauce: 11. Lightly fry the red onion until soft. 12. Add the tomatoes, tomato paste, chilli flakes, curry powder and thyme to cover the onion. 13. Slice the other garlic clove and add it, along with the ginger and cook for another minute, before serving.

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Special

BEST BODY

Chicken is a fit-body staple for good reason. ‘It’s one of the leanest protein sources,’ says Rose. ‘It’s also rich in magnesium, which enhances performance.’ A natural winner. protein 51g

carbs 9g

fat 29g

INGREDIENTS 1 tbsp lemon juice 100g chicken breast 1 tsp olive oil Pinch of salt 1 tsp rosemary 40g asparagus handful of rocket leaves 3 tomatoes 25g hazelnuts 25g cashew nuts 1 tbsp olive oil 50g basil METHOD 1. Preheat the oven to 200°C. 2. Add the lemon juice, olive oil and a pinch of salt to a bowl. 3. Coat both sides of the chicken with the dressing. 4. Chop the rosemary and rub into both sides of the chicken. 5. Place the chicken breast on a tray and bake for 10 minutes. 6. Flip the chicken and bake for a further 15 minutes until it is cooked all the way through and the juices run clear. 7. Steam the asparagus for 6-8 minutes. Quarter the tomatoes and serve next to the asparagus, topped with rocket. 8. To make the pesto, blend hazelnuts, cashews, oil and basil until smooth. Serve the chickent with the salad and the pesto on the side.

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BEST BODY

‘Low iron levels are common in women – and can leave you too tired to exercise,’ says Rose. But beef is a rich source. ‘Serve with leafy greens to help your body better absorb the mineral,’ she adds. Power food. protein 38g

carbs 38g

fat 14g

WORDS ROISIN DERVISH-O’KANE, EMMA PRITCHARD. PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL HART PHOTOGRAPHY

INGREDIENTS ¼ onion 2 cloves black garlic chopped 1 tbsp tomato paste 50ml beef stock 1 stick of celery 30g chopped leeks 90g beef brisket 100g Brussels sprouts 1 tsp chilli flakes 1 tbsp pomegranate seeds 2 tsp purple basil, chopped 100g purple potatoes 1 tsp coconut oil 1 tbsp pea shoots METHOD 1. Heat a little olive oil in a pan. 2. Gently fry the onion until soft. 3. Add the garlic and cook for one more minute. 4. Add the tomato paste, making sure it coats the onions and garlic. 5. Pour in the stock, add the celery and leeks. 6. Bring to the boil. 7. Add the beef, cover and simmer for 3 hours. 8. After two hours, add a splash of olive oil to a pan. 9. Slice the sprouts in half and add to the pan. 10. Sprinkle with chilli flakes, cover, and cook for 10-15 minutes until tender. 11. Garnish with the basil and the pomegranate seeds. 12. Slice the potatoes in half and roast in a small amount of coconut oil at 180°C for about 45 minutes until soft on the inside and golden on the outside. 13. Serve the beef with the potatoes and add the salad. 14. Finish with a sprinkling of pea shoots. Let out a little cheer.

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Low-carb just got interesting. ‘Beetroot is rich in energyboosting B vitamin folate – and carrots provide complex carbs,’ says Rose. Turkey’s good too. protein 28g

carbs 22g

fat 14g

INGREDIENTS ½ onion 70g carrots 25g celery 100g turkey, diced 1 tbsp tomato paste 100g tinned chopped tomatoes 30g beetroot 40g carrots 40g courgettes 1 tsp olive oil

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METHOD 1. Finely chop the onion and lightly fry until soft. 2. Roughly slice half the carrots and celery, add to the onion and cook for 3-5 minutes. 3. Add the diced turkey and cook until browned. 4. Stir in the tomato paste and the chopped tomatoes. 5. Bring to the boil. 6. Simmer for 45 minutes. 7. Grate the beetroot, courgette and remaining carrots. 8. Lightly fry it for 2-4 minutes, then pour the sauce over to serve.

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HIIT CIRCUIT1

W E E K T W O

These cardio and strength workouts will set you up for pushing yourself in the second leg of your transformation

You’ll need: Mat Do: 7 sets (6, 8, 10, 12, 10, 8, then 6 reps) for every move each round

1

3

JUMPING JACK (a) Stand with your feet together and arms by your sides, then jump your feet wide and swing your arms up into a V-shape above your head. (b) Jump your feet back together and bring your arms back down to your sides.

SQUAT JUMP (a) Stand with your feet slightly wider than hip-distance apart, keeping your chest upright, knees over toes and thighs parallel to the floor. Lower into a squat. (b) Push up through your heels into a high straight-legged jump while simultaneously swinging your arms back behind you and squeezing your glutes. Land in your original squat position.

2

WALK-OUT (a) Start in a standing position with your legs hip-width apart. Keeping your legs straight, reach down to touch the floor and walk your hands forwards into a press-up position with your core engaged and spine in neutral. (b) Walk your hands back towards your feet, again keeping your legs straight, to return to the standing position.

4

5

SIDE SHUFFLE WITH FLOOR TOUCH (a) Stand with your feet together and arms by your sides. Shuffle two steps to your right, squat down keeping your chest upright, knees over toes and thighs parallel to the floor. Touch the floor with your right hand. (b) Straighten and shuffle to your left to your starting point. Squat and touch the floor between your legs with your left hand.

PRESS-UP (a) Lie on a mat with legs straight and toes on the floor. Place your palms outside the mat, with arms extended. Lower your body to the floor, chest first. (b) Bend your elbows and slowly lower back down to the mat.

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BEST BODY

RESISTANCE You’ll need: 4-6kg dumbbells, bench, mat Do: Repeat each superset or giant-set three times SUPERSET ONE

1A

SUMO SQUAT WITH DUMBBELL Do: 15 reps (a) Hold a dumbbell in front of your chest with both hands. Stand with your feet wider than hip-distance apart, toes slightly turned out. Keeping your chest up, knees over toes and thighs parallel to the floor, squat down. (b) Push back to straight legs, squeeze your glutes at the top and return to standing.

SUPERSET TWO

2A

BRIDGE STEP-OUT Do: 15 reps per side (a) Lie on your back on a mat with your arms by your sides, legs bent and feet close to your bottom. Lift your lower back and bottom up into a bridge position. (b) Keeping your lower back and bum raised, step your right foot out onto your heel, away from you. Repeat with left foot. Return your feet to the floor, close to your bum.

1B

2B

WEIGHTED STEP-UP Do: 10 reps per side (a) With a dumbbell in each hand, arms by your sides, stand facing a bench. Raise your right foot up onto the bench to create a 90° angle. Push through your right heel and bring your left foot up to rest next to it. (b) Step your left foot back onto the floor, then do the same with your right. Done.

HIP THRUST Do: 15 reps (a) Sit on the floor with your upper back against a bench, knees bent and fingers resting on your temples. (b) Push your bottom up into a table-top position, knees at a 90-degree angle. Squeeze your glutes before slowly lowering back to the floor. Hurts, but worth it.

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SUPERSET THREE

GIANT-SET FOUR

3A

4A

CHEST FLIES Do: 10 reps (a) Lie down on a bench with your arms above your shoulders and a dumbbell in each hand. In a controlled movement, lower your arms out to the side, a slight bend in your elbows with palms facing upwards. (b) Straighten and raise your arms back to the starting position.

WEIGHTED SIT-UP Do: 15 reps (a) Sit on a mat with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor, and holding a dumbbell with both hands at your knees. Lower your upper body down and bring the dumbbell up over your head to touch the floor behind you. (b) Moving your arms first, reverse the position to slowly crunch up and return to original position.

4B

3B

SINGLE-ARM ROW Do: 10 reps on each side (a) Put your left hand and left knee on the bench, with your right leg straight and right foot on the floor. Holding a dumbbell in your right hand directly below your shoulder. (b) Keeping your spine neutral, bring your right elbow up as you lift the dumbbell to the right side of your chest. Squeeze your shoulders before putting your arm back down.

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STANDING SIDE DUMBBELL REACH Do: 15 reps per side (a) Stand with your feet just wider than hip-distance apart. Hold a dumbbell in your right hand, arm by your side, and place your left hand on your hip. (b) Bending from the waist, lower the dumbbell towards the floor. Return your body back to centre then bend over to your left side.

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HIIT CIRCUIT 2

You’ll need: Mat, stopwatch Do: 30 seconds on, 30 seconds rest. Repeat each round twice

ROUND ONE

ROUND TWO

1A

1C

2A

HIGH KNEES WITH OVERHEAD PUNCH (a) Start with your feet hipdistance apart. With pace, lift your right knee as high as you can. Swap sides and raise your left knee. (b) Whichever knee you are doing, punch your opposite hand into the air overhead at the same time.

SPIDERMAN PRESS-UPS (a) Start in a high plank then bring your right knee towards your right elbow. (b) Bending your elbows, lower down into a press-up. Push back to straighten your arms and place your right foot back beside your left. Swap sides.

BEAT JUMPS (a) Stand with your feet together and arms by your sides. Jump into the air and land with wide legs and knees bent at 90 degrees. (b) Touch your left hand to the floor then push through heels to jump your feet back together and return to starting position.

SINGLE LEG HOPS FORWARD AND BACK (a) Stand on your left leg with your right foot off the floor, knee slightly bent. Put your hands on your hips. (b) Hop forwards and backwards on the same leg for 15 seconds before switching sides.

1B

1D

2B

2D

CURTSEY WITH SIDE KICK (a) Start with your feet hipdistance apart. Lunge your left leg back diagonally so that it crosses behind your right. (b) Transferring your weight to your right leg, kick your left foot into the air. Return to the starting position then repeat for 15 seconds before swapping legs.

BURPEE SKI JUMPS (a) Stand with your feet together then bend your knees slightly and kick both feet together diagonally behind you to the right. Then jump them both across to the left. (b) After landing, crouch down and place your hands on the floor. Jump your feet back into a high plank, then back towards your hands. Return to your standing position. You’ll be warm.

PLANK INTO LEG EXTENSION TWISTS (a) Start in a high plank then twist your torso to the right, bring your left foot underneath your body, straightening it out as you lift your right arm into the air. (b) Lower your arm and twist back into high plank position. Swap sides. Obvs.

TRICEP DIPS WITH LEG EXTENSIONS (a) Sit on the mat with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Place your hands just behind your bottom with your fingers pointing forwards. Straighten your arms, pushing your bum off the ground. (b) Raise your right leg into table top. Bending your elbows, lower your bum to touch the floor. Rep for 15 seconds. Change legs.

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2C

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BEST BODY

GYM SESSION

You’ll need: 12-30kg barbell, 6-8kg dumbbells, bench, mat Do: Repeat each superset three times

WORDS: LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY IAN HARRISON

SUPERSET ONE

SUPERSET TWO

SUPERSET THREE

SUPERSET FOUR

1A

2A

3A

4A

SQUATS Do: 15 reps using a 20kg barbell (a) With feet wider than hipdistance apart, rest a barbell across your shoulders, supporting it with both hands. Ensuring that your spine stays neutral and chest raised, slowly lower into a squat. (b) Push up through your heels back to starting position. Squeeze!

DEADLIFTS Do: 12 reps using a 30kg barbell (a) Feet wider than hip-distance apart, grasp a barbell with an overhand grip. Ensure chest is up, spine neutral, knees slightly bent. (b) In one fluid move, stand up, pushing your hips forwards and shoulders back and down. Slowly lower bar back to the floor.

BENCH PRESS Do: 10 reps with 6-8kg dumbbells (a) Lie on a bench with a dumbbell in each hand, elbows pointing out to the sides. With control, push the dumbbells up above you until your arms are straight. (b) Bend your arms and lower the dumbbells back down to your chest.

SHOULDER PRESS Do: 10 reps with 6-8kg dumbbells (a) Start with feet wider than hip-width apart, dumbbell in each hand, elbows at 900. (b) With dumbbells at shoulder height and palms facing forwards, lift the dumbbells up until your arms are straight. Lower them back down to the starting position.

1B

2B

SPLIT SQUATS Do: 20 reps with a 20kg barbell (a) Holding a barbell across your shoulders, start with your right foot flat on the floor one stride in front of you and your left heel off the floor. (b) Bend your knees to slowly lower into a 90° lunge. Ensure your body is upright and your front knee doesn’t overshoot your toes. Now swap sides.

womenshealthmag.co.uk

HIP THRUSTS Do: 15 reps using a 12kg barbell (a) Sit on the floor with your back against a bench, knees bent and feet flat. Hold a barbell in the groove above your hips. (b) Push your hips up into a bridge position, keeping a straight line from your nose to your knees. Lower your hips down to hover just above the floor. Pert butt, here you come.

3B

4B

BENT-OVER FLIES Do: 10 reps with 6-8kg dumbbells (a) Stand with feet wider than hip-distance apart, a dumbbell in each hand. Bend your knees slightly and lean forward. (b) In one slow and controlled movement, move your hands out to the sides. Then, with control and without swinging, bring them back together. Guns to die for, promise.

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JACKKNIFE Do: 10 reps on each side using 6-8kg dumbbells (a) Lie back on a mat, a dumbbell in each hand. With your hands hovering above the floor behind you and legs out straight, lift your left leg and raise the right dumbbell towards your left foot. (b) Lower your left leg as you lie back on the mat and return dumbbells to starting position.

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S T R E T C H

Chiara Pellegrino shares eight moves that’ll warm you up and cool you down to make sure you can go again tomorrow

STRETCH SEQUENCE Warm up: Before every session, jog for 5 minutes then do these stretches You’ll need: Mat

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HIGH-KNEE WALK Do: 30 seconds (a) Stand with feet together, then raise your right knee above waist height, swinging your left arm forward. (b) Step forward with the right leg, then repeat with the left knee. Limited space? Do it on the spot, okay?

SHOULDER ROLL Do: 30 seconds on each side (a) Stand with your feet slightly wider than hip distance apart, with your left hand on your left hip. (b) Rotate your right arm in a circular motion – first backwards, then forwards, keeping it close to the body. Now switch sides. Easy as that.

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DOWNWARD DOG HEEL WALK Do: 30 seconds (a) Begin in downward dog, with your bum raised to the ceiling, feet and hands flat on the floor and arms and legs straight. (b) Alternate bending each knee and raising the heel to increase the stretch in the hamstring. Feel that burn.

womenshealthmag.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHY: IAN HARRISON HAIR & MAKE-UP: CHARLOTTE GASKELL AND LHA REPRESENTS

AND


Special

BEST BODY

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CAT COW Do: 30 seconds (a) Start on all fours, your hands and knees on a mat. Slowly drop your belly towards the floor to create a hollow in your back, raising your gaze to the ceiling. (b) Return to a neutral spine before curving your back to the ceiling as you drop your head and neck. Alternate between positions with a fluid motion.

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RUNNER’S LUNGE WITH ROTATION Do: 30 seconds on each side (a) Step your left foot a stride in front of you, creating a 90° bend in your knee, keeping in line with your toes. Straighten your right leg and let the heel lift off the ground. (b) Place your right hand inside your left food and twist your torso towards the left. Lift your gaze and left hand towards the ceiling. Return to centre, switch legs and repeat on the other side.

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SPINAL TWIST Do: 30 seconds on each side (a) With your body upright and legs straight in front of you, bend your left leg and place the foot on the other side of your right knee. (b) Twist your torso to the right, placing your right hand on the floor behind you. Use your left elbow to hold your left knee in place. Direct your gaze over your right shoulder. You know what’s next! Switch sides.

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KNEELING SHOULDER STRETCH Do: 30 seconds on each side (a) Kneeling on a mat, bend your upper body forward to rest on your thighs and stretch your arms out straight in front of you with palms down. (b) Thread your left hand underneath your right armpit and lay your left shoulder on the mat. This one feels great. Repeat on the other side.

HIP OPENER Do: 30 seconds (a) Begin with your feet in a wide stance, toes pointing outwards, and squat down until your bum is level with your knees. (b) Put your hands on your thighs and twist one shoulder at a time towards the opposite knee.

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BEST BODY

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REFUEL STATION

You need fuel to sculpt your best body, but calorie-bomb snacks will undo all your hard work. Make these good-for-you treats from the experts at Natural Fitness Food your new grab-and-go bites

(serves 1)

(makes 25)

(serves 6) (makes 20)

INGREDIENTS 80g mixed frozen berries 30g vanilla whey protein 50g coconut yoghurt 300ml whole milk, almond milk or coconut water METHOD 1. Blitz the berries in a processor or Nutribullet for 10 seconds before adding the whey protein powder, then blitz again for another 10 seconds. 2. Next, add the coconut yoghurt, then the milk or water and stir. Top tip: the less liquid you use, the thicker the mixture will be, so if you fancy a post-dinner treat, grab a spoon and dive in.

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INGREDIENTS 300g macadamias 250g raisins 150ml almond milk 150g vanilla whey protein 135g chia seeds 100g oats 30ml coconut oil

INGREDIENTS 175g pistachios 315g oats 300g vanilla whey protein 200ml almond milk 140g cranberries 105ml honey 75g chia seeds 115ml coconut oil

METHOD 1. Blitz the macadamias in a food processor for 10 seconds and throw most into a mixing bowl. 2. Next, blitz the raisins and almond milk in a food processor for 30 seconds, then add the mix to the bowl of nuts. 3. Mix in the remaining ingredients (minus the extra nuts). Cover with clingfilm and leave in the fridge for 30 minutes. 4. Now roll the mix into small balls and sprinkle over the remaining macadamias. Dark chocolate works, too.

METHOD 1. Roast the pistachios on a baking tray at 190°C for 8 minutes. 2. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and place on a baking tray greased with extra coconut oil. Bake in the oven at 160°C for 15 minutes or until the top is golden. 3. Remove from the oven and leave to cool. Cut into 24-32 bars. Bonus: the batch will keep for a week.

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INGREDIENTS For the base: 250g dark chocolate 200g goji berries 400g dates 300g almond milk 335g chocolate protein powder 150g coconut flour For the topping: 100g chocolate 70g flaked almonds METHOD 1. Blitz the chocolate, berries, dates and almond milk for 30 seconds, then pour into a bowl with the protein powder and flour. Mix slowly for 6 minutes. 2. Spread the mix on a baking tray and flatten. 3. Melt the chocolate and brush it on top, then sprinkle over the flaked almonds. Refrigerate for 3 hours to set, then cut into bars.

INGREDIENTS 60g cacao butter 60g coconut sugar 60g raw cacao 2g Himalayan pink salt 500g walnuts METHOD 1. Make a paste by melting the cacao butter and coconut sugar in a pan over a low heat. Then add the raw cacao and Himalayan pink salt. 2. Mix in the walnuts, ensuring they get covered with the paste. 3. Lay out your walnuts on a baking tray and leave to set. Go nuts. @naturalfitnessfood For the full 10-week transformation, go to womenshealthmag.co.uk

womenshealthmag.co.uk

WORDS: ROÍSIN DERVISH-O’KANE. PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC AT HEARST STUDIOS; MICHAEL HART PHOTOGRAPHY

(makes 24-32)


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FIT AS

FITNESS LINE-UP They’re the most famous fit-stars, but what really goes into building an Instagram body and a following of thousands? WH goes behind the filter with this year’s hottest influencers

ZOE MCCONNELL

VICTORIA YOUNG & AMISHA DESAI

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FIT AS Alice’s breakfasts have become her signature Instagram shot. It is more often than not some kind of riff on a plate of eggs, avocado, green veg and sweet potato on rye. You’d think even a social media audience might get bored by such little variation on a theme but actually consistency has proved to be the key to her success. ‘People like to know what they’re going to get,’ she says.

@clean_eating_alice

In a draughty east London studio, Alice Liveing pulls her parka across those rock-hard abs and leans forward to sip a mint tea in a bid to warm up. Of course it’s a mint tea. This is one of the UK’s most famous fitstastars. At just 23, she’s amassed two book deals, a decent PT client list, an Instagram following of nearly 500,000 and a set of abdominals an Olympic athlete would be proud of, under the moniker Clean Eating Alice. She’s hardly going to be chugging back a double-shot caramel latte is she? ‘I don’t mind coffee, actually,’ she admits. ‘I tend to have it before a workout for that quick energy boost.’ It turns out that there’s not much that’s permanently off the menu for Alice. ‘Um, day-to-day I’d say trans fats are the only thing I avoid,’ she reasons. ‘But even then if I’m having a blowout, I’m not sitting there thinking about the trans fats. There’s no point.’

GETTING CLEAN

And that’s the first surprise about Clean Eating Alice; she’s not nearly as clean as you’d assume. ‘I know I’m called Clean Eating Alice but I don’t want to be defined as a clean eater,’ she says, refusing to be the poster girl for a tagline that is increasingly associated with restriction to the point of disordered eating. ‘I’m not restricted in any sense,’ she insists. ‘I called myself Clean Eating Alice because I wanted to start cleaning up my diet. Before I started blogging, everything I ate was processed and microwaved.’ As a first-year drama and dance student, Alice was in a very different place; lethargic and a size 12 (at 5ft 1in) with what she refers to as an unhealthy relationship with food. ‘I was bingeing on sugary, processed food… the chocolate bar followed by two bowls of cereal.’ The turning point was when she danced badly at an assessment. Her tutors pointed out her ‘lack of strength’. At the time, she was going to the gym but ‘literally doing 20 minutes on a treadmill and a couple of sit-ups a few times a week’. She spoke to a PT who talked about weight training and eating more protein. ‘The first major change I made was to breakfast. I used to have two bowls of cereal and then be hungry by 9am. I decided to get up earlier and make scrambled eggs. The difference! I had more energy and was more alert.’

THE TRANSFORMATION

Of course, she never foresaw any of this. At the start, social media was a support network – a place to find inspiration for food and workouts since none of her friends were into it. ‘I didn’t want to be the boring friend going on about my new diet, but it’s really nice to interact with people doing likewise. When I decided to go public I started to interact, asking questions and hashtagging and trying to build a following.’ And then she stumbled across the secret of every successful fitstagram star – the transformation picture. ‘Six months in I started sharing some photos. I had a couple of thousand followers at the time, which I thought was pretty incredible. But the photos really drove my following. I think people could see I was a “real” person.’ It is easy to scoff at the narcissism of social media; the dangers of basing your self-esteem on how well a bunch of strangers like your photo. But Alice offers a flipside. ‘I was very, very unconfident before – the pressure, at uni, of standing in a leotard next to 15 other girls was really hard. But then [on Instagram], I was working really hard and having people tell me I looked amazing felt amazing.’ Her trajectory from blogger to brand has been cemented with her second book, Eat Well Every Day, out at the end of 2016. It contains more than 100 recipes; the sort of stuff she eats, you’d rightly guess, every day. Although – and here’s where the Buckinghamshire girl throws in another surprise – she refuses to reveal exactly what she eats day to day. ‘I do find it a pressure that people want to know every little thing I eat, which I never reveal because I’d worry that someone might copy me and it could be dangerous.’ Not that she doesn’t eat enough, she clarifies, but: ‘I am 5ft 1in and I eat for me. I’m always aware that if someone replicated what I ate and were much taller it would not translate. I’m always very aware of eating disorders – and that it’s the danger of “clean living”. In an age when too many social media stars are happy to shout unsubstantiated claims about their eating regimes, it’s a refreshing stance. ‘Blogging can be incredibly self indulgent,’ she admits. ‘It’s easy when you get a following to let it go to your head. But you have to be able to distinguish reality from the social media bubble.’ It’s good advice – and not just for the starlets of Instagram. And so, now a qualified PT, Alice’s ambitions stretch beyond the virtual world. ‘I want to start my own gym; do more training; specialise in elite level sports and gain a nutrition qualification.’ But, much more pressing than any of that, is her plan for the immediate future – to go and celebrate the end of a successful shoot with pizza and Prosecco. It is, after all, all about balance.

‘YOU MUST DISTINGUISH REALITY FROM SOCIAL MEDIA’

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STYLING: CHARLIE LAMBROS. HAIR AND MAKE-UP: CARL STANLEY, LIZ KITCHENER, DESMOND GRUNDY AND CAROL HAYES. ALICE WEARS (PREVIOUS PAGE): BRA, £75, OLYMPIA ACTIVEWEAR AT NET-A-PORTER.COM; JACKET £15, PRETTYLITTLETHING.COM, JUMPER, £100, TOMMY HILFIGER; BIKINI BOTTOMS, £35, SEAFOLLY; TRAINERS, £129.95, ADIDAS BY STELLA MCCARTNEY. (THIS PAGE) GLOVES, £8.99, NIKE AT SPORTS DIRECT, LEGGINGS, £70, KORAL. OTHER ITEMS AS BEFORE

ALICE LIVEING


ABS LIKE ALICE For a similarly steely core, you’ll need to nail Alice’s five killer moves

Do the twist ‘To sculpt those lines either side of your midriff, you need to target your obliques with rotational moves like seated twists a cable machine in the gym.’

Feel unstable ‘Anything that makes your core fight to keep you stable will help build abs,’ says Alice. ‘Planks are perfect but also upgrade lunges by holding a couple of kettlebells to your chest.’

Raise the bar ‘Leg raises are great for creating a V-shape,’ says Alice. ‘View your body as one long muscle and pull up your legs from your core. Doing them on a bench makes it harder.’

Compound the issue ‘Don’t get obsessed with your abs. Compound moves like squats and deadlifts work your core from top to bottom and boost your fat-burn by working nearly all your stomach muscles.’

Get high ‘Lifting weights above your head is a secret weapon in the ab-sculpting arsenal,’ says Alice. ‘All your abdominals need to be engaged to get that barbell above your head.’

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FIT AS

Ultimate fitness goal ‘I don’t usually have specific goals but I am currently trying to get to grips with handstands.’

Foodie indulgence ‘I’m all about savoury, so sweet potato fries and hummus’

Favourite fitspo quote ‘Everything happens for a reason’ – I had it tattooed on my arm’

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All radiant skin, shining eyes and lustrous brown hair, Annie Clarke is the picture of health, brimming with enthusiasm about her move from south London to the east: ‘Now I cycle everywhere.’ Best known for her yogic prowess, Annie’s journey to fitstagram stardom has been ‘life changing’ and inspired by her former boss and close friend Deliciously Ella. ‘At university, I didn’t understand that the type of food I was eating mattered,’ she explains. ‘I was always bloated and in so much pain.’ With a nutritionist’s help, Annie started to home in on trigger foods. ‘For me, that was dairy, gluten and sugar. After six weeks without them, I felt like a new person.’ She also started to do more yoga – Bikram then Vinyasa flow – and meditation. ‘One day, Ella said, “You have to do something for yourself.” So a year ago, I spent the last of my savings doing a month of yoga teacher training in Goa.’ Once home, Annie started teaching. ‘I was really focused on getting healthy and didn’t want to drink and party,’ she says. ‘Instagram was a good reminder there were other people out there like me.’ Although she wasn’t driven by her number of followers, within nine months she had gained 10,000 (she now has close to 83k). Annie, 26, teaches yoga five days a week at 6.45am, as well as fitting in her own training: she does a mix of boxing and HIIT four or five times a week, plus yoga. Breakfast is porridge with almond milk, frozen berries and hemp seeds. Lunch, a mixed bowl of salad and hummus with veggie stew. For dinner, soup or lentil pasta with stir-fried vegetables. She snacks on nut butter or avocado on crackers, treats herself once in a while with raw chocolate and allows herself the occasional G&T. ‘You need to be authentic,’ she says. ‘I’d rather struggle than work with a brand I don’t believe in.’ Her biggest goal is to stay true to herself: ‘I’ve had moments of thinking “I’m not that positive person everyone thinks I am”. But I’ll have a little cry, do some yoga and I’m fine again.’

womenshealthmag.co.uk

ANNIE WEARS (OPENING PAGE): TOP, £79, HEYJO, LEGGINGS, £75, VARLEY. (THIS PAGE): TOP, £70, KORAL AT THESPORTSEDIT, JUMPER, £94.95, ADIDAS BY STELLA MCCARTNEY, LEGGINGS, £135, MICHI, TRAINERS, £145, APL

@mind_body_bowl

CREDITS HERE PLEASE

ANNIE CLAR K E


Ultimate fitness goal ‘To do serious Calisthenics moves such as the “flag pole”.’

Motivating fit kit ‘My wetsuit. It makes me feel powerful. I’ve been surfing since my teens.’

SHONA WEARS (OPENING PAGE) SHORTS, £25, NEW BALANCE, GLOVES, MODEL’S OWN. SPORTS BRA, £30, NEW BALANCE, BIKINI TOP, £16, ASOS.COM. (THIS PAGE): PANTS, £93, MELISSA ODABASH, TRAINERS, £75, NEW BALANCE

Foodie indulgence ‘Franco Manca pizza. It’s delicious and there’s a branch near my house.’

SHONA VERTUE @shona_vertue

womenshealthmag.co.uk

followers. ‘One guy said: “This girl has no idea what she is talking about, but she is f***ing hot.” I wanted to write back, but then I realised that it’s not worth it.’Born in Sydney, Shona was an elite gymnast, dancer and bodybuilder. Now she’s married that dedication with her love of yoga and meditation with a class that runs in New Balance’s Oxford Street store from January. Her book, The Vertue Method, is due to be published in June. A big part of Shona’s philosophy is to never restrict herself so “clean eating” is as much about chocolate as avocado. ‘Sometimes the most nourishing thing you can do is eat a cupcake – it’s good for the soul.’ ‘I’ve learned that your exercise regime should be about enjoying your body,’ she explains. ‘In Bondi in my bikini, I believed I had to earn my carbs through training, which is really unhealthy. I’ve learned to eat intuitively.’ Shona champions meditation as the secret to inner calm: ‘I meditate for 20 minutes as soon as I wake up to help me connect. Only then do I check Instagram.’

Start talking about ‘the butt’, and Shona’s eyes light up. For the Australian yogi and PT, a key part of The Vertue Method (a 55-minute yoga/gymnastics/circuits mash-up she’s created to ‘lift, lengthen and nourish’) is about ‘glute activation’. The secret to having the strong body of a fitness Instastar is a strong booty. ‘When I moved to London three years ago, I had a stint in an office,’ she says. ‘I suffered so many aches and pains, but I couldn’t figure out why. Then I discovered glute training. The glutes are the biggest muscle in the body so, as a survival method, they will shrink if you don’t use them, leading to all sorts of problems. Having a little junk in your trunk is healthy.’ Bending her gym-honed curves into mind-boggling positions, Shona is proud to show off her ‘peach emoji’ as she calls it. But it has, inevitably, attracted some unsavoury attention from some of her 53k |

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FIT AS

Food indulgence ‘Salted caramel, peanut butter, Galaxy chocolate.’

Favourite fitspo quote ‘I love the Gigi Hadid quote: “Eat clean to stay fit, have a burger to stay sane”.’

ZANNA VAN DIJK @zannavandijk

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She’s 6ft 2in with a 37in inside leg, has 129k followers on Insta and can deadlift 110kg. So it might come as a surprise that 23-year-old Zanna van Dijk – PT, nutrition consultant and model (she walked the catwalk for Tommy Hilfiger) – once questioned her right to be revered. ‘Many bloggers have had transformations, but I haven’t, which made me think: “Do I deserve this?”’ she says. ‘But I learned gradually, which I think makes me relatable.’ And the co-founder of the #girlgains hashtag, whose book Strong is out now, is the first to admit she’s made her share of mistakes since starting her shape-up journey six years ago. ‘I followed fads – high protein, paleo, gluten free – but you realise it’s a fad for a reason; it’s not sustainable. Now, I prefer a bit of everything.’ A down-to-earth Yorkshire girl, it’s clear from her recipes (think: brownies, cookies and pancakes) that Zanna certainly believes in everything in moderation.

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So how does she keep that Amazonian figure? ‘Sharing is caring,’ she laughs, referring to her love of batch cooking and eating with friends. ‘And self-control. I look at the day as a whole. I’ll have zoats (oats and courgette) for breakfast; an omelette for lunch; and salmon, sweet potato and greens for dinner. It’s about balance. If I fancy a bar of Galaxy, I’ll have it. I train really hard and it’s unrealistic to never show myself eating those things.’ Zanna’s weekly regime includes three cardio sessions – usually HIIT classes – plus three or four strength training workouts doing squats, presses and chin-ups. ‘I’m really proud that I can do six,’ she says. But how does she handle the pressure of being a role model? ‘For the first year I was definitely finding my feet. You’re not used to having people watching you and analysing what you eat. But then I just realised what I’m doing works for me. I won’t change myself for anyone.’ Her boyfriend, Ant, works in finance and ‘doesn’t care about social media,’ she says. ‘When we’re together, I have to switch off. I get caught up in it but he says: “Stop it.”’ womenshealthmag.co.uk

ZANNA WEARS (OPENING PAGE) BRA £95, MICHI, LEGGINGS, £70, ALOYOGA. (THIS PAGE): TOP, £50, VARLEY, JACKET, £110, BODYISM, PANTS, £76, PRISM, GLOVES, £3.49, LONSDALE AT SPORTS DIRECT, TRAINERS, £175, KURT GEIGER

Motivating fit kit ‘Head to toe L’urv; a gorgeous Australian brand that flatters tall girls like me.’


HAZEL WALLACE @thefoodmedic

Ultimate fitness goal ‘Running has never been my forté but I’m building myself up to a marathon’

Foodie indulgence ‘My homemade sweet potato chocolate orange brownie – served hot with ice cream’

I

HAZEL WEARS (OPENING PAGE) TOP, £75, VARLEY, PANTS, £16, JACKET, FROM £100, KORAL. (THIS PAGE): SWEATY BETTY, TOP, £45, VARLEY, JUMPER, £62.95, ADIDAS BY STELLA MCCARTNEY, LEGGINGS, £75, VARLEY, GLOVES, £8.99, NIKE, TRAINERS, £129.95, Y3 ADIDAS, DUMBBELLS, £123, TECHNOGYM

Favourite fitspo quote ‘Everyone’s fallback has the opportunity to be a comeback,’ ie. your failures help you

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To look smoking in a bikini. That was the aim four years ago when junior doctor, PT and ‘passionate foodie’ Hazel Wallace first started on the health kick that has seen her smash Instagram (98k followers and counting) and write her debut book The Food Medic (out in May). And she’s only 26. Now, though, Hazel’s focus is less on ‘aesthetics’ and more on ‘achievements’ when she hits the gym at 6am for a 40-minute HIIT workout, a Tupperware box of peri-peri chicken with caulirice in her bag, before a busy day on the ward at a London hospital. ‘When I started, my goal was to drop fat,’ she says. ‘I’d fallen into the trap of ready meals and takeaways and drinking at uni, and had gone from a size 6-8 to a 10-12. I had acne, gut problems and low self-esteem. I thought looking good on the beach required eating very little and doing lots of cardio – which is exactly what I did. I lost weight but didn’t gain any muscle and I realised I wanted to be strong not skinny, so went back to the drawing board.’ Swotting up on nutrition, Hazel learned it was possible to lose body fat and gain muscle without dieting or killing yourself in the gym. She swapped low-cal cereals, fruit and soups for protein, healthy fats and good quality carbs such as sweet potato, oats and rice, and started lifting weights. ‘At first, I could barely squat with an unweighted bar on my back,’ she says. ‘But, slowly, I added 2.5kg plates and increased that each week. I got more satisfaction from lifting weights in the gym than weighing myself.’ And so her passion was born; as was her blog. Hazel thinks that a combination of being a ‘girl-nextdoor’ and her science background makes her blog attractive. ‘People can see I trained to be a doctor and I’m excited to be bridging the gap between medicine and nutrition.’ But what about bitchy bloggers? ‘Some people try to climb on one another to get ahead,’ she says, but it’s away from the internet that Hazel finds most motivation. ‘My workmates will show me their lunchboxes and say: “Look, you inspired me.” I want to show people what a healthy plate can look like.’

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A BAD DRIP

IV nutrient drips are no longer just for reviving hard-partying celebs – but do they offer anything more than a few likes on Instagram? WH gets wired up TYPOGR APHY LUKE LUCAS

ILLUSTR ATIONS OLIVER BURSTON

WORDS ROISÍN DERVISH-O’K ANE

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ow far would you go in pursuit of your healthiest self? As I watch a nurse insert a cannula into my arm and see flecks of blood fall onto my inner elbow, I realise that I’ve probably hit my PB. ‘Just relax, I’ll be back shortly,’ a slender woman – clear-eyed and glossy haired – says, stilettos clicking out the door. A plastic tube snakes from my arm to a transparent sack on a tall metal stand. It’s filled with a lurid yellow liquid – an exclusive blend of vitamins, minerals and amino acids: my VIP ticket to winter wellness. Sound a bit intense? That’s because it is. Having nutrients supplied directly into your bloodstream used to be the preserve of people who were actually sick. For patients with intestinal failure, it’s the only way to get their essential vitamins and minerals. Yet in 2016, the mechanism has been glossed up and is now marketed to perfectly healthy people as Intravenous Nutrient Therapy, the cash-rich, time-poor way to speed your path to optimal wellbeing. At £200 a go, it’s no surprise that IVNT attracts hard-partying celebrities and six-figure salary types – but the trend is trickling down. In the past 12 months, global IVNT chain Reviv added 15 IV spots to its three existing clinics, and Essex-based pharmacy IntraVita has trained more than 200 doctors and nurses to administer IV therapy. If you can’t already drip ’n’ chill on

‘THE NURSE SHOWS ME THE MENU OF VITAMIN COCKTAILS’

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HYDROMAX

VITAGLOW

ANTI-AGEING HYDRATION

DIET AND DETOX

your high street, it won’t be long. So what exactly are they promising? A lot – it turns out. Overweight? ‘This helps you burn off stubborn body fat,’ says one clinic’s website. Permanently on-edge? ‘Our drip has been formulated to reduce depression and anxiety,’ says another. Calling clinics nationwide reveals more alluring sells. ‘IV can soften, improve and possibly eradicate lines and wrinkles,’ says one clinic in the Midlands. But it’s a promise on another’s website of a flu-free winter that reels me in, so I call and tell them I’m feeling run-down. ‘Our immunity drip would be perfect,’ the receptionist responds. It’s £200 – more than my monthly food budget. I ask what results

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I can expect. There’s a pause. ‘It depends on how run-down you are,’ she says, adding: ‘I felt good for two weeks after I had mine.’ Pick apart the grand claims and the specifics of my return on investment seem hard to get at. Fast-forward a week and I arrive for my ‘full medical consultation’ with the clinic’s nurse. I’m feeling on the edge of a cold, exhausted and anxious. I input my medical history on an iPad. My blood pressure is measured. Oddly for a treatment involving vitamins and minerals, I’m asked little about my diet. I volunteer that I’ve never eaten meat. ‘You’re probably deficient in vitamin

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A BAD DRIP

MEGABOOST

ULTRAVIV

IMMUNITY UPGRADE

VITAMINS AND MINERALS

Powers, a nutritional biochemist at the University of Sheffield. Then there’s the high dosage. The clinic won’t tell me the exact quantities of micronutrients in my drip (‘company policy’), but it’s not hard to estimate. Most IVNT cocktails are variants on the formula created by US doctor John Myers in the 60s: the so-called ‘Myers cocktail’, which contains 1,000 micrograms of vitamin B12. ‘The recommended nutrient intake for B12 is 1.5 micrograms,’ says Powers, so it arguably contains up to 700 times what the body would need. The industry’s safety assurance is that they don’t use fat-soluble vitamins – A, C, E, D or K – which are stored in tissue and can reach toxic levels. ‘But from what we can see, this drip contains a very high concentration of many (water soluble) B vitamins,’ explains Powers. ‘And peer-reviewed evidence shows – for example – that vitamin B2 can cause kidney stones, so there is some risk.’

DRIP FEED

B12,’ says the nurse. ‘You might have anaemia because of it.’ She also puts my anxiety down to low magnesium. The nurse shows me the clinic’s menu of vitamin cocktails, and confirms that I should opt for the immuneboosting mix of vitamins C, B12, B5, B6, B complex, calcium, selenium, magnesium, zinc, and various amino acids. I ask if this treatment will correct any deficiencies and stop my sore throat creeping into flu – she nods, and I’m game to try.

HYPE CHECK

Beneath the marketing spiel is little consensus on what happens when we intravenously inject nutrients that, if consumed in the right amount through food, are essential for health. But there is some evidence supporting the use of high-dose IV vitamin and mineral injections for genuine health problems. In 2013, the Journal of Translational Medicine reported that IV vitamin C could reduce inflammation in cancer patients. ‘But the results shouldn’t be used as evidence backing IV vitamin C for healthy people,’ says Alan Shenkin, professor of biochemistry at the University womenshealthmag.co.uk

No vein, no gain

of Liverpool. Relief from pain and depression associated with fibromyalgia (muscular pain) is an oft-reported benefit of IVNT, as are its claims to boost energy. Research published in Nutrition Journal saw IV vitamin C reduce office workers’ fatigue after two hours – with the effect lasting for one day. ‘But individuals’ self-reported “fatigue scores” only dropped by about 15%,’ says Shenkin. Many experts are concerned the treatment could be harmful as well as ineffective. ‘When we digest food, the intestines regulate the amount of a nutrient that goes into the blood, but IVNT bypasses that mechanism,’ says Professor Hilary

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The gulf in opinions between professors and practitioners is alarming, so, before the treatment, I arranged to meet Rick Miller, performance nutritionist and spokesperson for the British Dietetics Association, and filled him in on my recommended treatment. ‘There’s absolutely no need for you to do that,’ is his response. ‘Your diet is balanced and you show no signs of vitamin deficiency. Given you don’t eat meat, I’d do blood tests for B12, vitamin D and calcium, but I wouldn’t even recommend supplements. Without a blood test, I can’t tell how much you need.’ I head home afterwards via London’s Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth to measure my blood vitamin and mineral levels. Everything comes back normal, except vitamin D – in which I’m almost deficient, and Miller recommends correcting it with a daily oral supplement. My low levels of bilirubin (a compound produced in the liver) are revealing. ‘High amounts indicate your body is stressed, which can occur when people push too hard at work or in their training,’ explains Miller. ‘This suggests that your feeling mentally or physically tired has nothing to do with your vitamin levels or biochemistry.’ The message from the IVNT industry is the exact opposite. ‘Many of us are severely deficient in these essential nutrients,’ reads a glossy booklet I flick through. Not so, according to the latest National Diet and Nutrition Survey, which only identifies the nation’s vitamin D levels as chronically low. ‘To be deficient, someone must to have physical evidence that their body is deprived of something,’ says Shenkin. Think scurvy for vitamin C, anaemia for vitamin B12.

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Blue blood

IVNT is instead dealing with an intake that is ‘sub-optimal’ – but that doesn’t sound so urgent. Let’s be clear, you don’t have to be all-out deficient in a nutrient to benefit from supplementing. ‘Additional oral vitamin B supplements can help fight fatigue,’ says Miller. ‘But people should only take them orally after making every attempt to improve their diet – and there’s certainly no need for a megadose via IV.’ Despite employing nutritional deficiency speak, only one of the 12 clinics I contacted actually mentioned testing for any. Miller acknowledges blood tests aren’t perfect, but supplementing without them is ‘clinical negligence’. This phrase loops in my head as I return to the clinic for my treatment. Ten minutes in, I trail off mid-sentence talking to the nurse (‘That’s the magnesium chilling you out,’ she says). Afterwards I head to the hospital for more blood tests, intrigued to see what all this has done to my blood levels. The results reveal a surge in vitamin B12 (way above the lab’s healthy range) and large spikes in vitamin C and zinc. ‘A cocktail with a high dose of vitamin B12 increases blood concentration levels,’ says Powers. ‘But that will likely exceed the amount your kidneys can handle and you’ll wee out the rest.’ In other words, such high doses are essentially pointless. As for vitamin C: ‘White blood cells are saturated after taking 100-200mg orally,’ says Shenkin. ‘The cells don’t work faster or harder because there is more of a vitamin or mineral.’ Fortunately for these clinics, they don’t have to answer scientists’ claims, as they fall outside the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency’s remit. Overt medical claims are policed, but promises to boost energy, immunity, weight loss or skin health are not.

MIND OVER MATTER?

Alongside the unsubstantiated claims are the tantalising anecdotes of IV converts. For Kelly Marks, 42, who works in public relations in London, her first IV experience made her really relax. ‘I went for a 45-minute drip and left feeling less bogged down by my worries,’ she says. Emily Porter, 32, a copywriter from Devon noted the difference while running: ‘I achieved a PB over 5K, which felt effortless.’ Then there are the medical professionals who,

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A BAD DRIP

FIVE FOODS TO BOOST YOUR IMMUNITY Dietitian Rick Miller on how to get your winter nutrients without going on a drip

GO MANGO ‘Mangoes are loaded with vitamin C and beta-carotene, an antioxidant that enhances immune function – giving them an edge over oranges.’ Sweet.

’KRAUT PLEASER ‘Sauerkraut is rich in folate, a B vitamin critical in the formation of new cells. And its natural prebiotics act like fertiliser for the good bacteria in your gut.’

SALTY LITTLE NUMBERS ‘The omega-3 fatty acids in anchovies help regulate your inflammatory response by maintaining the delicate membranes of immune cells.’ Pizza topping, sorted.

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES

LET THEM EAT STEAK Beef, specifically. ‘Zinc is key to metabolic processes that fight infections, protect cells and prevent inflammation.’ One 70g steak should do the trick.

unswayed by the evidence, believe that vitamin drips do have something to offer. I asked Dr Jane Leonard, a cosmetic doctor who administers IVNT independently, why IV vitamins are superior to oral supplements. ‘It’s the delivery,’ she says. ‘A capsule has to be broken down, but IV vitamins go straight into your bloodstream, at a dose where they can have a potent effect.’ Sure, but can you quantify if they’re worth it? ‘It’s impossible to measure feeling better,’ says Leonard, ‘the only thing you can monitor is how you feel afterwards.’ But what if it is just a feeling? Multiple studies suggest IV therapy is primed for the placebo effect. The first clue is the cost, as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology found a higher price increases the potency of a placebo. ‘The more invasive a placebo, the more effective it is, too,’ adds Dr Jeremy Howick, leading placebo researcher at the University of Oxford. So what happens in your brain when you’re duped by a medical placebo? ‘Expect the treatment to work, and you’ll activate your brain’s neural reward mechanism, releasing [feel-good hormones] dopamine and endorphins,’ explains Howick. These deliver the chemical kick attributed to the treatment. My sore throat lingers for hours after the treatment and by 6pm, I’m so tired I cancel a spin class. ‘You had a “low necessity belief”,’ explains Robert Horne, a professor in behavioural medicine at University College London. ‘Because you were sceptical, the treatment probably didn’t work as a placebo.’ Does this idea put our IV newbies off? ‘If that’s the case, then I wouldn’t spend the money before a 5k park run, but I’d consider it for a marathon,’ says Porter.

B12 and magnesium are slightly below pre-treatment levels. ‘Your body is returning to homeostasis: the level it has genetically set as its normal range for micronutrients,’ says Miller. So what’s my body got out of it? ‘From these results, we can see little except a rise in some B vitamins, but it’s nothing you couldn’t have done through your diet in a safer and cheaper fashion.’ More concerning are my B6 levels, which, after dipping immediately following the treatment, are now over the lab’s healthy threshold. ‘We don’t know why this happened,’ says Miller – assuring me that, as a water-soluble vitamin, levels should drop down to within my normal range. My zinc levels spiked immediately and remain unusually high 10 days later. So am I enjoying all the reported benefits associated with peaking zinc: supercharged energy; clear and glowing skin; a throat that doesn’t forecast looming lurgy? Honestly, I notice none of it. So what should I do now? ‘You can book in for as many sessions as you like until you feel better,’ said the clinic’s receptionist when I first called. In consultation, I’m advised that six treatments are proven to be effective (no source listed), and that I should return within a fortnight for my second. ‘Don’t even consider it,’ says Nicola Lowe, professor in nutritional science at the University of Central Lancashire. ‘Your zinc levels are now out of physiological norms 10 days after just one treatment – having another could be dangerous.’ The bottom line? ‘Your body has its own sophisticated mechanisms for monitoring the levels of nutrients in your blood,’ says Lowe. ‘There’s no need for us to create expensive, overcomplicated ways to bypass them.’ I head home via the supermarket and fill my basket with brown rice, oats, green vegetables and eggs. All in all, my vitamin-B packed haul comes to £12. For now, I’ll continue to get my vitamins the budget way, thanks all the same.

‘SUCH HIGH DOSES OF NUTRIENTS ARE POINTLESS’

THE UPSHOT

Two weeks later I return to the lab for a second round of tests. Readings show my vitamin C has dropped to within the lab’s healthy range, as expected. Both vitamin

WHEY TO GO Your protein shake could keep you flu-free. ‘Whey is rich in the protein lactoferrin, which stimulates immune cell growth.’ No whey? Yes whey.

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EXCES ALL A

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GIRL POWER

SS REAS TANYA GOLD

NEALE HAYNES

Diamanté bikinis, false eyelashes and layers of fake tan, paired with bulging biceps, solid quads and rock-hard abs – a new sort of beauty pageant? WH has a backstage pass to the increasingly mainstream world of the bikini fitness competition

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I

am backstage at a creaky, ageing theatre in Nottingham, watching fake-tanned women – in huge false eyelashes and plumped-up, painted lips – queue. They queue to sign in; they queue to be painted with oil; they queue to collect their competitor numbers, which they pin to their bikini bottoms; and, finally, they queue to go on stage. Today, they live to queue. As they stand in line I initially think they look like extras in a bad science-fiction flick – a battalion of female soldiers seconded as sex slaves – muscular, fetishised Disney princesses. But that is only a first impression; later I am dazzled by their commitment to the possibilities of their own bodies. Even so, the cognitive dissonance is extraordinary: the fittest women I have ever seen, painted like dolls. A glittering army. As they wait to compete in the national finals of the UK Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation (UKBFF) Championships, they are at once nervous and excited. They have trained a whole year for this day – for some, even longer. For them it is more than just a hobby or a vocation – it’s salvation. ‘This is the only thing I’ve found that I’m good at and that I enjoy,’ says competitor Amy Madeley, 22, a call-centre worker from Leeds, who says her love of training helped her overcome body issues. Madeley is at the softer end of the scale, conker-like with her chestnut skin stretched neatly over hard curves. While for Barbara Kiss, 28, a receptionist from London, her entry into this world was the result of a chance conversation at the gym. ‘I’ve done sport all my life,’ she

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says. ‘But it was a PT who introduced me to weightlifting; I was scared that it would make me look bulky. But I began to enjoy seeing how far I could push my body and knew I wanted to compete after seeing a photo of a female competitor.’ A peroxide blonde, she is in purple today – purple lips, purple eyes and a teardrop jewel hanging from the middle of her purple embellished bikini pointing directly to her ab crack. It is the status symbol of the strong-not-skinny brigade, overtaking the thigh gap as the new body part du jour to be fetishised and demonised on social media. Waiting for their moment, these women, plus the other 420+ competing here today, browse their smartphones, groom each other or do the ‘pump-up’ (tensing the muscles to warm them up). Tomorrow there will be more than 600 competitors vying for a platform. In the past 10 years, as gym culture has exploded, the number of entrants has doubled. For women, the breakthrough came in 2010, with the introduction of the Bikini Fitness category, which focused more on being toned than overtly muscular. The category is now so popular there are height classes. Body Fitness; Junior (ages 16-23) and Masters (over 35) are other categories to enter. The winner in each one will be eligible for the European Championships in Spain in May and the World Championships in Poland in November; assuming they pass the drugs test. (They are looking for steroids and growth hormones. Last year, two winners were disqualified and banned. This year, everyone passes.) The winner will get the opportunity to turn professional and travel the world: to win prize money, start a fitness brand, compete in professional shows. ‘I’m really glad more women are realising that building muscle isn’t going to make them look manly,’ says Kiss, adjusting her jewel-encrusted bikini. ‘It creates shape and curves, and is also incredibly beneficial for your health. I think social media has played a huge part in the growing popularity of the sport – there are so many motivational fitness pages online that promote the beauty of a strong female body and celebrate the hard work it takes to achieve one.’ As Megan Prescott, 25, an actress (famous for her role in Skins) and fellow competitor admits: ‘The world of competitive bodybuilding is crazy – I mean, a whole year prepping for one day? But I love it.’ Backstage, I investigate exactly what it is that women need to do to win at national

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‘THE JUDGES WANT TO SEE SKINTONE, CONDITION AND TAN’

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Every second counts: Cramming in those final pre-show curls (above); Barbara Kiss gets into her stride (top); Pumped and ready to go (top right)

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GIRL POWER

More is more: When in doubt, slap on an extra layer of fake tan (left). Last-minute resistance band action (above)

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From left: Hannah Kent came second, winner Chelsea Dyson, and third place went to Lynsey Allen

level. Krish Kataria, 29, won a Bikini Fitness class last year; she looks gloriously strong and healthy. She is a business development manager from London and trains 12 times a week – a morning HIIT cardio session at 6am and an evening weights session six days a week. ‘There’s not a lot of time for anything else and it requires a lot of planning,’ she says. ‘There are no shortcuts. It’s about consistency.’ The discipline is astounding; brutal, some might say. For up to three months before a show, a competitor can drop her calorie intake to around 1,000-1,200 a day, fuelling twice-daily workouts with a strict macro regime. Chicken, beef, salmon, green vegetables, oats and avocados are staples. ‘You can’t go to the gym six times a week [rather than 12] or eat 300 extra calories a day or eat cheap food and look like Krish,’ says Kataria, using the third person. I like the way she objectifies herself. ‘You just get used to the diet,’ admits Kiss. ‘It’s a mind game. You decide that you’re going to do it. The hardest part is always having to be prepared, to take your food with you everywhere and to know that is the only thing you can eat,’ she says, pointing to the Tupperware in her bag that’s filled with snacks for today – lean chicken, rice, almond butter and jam, which I’m told helps plump up the muscles before stepping on stage. You may expect food stalls full of protein bars and fortified shakes, but there is only one food outlet in the building, a sweet shop, and it is queue-free. They’ve

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GIRL POWER

come this far, they’re not going to ruin it now with a bar of Dairy Milk. For the past week, they will have been ‘water-loading’, forcing themselves to drink up to 10 litres of water a day, only to drink nothing – aside from, perhaps, dehydrating coffee or red wine – from the night before the show until it finishes. It’s all about ridding the body of muscle-masking fluids so they can show their gains in high definition. Devotees can report blurry vision and plummeting body temperature. But everyone here insists they feel great, filling up on a last-minute carb fix to give those muscles a final pump. Meanwhile, the auditorium fills with gym buddies, trainers, parents and grandparents. The nine judges – all former bodybuilders – sit at a long table in front of the stage. They watch as the girls come on, herded by a compere, flex their muscles, and smile. The art of the genuine fake smile seems a skill to be perfected; some succeed more than others. The women face the audience, one hand on hip, then rotate through a series of poses – turning to the side, the back and front. Considering how little they’re wearing, it is unsexy. ‘Come on, that girl!’ screams a father in the second row. I meet Diane Bennett, a judge rumoured to be friends with Arnold Schwarzenegger; and Bill Tierney, president of the UKBFF. They are polite and very formal in their black suits; an old-fashioned touch to a terribly modern pageant. ‘The ideal,’ says Bennett, pointing towards Kiss, ‘is to have symmetrical muscular development.’ Tierney agrees: ‘You are looking for a female shape where everything is in balance – as well as having a healthy appearance, condition, skintone and tan.’ Bodybuilding, he says, is one of the biggest sports in the world; and it is growing fast. There are now 191 member countries in the International Federation of Bodybuilding and Fitness, but its first competition drew 500 people. A decade ago, the UKBFF had 1,000 regular competitors; now it has twice that. ‘It’s subjective, of course,’ continues Tierney. ‘Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. But some girls are obviously dieting too hard.

We don’t want that.’ Indeed, as it states in the competition guidelines: ‘Entrants must be viewed with the emphasis on a healthy, fit, athletic physique.’ I ask Tierney about the tan. I saw one girl with green hands – her fake tan had gone awry and given her goblin fingers. ‘Some competitors listen to the wrong people,’ he says calmly. ‘They think the darker the better. It’s supposed to look natural.’ Really? Looking around, ‘natural’ isn’t an aesthetic target that anyone seems to have aimed for, let alone hit. The hair, the nails, the make-up. And the bikinis. I was told couture was mandatory by a group of girls backstage; they think no one will win with an off-the-peg number and they pay up to £500 for a bespoke alternative. ‘People think judges are going to notice the best and most expensive outfit,’ he says. ‘That is not the case. Plus some bikinis are too small. It looks indecent. This is a family show.’ And the diamanté? He sighs. ‘You cannot stop girls exploiting the diamanté. It’s contagious.’ I watch as Kiss is crowned winner of her Body Fitness class. She’s crying – her efforts finally recognised. She clutches her golden trophy in disbelief. The smiles of her fellow competitors don’t waver – professional to the end. The first thing they do when they step off stage? Eat. ‘I’m so hungry!’ I hear one girl cry. She’ll eat whatever’s in her bag now – but pasta, desserts and sweets later. ‘It’s tiring,’ Kiss admits, as she changes to go home. ‘But it’s always nice to socialise with the other women.’ Indeed, the camaraderie has been evident throughout the day, as I watched them celebrate with and console each other backstage. ‘Everyone’s in the same boat,’ says Prescott. ‘We’re all hungry, tired, nervous.’ I ask her how she feels about all the glitter; the looking like a weaponised doll, and she says this: ‘Everyone has this preconception that women shouldn’t be muscular. But we’re proof that women can be toned, strong – and feminine. We are creating our own rules. Glitter, sparkle, make-up and bodybuilding. We can do it all.’

‘WE SPEND A YEAR PREPPING FOR JUST ONE DAY’

Ex Skins actress Megan Prescott (above) has completely transformed her body – mainly because it’s now 18 shades darker than her face. Left and top: Let the judging commence

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L I T T L E T H I N G S T H AT M A K E L I F E A LOT B E T T E R

WELL T R AV E L L E D

DESTINATION WELLNESS

From an Austrian medi-spa and Ayurvedic overhaul to coastal yoga retreats, here’s WH’s pick of the very best health-restoring holidays for the year ahead

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JET TO BALI TO MAINTAIN THAT PRE-WEDDING BODY ON A…

HEALTHY HONEYMOON W H AT ? Como Shambhala, Estate W H E R E ? Ubud, Bali, Indonesia W H Y ? Romance + relaxation =

perfect wellness break for two H OW M U C H ? Rooms start at £425 per night, with wellness programmes starting at £560 a night (minimum of 3 nights) comohotels.com Indonesia? That’s quite a long way to go, isn’t it? Well, yes it is but – and sorry for the cliché – upon arrival, my long-haul fatigue ebbed away. Factor in the lost case en route and that my new hubby was quite enthusiastic about what we could fit into our itinerary, I was more than pumped for a slice of all the wellness and relaxation the resort had promised.

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You’d need a pretty decent room after an 18-hour flight… But of course – and they didn’t fail to deliver. Arriving in darkness, we were led to a pristine villa with a treetop infinity pool and vista that alone justified the journey (you know, once we’d seen it in the morning). Sure, I was tired, but I was actually impatient for the sun to rise so that I could see the estate in all its glory. So stunning view aside, just what else is on offer? Day one started early with meditation in a yoga barn overlooking the pranayama inducing landscape of the estate. It ain’t all about the view, though. The food

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knocks your socks off, too. For breakfast, every dietary need was catered for and I can state with some confidence that I’d go back for the muesli and vegan buckwheat hot cakes alone. Let’s talk yoga then – do they fill every last minute of your waking hours? You can do as much or as little as you want. I opted for yoga (obvs), hiking in the grounds, using the outdoor jungle gym, and mountain biking through rice fields. The latter of which ended with me in the on-site state-of-the-art clinic after applying my brakes too hastily down the dirt track. Patched up, I was back on the bike in no time.

Okay, so sum it up for us… Exercise, food, views – it was all good. From the oh-so attentive staff, the spa with its seemingly endless offerings, and the landscape to the positioning of your villa – cleverly arranged that if you don’t want to meet another person for your entire stay (and no, we didn’t), you don’t have to. New day, new area to explore, and yet another piece of the estate you wanted to take home with you. Even the dawn chorus from the beautiful exotic birds that woke us at sunrise didn’t irritate. Did I have any complaints? Only one: that we didn’t stay for longer.

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WORDS: CHLOE BARRINGTON

Tying the knot? Lucky you. Get even luckier by booking yourselves into this beautiful retreat where your every need will be catered for


LIVE WELL WELL T R AV E L L E D

brands. (And by the way, Sveti Stefan, is a hotel unlike any other – mainly because it’s not actually a hotel but rather an entire former fishing village, more of which later.)

RELAX WITH THE EUROPEAN CHIC AT A…

SUPER-LUXE SPA W H AT ? Aman Sveti Stefan W H E R E ? Montenegro W H Y ? The chance to

unwind in an all-out luxury spa in Eastern Europe H OW M U C H ? Prices start from £650 per person per night aman.com/resorts

A spa in Eastern Europe? We’re talking men in budgie smugglers using olive branches to bash out your cellulite, right? Dear Lord, no. This is luxury with a capital L. After all, this is an Aman resort – one of the world’s most perfect hotel

Okay, got it. So, what’s the deal with the spa then? It is 1600 square metres of wellness fantasy. Think acres of marble and vast expanses of dark wood; smiling staff in every corner and masseurs who understand that firm hands, heated beds and extreme silence are the cornerstones on which all quality massages should be founded. Oh, plus Pilates and yoga rooms, a pool as big as anything Jay Gatsby could have dreamed up, and a menu of treatments that spans muscle-melting massages and hydrotherapy suites for two. All this and you barely see another person. Quite simply, it’s one of the most astonishingly well conceived spas I have ever seen.

WORDS: (MONTENEGRO) FARRAH STORR; (BARCELONA) AMELIA JEAN JONES

work for you. And this is the best place to do it: somewhere so chilled you can recharge without having to charge your phone (the signal’s hit and miss but you have far more exciting things to enjoy). Sounds like hard work. Will I be nibbling on rabbit leaves and getting shouted at by a PT? Well, your diet and exercise are set for an overhaul, but don’t worry. If you like clean, delicious three-course meals, yoga sessions at first light and getting sweaty in the sunshine, you’re going to love this place.

EASYJET IT TO BARCELONA FOR A…

BODY REBOOT W H AT ? Reset Button W H E R E ? Barcelona, Spain W H Y ? You’ve fallen off the

wagon with a bump and need a short and sweet health kick H OW M U C H ? Week-long retreats start at £1,950 theresetbutton.co.uk

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I’m currently stuck in a bit of an ‘all or nothing’ rut with food and exercise – what next? Then you’ve come to the right place. It’s time to strip away your bad habits and totally re-evaluate your lifestyle to see what does and doesn’t

I’m a graze-all-day kind of girl – won’t I get hungry? Full disclosure? Getting your head round eating portions that shrink throughout the day – oh and cutting out all the crap – can make the first couple of days fairly hard going. But on the plus side, you won’t be lounging around moaning about your empty belly. Mindfulness walks and

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Let’s talk about the hotel… is it weekending oligarchs and their mistresses? We’re in Montenegro, not Moldova. It’s a two-hour drive from Dubrovnik, so any minute now the rest of Europe will discover this place. For now, it’s a classic European crowd; lived-in Crayola-coloured chinos and espadrilles for the men; Cos, toned arms and expensive-looking highlights for the women. The rooms are minimalist – this is understated luxury, remember – so the flash pack stay away. Right: food. Can I eat healthy? It’s not the place you come for calorie-controlled meals, but you can eat with all the virtue of a novice health blogger. And the chef has a knack of doing some great things with salads, fish and vegetables. Quote for the poster then? As close to perfection as spas can be. As long as you don’t see anyone in budgie smugglers.

massage sessions fill your time, so before you know it, there’s another meal on offer. Caffeine withdrawals? No bother. The on-site chef will set you up with a little matcha tincture or espresso to make your blood vessels dilate and pain melt aware. Purely medicinal, of course. But can you really make a difference in less than a week? Sure, cutting out what’s bad for you en vacances is usually followed by Monster Munch and a bottle of Cab Sauv on the plane home. But this retreat is designed to make a cleaner lifestyle more enjoyable; beetroot carpaccio and monkfish Thai curry are by no means a hardship. Tempted to go rogue on your way home? Don’t be. You’ll be fuelled up with sweet potato omelette before you leave, then given a delicious packed lunch to take with. All you have to worry about is tightening the slightly looser seatbelt for take-off.

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5-STAR FITNESS EAT AND TRAIN LIKE THE A-LIST FOR SOME…

Where can I get lathered up and rubbed down? Spa My Blend by Clarins is the place to be. The fully serviced spa delivers the ultimate pamper experience. Kick things off with a dip in the adults-only pool, then be led into a private room to be spoilt with a full-body scrub and massage.

recalibrate the stress levels that come with city life H OW M U C H ? An Ocean Bay Room starts at £535 per night, with breakfast leguanahani.com Forgive me, but where exactly is St Barts anyway? You’ll find the French speaking island of St Barthélemy, known for its luxury beach resorts and designer everything, tucked away in the Caribbean. It’s where your DiCaprios and Kardashians go to sip piña coladas on their super yachts. The island is tiny (population: 9,000), so you can’t fly in on a commercial plane. I flew to Antigua, then hopped on a Tradewind private jet for the short (albeit white knuckle) trip to paradise.

All that pampering – must work up an appetite? Food is a way of life on St Barts and, while you could just stay in your suite and make the most of the five-star room service, it would be a shame not to experience all the cuisine that Le Guanahani has to offer. Mediterranean inspired dishes? Yep. Gluten intolerant? Sorted. Lactose averse? Don’t sweat it. They even catered for my very niche I-swear-I’m-notmaking-it-up fruit allergy.

You saw DiCaprio then? Sadly not. But if Leo were staying on the island, you wouldn’t know it. St Barts is known for being chilled as f*ck; celebs and plebs can unwind in peace (i.e. without crossing paths). And chilled is how I felt when I arrived at the luxury resort of Le Guanahani. Thanks in part to the sound of waves lapping, and also the bottle of bubbly.

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Get any exercise done in between all the eating? Quite a lot, thank you. You can start your day at the fully equipped gym, doing TRX pistol squats while overlooking the ocean. Two pools, a walking trail, aqua fitness, paddleboarding and kitesurfing – it’s all on offer. At the end of my stay, I felt recharged and ready to face the world again. Nuff said.

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January/February 2017

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BOOK IN FOR MORE THAN A MASSAGE IN INDIA’S BEST…

SPIRITUAL SPA Get up close and personal with your inner self while enjoying a much-needed break somewhere exotic

W H AT ? Soukya Holistic Centre W H E R E ? Bangalore, India W H Y ? You want to cleanse

body and mind with an Ayurverdic overhaul H OW M U C H ? Double rooms from £156 per person per night, full board* soukya.com So, where are we heading? To a private estate just outside Bangalore where Dr Issac Mathai – homeopath and holistic practitioner – runs his Ayuverdic retreat. His clientele return year after year for a multi-pronged, mind-bodyspirit overhaul. From the flower gardens and yoga studio to the solitude (I didn’t speak to another guest for a week), you can give everything from your head to your digestive system a well-needed rest.

As you mention digestion, let’s start with the food. You get three square meals a day – a vegetarian menu with eggs and juices for breakfast and mild curries for lunch and dinner. Most ingredients are grown on site; I pass a bed of wheatgrass on my way to breakfast, but there’s no carbs at dinner. I foolishly said I’d wanted to lose a few pounds, so they take dessert away from me, too. But, to be fair, as hatha yoga is as physical as it gets, it’s not as if I’m ravenous. A pretty easy detox then? Physically yes, but emotionally it was more taxing than you’d think. On meeting, Dr Mathai warns me it will be emotional; that feelings of anger and sadness are common. I take little notice; from what I can

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*HOLISTIC WELLNESS PROGRAMMES START FROM AROUND £185 PER DAY AND MEDICAL PROGRAMMES START FROM AROUND £60 PER HOUR. A TWO-NIGHT MINIMUM STAY IS REQUIRED FOR TREATMENTS AND ACTIVITIES AND A ONE-WEEK MINIMUM STAY IS REQUIRED FOR HOLISTIC WELLNESS PROGRAMMES. ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO 18% TAXES

W H AT ? Le Guanahani W H E R E ? St Barts W H Y ? You need to


LIVE WELL WELL

WORDS: (SOUKYA) KATIE MULLOY; (ST BARTHS) AGILENE DE VILLA; (MEDI-SPA/YOGA) ANNA HART. PHOTOGRAPHY: ERNST PETER PROKOP. WITH THANKS TO LE GUANAHANI (LEGUANAHANI.COM) AND TRADEWIND AVIATION

T R AV E L L E D

see, my week ahead is full of massages. Turns out, he’s right. With four hours of treatments a day, my programme is relentless: I am scrubbed and pummelled, I have reflexology and one-on-one breathing tuition. One treatment, the shirodhara, involves having oil poured onto my forehead for 30 minutes. I spend a lot of time covered in oil and lots showering it off. That’s good though, right? I mean, it is a cleanse. Yup, but prepare to cleanse everything from your colon (I had the pleasure of a colonic and an enema: I’ll let you look up the difference) to your eyeballs by submerging your open eyes in egg-cup-like receptacles of anti-bacterial water.

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And was it that which sent you a bit mental? I’m not sure I can blame the eye-ball washing specifically, but as Dr Mathai predicted, I became an emotional tempest. I spend the first four days in an awful mood, then one whole day weeping, then the last 48 hours, I feel more content and calm than I have in a long time. In the end it was pretty good? It was wonderful. I lost almost 2kg and it was easy to see why this place is full of A-types. Everything about your stay is quiet and gentle and done with kindness that’s missing from everyday life. Quite simply, you are cared for. I was waved off with a case of homeopathic and Ayurvedic goodies but had a real urge to turn round and stay put.

THE FUTURISTIC MEDI-SPA… W H AT ? Viva Mayr, Austria W H E R E ? An alpine lakeside idyll in a storybook setting W H Y ? For a no-nonsense overhaul of your eating habits H OW M U C H ? Rooms start at £120 per night, all-inclusive vivamayr.com

Well, this sounds sexy… Don’t mock. Of all the detox tribes, the Mayr bunch might be the most hardcore; their approach to digestion is a sneaker hit with the likes of Alber Elbaz and Karlie Kloss.

What’s this ‘Mayr’ deal? Named after therapist Franz Xaver Mayr, FX Mayr clinics are dotted across Germany, Austria and Switzerland, offering a regime of fasting, chew-training (I know) and purging Epsom salts.

Still not sure this is how I want to spend a holiday… Get used to spelt, porridge, fish, vegetables and yoghurt. Trust me, by day four, you notice a difference and you regain a lost art: properly savouring your food.

FOR THE HIP YOGA CREW… W H AT ? 38 Degrees North W H E R E ? Ibiza, Marbella, UK W H Y ? You want to reconnect with your yoga self H OW M U C H ? Four-day retreats start at £699 thirtyeightdegreesnorth.com

What do my days look like? Owners Kelly and James take charge, offering HIIT and yoga combos and sleep retreats. Raw vegan-leaning food and massages? You’re on a healthy holiday that feels hedonistically good.

Typical week in ’Beefa? Not exactly healthy… There’s another side to the White Isle. It’s the new epicentre of wellness; hip hedonists want their debauchery balanced with superfood salads, yoga and cold-pressed juice.

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January/February 2017

Come on, detox in Ibiza is just ripe for FOMO, no? You’re there with other chilled-out holidaymakers and you’ll go home feeling better than when you left, which is what downtime is all about, surely?

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J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

Group Publishing Director Alun Williams Head of Marketing and Events Jane Shackleton Sales Director Georgina Parrott Brand Director Chloe Barrington Account Manager Camilla Wood Group Creative Partnerships Director Andrea Sullivan Creative Partnerships Director Morgan Harrison-Doyle Senior Partnerships Executive Jason Milton-Barker

Editor Katie Mulloy Acting Deputy Editor Terry Barbrook

Creative Director Adam Gerrard

Workflow Director Kris Pace

Acting Managing Editor/Picture Editor Caz Conboy

WORDS Features Editor Emma Pritchard

Health & Beauty Editor Amelia Jean Jones

Deputy Chief Sub Editor James Brown

Features Writer Roisín Dervish-O’Kane

Editorial Assistant Lauren Clark

VISUALS Deputy Art Editor Nathalie Gimson

Designer George Hilton

FASHION

Picture Assistant Jodie Shepherd

DIGITAL

Fashion Editor Charlie Lambros

Assistant Digital Editor Francesca Menato

Digital Editor Amy Hopkinson

T HE FACE S FROM T HE ISSU E

Creative Partnerships Art Director Ben Briley Creative Partnerships Designer Aoife Kavanagh Senior Project Manager Victoria Stephen Regional Sales Director Keely McIntosh Regional Ad Manager Clare Crookes Advertising Enquiries 020 7339 4684 Production Manager Roger Bilsland Product Development Manager Mark Peacock Marketing and Events Executive Meg Stephenson Head of PR Karen Meachen PR Manager Ben Bolton Managing Director, Brands Michael Rowley Chief Financial Officer Claire Blunt HR Director Surinder Simmons Head of Newstrade Marketing Jennifer Smith Circulation Manager Bianca Lloyd-Smith Chief Revenue Officer Duncan Chater Director of Communications Lisa Quinn Circulation Director Reid Holland Hearst Rodale Limited Joint Board of Directors President and CEO, Hearst Magazines International Duncan Edwards Chief Executive Officer, Hearst Magazines UK Anna Jones Senior Vice President, International Business Development and Partnerships, Rodale International Robert Novick Executive Vice President, General Counsel, Chief Administrative Officer Paul McGinley Rodale International Rodale Inc, 33 East Minor Street, Emmaus, Pennsylvania 18098, USA Executive Director, Business Development and Global Licensing Kevin LaBonge Director, Business Development and Global Licensing Angela Kim Director, Global Marketing Tara Swansen International Finance Manager Michele Mausser Coordinator Shoi Greaves

The trainer

The photographer

Third Space PT Chiara Pellegrino whips WH Editor Katie into shape on p88

Neale Haynes goes behind the scenes of a female bodybuilding contest on p130

Go-to ingredient? Pears – they’re delicious and in season now. Add to porridge, salad or a Sunday roast. New Year’s resolution? Drink more water to combat afternoon headaches. I’m going to make it less boring by adding cucumber and mint or strawberry and rosemary.

Weekly workouts? Two or three resistance training sessions, with two cardio workouts and a HIIT circuit. I teach two spin classes as well. Fit kit saviour? Sweaty Betty leggings. They look great wash after wash and come flatteringly high-waisted.

Ultimate winter dish? Fish tacos on the beach in Hawaii. I try to counter Christmas indulgence by going away as much as possible during this time. Bikini comp secret? One competitor was using a B&Q paint roller set to top up her tan between heats.

WITH THANKS TO Managing Editor/Picture Editor: Emily Murphy Deputy Editor: Jessica Salter Editor-At-Large: Victoria Pendleton Beauty: Bobbi Brown Fitness: James Duigan Nutrition: Rosemary Ferguson Co-conspirators: Maxine Ali, Lucy Bowen, Lian Brooks, Katy Fallon, Taylor Logeman, Eva Pineda, Andrew Saxton

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Women’s Health is published in the UK by Hearst-Rodale Limited, a joint venture by Hearst Magazines UK, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Hearst Corporation, and Rodale International, a division of Rodale Inc. Women’s Health is a trademark of, and is used under licence from, Rodale Inc. Hearst Rodale Ltd, 72 Broadwick Street, London W1F 9EP. Company number: 00519122. Editorial team tel: 020 7339 4466. Women’s Health (ISSN 2049-2243). Copyright © 2016. All rights reserved. Women’s Health is printed and bound by Southernprint Ltd. 17-21 Factory Road, Upton Ind. Estate, Poole, Dorset BH16 5SN. Distribution by Comag. Published 10 times a year. Conditions apply. Women’s Health does not consider unsolicited material for publication and will not return it if submitted. Hearst Magazines Environmental Statement All paper used to make this magazine is from sustainable sources in Scandinavia and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling, you can reduce waste and add to the 5.5 million tonnes of paper recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Before you recycle your magazine, ensure you remove all plastic wrapping, free gifts and samples. If you are unable to join a recycling scheme, why not pass your magazine on to a local hospital or charity? Women’s Health is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (which regulates the UK’s magazine and newspaper industry). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint, please contact complaints@hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/hearst-magazines-uk-complaints-procedure. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk

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INTERVIEWS: LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: SUSANNA BLAVARG

The food writer Proving the versatility of kale on p49 is actress-turned-foodie Nicola Millbank

Editorial Director, Rodale International John Ville Editorial Director, Men’s Health and Women’s Health Laura Ongaro Deputy Editorial Director, Bicycling, Prevention, Runner’s World and International Branded Books Veronika Taylor Senior Content Manager Karl Rozemeyer Associate Editor Samantha Quisgard Production Assistant Denise Weaver


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J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y

2 0 1 7

My week on a plate Lucy Watson, 25, reality TV star

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

9am

9.30am

9.15am

10am

9.15am

10am

9.30am

Scrambled tofu, red peppers and soy sauce, with two vegan sausages

Wholegrain toast with avocado and lime juice

Porridge with almond milk and chocolate protein powder

Hash browns, avocado on toast, roasted tomatoes and baked beans

Toast with peanut butter and banana

Scrambled tofu, beet bacon, baked beans and hash browns

Buckwheat banana pancakes with blueberries and maple syrup

2pm

Veggie mince chilli topped with avocado and sour cream

2.30pm

2pm

Sweetcorn and pea fritters

Butternut squash soup with wholegrain toast

8.15pm

8pm Pasta and pesto of pine nuts, tomatoes and vegan Parmesan I made the switch from vegetarianism to veganism a year ago for ethical reasons and it’s already had a positive impact on my health. I have so much more energy now and have lost a stone by cutting out cheese and milkshakes.

Sweet potato and black bean and tomato chilli

2.15pm Sweet potato and coconut curry with chickpeas, tofu and basmati rice

10pm

A few squares of dark chocolate

Pizza with truffle oil and mushrooms

Two vegan sausage rolls

Stuffed aubergine with tomato and pomegranate couscous

I feel bloated after having white carbs, so I have wholewheat or wholegrain options. I’ve reduced refined sugar since I became vegan – I’m lucky because I only need a little bit of something sweet to satisfy me.

As I don’t eat meat, ensuring I get enough protein is very important. I try to include vegetables such as broccoli, which is a rich source, at every meal and, if I need an extra boost, I have protein powder with my meal.

When I became vegan, I didn’t want to give up my favourite dishes, so I buy vegan Parmesan and sausage rolls and have learned to adapt classics like a Sunday roast where I use meat alternatives such as tofu. It’s just as tasty and better for you.

I don’t really like alcohol and I’m a bit of a lightweight. I always feel better when I’m properly hydrated, so I sip water throughout the day. I’m trying to increase my intake from one litre a day to two as it’s so important.

9pm

8pm

WH nutritionist Eve Kalinik gives her verdict: ‘While Lucy is including vegan forms of protein in her diet, she does need to be cautious of the types she is eating. She would do better to limit processed soya products such as yoghurt, milk, desserts,

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Wholewheat pasta, broccoli, carrots and sprouts, topped with olive oil

2.30pm

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7.45pm

3pm

2pm

Wholegrain sandwich of hummus, avocado, red peppers and spinach

Pizza with mushrooms and truffle oil

8pm

Quinoa hot pot with vegetables

Roast dinner with tofu, parsnips, carrots, broccoli and cauliflower with gravy

I don’t stick rigidly to regular meal times. Sometimes I won’t eat lunch until 3pm or have dinner until 10pm – with such a busy schedule, I find listening to my body and eating when I’m hungry works best for me.

Two or three times a week I’ll do Pilates or yoga for an hour to stay in shape. I prefer low-intensity exercise over weight training and since I’m always on the go, I tend to burn off the generous portions I eat quite easily.

8.30pm

THE EXPERT VERDICT marinated tofu and meat substitutes in favour of protein from pulses and legumes, protein-rich grains and fermented soy beans (especially sprouted or soaked ones) that will increase the absorption of the protein. Since she has no animal

January/February 2017

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products in her diet, she should include vitamin B12 to prevent anaemia or she could add spirulina to smoothies, which is a great vegan form of the nutrient. She could also add a small handful of nuts between meals for a low-sugar snack.

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SEARCH FOR LUCY WATSON ON YOUTUBE.COM. AS TOLD TO LAUREN CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHY: PRESS HEADSHOT FROM GETTY, MWOAP SUPPLIED BY LUCY WATSON

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Women 's Health - Jan/Feb 2017 UK